Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Social Justice Minor

School of Social Work
College of Education and Human Development
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Required credits in this minor: 17 to 18
The social justice minor offers undergraduate students the opportunity to theorize about the meanings of social justice and practice "doing" social justice advocacy in community organizations. The minor is an interdisciplinary, cross-collegiate undergraduate program. Students create socially just communities and respectful spaces for all opinions in dialogue-based classrooms. Teaching faculty, students, and community groups become partners in creating and sharing in an authentic, collective learning experience. The program is based on the belief in equity and fairness in every aspect of human experience, the importance of recognizing the struggles for liberation, and the social movements of many peoples globally.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
The social justice minor requires three of the four core courses (11 to 12 credits), all of which include 30 hours of community engaged learning [CEL] in social justice organizations, and 6 credits of elective courses.
Core Courses
SW 2501W - Introduction to Social Justice [DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or SW 1501 - Introduction to Peace Studies [GP] (3.0 cr)
SW 3501 - Theories and Practices of Social Change Organizing (4.0 cr)
SW 4501 - Senior Seminar in Social Justice (4.0 cr)
Electives
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AAS 3211W - Race & Racism in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History [HIS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3120 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3125W - Black Visions of Liberation: Ella, Martin, Malcolm, and the Radical Transformation of U.S. Democracy [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3131 - Peace & Conflict in 21st Century Africa (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· AFRO 3866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3312 - American Indian Environmental Issues and Ecological Perspectives [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3501 - Indigenous Tribal Governments and Politics [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· CHIC 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3852 - Chicana/o Politics [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3888 - Immigration and the U.S. Latina/o Experience: Diaspora, Identity, and Community [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 4275 - Theory in Action: Community Engagement in a Social Justice Framework [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CI 4121 - Culture Power and Education (3.0 cr)
· CI 4122 - Social Class Education and Pedagogy (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment [LITR, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3505 - Protest Literature and Community Action [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3506 - Social Movements & Community Education [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· GLBT 3301 - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Social Movements in the United States (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3322W {Inactive} [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3401W - International Human Rights Law [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3896 - Global Studies Internship (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3003 - Gender and Global Politics [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3406 - Gender, Labor, and Politics [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3501 - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Social Movements in the United States (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3307 - Social Justice and Community Service [AH, CIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3003 - Social Problems (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3201 - Inequality: Introduction to Stratification (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3211W - Race and Racism in the US [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4461 - Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3401 - Latino Immigration and Community Engagement [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· SW 3703 - Gender Violence in Global Perspective (3.0 cr)
· TH 5117 - Performance and Social Change (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3381W - Writing and Modern Cultural Movements [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· YOST 3101 - Youthwork: Orientations and Approaches (4.0 cr)
· YOST 4314 - Theater Activities in Youthwork and Education (2.0 cr)
· AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HECU 3571W - Inequality in America: A Political Economy Approach [WI] (4.0 cr)
or HECU 3572 - Inequality in America: Political Sociology of Building Power, Change, and Equity (Field Seminar) (4.0 cr)
or HECU 3573 - Inequality in America: Internship and Integration Seminar (8.0 cr)
or HECU 3555W - Making Media & Change: Digital Technologies, Storytelling, and Activism From Consumers to Creators [AH, CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or HECU 3557 - Making Media, Making Change: Digital Technologies, Storytelling, & Activism Digital Media Internship (4.0 cr)
or HECU 3558 - Making Media, Making Change: Digital Technologies, Storytelling, and Activism Digital Internship (8.0 cr)
or HECU 3581 - Art for Social Change: Art and Culture in Political, Social, and Historical Context [AH] (4.0 cr)
or HECU 3582 - Art for Social Change: Arts Praxis - Social Justice Theory and Practice in the Field [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
or HECU 3583 - Art for Social Change: Intersections of Art, Identity and Advocacy Internship & Integration Seminar [CIV] (8.0 cr)
or HECU 3591 - Environmental Sustainability: Sci, Public Policy, & Cmty Action Climate & Environment Justice (4.0 cr)
or HECU 3592 - Environmental Sustainability: Ecology and Socio-ecological Systems Change (4.0 cr)
or HECU 3593 - Environmental Sustainability Sci, Public Policy, & Cmty Action Field Research Method & Investigation (4.0 cr)
or HECU 3594 - Environmental Sustainability Sci, Public Policy, & Cmty Action Internship (4.0 cr)
· AAS 3301 - Asian America Through Arts and Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3301 - Asian America through Arts and Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3866 - Arab American Experiences (3.0 cr)
or ALL 3866 - Arab American Experiences (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3212 - Chicana Feminism: La Chicana in Contemporary Society [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3410 - Chicana Studies: La Chicana in Contemporary Society [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Education and Human Development

View sample plan(s):
· Social Justice Minor Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Social Justice Minor
View PDF Version:
Search.
