Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Agricultural Education B.S.

Applied Economics
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2021
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 91 to 102
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The agricultural education major provides students with a broad understanding of agricultural, food, and natural resource sciences, and opportunity to develop professional educator skills. Professional courses in education and agricultural education prepare students to become effective and successful educators. Experiential learning is emphasized as students spend time in schools applying course concepts, learning from effective educators, and completing a teaching internship as a capstone activity. While the major is focused on teaching school-based agricultural education, graduates are prepared for a variety of careers within the food and agricultural industry. Students are equipped with communication, critical thinking, and interpersonal skills; experience in the teaching and learning process; and a breadth of knowledge of the science and business of agriculture that are in demand by a wide range of employers. Graduates take positions as agricultural education teachers or youth educators; educational and training specialists for agribusinesses, commodity organizations, extension, and nonprofits; as well as positions in sales, management, and customer relations with agribusinesses. Students graduating in agricultural education are in demand by employers, very satisfied in their careers, and earn some of the highest average starting salaries among College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS) majors. However, there are not enough graduates to meet the current demand for school-based agricultural education teachers. This demand is predicted to increase in the future, both in Minnesota and across the United States. Students are prepared to meet teacher licensure requirements in Agricultural Education (grades 5-12) and Coordinator of Work-Based Learning (grades 9-12). The agricultural education major is a collaborative partnership between the College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS) and the College of Education and Human Development (CEHD).
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 2.50 already admitted to the degree-granting college
  • 2.50 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
  • 2.50 transferring from outside the University
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
At least 18 upper division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus.
Agricultural Education
AECM 5696 meets the requirement for Experiential Learning
AECM 1001 - Introduction to Agricultural Education, Communication & Marketing (1.0 cr)
AECM 2096 - Career Exploration & Early Field Experience in Agricultural Education, Communication, and Marketing (2.0 cr)
AECM 5115 - Foundations of Agricultural Education (3.0 cr)
AECM 5125W - Designing Curriculum & Instruction for Agricultural Education [WI] (3.0 cr)
AECM 5135 - Instructional Methodology for Agricultural Education (3.0 cr)
AECM 5145 - Agricultural Education Classroom & Program Leadership (3.0 cr)
AECM 5155 - Agricultural Education Teaching Seminar (3.0 cr)
AECM 5696 - Teaching Internship (2.0-10.0 cr)
Communication
AECM 2421W - Professional and Oral Communication for Agriculture, Food & the Environment [WI] (3.0 cr)
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Education
CI 4602 - English Learners and Academic Language (1.0 cr)
CI 5163 - Child and Adolescent Development for Teaching and Learning I (1.0 cr)
CI 5164 - Child and Adolescent Development for Teaching and Learning II (2.0 cr)
CI 5307 - Technology for Teaching and Learning (1.5 cr)
CI 5452 - Reading in the Content Areas for Initial Licensure Candidates (1.0-2.0 cr)
EPSY 4001 - Teaching Students with Special Needs in Inclusive Settings (1.0 cr)
OLPD 5005 - School and Society (2.0 cr)
OLPD 5009 - Human Relations: Applied Skills for School and Society (1.0 cr)
Animal Science
ANSC 1101 - Introductory Animal Science (4.0 cr)
ANSC 1011 - Animals and Society [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care (3.0 cr)
or ANSC 2012 - Livestock and Carcass Evaluation (3.0 cr)
or ANSC 2401 - Animal Nutrition (3.0 cr)
or ANSC 3221 - Animal Breeding (4.0 cr)
or ANSC 3509 - Animal Biotechnology [BIOL, TS] (4.0 cr)
Applied Economics & Agribusiness
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3841 - Agricultural Cooperatives and Mutuals (3.0 cr)
Food Systems
ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers (3.0 cr)
or BBE 3201 - Sustainability of Food Systems: A Life Cycle Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
Natural Resources
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· BBE 2201 - Renewable Energy and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3001 - Ecology and Society [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 1xxx
· FNRM 2xxx
· FNRM 3xxx
· FNRM 4xxx
· FNRM 5xxx
Plant Science
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
or CFAN 2333 - Insects, Microbes, and Plants: Ecology of Pest Management [TS] (3.0 cr)
or ENT 3211 - Insect Pest Management (3.0 cr)
or HORT 1003 - Organic Gardening: From Balconies to Backyards (3.0 cr)
or HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape [TS] (3.0 cr)
or HORT 1061 - The Sustainable Lawn (3.0 cr)
or HORT 1113 - Floral Design (3.0 cr)
or HORT 3131 - Student Organic Farm Planning, Growing, and Marketing (3.0 cr)
Soil Science
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Technology
AECM 2051 - Current Technical Competencies (4.0 cr)
AECM 3051 - Building Construction/Woodworking Technology (4.0 cr)
Biological Sciences
HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or AGRO 1101 - Biology of Plant Food Systems [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
Physical Science
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Mathematical Thinking
