Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Plant Science B.S.

Agronomy & Plant Genetics
Entomology
Horticultural Science
Plant Pathology
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2018
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 75 to 79
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The plant science major provides a broad course of study in plant sciences, as well as options to concentrate more specifically within an area of individual interest. The major prepares students for rewarding careers in diverse areas, such as research and development (plant breeding, genetics, or plant molecular biology); food and plant production (sustainable and organic production or floriculture and nursery production); plant use and function (restoration of damaged landscapes); and management of landscapes (agro-ecology and turf grass management). Students gain experience in the use of plants to produce food and other useful products, alter environments, restore damaged landscapes, improve human health and well-being, educate people about science and agriculture, improve community environments, and provide recreational and practical benefits to the public.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Core Courses
AGRO 1660W - First-Year Colloquium/Experience in Agroecosystems Analysis [WI] (2.0 cr)
BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
CFAN 2333 - Insects, Microbes, and Plants: Ecology of Pest Management [TS] (3.0 cr)
FDSY 2101 - Plant Production Systems (3.0 cr)
HORT 1015 - Woody and Herbaceous Plants (4.0 cr)
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Mathematics
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1051 - Precalculus I [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1241 - Calculus and Dynamical Systems in Biology [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Statistics
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Plant Breeding
PLSC 3401 - Plant Genetics and Breeding (4.0 cr)
Plant Physiology
PLSC 3005W - Introduction to Plant Physiology [WI] (4.0 cr)
Biology or Plant Propagation
HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or PMB 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
Chemistry
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Chem Lecture Options
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
Biochemistry
Students enrolled in Integrated plant science BS/MS applied plant science plant breeding must enroll in BIOC 3021 rather than HORT 2100
HORT 2100 - Agricultural Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
or BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
Experiential Learning
HORT 4096W - Professional Experience Program: Internship [WI] (2.0 cr)
or AGRO 4096W - Professional Experience Program: Internships [WI] (2.0 cr)
or AGRO 4097W - Undergraduate Research Thesis [WI] (2.0 cr)
Interdisciplinary Learning
Select one course from the list
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 3305 - Agroecosystems of the world [GP] (3.0 cr)
or ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes (3.0 cr)
or PLPA 2003 - Plague, Famine, and Beer: The Impact of Microscopic Organisms on Human Civilization [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 3017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger [GP] (3.0 cr)
or HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
Plant Identification
HORT 4110 - Spring Flowering Bulbs (1.0 cr)
or HORT 4111 - Prairie Perennials and Grasses (1.0 cr)
or HORT 4112 - Flowering Trees and Shrubs (1.0 cr)
or HORT 4113 - Identifying Plants for the Home and Garden: Garden, Annual, and Potted Plants (1.0 cr)
or AGRO 2501 - Plant Identification for Urban and Rural Landscapes (1.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Plant Breeding
In consultation with their faculty mentor, students develop a plant breeding track consisting of at least 24 credits, with a minimum of 15 credits at the 3xxx-level or above. Of these 24 credits, students need to take a minimum of 12 credits of Agro, Ent, Hort or PlPa designators. Students interested in this sub-plan for early graduate school admission in plant breeding and genetics should visit plantscience.umn.edu, or contact your advisor.
Plant Breeding
Take 24 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 3660 - Plant Genetic Resources: Identification, Conservation, and Utilization (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4034 - Molecular Genetics and Genomics (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4071W - Applications of Biotechnology to Plant Improvement [WI] (4.0 cr)
· AGRO 5021 - Plant Breeding Principles (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4141W - Scheduling Crops for Protected Environments [WI] (4.0 cr)
· HORT 4461 - Horticultural Marketing (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 2022 - Growth and Development of Minnesota Field Crops (1.0 cr)
· PLSC 3002 - Seed Science, Technology, and Society (2.0 cr)
· BIOL 4003 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· AGRO 5431 - Applied Plant Genomics and Bioinformatics (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 5301 - Large Scale Omic Data in Plant Biology (3.0 cr)
Agroecology
In consultation with their faculty mentor, students develop an agroecology track consisting of at least 24 credits, with a minimum of 15 credits at the 3xxx-level or above. Of these 24 credits, students need to take a minimum of 12 credits of Agro, Ent, Hort or PlPa designators.