Search Programs

Search University Catalogs
Related links.

College of Education and Human Development

TC Undergraduate Admissions

TC Undergraduate Application

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more
 
SW 2501W - Introduction to Social Justice (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Meanings of social justice. Ways in which social justice advocates work for social change. Criminal justice, globalization, and social welfare. Students do service learning in a social justice organization.
SW 1501 - Introduction to Peace Studies (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary field that considers questions such as how human conflicts can be resolved in ways that promote justice/peace. Definitions, conditions, and causes of violence, nonviolence, war, and peace between nations, groups, or individuals.
SW 3501 - Theories and Practices of Social Change Organizing
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts, theories, and practices of social change organizing. U.S. power relations. How people organize. Cross-class, multi-racial, and multi-issue organizing. Students do service learning in social justice organization. prereq: 2501W
SW 4501 - Senior Seminar in Social Justice
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Capstone course. Students complete a social justice portfolio, do service learning in a social justice organization. prereq: 2501, 3501
AAS 3211W - Race & Racism in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible?some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial ?problems? by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
AAS 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History (HIS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02074 - AAS 3875W/Hist 3875W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This writing-intensive course examines the racial history of modern America. The focus is placed on how American Indians, African Americans, and immigrants from Europe, Asia, and Latin America struggle over identity, place, and meanings of these categories in society where racial hierarchy not only determined every aspect of how they lived, but also functioned as a lever to reconstitute a new nation and empire in the aftermath of the Civil War. We are interested in studying how these diverse groups experienced racialization not in the same way but in various and distinct ways in relation to each other.
AFRO 3120 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00788
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political, cultural, historical linkages between Africans, African-Americans, African-Caribbean. Black socio-political movements/radical intellectual trends in late 19th/20th centuries. Colonialism/racism. Protest organizations, radical movements in United States/Europe.
AFRO 3125W - Black Visions of Liberation: Ella, Martin, Malcolm, and the Radical Transformation of U.S. Democracy (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Course on the critical thought of Black intellectual-activists and others enmeshed in the struggles for the radical transformation of U.S. democracy. Introduces the following three leaders and activists--Ella Baker, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X--whose work in the building of the Black freedom movement spanned the period from the 1930s to the late 1960s. Course proposition is that their life and times in the struggle for liberation offer important insights into the transformation of the U.S. political economy from the welfare/warfare state to the neoliberal state. These intellectual-activists, as well as others who translate their radical traditions through Black-Brown and Afro-Asian solidarity projects (e.g. Grace Lee Boggs of Detroit) have responded to racial formation in the U.S. and presented not just visions of liberation but concrete alternatives at the grassroots to usher in a more just, egalitarian, and ethical society.
AFRO 3131 - Peace & Conflict in 21st Century Africa
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Departing from a country-specific focus and a comparative regional perspective, this course examines contemporary African challenges and varied struggles using case studies, and a range of analytical parameters. Of particular interest will be issues relating to peace and (in)security, ethnic/civil clashes, religious conflicts, authoritarianism, democracy and related impacts: political destabilization, social fragmentation, economic disruption; internal displacement and international migration within regional and global contexts etc. Historical contexts (colonial legacies) and contemporary dynamics (contemporary realities) will be studied from a political, and sociological perspective to establish course content and outcomes.
AFRO 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/Afro 3432
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in Africa, from abolition of trans-Atlantic slave trade through postcolonial era.
AFRO 3866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/5866
Typically offered: Every Fall
Modern black civil rights struggle in the U.S., i.e., the second reconstruction. Failure of reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Assault on white supremacy via courts, state, and grass roots southern movement in 1950s and 1960s. Black struggle in north and west. New emphasis on Black Power, by new organizations. Ascendancy of Ronald Reagan, conservative assault on the movement.
AMIN 3312 - American Indian Environmental Issues and Ecological Perspectives (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
American Indian environmental issues in U.S./Canada. Analysis of social, political, economic, legal forces/institutions. Colonial histories/tribal sovereignty.
AMIN 3501 - Indigenous Tribal Governments and Politics (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00284
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
History, development, structure, politics of American Indian Governments. North American indigenous societies from pre-colonial times to present. Evolution of aboriginal governments confronted/affected by colonizing forces of European/Euro-American states. Bearing of dual citizenship on nature/powers of tribal governments in relation to states, federal government.
AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00285
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Formulation, implementation, evolution, comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial times to self-governance new millennium. Theoretical approaches to federal Indian policy. Major federal Indian policies. Views/attitudes of policy-makers, reactions of indigenous nations to policies. Effect of bodies of literature related to policies.
CHIC 3374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01146 - Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
CHIC 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02109
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in the U.S. Notions of citizenship from WWII. Chicano civil rights movement. Impact of immigration patterns/legislation. Cultural wars, changing demographics. Social, economic, and political changes that influenced day-to-day life of Mexican Americans. Meaning of racialized "Mexican" identity. How different groups of Mexicans have understood their relationships to other Americans and other Latino groups.
CHIC 3852 - Chicana/o Politics (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01223 - Chic 3852/Pol 3752
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory/practice of Chicana/o politics through an analysis of Mexican American experience, social agency, and response to larger political systems and behaviors using social science methods of inquiry. Unequal power relations, social justice, and the political economy.
CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin American, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
CHIC 3888 - Immigration and the U.S. Latina/o Experience: Diaspora, Identity, and Community (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02058
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiences of migrants from Latin America to the United States in 20th/21st century. Migrant engagements with US society. Pre-existing Latina/o and other ethnic communities. experiences within political, economic, and social aspects of life at local/global level.
CHIC 4275 - Theory in Action: Community Engagement in a Social Justice Framework (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical frameworks of social justice and community engagement for work outside classroom with/in Latina/o community. Worker issues/organizing. Placements in unions, worker organizations. Policy initiatives on labor issues. Students reflect on their own identity development, social location, and position of power/privilege.
CI 4121 - Culture Power and Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02193
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Manifestations of culture/power in education. How culture is mediating factor in educational achievement of students of color. Relationship between home/community, school cultures. Theories/research that show importance of integrating students' interests, knowledge, experience for increasing student engagement/achievement.
CI 4122 - Social Class Education and Pedagogy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02171
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Social, psychological, economic, political aspects of social class/poverty. Implications for education as social institution/classroom pedagogy. Social class in U.S., working-class literature for adults/children, labor histories, economic systems.
ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment (LITR, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores significant environmental issues (such as environmental justice, toxic chemicals, climate change) through the analysis of texts from diverse literary genres. It focuses as much on issues of language and meaning as it does on the subjects these texts concern. Students examine the formal dimensions of these texts, as well as their social and historical contexts. In addition, students are introduced to the underlying scientific principles, the limitations of technologies, and the public policy aspects of each of these issues, in order to judge what constitutes an appropriate response to them. Students also learn how to identify and evaluate credible information concerning the environment.
ENGL 3505 - Protest Literature and Community Action (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course combines academic analysis and experiential learning to understand, in both theory and practice, different perspectives on the power of ?protest? in civic life. We will read a selection from the vast genre of progressive protest literature (pamphlets, poems, polemics, lists of demands, teaching philosophies, organizing principles, cultural histories, newsletter articles, movement chronicles, and excerpts from novels and biographies) from four key social-justice movements: the American Indian Movement, the Black Power movement, the post-Great Recession struggle for economic power, and the battle for immigrant rights. We?ll also learn about this experientially as we roll up our sleeves and get involved in local community-based education initiatives and local social-justice organizations through our service-learning. Students receive initial training from CLA Career Services, The Center for Community-Engaged Learning, the Minnesota Literacy Council, as well as orientations at community sites.