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability [MATH] (3.0 cr)
Social Science
PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
Interdisciplinary Learning
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· AECM 5125W - Designing Curriculum & Instruction for Agricultural Education [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
 
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AECM 1001 - Introduction to Agricultural Education, Communication & Marketing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical development of the discipline of agricultural education; orientation to career opportunities; areas and expectations of specialization; issues in the field.
AECM 2096 - Career Exploration & Early Field Experience in Agricultural Education, Communication, and Marketing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analyses of occupations, employment potential, expectations for work, and readiness for careers in agricultural education, communication, and marketing. Field placement experiences examine career options and professionals in the field. Observe schools, extension offices, and agricultural businesses to learn about the work/workplaces in agricultural education, communication, and marketing.
AECM 5115 - Foundations of Agricultural Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course explores historical and philosophical foundations and current structures of school-based agricultural education programs. Students will understand, value, and apply strategies to implement and manage the integrated program model of agricultural education.
AECM 5125W - Designing Curriculum & Instruction for Agricultural Education (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides students an opportunity to understand, observe, and experience the process of developing curriculum and instruction for school-based agricultural education. Through coursework and a part-time clinical field experience (minimum of 25 hours at an assigned placement) in a school setting (grades 5-12), students will engage in the development of middle and secondary school agricultural education curricula. Special consideration in planning will be given to identifying regional, state, and community needs as well as student interest and prior knowledge. Students will have the opportunity to determine a programmatic framework, outline a scope and sequence of courses within a school-based agricultural education program, develop course outlines and materials, and create units, sub-units, and daily lessons for a variety of content areas. Additionally, using the integrated program model, curricular and instructional opportunities related to experiential learning (Supervised Agricultural Experience ? SAE) and leadership development (FFA) will be addressed. prereq: Jr or Sr Ag Ed student, or Ag Ed MS IL student.
AECM 5135 - Instructional Methodology for Agricultural Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course focuses on instructional methodology for use in school-based agricultural education. Students will understand and apply psychological principles of teaching and learning, practice a variety of instructional strategies, develop pedagogical content knowledge, and apply the integrated program model of agricultural education to classroom teaching. Prerequisites: Junior or senior Ag Ed student or Ag Ed MS IL student
AECM 5145 - Agricultural Education Classroom & Program Leadership
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course examines models of classroom and program leadership within school-based agricultural education. Through coursework and a part-time clinical field experience (minimum of 25 hours) in a school setting (grades 5-12), students will learn, observe, and experience the ways in which school-based agricultural education teachers create and maintain an effective classroom/lab environment, manage student behavior, communicate and engage with school district leaders, program stakeholders, and community members to ensure student success. (3 credits) Prereqs: Jr or Sr Ag Ed student or Ag Ed MS IL student
AECM 5155 - Agricultural Education Teaching Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course emphasizes professionalism and the code of ethics for school-based agricultural educators. Students are prepared for the job search and teacher licensure application process. Students take this course concurrent with AECM 5698-Teaching Internship and apply professionalism and the integrated program model in their classroom, school, and community. Prereqs: Jr or Sr Ag Ed Student or Ag Ed MS IL student
AECM 5696 - Teaching Internship
Credits: 2.0 -10.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Agricultural Education teaching experience in a school system that provides instruction to grades 5-12. prereq: Admission to initial licensure program
AECM 2421W - Professional and Oral Communication for Agriculture, Food & the Environment (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Speaking/writing about scientific/technical issues. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation. Public communication.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to technical and professional writing through various readings and assignments in which students analyze and create texts that work to communicate complex information, solve problems, and complete tasks. Students gain knowledge of workplace genres as well as to develop skills in composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing genres such as memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations. Students work in teams to develop collaborative content and to compose in a variety of modes including text, graphics, video, audio, and digital. Students also conduct both primary and secondary research and practice usability testing. The course emphasizes creating documents that are goal-driven and appropriate for a specific context and audience.