Agroecology
Take 24 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENT 3925 - Insects, Aquatic Habitats, and Pollution (3.0 cr)
· HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
· PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 2022 - Growth and Development of Minnesota Field Crops (1.0 cr)
· HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape [TS] (3.0 cr)
· ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· AGRO 3305 - Agroecosystems of the world [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 3660 - Plant Genetic Resources: Identification, Conservation, and Utilization (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 4605 - Strategies for Agricultural Production and Management (3.0 cr)
· PLSC 3002 - Seed Science, Technology, and Society (2.0 cr)
· SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
Horticultural Production
In consultation with their faculty mentor, students develop a horticultural production track consisting of at least 24 credits, with a minimum of 15 credits at the 3xxx-level or above. Of these 24 credits, students need to take a minimum of 12 credits of Agro, Ent, Hort or PlPa designators.
Horticultural Production
Take 24 or more credit(s) from the following:
· HORT 3131 - Student Organic Farm Planning, Growing, and Marketing (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 4888 - Issues in Sustainable Agriculture (2.0 cr)
· ENT 1005 - Insect Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 4605 - Strategies for Agricultural Production and Management (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4141W - Scheduling Crops for Protected Environments [WI] (4.0 cr)
· HORT 5031 - Fruit Production and Viticulture for Local and Organic Markets (3.0 cr)
· HORT 5032 - Organic Vegetable Production (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4461 - Horticultural Marketing (3.0 cr)
· PLSC 3002 - Seed Science, Technology, and Society (2.0 cr)
· HORT 1003 - Organic Gardening: From Balconies to Backyards (3.0 cr)
· HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape [TS] (3.0 cr)
· HORT 1031 - Vines and Wines: Introduction to Viticulture and Enology (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
Nursery & Floriculture
In consultation with their faculty mentor, students develop a nursery & floriculture track consisting of at least 24 credits, with a minimum of 15 credits at the 3xxx-level or above. Of these 24 credits, students need to take a minimum of 12 credits of Agro, Ent, Hort or PlPa designators.
Nursery & Floriculture
Take 24 or more credit(s) from the following:
· HORT 4141W - Scheduling Crops for Protected Environments [WI] (4.0 cr)
· HORT 5031 - Fruit Production and Viticulture for Local and Organic Markets (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology (3.0 cr)
· HORT 5023 - Public Garden Management (2.0 cr)
· HORT 4461 - Horticultural Marketing (3.0 cr)
· HORT 1013 - Floral Design (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants (3.0 cr)
· PLSC 3002 - Seed Science, Technology, and Society (2.0 cr)
· HORT 1003 - Organic Gardening: From Balconies to Backyards (3.0 cr)
· HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape [TS] (3.0 cr)
· HORT 1031 - Vines and Wines: Introduction to Viticulture and Enology (3.0 cr)
· ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
Turfgrass Science
In consultation with their faculty mentor, students develop a turfgrass science track consisting of at least 24 credits, with a minimum of 15 credits at the 3xxx-level or above. Of these 24 credits, students need to take a minimum of 12 credits of Agro, Ent, Hort or PlPa designators.
Turfgrass Science
Take 24 or more credit(s) from the following:
· HORT 4061W - Turfgrass Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4062 - Turfgrass Weed and Disease Science (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4063 - Turfgrass Science (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology (3.0 cr)
· ENT 4015 - Ornamentals and Turf Entomolgy (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants (3.0 cr)
· PLSC 3002 - Seed Science, Technology, and Society (2.0 cr)
Sustainable Plant Health
In consultation with their faculty mentor, students develop a sustainable plant health track consisting of at least 24 credits, with a minimum of 15 credits at the 3xxx-level or above. Of these 24 credits, students need to take a minimum of 12 credits of Agro, Ent, Hort or PlPa designators.
Sustainable Plant Health
Take 24 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ENT 1005 - Insect Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes (3.0 cr)
· ENT 5341 - Biological Control of Insects and Weeds (3.0-4.0 cr)
· PLPA 5660 - Plant Disease Resistance and Applications (3.0 cr)
· ENT 3925 - Insects, Aquatic Habitats, and Pollution (3.0 cr)
· HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape [TS] (3.0 cr)
· ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology (3.0 cr)
or PLPA 5480 - Principles of Plant Pathology (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
Agronomy Production
In consultation with their faculty mentor, students develop a agronomy production track consisting of at least 24 credits, with a minimum of 15 credits at the 3xxx-level or above. Of these 24 credits, students need to take a minimum of 12 credits of Agro, Ent, Hort or PlPa designators.