ENGL 3506 - Social Movements & Community Education (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, we’ll examine four progressive social movements. After beginning with a foundational civil rights movement example, we will learn about the antiracist feminism branch of the women’s movement, often referred to as “third-wave feminism.” We’ll also study the Occupy movement that arose in response to the Great Recession (the financial crisis beginning in 2008). Then we’ll take a look at two social movements that, while by no means underground, tend to fly below the radar: the prison abolition movement and the fight for public schools. While all of these social movements have different emphases, they also overlap quite a bit in their systemic analysis of society and their strategies for action. As activist, organizer, and trainer Rinku Sen observes, “the history of community organizing and social movements is replete with tactics learned in one movement being applied to another.” As we study these social movements, community organizing will be of particular interest to us. How do the groups, collectives, nonprofits, and communities propelling these different social movements organize themselves, their leadership, their strategies, and their activities? How do they make decisions? What do meetings and planning processes look like? What do they do when they disagree? How do they recruit and mobilize? How do they communicate with – and confront – the general public, elected officials, and the more powerful elements of the ruling class? How do they talk about the work they’re doing? How do they develop a vision of the world they’d like to live in while still inhabiting the present one, with all its flaws and injustices? We’ll also examine the role of education in organizations working for social change. Whether through trainings, “political education,” reading groups, or small group activities associated with popular education, many of the social-movement groups we’ll study have developed educational strategies and curricula. Hands-On Learning through Community Education: As we study these social movements and their approaches to organizing and educating in the comfortable confines of our university classroom, we’ll also learn about them experientially through our service-learning. That is, we’ll work 2 hours per week at local education initiatives in K-12 schools, adult programs, and social-justice organizations in the non-profit and grassroots sectors, comprising a total of 24 hours by the end of the semester. This hands-on learning will strengthen our academic grasp of social movements, organizational dynamics, and teaching and community organizing by providing us with grounded perspectives. More broadly, we’ll get a feel for what it’s like to get involved as citizens, activists, teachers, and learners attempting to build cross-organizational coalitions. And we’ll share what we learn with each other. Representatives from the Center for Community-Engaged Learning (the U's service-learning office) and various community organizations will attend our second class session to tell you about their respective sites and how you can get involved. For our third class session, you will rank the top three community sites you'd like to work at. You will then be "matched" with a community organization, and your community education work will begin as soon as this matching process is complete. (We try to honor students' first and second choices, while also making sure that you also have some fellow classmates at your site.) To help prepare you, at a time convenient for you, you will also attend a training session facilitated by the Minnesota Literacy Council (MLC) or the Center for Community-Engaged Learning – details will be provided in class.
GLBT 3301 - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Social Movements in the United States
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01970 - GLBT 3301/GWSS 3501
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interdisciplinary course. Development of GLBT social movements using social movement theory/service learning.
GLOS 3401W - International Human Rights Law (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [3145, 3144] or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Issues, procedures, advocacy strategies regarding promotion/protection of international human rights. Students analyze recent case studies of human rights violations in light of evolving laws, enforcement mechanisms. prereq: [3145, 3144] or instr consent
GLOS 3896 - Global Studies Internship
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on experience at Twin Cities organizations working at the nexus of the local and the global. Work 100 hours in non-governmental organization. Substantive coursework in Global Studies is required. prereq: dept consent
GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will introduce students to three of the world's most powerful global institutions -- the World Bank (IBRD), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Trade Organization (WTO) - and one fairly weak one, the United Nations, and its many affiliated agencies such as UNHCR (for refugee support). The course will emphasize three dimensions: We will look behind their doors to understand their daily practices; we will learn about the political, economic, environmental and cultural terrain in which they operate and which they help to create; and we will observe them in key sites in the global South and North.
GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02027
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative study of women, gender, race, class, sexuality in two or more ethnic cultures throughout U.S.
GWSS 3003 - Gender and Global Politics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Similarities/differences in women's experiences throughout world, from cross-cultural/historical perspective. Uses range of reading materials/media (feminist scholarship, fiction, film, news media, oral history, autobiography).
GWSS 3406 - Gender, Labor, and Politics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02455
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical developments/contemporary manifestations of women's participation in labor force/global economy. Gender as condition for creation/maintenance of exploitable category of workers. How women's choices are shaped in various locations. Women's labor organizing. GWSS / Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies / Gender Studies
GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis of media, art, literature, performance, on artistic contributions. History, politics, culture of Asian American women. Interpret cultural production to better understand role of race, gender, nation within American society/citizenship.
GWSS 3501 - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Social Movements in the United States
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01970
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interdisciplinary course. Development of GLBT social movements using social movement theory/service learning.
HIST 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19nth century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
One feature of life in modern society is the presence of deep moral disagreement. Individuals must decide what actions are right, and societies must make political choices. How do we know what the right answer is? Which answers and approaches are rationally defensible? Philosophical reflection, rational argument, and systematic analysis can help us think about these problems more clearly and arrive at answers that are both useful and intellectually satisfying. This course will address various rotating topics, such as abortion, animal rights, criminal punishment, censorship, personal relationships, affirmative action, and other active areas of moral and social concern.
PHIL 3307 - Social Justice and Community Service (AH, CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Exploration of concepts of justice, charity, equality, freedom, community service in connection with current social issues. Perspectives from philosophy, history, literature, and student involvement in the community. Community service for at least three hours per week.