CI 4602 - English Learners and Academic Language
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course prepares teacher candidates to work effectively with English Learners (ELs) and other linguistically diverse students in their subject areas of music and agricultural education and to develop their students' academic language proficiency as needed for school success. prereq: Music ed student OR Ag Ed student OR instr consent(If there are questions, contact Naim Madyun)
CI 5163 - Child and Adolescent Development for Teaching and Learning I
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Attending to constant transitions/development in which children and adolescents negotiate their road to adulthood. How to foster learning/positive development. prereq: Enrolled in teacher initial licensure program
CI 5164 - Child and Adolescent Development for Teaching and Learning II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Transitions/development in which children/adolescents negotiate road to adulthood. How to foster learning/positive development. prereq: Enrolled in teacher initial licensure program
CI 5307 - Technology for Teaching and Learning
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Prerequisites: [MEd/initial licensure or CLA music ed major or preteaching major or #], basic computer skills
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diverse educational technology in K-12 classrooms. Effective use of technology. Computer technologies used to stimulate personal productivity/communication and to enhance teaching/learning processes. prereq: [MEd/initial licensure or CLA music ed major or preteaching major or instr consent], basic computer skills
CI 5452 - Reading in the Content Areas for Initial Licensure Candidates
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in licensure area methods course(s), enrolled in Initial Licensure Program, Internet access, basic understanding of [computer use, Web browsers, email, word processing software]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Web-based course. Fostering students' reading related to learning from text. prereq: Concurrent enrollment in licensure area methods course(s), enrolled in Initial Licensure Program, Internet access, basic understanding of [computer use, Web browsers, email, word processing software]
EPSY 4001 - Teaching Students with Special Needs in Inclusive Settings
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Historical perspectives, definitions/professional language, characteristics, needs, service delivery systems for each area of exceptionality. prereq: Must be enrolled in either the initial teaching licensure program for music education or agricultural education students. All other initial teaching licensure candidates should enroll in 5015 and 5016.
OLPD 5005 - School and Society
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Readings in history, philosophy, social sciences, and law revealing diverse educational values in a pluralistic society. Multiple expectations of schools. Civil liberties, rights, community. Varying cultural backgrounds of students, family circumstances, exceptional needs. prereq: Jr or sr or MEd/initial licensure student or CLA music ed major or preteaching major or instr consent
OLPD 5009 - Human Relations: Applied Skills for School and Society
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Issues of prejudice/discrimination in terms of history, power, social perception. Knowledge/skills acquisition in cooperative learning, multicultural education, group dynamics, social influence, leadership, judgment/decision making, prejudice reduction, conflict resolution, teaching in diverse educational settings. prereq: MEd/init lic or CLA music ed or preteaching or instr consent
ANSC 1101 - Introductory Animal Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental concepts of animal breeding, physiology, nutrition, and management as they apply to the production of beef, dairy, horses, poultry, sheep, swine, and other livestock. Fall term class open only to ANSC majors. Spring term class open to all majors.
