Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Social Justice Minor

School of Social Work
College of Education and Human Development
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits in this minor: 17 to 18
The social justice minor offers undergraduate students the opportunity to theorize about the meanings of social justice and practice "doing" social justice advocacy in community organizations. The minor is an interdisciplinary, cross-collegiate undergraduate program. Students create socially just communities and respectful spaces for all opinions in dialogue-based classrooms. Teaching faculty, students, and community groups become partners in creating and sharing in an authentic, collective learning experience. The program is based on the belief in equity and fairness in every aspect of human experience, the importance of recognizing the struggles for liberation, and the social movements of many peoples globally.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
The social justice minor requires three of the four core courses (11 to 12 credits), all of which include 30 hours of community engaged learning [CEL] in social justice organizations, and 6 credits of elective courses.
Core Courses
SW 2501W - Introduction to Social Justice [DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or SW 1501 - Introduction to Peace Studies [GP] (3.0 cr)
SW 3501 - Theories and Practices of Social Change Organizing (4.0 cr)
SW 4501 - Senior Seminar in Social Justice (4.0 cr)
Electives
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AAS 3211W - Race & Racism in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History [HIS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3120 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3125W - Black Visions of Liberation: Ella, Martin, Malcolm, and the Radical Transformation of U.S. Democracy [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· AFRO 3866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3312 - American Indian Environmental Issues and Ecological Perspectives [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3501 - Indigenous Tribal Governments and Politics [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· CHIC 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3852 - Chicana/o Politics [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3888 - Immigration and the U.S. Latina/o Experience: Diaspora, Identity, and Community [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 4275 - Theory in Action: Community Engagement in a Social Justice Framework [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CI 4121 - Culture Power and Education [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CI 4122 - Social Class Education and Pedagogy (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment [LITR, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3505 - Protest Literature and Community Action [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3506 - Social Movements & Community Education [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· GLBT 3301 - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Social Movements in the United States (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3401W - International Human Rights Law [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3896 - Global Studies Internship (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3003 - Gender and Global Politics [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3406 - Gender, Labor, and Politics [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3501 - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Social Movements in the United States (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3003 - Social Problems (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3201 - Inequality: Introduction to Stratification (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3211W - Race and Racism in the US [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4461 - Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3401 - Latino Immigration and Community Engagement [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· SW 3601 - Solidarity & Community-led Transformation in South Africa [GP, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· SW 3703 - Gender Violence in Global Perspective (3.0 cr)
· TH 5117 - Performance and Social Change (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3381W - Writing and Modern Cultural Movements [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· YOST 3101 - Youthwork: Orientations and Approaches (4.0 cr)
· YOST 4314 - Theater Activities in Youthwork and Education (2.0 cr)
· YOST 4317 - Youthwork in Contested Spaces (3.0 cr)
· Color of Public Policy
· AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· Socio Perspec's on Race, Class, & Gender
· AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Asian America Through Arts and Culture
· AAS 3301 - Asian America Through Arts and Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3301 - Asian America through Arts and Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Chicana Studies: La Chicana in Contemporary Society
· CHIC 3212 - Chicana Feminism: La Chicana in Contemporary Society [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Grand Challenge Curriculum
· GCC 3018 - What American Dream? Children of the Social Class Divide [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 3021 - The Achievement Gap: Who is to Blame? [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 3035 {Inactive} [GP] (3.0 cr)
 
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SW 2501W - Introduction to Social Justice (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Meanings of social justice. Ways in which social justice advocates work for social change. Criminal justice, globalization, and social welfare. Students do service learning in a social justice organization.
SW 1501 - Introduction to Peace Studies (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary field that considers questions such as how human conflicts can be resolved in ways that promote justice/peace. Definitions, conditions, and causes of violence, nonviolence, war, and peace between nations, groups, or individuals.
SW 3501 - Theories and Practices of Social Change Organizing
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts, theories, and practices of social change organizing. U.S. power relations. How people organize. Cross-class, multi-racial, and multi-issue organizing. Students do service learning in social justice organization.