SOC 3003 - Social Problems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will engage in a sociological examination of major social problems facing the contemporary US and abroad. We explore the origins and causes of different social problems, seek to understand how they impact individuals, groups, and the society as a whole, and evaluate solutions. We ask how an issue becomes defined as a "social problem," discuss the social construction of reality and deviance, and consider the primary frameworks under which societies have organized their responses to different social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3201 - Inequality: Introduction to Stratification
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Why does inequality exist? How does it work? These are the essential questions examined in this class. Topics range from welfare and poverty to the role of race and gender in getting ahead. We will pay particular attention to social inequities – why some people live longer and happier lives while others are burdened by worry, poverty, and ill health. prereq: soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3211W - Race and Racism in the US (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible?some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial ?problems? by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
SOC 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Focusing on the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements, this course explores debates about the dilemmas and challenges facing movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and various institutions, and the role of social movements and protest in bringing about change. The course is organized around general theoretical issues concerning why people join movements, why they leave or remain in movements, how movements are organized, the strategies and tactics they use, and their long-term and short-run impact. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4461 - Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
We will examine conceptual and theoretical approaches to the sociological study of ethnic and racial conflict around the globe, looking at ethnicity and race as distinctive but overlapping social constructions of collective identity that underpin patterns of social conflict and systems of power and privilege. We will also explore the difference between race and ethnicity, the various ways in which racial, ethnic, and national identities are constructed in different countries, individual versus group approaches to the study of prejudice and discrimination, and the racialization of ethnic and religious groups prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SPAN 3401 - Latino Immigration and Community Engagement (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Service-learning course. U.S. power structures associated with emigration from Latin America. Rapid demographic change. Global economic system/emigration. Human rights. Federal immigration reform. Language issues. Inclusive political, economic, educational systems. Dialogue with Latino immigrants, community visits, civic engagement. Instructor approval required for January or summer offering. Pre-req SPAN 3015
SW 3703 - Gender Violence in Global Perspective
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories/research on violence in intimate domestic relationships examined through multiple lenses. Overview of interventions in Minnesota, United States, and other societies.
TH 5117 - Performance and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading, writing, research, presentations and workshops explore activist performance projects. Theories of social formation and ideology provide framework to discuss/animate theater's potential for social change. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student
WRIT 3381W - Writing and Modern Cultural Movements (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
How written texts contribute to movements in art and culture. How such texts are written with particular audiences, purposes, styles, and forms. Readings, lectures, discussions, analysis of texts.
YOST 3101 - Youthwork: Orientations and Approaches
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Historical/contemporary approaches to youthwork, diverse settings in which it is done, importance of worker's life experience in crafting ethical, effective practice. At least 15 hours of field experience. prereq: One gen psy course, one gen soc course
YOST 4314 - Theater Activities in Youthwork and Education
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01329
Typically offered: Every Spring
Empowering methods of personal/creative development using experiential learning and theater activities to enhance creativity/imagination. Approaches to working with youth in school and youth agency settings. Experiential learning, improvisational theater theory/practice. prereq: 1001 or 2101
AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581 - AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical overview of three major forms of inequalities in the United Sates today: race, class, gender. Focus on these inequalities as relatively autonomous from one another and as deeply connected/intertwined with one another. Intersectionality key to critical understanding of these social forces. Social change possibilities.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
HECU 3571W - Inequality in America: A Political Economy Approach (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This seminar provides the theoretical foundations necessary for understanding the roots, dynamics, and reproduction of urban and regional economic, political, and social inequality and poverty. It will also equip students with the key theoretical tools for evaluating alternative policies and strategies for addressing various forms of poverty and inequality. Theory will be treated in an integrated fashion with students' field and internship work and will draw from numerous disciplines but with a particular focus on the field of political economy. Students examine a series of interrelated social systems relevant to the study of poverty and inequality such as the economy, the politics of economic policy, labor markets, geographic systems and housing, education and welfare systems. Theories of oppression help students understand how institutionalized racism, classism and gender discrimination factor in and among all of these systems. This course is one of three courses taken concurrently that make up the Inequality in America: Policy, Community, and the Politics of Empowerment program taught through our institutional partnership with HECUA. Students are also enrolled in HECU 3572 Political Sociology of Building Power, Change, and Equity and HECU 3573 Internship and Integration Seminar. prereq: departmental consent required
HECU 3572 - Inequality in America: Political Sociology of Building Power, Change, and Equity (Field Seminar)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This seminar illuminates, grounds, and 'tests' theoretical perspectives and insights gained in the "Inequality in America: A Political Economy Approach" seminar. Students will examine a variety of policy alternatives and strategies for social change used to address poverty and inequality by conversing with policy makers, community activists, and public and private organizations, and by participating in a number of structured field exercises and legislative lobbying. This course is one of three courses taken concurrently that make up the Inequality in America: Policy, Community, and the Politics of Empowerment program taught through our institutional partnership with HECUA. Students are also enrolled in HECU 3571 Inequality in America: A Political Economy Approach and HECU 3573 Internship and Integration Seminar. Departmental Consent Required.