Agronomy Production
Take 24 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· AGRO 4015 - Topics in Agronomy (1.0 cr)
· AGRO 4093 - Directed Studies for Advanced Students (1.0-4.0 cr)
· AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 4605 - Strategies for Agricultural Production and Management (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 3001 - Pests and Crop Protection (3.0 cr)
· ENT 1005 - Insect Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 4111 - Introduction to Precision Agriculture (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4141W - Scheduling Crops for Protected Environments [WI] (4.0 cr)
· AGRO 2022 - Growth and Development of Minnesota Field Crops (1.0 cr)
· HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape [TS] (3.0 cr)
· PLSC 3002 - Seed Science, Technology, and Society (2.0 cr)
· CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· AGRO 2501 - Plant Identification for Urban and Rural Landscapes (1.0 cr)
· AGRO 3305 - Agroecosystems of the world [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
Integrated Plant Science BS/MS Applied Plant Science - Plant Breeding
Sub-plan catalog description: CFANS offers an integrated bachelor of science (BS) in plant science and master's of science (MS) in applied plant sciences (plant breeding and molecular genetics track). The integrated BS/MS program offers students the opportunity to earn both degrees in five years by working toward a master's degree while simultaneously working toward their undergraduate degree. Plant science undergraduate students in the plant breeding and genetics sub-plan are welcome to apply to this program during their 3rd year of undergraduate study. During the the 4th year, students take undergraduate and graduate courses concurrently and are advised by an undergraduate and graduate program advisor. Students must complete undergraduate degree requirements before the end of their fourth year. If the student does not pursue or complete the applied plant sciences MS degree portion of the integrated plant science BS/MS applied plant science - plant breeding track, their sub-plan will revert to plant breeding.
Students in this program will complete the 120 undergraduate credits required for a BS degree in plant science by the end of the 4th year and must be awarded an undergraduate degree at the 4th year mark or earlier. During the 4th and 5th years, student will complete 30 graduate credits and a Plan A or B research project with a final oral defense as required for the applied plant sciences MS degree. Student cannot double count credits to meet credit requirements for both the undergraduate and graduate degrees.
Chemistry
These 3 chemistry courses are required.
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
Course Group 1
Take 17 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AGRO 3660 - Plant Genetic Resources: Identification, Conservation, and Utilization (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 4888 - Issues in Sustainable Agriculture (2.0 cr)
· AGRO 5021 - Plant Breeding Principles (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 5431 - Applied Plant Genomics and Bioinformatics (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5042 - Quantitative Genetics (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4034 - Molecular Genetics and Genomics (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4071W - Applications of Biotechnology to Plant Improvement [WI] (4.0 cr)
· HORT 5058 - Plant Cytogenetics (2.0 cr)
· HORT 5059 - Plant Cytogenetics Lab (1.0 cr)
· PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 5301 - Large Scale Omic Data in Plant Biology (3.0 cr)
· Directed Studies
· AGRO 4093 - Directed Studies for Advanced Students (1.0-4.0 cr)
or HORT 3090 - Directed Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
or PLPA 3090 - Research in Plant Pathology (1.0-4.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences

View sample plan(s):
· Agroecology
· Nursery and Floriculture
· Plant Breeding
· Production
· Sustainable Plant Health
· Turfgrass Science
· Agronomy
· Plant Breeding Sample Plan
· Agroecology Sample Plan
· Horticultural Production Sample Plan
· Nursery & Floriculture Sample Plan
· Turfgrass Science Sample Plan
· Sustainable Plant Health Sample Plan
· Agronomy Production Sample Plan
· Integrated BS/MS Plant Breeding Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Plant Science B.S.
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AGRO 1660W - First-Year Colloquium/Experience in Agroecosystems Analysis (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Agroecosystems and their impacts on the environment, landscapes, and rural communities. Students develop a course plan within their major, explore career options, and increase their familiarity with the department, its history, and its faculty/staff. Field trips, discussions, readings, reflective writings. prereq: 1st yr in major hosted by Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525 - Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
CFAN 2333 - Insects, Microbes, and Plants: Ecology of Pest Management (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course uses fundamental concepts of ecology and evolution to illuminate and solve the challenges in managing insects and microbes in today's global context of food and fiber production. Students will learn relevant aspects of insect and microbial biology to be able to situate concrete management problems in an appropriate ecological and evolutionary conceptual framework. Students will apply these concepts and discuss ecological and management controversies, such as what can we learn from natural areas to better manage food and fiber production systems. Case studies, readings, and discussion topics will emphasize factors influencing responsible management decisions.