SW 4501 - Senior Seminar in Social Justice
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Capstone course. Students complete a social justice portfolio, do service learning in a social justice organization. prereq: 1501 or 2501, 3501
AAS 3211W - Race & Racism in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3211W/Soc 3211W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible?some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial ?problems? by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
AAS 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3862/Chic 3862/Hist 3862
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History (HIS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3875W/Hist 3875W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This writing-intensive course examines the racial history of modern America. The focus is placed on how American Indians, African Americans, and immigrants from Europe, Asia, and Latin America struggle over identity, place, and meanings of these categories in society where racial hierarchy not only determined every aspect of how they lived, but also functioned as a lever to reconstitute a new nation and empire in the aftermath of the Civil War. We are interested in studying how these diverse groups experienced racialization not in the same way but in various and distinct ways in relation to each other.
AFRO 3120 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3120/Afro 5120/Hist 3456
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political, cultural, historical linkages between Africans, African-Americans, African-Caribbean. Black socio-political movements/radical intellectual trends in late 19th/20th centuries. Colonialism/racism. Protest organizations, radical movements in United States/Europe.
AFRO 3125W - Black Visions of Liberation: Ella, Martin, Malcolm, and the Radical Transformation of U.S. Democracy (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Course on the critical thought of Black intellectual-activists and others enmeshed in the struggles for the radical transformation of U.S. democracy. Introduces the following three leaders and activists--Ella Baker, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X--whose work in the building of the Black freedom movement spanned the period from the 1930s to the late 1960s. Course proposition is that their life and times in the struggle for liberation offer important insights into the transformation of the U.S. political economy from the welfare/warfare state to the neoliberal state. These intellectual-activists, as well as others who translate their radical traditions through Black-Brown and Afro-Asian solidarity projects (e.g. Grace Lee Boggs of Detroit) have responded to racial formation in the U.S. and presented not just visions of liberation but concrete alternatives at the grassroots to usher in a more just, egalitarian, and ethical society.
AFRO 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3432/Afro 3432
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in Africa, from abolition of trans-Atlantic slave trade through postcolonial era.
AFRO 3866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/Afro 5866/Hist 3856
Typically offered: Every Fall
Modern black civil rights struggle in the U.S., i.e., the second reconstruction. Failure of reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Assault on white supremacy via courts, state, and grass roots southern movement in 1950s and 1960s. Black struggle in north and west. New emphasis on Black Power, by new organizations. Ascendancy of Ronald Reagan, conservative assault on the movement.
AMIN 3312 - American Indian Environmental Issues and Ecological Perspectives (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
American Indian environmental issues in U.S./Canada. Analysis of social, political, economic, legal forces/institutions. Colonial histories/tribal sovereignty.
AMIN 3501 - Indigenous Tribal Governments and Politics (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3501/Pol 3701
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
History, development, structure, politics of American Indian Governments. North American indigenous societies from pre-colonial times to present. Evolution of aboriginal governments confronted/affected by colonizing forces of European/Euro-American states. Bearing of dual citizenship on nature/powers of tribal governments in relation to states, federal government.
AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 4525W/Pol 4525W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Formulation, implementation, evolution, comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial times to self-governance new millennium. Theoretical approaches to federal Indian policy. Major federal Indian policies. Views/attitudes of policy-makers, reactions of indigenous nations to policies. Effect of bodies of literature related to policies.
CHIC 3374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
CHIC 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3446/Hist 3446
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in the U.S. Notions of citizenship from WWII. Chicano civil rights movement. Impact of immigration patterns/legislation. Cultural wars, changing demographics. Social, economic, and political changes that influenced day-to-day life of Mexican Americans. Meaning of racialized "Mexican" identity. How different groups of Mexicans have understood their relationships to other Americans and other Latino groups.