ANSC 1011 - Animals and Society (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This online course is designed for anyone interested in the ways in which we as a human society interact with, affect and are affected by non-human animals. Students will gain a broad understanding of the major ways in which humans use animals in contemporary society, including as food, as companions, as research subjects, and as entertainment. Other topics will include: social and ethical issues concerning animal use, the human-animal bond, animals in culture, and animals and the law.
ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed for individuals having no prior training with animals or nutrition but have interest in caring for and understanding the contemporary importance of companion animals. Emphasis will be on nutrition of healthy animals and the various factors that play a role in feeding an animal adequately. These factors include animal behavior, environmental conditions, food type, and availability. The course will emphasize basic principles of nutrition. The target audience of this course is all undergraduate students interested in nutrition and care of companion animals. The course will focus on companion animals, but not exclusively dogs and cats.
ANSC 2012 - Livestock and Carcass Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evaluation of cattle, swine, and sheep. Breeding stock evaluated on live appraisal, performance records, and breeding values. Market animals evaluated, graded, and priced on physical appearance followed by evaluation and grading of their carcasses.
ANSC 2401 - Animal Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Classification/function of nutrients. Use of nutrients for body maintenance, growth, egg production, gestation, and lactation. Comparative study of digestive systems of farm animal species.
ANSC 3221 - Animal Breeding
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of qualitative and quantitative genetics to animal breeding. Concepts of livestock improvement through selection and mating programs.
ANSC 3509 - Animal Biotechnology (BIOL, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
ANSC 3509 is a course for undergraduates seeking a broad understanding of animal biotechnology in a single semester. The course covers the major concepts and principles of modern animal biotechnology. Topics include: genes and genomes, recombinant DNA technology, proteins as products, DNA fingerprinting and forensic analysis, bioremediation, aquatic biotechnology, medical biotechnology, and bioethics as it pertains to biotechnology. The laboratory component will focus on teaching molecular techniques necessary to gather DNA profiling data of scarlet macaws in southwest Belize. The Scarlet Macaw Protection Program is a conservation initiative between the Wildlife Institute (WI), the Belize Wildlife & Referral Clinic (BWRC) and Friends for Conservation & Development (FCD). The purpose of the Scarlet Macaw Protection Program is to support a specific scarlet macaw population in the Chiquibul Forest, which is under heavy poaching threat. The conservation strategy is to remove chicks from nest sites that are under heaviest threat of poaching, and for which security provision is most prohibitive. Chicks are reared with the aim to be reintroduced into the wild. The Animal Biotechnology laboratory will use DNA isolated from feathers gathered at scarlet macaw nesting sites and housing facilities in Belize. The DNA will be used to genotype scarlet macaws to establish parentage, genealogy and nesting/breeding behavior.
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Financial accounting. Theory, concepts, principles, procedures. Preparation/understanding of the four financial statements.
APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to use of systems thinking for exploration of problems in contemporary food system from multidisciplinary perspective. System concepts. Historical evolution of food system. Analysis, management, design.
APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 3411/ApEc 5411
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic concepts related to marketing agricultural commodities. Conditions of competitive markets, historical perspectives on market institutions/policy, structural characteristics of markets, policies/regulations affecting agricultural marketing of livestock, crop, and dairy products. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Professional selling of agricultural and food products. Students build/refine sales abilities, identify/qualify prospects, deliver sales presentations, close the sale. Principles of market research. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Strategic and operations aspects of farm management; financial analysis, budgeting, strategic management; marketing plan and control; enterprise and whole farm planning and control; investment analysis, quality, risk, and personnel management. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3841 - Agricultural Cooperatives and Mutuals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 3841/ApEc 5841
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the cooperative and mutual form of business organization. Extensive applications to agricultural, food, and consumer cooperatives are used. The class is an active-student learning process with a distance learning component. prereq: ApEc 1101 or 1101H or Econ 1101 or 1101H
ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the compositional variation, processing, selection, storage, cookery, palatability, nutritional value, and safety of red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products.