HECU 3573 - Inequality in America: Internship and Integration Seminar
Credits: 8.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The Internship and Integration Seminar is an 8 credit course comprised of two interconnected parts.. The internship is concentrated practice, and facilitates student learning on many levels. Students integrate and refine their theoretical understanding, build and develop skills, gain a greater understanding of methods of social change, and grow in their understanding of vocation. The program deliberately integrates these experiences with themes and experiences from the other courses in the program. Students work a minimum of 200 hours at their placement, approximately 20 hours each week for the duration of the program. This seminar integrates theoretical and experiential work in the other seminars of the program with internship work, and provides further theoretical frameworks for making meaning from the internship experiences. Students analyze the operation of organizations that are dedicated to changing systemic inequalities, learn how, when, and why organizations collaborate, and explore the perspectives that internship organizations and staff bring to individual and societal change. Assignments ask students to articulate and assess worldviews on social change and movement-building, including; their own, those in texts discussed in the classroom, those expressed by field speakers who visit the program, and staff at their internship sites. Through guided examination of the assumptions they bring to interactions with practitioners and communities, students see how those varying worldviews play out within organizations and in processes of social change. Finally, students reflect on the impacts their classroom training and lived experiences have in real-world work and community environments, and articulate plans for their future engagement. This course is one of three courses taken concurrently that make up the Inequality in America: Policy, Community, and the Politics of Empowerment program taught through our institutional partnership with HECUA. Students are also enrolled in HECU 3571 Inequality in America: A Political Economy Approach and HECU 3572 Political Sociology of Building Power, Change and Equity. Departmental consent required.
HECU 3555W - Making Media & Change: Digital Technologies, Storytelling, and Activism From Consumers to Creators (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The From Consumers to Creators course is a critical exploration of the role of storytelling and media in social change efforts. In this course will examine the ways that story is both a lens through which one understand the world and a tool which can be used to shape it. Students will have the opportunity to learn about and evaluate media-based activist strategies in the context of competing theoretical perspectives on media and society. Students will use theory and field experiences to reflect upon and hone their own digital practices as an effective agent of social change. This course is one of two required linked courses taken concurrently which make up the Making Media, Making Change Digital Technologies, Storytelling, and Activism program taught through our institutional partnership with HECUA and their community partner, the Twin Cities public access media powerhouse St Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), which provides technical training, equipment, and video production support. Students are also enrolled in HECU 3556 Digital Laboratory and have the opportunity to register for an optional internship the following semester or summer at SPNN, where students can strengthen relationships with the diverse set of actors in the Twin Cities committed to using digital media to share their voices and build community. Interns contribute to public access and nonprofit programming and create professional quality video for community organizations in the Twin Cities. prereq: Departmental Consent Required.
HECU 3557 - Making Media, Making Change: Digital Technologies, Storytelling, & Activism Digital Media Internship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02577 - HECU 3557/HECU 3558
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
An optional Internship in Digital Media course is offered for students who have participated in Making Media, Making Change: Digital Technologies, Storytelling, and Activism. The internship allows students to put their passion to work at St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) and deepen their understanding of how the core issues in the program's two linked courses (HECU 3555W and 3556) play out in this community media center and shape professional practice in digital media. Students typically take the Internship in the semester or summer immediately after the initial core courses, but may be eligible to take it concurrently or in fall semester after the Spring program, with instructor consent. Working at SPNN, students build networks in the diverse set of practitioners in the Twin Cities committed to using digital media for social change. Interns contribute to public access and nonprofit programming and create professional quality video for community organizations in the Twin Cities. Departmental Consent required. Successful completion or concurrent enrollment in HECU 3555W and 3556. Credit cannot be earned if already granted for HECU 3558.
HECU 3558 - Making Media, Making Change: Digital Technologies, Storytelling, and Activism Digital Internship
Credits: 8.0 [max 8.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02577 - HECU 3557/HECU 3558
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
An optional Internship in Digital Media course is offered for students who have participated in Making Media, Making Change: Digital Technologies, Storytelling, and Activism. The internship allows students to put their passion to work at St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) and deepen their understanding of how the core issues in the program's 2 linked courses (HECU 3555W and 3556) play out in this community media center and shape professional practice in digital media. Students typically take the Internship in the semester or summer immediately after the initial core courses, but may be eligible to take it concurrently or in fall semester after the Spring program, with instructor consent. Working at SPNN, students build networks in the diverse set of practitioners in the Twin Cities committed to using digital media for social change. Interns contribute to public access and nonprofit programming and create professional quality video for community organizations in the Twin Cities. Departmental Consent required. Successful completion or concurrent enrollment in HECU 3555W and 3556. Credit can not be earned if already granted for HECU 3557.