CHIC 3852 - Chicana/o Politics (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3852/Pol 3752
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory/practice of Chicana/o politics through an analysis of Mexican American experience, social agency, and response to larger political systems and behaviors using social science methods of inquiry. Unequal power relations, social justice, and the political economy.
CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3862/Chic 3862/Hist 3862
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin American, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
CHIC 3888 - Immigration and the U.S. Latina/o Experience: Diaspora, Identity, and Community (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3888/Hist 3445
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiences of migrants from Latin America to the United States in 20th/21st century. Migrant engagements with US society. Pre-existing Latina/o and other ethnic communities. experiences within political, economic, and social aspects of life at local/global level.
CHIC 4275 - Theory in Action: Community Engagement in a Social Justice Framework (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical frameworks of social justice and community engagement for work outside classroom with/in Latina/o community. Worker issues/organizing. Placements in unions, worker organizations. Policy initiatives on labor issues. Students reflect on their own identity development, social location, and position of power/privilege.
CI 4121 - Culture Power and Education (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 4121/CI 5121
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Manifestations of culture/power in education. How culture is mediating factor in educational achievement of students of color. Relationship between home/community, school cultures. Theories/research that show importance of integrating students' interests, knowledge, experience for increasing student engagement/achievement.
CI 4122 - Social Class Education and Pedagogy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 4122/CI 5122
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Social, psychological, economic, political aspects of social class/poverty. Implications for education as social institution/classroom pedagogy. Social class in U.S., working-class literature for adults/children, labor histories, economic systems.
ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment (LITR, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores significant environmental issues (such as environmental justice, toxic chemicals, climate change) through the analysis of texts from diverse literary genres. It focuses as much on issues of language and meaning as it does on the subjects these texts concern. Students examine the formal dimensions of these texts, as well as their social and historical contexts. In addition, students are introduced to the underlying scientific principles, the limitations of technologies, and the public policy aspects of each of these issues, in order to judge what constitutes an appropriate response to them. Students also learn how to identify and evaluate credible information concerning the environment.
ENGL 3505 - Protest Literature and Community Action (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course combines academic analysis and experiential learning to understand, in both theory and practice, different perspectives on the power of "protest" in civic life. We will read a selection from the vast genre of progressive protest literature (pamphlets, poems, polemics, lists of demands, teaching philosophies, organizing principles, cultural histories, newsletter articles, movement chronicles, and excerpts from novels and biographies) from four key social-justice movements: the American Indian Movement, the Black Power movement, the post-Great Recession struggle for economic power, and the battle for immigrant rights. We'll also learn about this experientially as we roll up our sleeves and get involved in local community-based education initiatives and local social-justice organizations through our service-learning. Students receive initial training from CLA Career Services, The Center for Community-Engaged Learning, the Minnesota Literacy Council, as well as orientations at community sites.