BBE 3201 - Sustainability of Food Systems: A Life Cycle Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Consequences of global food system. Diversity in food systems. Current topics in food sustainability.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
BBE 2201 - Renewable Energy and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
There is a growing sense of national and global urgency regarding carbon and climate change with particular emphasis on our energy system. Unfortunately, the answers are not simple. In this course, students explore our wide range of traditional and renewable energy sources and how these options impact our environment and society. Students are also exposed to the complex and compelling ethical issues raised by global, national, and local changes in how we produce and use energy. This course informs and engages students to be thoughtful, rather than passive consumers of energy. Students gain the knowledge necessary to be articulate in career, community, and personal arenas regarding renewable energy resources. In addition, students develop the ability to evaluate and respond to present and future technological changes that impact their energy use in the workplace, at home, and in the community. This course was designed and offered as an online course since 2011. For more details on the course please look at the syllabus and some comments from previous students by going to bbe2201.cfans.umn.edu
EEB 3001 - Ecology and Society (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic concepts in ecology. Organization, development, function of ecosystem. Population growth/regulation. Human effect on ecosystems. prereq: [Jr or sr] recommended; biological sciences students may not apply cr toward major
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary survey of environmental issues. Interrelationships between environment and human society. Roles of science, technology, and policy in meeting environmental challenges. Lecture, discussion. Students evaluate social, ethical, political, and economic factors.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
CFAN 2333 - Insects, Microbes, and Plants: Ecology of Pest Management (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course uses fundamental concepts of ecology and evolution to illuminate and solve the challenges in managing insects and microbes in today's global context of food and fiber production. Students will learn relevant aspects of insect and microbial biology to be able to situate concrete management problems in an appropriate ecological and evolutionary conceptual framework. Students will apply these concepts and discuss ecological and management controversies, such as what can we learn from natural areas to better manage food and fiber production systems. Case studies, readings, and discussion topics will emphasize factors influencing responsible management decisions.
ENT 3211 - Insect Pest Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ent 3211/Ent 5211
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Management of Insect Pests is designed for upper division undergraduates in any major or minor. The course will emphasize principles of insect pest management and draw from examples related to agricultural, horticultural and landscape and urban systems. Conventional (nonorganic) and organic approaches, the use of social media and modern technology, and economic, environmental and social consequences of diverse tactics (chemical, cultural, biological, genetic, etc.) will be covered by the Instructor and, on occasion, by guest lecturers. Student debates on pesticide-pollinator and genetic engineering issues will provide real-world context and insights on complexities of insect pest prevention and management.
HORT 1003 - Organic Gardening: From Balconies to Backyards
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This fully online course focuses on the principles and practices of growing fruits, vegetables, and herbs with an ecological approach. You'll explore basic botany, soils and compost, species and variety selection, planning and design, container gardening, pest management, season extension, and more so you can approach your gardening projects with confidence.
HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Tracing our relationship with edible landscapes traces to our hunting-gathering origins. Technological/social changes that have distanced us from our food. Integrating food plants into pleasing, sustainable, and edible landscapes in yards, neighborhoods, and cities.
HORT 1061 - The Sustainable Lawn
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Common turfgrasses. How to manage home lawn in sustainable way. Maintaining quality turf areas with reduced inputs.
HORT 1113 - Floral Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hort 1013/Hort 1113
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design for use in commercial flower shops and at home. Principles and elements of design. Wedding arrangements. Corsages. Decorative use of dried materials.