HECU 3581 - Art for Social Change: Art and Culture in Political, Social, and Historical Context (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, students will combine new learning from field speakers, books, articles, guest speakers, and field trips to gain a deeper understanding of the need for and approach to effective community-based artistic engagement. Each student will participate in or facilitate engaged conversations with their peers to grapple with the themes of the course and have the chance to create artistic projects that help each other integrate their new learning and awareness. Concurrent registration is required in HECU 3582 and HECU 3583; Departmental Consent required.
HECU 3582 - Art for Social Change: Arts Praxis - Social Justice Theory and Practice in the Field (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, students will be immersed in the creative community in the Twin Cities to they can learn more about themselves, what social justice issues drive your passion and how to address these issues as an artist or arts advocate. Students will work with professional artists who will mentor each person through creative projects that allow each participant to interact with the communities surrounding Pillsbury House + Theatre. Concurrent registration is required in HECU 3582 and HECU 3583; Departmental Consent required. Offered each Spring semester.
HECU 3583 - Art for Social Change: Intersections of Art, Identity and Advocacy Internship & Integration Seminar (CIV)
Credits: 8.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this Art for Social Change Internship and Integration seminar students will work with HECUA to be placed in an internships which will offer them the chance to integrate and apply their learning in professional settings. As an intern, students will gain skills in communication, discipline, organization, project management, and turning theory into action. By completing a HECUA internship, students will have a critical competitive edge in the job market after graduating. In addition to professional development, students will also leave their internship experience with a better sense of the type of job and work environment they want to find and the steps needed to take to get there. Students are required to be concurrently registered in HECU 3581 and 3582. Spring semester offering.
HECU 3591 - Environmental Sustainability: Sci, Public Policy, & Cmty Action Climate & Environment Justice
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
In the twenty-first century, the environmental century, human beings must decide how to deal with the many planetary consequences of the ?Great Acceleration? and its conjunction with the 500-year pattern of conquest, genocide, and extreme social marginalization of indigenous peoples and poor peoples of color. As we consider how to respond to climate change, restore degraded ecosystems, and promote a sustainable quality of life in human settlements, how might we do this in an environmentally just approach? This is the basic question to be explored in this course, in light of the past record of the inequitable distribution and accumulated disadvantage resulting from historical environmental behavior in societies and global civilization as a whole. This course is one of four courses which make up the Environmental Sustainability: Ecology, Policy and Social Transformation Program taught by Study Away partner HECUA. Concurrent registration is required in 3592, in 3593, and in 3594, Fall semester. Dept consent required.
HECU 3592 - Environmental Sustainability: Ecology and Socio-ecological Systems Change
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Since our original hunter-gatherer communities, humans have had an impact, sometimes quite negative, on our environment. What is different now, since the ?Great Acceleration? that began in the mid-twentieth century, is that our environmental impacts are global in scope and potentially catastrophic in scale. Learning to become ecologically wise is thus a priority for all of humanity in the twenty-first century. Socio-Ecological Systems bridges political science and environmental sciences with the intent of fostering policy responses that help human society apply ecological wisdom in a timely manner at worst, and in an ecologically regenerative manner at best. In this course, we will integrate questions regarding sustainability challenges of water, forest, wetland, climate, soil, with those involving people, cultures, politics, and economy in a comprehensive, integral framework. This investigation will build students? ability to see complex dynamics more clearly, and prepare students to be part of efforts to create ecologically wise policy and practices for a more sustainable future. This course is one of four courses which make up the Environmental Sustainability: Ecology, Policy and Social Transformation Program taught by Study Away partner HECUA. Concurrent registration is required in 3591, in 3593, and in 3594, Fall semester program. Dept consent required.
HECU 3593 - Environmental Sustainability Sci, Public Policy, & Cmty Action Field Research Method & Investigation
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Field Methods course provides students with practical skills to assess and improve ecosystems and decision-making in socio-ecological systems. We will use a text by Bill Mollison, a founder of permaculture, to learn how to work with nature to improve ecological, communal, and personal health simultaneously. This course is designed to help students develop the capacity for constant and consistent ecological thinking, in order to participate in wise and effective decision-making at the interface of the human and natural worlds. All field-based learning in the course takes place in partnership with community organizations and branches of government that are working actively as ecological stewards and promoting sustainability of human society and specific settlements with wise design. We will learn and apply conceptual, organizational, and technical skills to help our community and institutional partners in this process. This course engages Lily Springs Farm as a field-learning site. We work with a permaculture designer and farmer on-site to use a variety of techniques to assess the landscape and to design and implement ecologically restoration strategies for: a lake; a wetland; a farm system, a pine plantation being slowly converted to an oak savanna mimic; and 30 acres of forest that has been largely undisturbed for the past thirty years. This course is one of four courses which make up the Environmental Sustainability: Ecology, Policy, and Social Transformation Program taught by Study Away partner HECUA. Concurrent registration is required in 3591, in 3592, and in 3594, Fall semester program. Dept consent required.