ENGL 3506 - Social Movements & Community Education (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, we'll examine four progressive social movements. After beginning with a foundational civil rights movement example, we will learn about the anti-racist feminism branch of the women's movement, often referred to as "third-wave feminism." We'll also study the Occupy movement that arose in response to the Great Recession (the financial crisis beginning in 2008). Then we'll take a look at two social movements that, while by no means underground, tend to fly below the radar: the prison abolition movement and the fight for public schools. While all of these social movements have different emphases, they also overlap quite a bit in their systemic analysis of society and their strategies for action. As activist, organizer, and trainer Rinku Sen observes, "the history of community organizing and social movements is replete with tactics learned in one movement being applied to another." As we study these social movements, community organizing will be of particular interest to us. How do the groups, collectives, nonprofits, and communities propelling these different social movements organize themselves, their leadership, their strategies, and their activities? How do they make decisions? What do meetings and planning processes look like? What do they do when they disagree? How do they recruit and mobilize? How do they communicate with and confront the general public, elected officials, and the more powerful elements of the ruling class? How do they talk about the work they're doing? How do they develop a vision of the world they'd like to live in while still inhabiting the present one, with all its flaws and injustices? We'll also examine the role of education in organizations working for social change. Whether through trainings, "political education," reading groups, or small group activities associated with popular education, many of the social-movement groups we'll study have developed educational strategies and curricula. Hands-On Learning through Community Education: As we study these social movements and their approaches to organizing and educating in the comfortable confines of our university classroom, we'll also learn about them experientially through our service-learning. That is, we'll work 2 hours per week at local education initiatives in K-12 schools, adult programs, and social-justice organizations in the non-profit and grassroots sectors, comprising a total of 24 hours by the end of the semester. This hands-on learning will strengthen our academic grasp of social movements, organizational dynamics, and teaching and community organizing by providing us with grounded perspectives. More broadly, we'll get a feel for what it's like to get involved as citizens, activists, teachers, and learners attempting to build cross-organizational coalitions. And we'll share what we learn with each other. Representatives from the Center for Community-Engaged Learning (the U's service-learning office) and various community organizations will attend our second class session to tell you about their respective sites and how you can get involved. For our third class session, you will rank the top three community sites you'd like to work at. You will then be "matched" with a community organization, and your community education work will begin as soon as this matching process is complete. (We try to honor students' first and second choices, while also making sure that you also have some fellow classmates at your site.) To help prepare you, at a time convenient for you, you will also attend a training session facilitated by the Minnesota Literacy Council (MLC) or the Center for Community-Engaged Learning-- details will be provided in class.
GLBT 3301 - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Social Movements in the United States
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GLBT 3301/GWSS 3501
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interdisciplinary course. Development of GLBT social movements using social movement theory/service learning.
GLOS 3401W - International Human Rights Law (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course presents an introductory overview of the idea of human rights, its social and legal foundations and contemporary global issues. In the class, students will learn about the laws and procedures designed to protect the human rights of individuals and groups, with a special focus on the United Nations system. The course explores the conceptual underpinnings of human rights such as who is eligible to have rights, where those rights come from and who is responsible for guaranteeing them. Students will learn about how international laws are made and interpreted, and will consider the geo-political context which shapes human rights laws and procedures. Because of the evolving nature of the laws and issues in this field, students are encouraged to think analytically and ethically about how to address the many human rights challenges in the world today. The course will cover current human rights issues, including the right to health care, housing and other economic and social rights; and the right to life, freedom from torture and other civil and political rights. The course is writing intensive. The required paper for the class is a model complaint to the United Nations about a country and issue of the student's choosing. The class invites discussion and uses class exercises to engage students in the course material by shaping arguments for various legal fora.
GLOS 3896 - Global Studies Internship
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on experience at Twin Cities organizations working at the nexus of the local and the global. Work 100 hours in non-governmental organization. Substantive coursework in Global Studies is required. prereq: dept consent
GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3415W/ Soc 3417W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will introduce students to some of the world's most powerful global institutions -- such as the World Bank (IBRD), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Trade Organization (WTO), the United Nations, and affiliated agencies such as UNHCR (for refugee support). We will follow their efforts to promote a style of global development practices -- large-scale capital lending and global expertise building -- that has crystallized into a common understanding of how global north-south dynamics should progress. Cases pursued in class may include their lending and debt policies, dam building and energy projects, climate resilience and water loans, and the ways they mediate free trade agreements among competing countries. We will also hear from the multitude of voices, theories, and practices that offer alternative visions as to how peoples strive to produce a more just, socially equitable, and climate-safe world. We will use books, articles, films, in-class debates, case study exploration, small-group projects, and guest speakers to create a lively discussion-based classroom environment.
GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GWSS 3002W/GWSS 3002V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative study of women, gender, race, class, sexuality in two or more ethnic cultures throughout U.S.
GWSS 3003 - Gender and Global Politics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Similarities/differences in women's experiences throughout world, from cross-cultural/historical perspective. Uses range of reading materials/media (feminist scholarship, fiction, film, news media, oral history, autobiography).