HORT 3131 - Student Organic Farm Planning, Growing, and Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organic fruit and vegetable production has been one of the fastest growing segments of the US economy for almost two decades, stimulating an overwhelming number of biological and ecological innovations to produce food using organic approaches. This course aims to increase student?s knowledge of ecological concepts as applied to managing organic systems, with an emphasis on soil nutrient cycles and plant-soil-microbe interactions that serve as the cornerstone of organic systems. Students in this course will learn tools needed to manage an organic diversified vegetable operation. The course consists of two components: a classroom session two times each week for 50 minutes, and a laboratory session that meets before class on Tuesdays for two hours. The classroom session is designed to help students think about concepts and principles that are useful in planning and managing production strategies on organic farms. We spend a significant amount of our time reviewing soil nutrient cycling and its critical importance for organic farms, including how to effectively use soil and organic nutrient inputs such as cover crops, manure and fertilizers, to provide vegetable crops with the nutrients they need to grow. We also learn about successful marketing strategies for organic produce. Finally, near the end of the semester we will discuss pest management, including both weeds and disease/insect pests, and compare different tillage options available to organic producers. What we learn is then applied to planning next year?s season of the UMN student organic farm. Throughout, we will use case studies, guest speakers, games, and active learning discussion approaches to move these classroom sessions "beyond the lecture" and allow students to engage with the material in a meaningful way. The lab is designed to allow a space to put into action some of the concepts students learn in lecture, including soil organic matter analysis, microgreen propagation, calculation of organic fertilizer rates, and operation of driven and walk-behind tractors.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
AECM 2051 - Current Technical Competencies
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Prepares agricultural education teachers and other agricultural professionals to use technology in the areas of welding and small gas engines. Develop basic skills and knowledge to plan, implement, operate, and maintain agricultural structural and mechanical systems. Experiential learning principles and applied problem solving.
AECM 3051 - Building Construction/Woodworking Technology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Instructional/lab exercises in light frame building construction. Foundations, concrete/masonry, framing, plumbing, electrical, insulating, roofing. Safe work procedures in a wood shop through small wood project construction will be utilized. Emphasizes safety and use of modern tools and materials.
HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles and techniques of propagating plants by seeds, cuttings, grafts, buds, layers, and division. Lectures on principles; labs on practice of various propagating techniques.
AGRO 1101 - Biology of Plant Food Systems (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Designed for students who are not majors in a life science program, but who wish to acquire a better understanding of biological concepts especially as they relate to their lives. We examine current issues related to food, food production and the environment which provide the context to investigate fundamental concepts of biology including productivity, energy, genetic change in populations, and environmental responses to human activity. We use a problem-based learning approach to explore three contemporary issues of great importance: risks and benefits of GMOs, farming and food, and the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico. Lab, greenhouse, field, and classroom discussions.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving. prereq: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, high school physics recommended; Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 1806/Math 1031
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions, with applications; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; basic probability rules, conditional probabilities, binomial probabilities. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology.
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary survey of environmental issues. Interrelationships between environment and human society. Roles of science, technology, and policy in meeting environmental challenges. Lecture, discussion. Students evaluate social, ethical, political, and economic factors.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
AECM 5125W - Designing Curriculum & Instruction for Agricultural Education (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides students an opportunity to understand, observe, and experience the process of developing curriculum and instruction for school-based agricultural education. Through coursework and a part-time clinical field experience (minimum of 25 hours at an assigned placement) in a school setting (grades 5-12), students will engage in the development of middle and secondary school agricultural education curricula. Special consideration in planning will be given to identifying regional, state, and community needs as well as student interest and prior knowledge. Students will have the opportunity to determine a programmatic framework, outline a scope and sequence of courses within a school-based agricultural education program, develop course outlines and materials, and create units, sub-units, and daily lessons for a variety of content areas. Additionally, using the integrated program model, curricular and instructional opportunities related to experiential learning (Supervised Agricultural Experience ? SAE) and leadership development (FFA) will be addressed. prereq: Jr or Sr Ag Ed student, or Ag Ed MS IL student.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to technical and professional writing through various readings and assignments in which students analyze and create texts that work to communicate complex information, solve problems, and complete tasks. Students gain knowledge of workplace genres as well as to develop skills in composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing genres such as memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations. Students work in teams to develop collaborative content and to compose in a variety of modes including text, graphics, video, audio, and digital. Students also conduct both primary and secondary research and practice usability testing. The course emphasizes creating documents that are goal-driven and appropriate for a specific context and audience.