HECU 3594 - Environmental Sustainability Sci, Public Policy, & Cmty Action Internship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The internship provides concentrated practice at an organization whose core work addresses issues raised in this program. At the internship, students integrate and refine their theoretical understanding, build and develop skills, and grow in their understanding of future career paths. Facilitated reflection, written assignments, and activities that include time at another student's internship site, integrate the internship experiences with the other courses. Students work a minimum of 160 hours at their placement, 12-15 hours/week for 12 weeks during the program. This course is one of four courses which make up the Environmental Sustainability: Ecology, Policy and Social Transformation Program taught by Study Away partner HECUA. Concurrent registration is required in 3591, in 3592, and in 3593, Fall semester program. Dept consent required.
AAS 3301 - Asian America Through Arts and Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01863 - AAS 3301/EngL 3301
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
The course focuses on the close analysis and interpretation of individual works by a range of modern and contemporary artists. Students will analyze, critique, and interpret these works in light of the historical and social contexts in which they were produced, their creation and uses of aesthetic form, and their impact on individuals and communities. Discussion, writing assignments, and oral presentations will focus on different ways of encountering and evaluating artistic work; for instance, students will write critical analyses and production reviews as well as dialogue more informally through weekly journal entries and online discussion forums. We will examine what it means to define artists and their work as being "Asian American" and explore how other categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, or class intersect with race. We will study how art works not only as individual creativity but also as communal and social practice; for instance, we look at the history of theaters, such as East-West Players or Pan Asian Repertory Theatre, that have sustained Asian Americans as actors, playwrights, and designers.
ENGL 3301 - Asian America through Arts and Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01863 - AAS 3301/EngL 3301
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
The course focuses on the close analysis and interpretation of individual works by a range of modern and contemporary artists. Students will analyze, critique, and interpret these works in light of the historical and social contexts in which they were produced, their creation and uses of aesthetic form, and their impact on individuals and communities. Discussion, writing assignments, and oral presentations will focus on different ways of encountering and evaluating artistic work; for instance, students will write critical analyses and production reviews as well as dialogue more informally through weekly journal entries and online discussion forums. We will examine what it means to define artists and their work as being "Asian American" and explore how other categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, or class intersect with race. We will study how art works not only as individual creativity but also as communal and social practice; for instance, we look at the history of theaters, such as East-West Players or Pan Asian Repertory Theatre, that have sustained Asian Americans as actors, playwrights, and designers.
AAS 3866 - Arab American Experiences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02528
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Arab diasporic experiences in the West, and in America in particular, have been mediated by popular depictions of "the Arab" as violent terrorist, oppressor of/oppressed woman, religious fanatic, and myriad other negative stereotypes, heightened since September 11, 2001. How do Arabs in America, especially youth, navigate the superimposition of these images upon them? How do they relate to the multiple locations of "home" between the West and the Arab world? To what extent are they perpetually "out of place," and what strategies have they developed to navigate their liminal and often marginalized social position? Through the examination of memoirs, novels, film, music, and even food, this course will use Arab American cultural production as a lens through which to explore these questions.
ALL 3866 - Arab American Experiences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02528
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Arab diasporic experiences in the West, and in America in particular, have been mediated by popular depictions of "the Arab" as violent terrorist, oppressor of/oppressed woman, religious fanatic, and myriad other negative stereotypes, heightened since September 11, 2001. How do Arabs in America, especially youth, navigate the superimposition of these images upon them? How do they relate to the multiple locations of "home" between the West and the Arab world? To what extent are they perpetually "out of place," and what strategies have they developed to navigate their liminal and often marginalized social position? Through the examination of memoirs, novels, film, music, and even food, this course will use Arab American cultural production as a lens through which to explore these questions.
CHIC 3212 - Chicana Feminism: La Chicana in Contemporary Society (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01049
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scholarly/creative work of Chicanas or politically defined women of Mexican American community. Interdisciplinary. Historical context, cultural process, and autoethnography.
GWSS 3410 - Chicana Studies: La Chicana in Contemporary Society (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01049 - Chic 3212/GWSS 3410
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scholarly/creative work of Chicanas or politically defined women of Mexican American community. Interdisciplinary. Historical context, cultural process, autoethnography.