GWSS 3406 - Gender, Labor, and Politics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GWSS 3406/GWSS 3406H
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical developments/contemporary manifestations of women's participation in labor force/global economy. Gender as condition for creation/maintenance of exploitable category of workers. How women's choices are shaped in various locations. Women's labor organizing. GWSS / Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies / Gender Studies
GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3409W/GWSS 3409W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis of media, art, literature, performance, on artistic contributions. History, politics, culture of Asian American women. Interpret cultural production to better understand role of race, gender, nation within American society/citizenship.
GWSS 3501 - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Social Movements in the United States
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GLBT 3301/GWSS 3501
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interdisciplinary course. Development of GLBT social movements using social movement theory/service learning.
HIST 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3862/Chic 3862/Hist 3862
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19nth century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 3302W/Phil 3322W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
One feature of life in modern society is the presence of deep moral disagreement. Individuals must decide what actions are right, and societies must make political choices. How do we know what the right answer is? Which answers and approaches are rationally defensible? Philosophical reflection, rational argument, and systematic analysis can help us think about these problems more clearly and arrive at answers that are both useful and intellectually satisfying. This course will address various rotating topics, such as abortion, animal rights, criminal punishment, censorship, personal relationships, affirmative action, and other active areas of moral and social concern.
SOC 3003 - Social Problems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will engage in a sociological examination of major social problems facing the contemporary US and abroad. We explore the origins and causes of different social problems, seek to understand how they impact individuals, groups, and the society as a whole, and evaluate solutions. We ask how an issue becomes defined as a "social problem," discuss the social construction of reality and deviance, and consider the primary frameworks under which societies have organized their responses to different social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3201 - Inequality: Introduction to Stratification
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Why does inequality exist? How does it work? These are the essential questions examined in this class. Topics range from welfare and poverty to the role of race and gender in getting ahead. We will pay particular attention to social inequities why some people live longer and happier lives while others are burdened by worry, poverty, and ill health. prereq: soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3211W - Race and Racism in the US (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3211W/Soc 3211W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible?some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial ?problems? by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
SOC 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3322W/Soc 3322W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Focusing on the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements, this course explores debates about the dilemmas and challenges facing movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and various institutions, and the role of social movements and protest in bringing about change. The course is organized around general theoretical issues concerning why people join movements, why they leave or remain in movements, how movements are organized, the strategies and tactics they use, and their long-term and short-run impact. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4461 - Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
We will examine conceptual and theoretical approaches to the sociological study of ethnic and racial conflict around the globe, looking at ethnicity and race as distinctive but overlapping social constructions of collective identity that underpin patterns of social conflict and systems of power and privilege. We will also explore the difference between race and ethnicity, the various ways in which racial, ethnic, and national identities are constructed in different countries, individual versus group approaches to the study of prejudice and discrimination, and the racialization of ethnic and religious groups prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SPAN 3401 - Latino Immigration and Community Engagement (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Service-learning course. U.S. power structures associated with emigration from Latin America. Rapid demographic change. Global economic system/emigration. Human rights. Federal immigration reform. Language issues. Inclusive political, economic, educational systems. Dialogue with Latino immigrants, community visits, civic engagement. Instructor approval required for January or summer offering. Pre-req SPAN 3015
SW 3601 - Solidarity & Community-led Transformation in South Africa (GP, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Though the magnificence of South Africa's people and landscapes is vast, it is often said that visitors ignore the view by overlooking the juxtaposition between acute poverty in the townships and immensely affluent neighborhoods (built for-and-by the white minority during Apartheid). Mindful visitors often put into question the free market and recognize that Apartheid's history of racism and classism still exists in all fabrics of life; and, many westerners try to assist through service or volunteerism without fostering real change. In Africa, service is a billion-dollar industry. Abuse by western volunteer organizations and other programs has included half-finished work, time and resources drained from communities, and unchanged volunteers. But, do we do nothing? In this course, we will explore the dynamics of power, privilege, and repression through social justice advocacy and scholarly analysis of the oppressive savior complex.
SW 3703 - Gender Violence in Global Perspective
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories/research on violence in intimate domestic relationships examined through multiple lenses. Overview of interventions in Minnesota, United States, and other societies.
TH 5117 - Performance and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading, writing, research, presentations and workshops explore activist performance projects. Theories of social formation and ideology provide framework to discuss/animate theater's potential for social change. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student
WRIT 3381W - Writing and Modern Cultural Movements (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course explores how written texts help to shape modern art and cultural movements. Writ 3381 first develops an understanding of the manifesto form by reading primary examples written by artists from such movements as Cubism and Expressionism. Students study the complex written and visual strategies of those texts and how they contributed to social and political change in the modern world. Out of those attempts to change culture, students will be challenged to consider how particular writing strategies developed in the U.S. aimed at bringing about change in 1960s culture in areas such as the women's movement, the move toward racial equality, and the environmental movement. Toward the end of the course, the writings of current movements are taken up as building on and departing from past writing and rhetorical strategies. Students both read about and practice writing strategies studied in the course.
YOST 3101 - Youthwork: Orientations and Approaches
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Within the U.S. there is an ongoing conversation about what values, knowledge, skills, and practice are basic to the field of youth work. The occupational title, youth worker, is not widely recognized with a set of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that distinguish it from other occupations that work with young people (teacher, coach, social worker). Often youth worker is taken to signify those who ?work with youth.? In recent years there have been attempts to clarify and specify what a youth worker does, whom a youth worker should be, and how one should be educated for this type of work. These debates now occur within international and national movements to ?professionalize? youth work. In this course, we enter this conversation by considering the multiple ways of becoming, being a youth worker, and doing youth work. Toward the end of the course, we will also explore how context?agency, street, and neighborhood?can have consequences on all three of these. To be knowledgeable participants in these conversations you must know the possible answers to at least four questions. Who are young people? What is youth work? Who are youth workers? Where is the location of the work? For each of these questions, we explore the diverse answers, given by scholars and practitioner, here in the United States and internationally. How one chooses to answer any one of these questions has consequences for the other three. Attention is also given to how you and I choose to answer these questions given our own experience of being a young person and our current interactions with young people. At the end of this course, you will be able to participate at a beginning level in the conversations that are of concern to youth work and enhance your direct work with, on behalf of, and/or for young people. In the process, you will have begun constructing and articulating a personal philosophy of youth work. prereq: One gen psy course, one gen soc course, or instr consent
YOST 4314 - Theater Activities in Youthwork and Education
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: YoSt 4314/YoSt 5314
Typically offered: Every Spring
Empowering methods of personal/creative development using experiential learning and theater activities to enhance creativity/imagination. Approaches to working with youth in school and youth agency settings. Experiential learning, improvisational theater theory/practice. prereq: 1001 or 2101
YOST 4317 - Youthwork in Contested Spaces
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
How does youth work change in contested spaces? Do youth workers require different competencies to work in a ?world that has been made strange through the desolating experience of violence and loss?? This course continually revisits these questions as we read about, research within, and talk to others who have worked in contested spaces. The course ends by describing and developing an understanding of youth work in current and post-violently divided societies internationally, such as Northern Ireland, Palestine, South Africa, and India. Veena Das? work in India around social suffering, will be used to frame the work and understand the overall aims and goals of community based youth work in such places. Indeed, youth work in contested spaces began in these worlds marked by suffering, loss, and a legacy of violence. One purpose of the course is to explore youth work practice in contexts marked by suffering, loss, and violence. During the first two thirds of the course, we begin to understand how contested spaces exist all around us, some that we are well aware of because we also experience and are shaped by them, and others that exist only slightly further away from our own personal experience. To gain a deeper understanding of what it is like to work in contested space, students and faculty will talk with and visit different organizations and people working in different ?contested spaces.? Over two weeks we will talk with community members and young people to gain insight into how contested spaces provides background and context for growing up, what major issues young people face living and growing up in this space, and what work is currently going on to address the contested nature of the community. The course also supports an autobiographical turn, asking students to begin to reflect on, and understand the contested spaces that they too were a part of, either as victim or instigator. We end the course by analyzing the data we have collected on the neighborhood, our own personal experience of contested spaces and searching for themes and touchstones to guide youth work in such spaces. prereq: 1001 or 2101 or instr consent; 3101 recommended
AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4231/Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/C
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4231/Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/C
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical overview of three major forms of inequalities in the United Sates today: race, class, gender. Focus on these inequalities as relatively autonomous from one another and as deeply connected/intertwined with one another. Intersectionality key to critical understanding of these social forces. Social change possibilities.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
AAS 3301 - Asian America Through Arts and Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3301/EngL 3301
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
The course focuses on the close analysis and interpretation of individual works by a range of modern and contemporary artists. Students will analyze, critique, and interpret these works in light of the historical and social contexts in which they were produced, their creation and uses of aesthetic form, and their impact on individuals and communities. Discussion, writing assignments, and oral presentations will focus on different ways of encountering and evaluating artistic work; for instance, students will write critical analyses and production reviews as well as dialogue more informally through weekly journal entries and online discussion forums. We will examine what it means to define artists and their work as being "Asian American" and explore how other categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, or class intersect with race. We will study how art works not only as individual creativity but also as communal and social practice; for instance, we look at the history of theaters, such as East-West Players or Pan Asian Repertory Theatre, that have sustained Asian Americans as actors, playwrights, and designers.
ENGL 3301 - Asian America through Arts and Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3301/EngL 3301
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
The course focuses on the close analysis and interpretation of individual works by a range of modern and contemporary artists. Students will analyze, critique, and interpret these works in light of the historical and social contexts in which they were produced, their creation and uses of aesthetic form, and their impact on individuals and communities. Discussion, writing assignments, and oral presentations will focus on different ways of encountering and evaluating artistic work; for instance, students will write critical analyses and production reviews as well as dialogue more informally through weekly journal entries and online discussion forums. We will examine what it means to define artists and their work as being "Asian American" and explore how other categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, or class intersect with race. We will study how art works not only as individual creativity but also as communal and social practice; for instance, we look at the history of theaters, such as East-West Players or Pan Asian Repertory Theatre, that have sustained Asian Americans as actors, playwrights, and designers.
CHIC 3212 - Chicana Feminism: La Chicana in Contemporary Society (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CHIC 3212/GWSS 3212/GWSS 3410
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scholarly/creative work of Chicanas or politically defined women of Mexican American community. Interdisciplinary. Historical context, cultural process, and autoethnography.
GCC 3018 - What American Dream? Children of the Social Class Divide (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
As a result of the increasing and widening social class divide present in the early 21st century, American families and their children are facing more challenges than ever before. In this course, students will identify and confront the barriers to opportunities created by the divide and seek solutions that can be pursued with families, schools, and communities, and public policy to redress these inequities. Because of the complexity of this grand challenge, an interdisciplinary approach to intervention and policy is required. From course instructors' respective vantage points in prevention science, developmental and educational psychology, and family social science, and with the perspectives provided by faculty contributors from economics, law, and pediatrics, students engage with diverse modes of inquiry, epistemologies, and critical lenses by which possible solutions can be generated and implemented. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 3021 - The Achievement Gap: Who is to Blame? (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in GCC 3021 will start the semester with a review of what unequal schooling looks like in the United States. The course uses the history of Detroit to examine how underinvestment and discrimination positioned minoritized communities to receive inadequate education. School structures--including resources, climate and discipline, academic tracks, and community engagement--will be explored. Students will consider what it means to say that there are "achievement gaps" in our society's schools. Mainstream assumptions and meanings will be questioned and criticized, and alternatives, such as the notion of an "education debt," will be explored. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.