FDSY 2101 - Plant Production Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: College level general biology course or Hort 1001 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
How food production systems fit within overall food system. Fundamentals of soils, plant nutrition, plant production metabolites as they affect food production systems. Decisions that differentiate among conventional sustainable/organic systems. prereq: College level general biology course or Hort 1001 or instr consent
HORT 1015 - Woody and Herbaceous Plants
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to identify plants around the world. A few hundred of the most important cultivated plants for northern climates, their distinguishing features, common uses, cultural specificities, and notable cultivars.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02451 - CI 1806/Math 1031
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions, with applications; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; basic probability rules, conditional probabilities, binomial probabilities. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
MATH 1051 - Precalculus I (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions with applications; zeroes of polynomials; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; coverage beyond that found in the usual 3 years of high school math. prereq: 3 yrs of high school math or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1241 - Calculus and Dynamical Systems in Biology (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differential/integral calculus with biological applications. Discrete/continuous dynamical systems. Models from fields such as ecology/evolution, epidemiology, physiology, genetic networks, neuroscience, and biochemistry. prereq: [4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]], CBS student
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01933 - Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00258 - AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
PLSC 3401 - Plant Genetics and Breeding
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00950 - Agro 4401/Hort 4401/PLSC 3401
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of plant genetics and environmental variation. Applications of genetics to crop evolution and breeding of self-pollinated, cross-pollinated, and asexually propagated crops. Investigation of hybridization, variation, and selection.
PLSC 3005W - Introduction to Plant Physiology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to physiological basis for effects of environment on plant growth/development. How to produce optimal plant growth. Experimental technique, data analysis, scientific writing. Lecture, readings, lab.
HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles and techniques of propagating plants by seeds, cuttings, grafts, buds, layers, and division. Lectures on principles; labs on practice of various propagating techniques.
PMB 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the biology of plants, algae, and fungi. Structure, growth, development, reproduction, diversity, and aspects of their ecology. Includes laboratory that focuses on structures in photosynthetic organisms and fungi as well as an introduction to physiology. prereq: One semester of college biology
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01878 - Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall
The topics of atomic theory, molecular structure, bonding and shape, energy and enthalpy, gases, properties of solutions, and equilibrium will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1015 or passing chemistry placement exam. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
HORT 2100 - Agricultural Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: CHEM 1015/1017 or CHEM 1061 #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Chemical/biochemical foundation for agricultural disciplines. Concepts in organic, analytical and biological chemistry. Chemistry, metabolism, and development of plants. prereq: CHEM 1015/1017 or CHEM 1061 instr consent
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00467 - BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Metabolism/regulation of metabolism. Quantitative treatments of chemical equilibria, enzyme catalysis, and bioenergetics. Chemical basis of genetic information flow. recommended prerequisites: Introductory Biology (BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003 or equivalent) and Organic Chemistry (CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equivalent) enforced prerequisite: not a CBS student
HORT 4096W - Professional Experience Program: Internship (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Professional experience in horticultural businesses, government agencies, arboreta, and botanical gardens achieved through a supervised practical experience. Students produce a final publication focusing on writing for lay audiences. Project starts before the internship begins and ends approximately two months after the internship is complete. prereq: CFANS undergrad
AGRO 4096W - Professional Experience Program: Internships (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Supervised professional experience with a private company, public agency, or non-profit organization involved in plant production or food systems. Reflective analysis of professional experience and technical communication on a topic related to the internship. This course meets on campus once in late spring and twice in early fall with several online activities during the summer.
AGRO 4097W - Undergraduate Research Thesis (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Research/thesis conducted under supervision of CFANS faculty member. Written thesis describing research results. prereq: Jr or Sr
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 3305 - Agroecosystems of the world (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explore four different areas of world (Minnesota, Morocco, Nepal, Costa Rica) by networking with locals on ground in each region through online interactions. Food, agriculture, environment. Biophysical/socio-cultural aspects of agroecosystems through unique multi-disciplinary lens.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to use of systems thinking for exploration of problems in contemporary food system from multidisciplinary perspective. System concepts. Historical evolution of food system. Analysis, management, design.
CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic concepts in genetic engineering as a foundation for studying the impact of biotechnology on agriculture, medicine, industry, and the environment. Controversial aspects of biotechnology related to public policy issues are discussed.
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary survey of environmental issues. Interrelationships between environment and human society. Roles of science, technology, and policy in meeting environmental challenges. Lecture, discussion. Students evaluate social, ethical, political, and economic factors.
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3575/5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Importance of pollinators in agricultural/other natural landscapes. Risks to pollinators. Ways risks can be reduced, minimized, or overcome. Ways public policy has impacted pollinators/how future policy decisions will affect pollinator protection efforts. prereq: [1001 or AGRO 1101 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1001 or ENT 1001 or PLPA 1005], 30 credits completed (non-freshman status)
PLPA 2003 - Plague, Famine, and Beer: The Impact of Microscopic Organisms on Human Civilization (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Impacts that microbes have made on course of human civilization. Negative influences of major human/plant infectious disease. Positive benefits attained by harnessing power of microbes. Scale of history includes prehistoric to present day. Projected future impacts.
GCC 3017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00136 - Agro 4103/ApEc 4103/GCC 3017
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course provides a multi-disciplinary look at problems (and some of the possible solutions) affecting food production, distribution and requirements for the seven plus billion inhabitants of this planet. It is co-taught by an agronomist (Porter) and an economist (Runge) who together have worked on international food production and policy issues for the past 40 years. Historical context, the present situation and future scenarios related to the human population and food production are examined. Presentations and discussions cover sometimes conflicting views from multiple perspectives on population growth, use of technology, as well as the ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world. The global challenge perspective is reflected in attention to issues of poverty, inequality, gender, the legacy of colonialism, and racial and ethnic prejudice. Emphasis is placed on the need for governments, international assistance agencies, international research and extension centers, as well as the private sector to assist in solving the complex problems associated with malnutrition, undernutrition, obesity and sustainable food production. Through a better understanding of world food problems, this course enables students to reflect on the shared sense of responsibility by nations, the international community and ourselves to build and maintain a stronger sense of our roles as historical agents. Throughout the semester students are exposed to issues related to world food problems through the lenses of two instructors from different disciplinary backgrounds. The core issues of malnutrition and food production are approached simultaneously from a production perspective as well as an economic and policy perspective throughout the semester.
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02353
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecological/physiological concepts for revegetation of grasslands, wetlands, forests, and landscapes. Plant selection, stand establishment/evaluation. State/federal programs that administer restoration/reclamation. Field trips. prereq: [One college course in ecology, one college course in [plant science or botany]] or instr consent
HORT 4110 - Spring Flowering Bulbs
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Geophytes are early harbingers of spring. In this course we will examine the variety of herbaceous perennial spring-flowering crops with underground storage organs (geophytes). As spring progresses, different genera and species predominate in the flowering landscape. In contrast, greenhouse production of potted plant and cut flower geophytic crops can be simultaneous rather than sequential. This course will consist of hands-on taxonomic identification of geophyte crops, their uses in landscape design, and production essentials. The laboratory will be hands-on, experiential learning with many visits of outdoor landscape, gardens, production greenhouses, and interiorscapes.
HORT 4111 - Prairie Perennials and Grasses
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Students will learn to identify over 100 plants, predominately native fall perennials and grasses at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum. Class meeting dates at the Arboretum are listed in the Class Detail under Class Search. prereq: HORT 1015
HORT 4112 - Flowering Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Need an excuse to spend a few hours outside at the height of the spring flowering season? Want to spend more time amidst the expansive and beautiful University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum plant collections? Do you want to be able to identify more woody landscape plants, in flower? Here's your chance to expand your plant identification skills and learn the names and flowering characteristics for approximately 150 woody landscape plants. Flowering Trees and Shrubs is a practitioners course, designed to give you a hands-on opportunity to learn to identify woody landscape trees, shrubs, ground covers, and vines, including the common and scientific names for each. We will study the plants as family assemblages, noting features common to each family which will assist you in identifying unknown plants in Minnesota and other geographical locations in the future. In addition to identification; common landscape uses, cultural specificities,problems, and notable cultivars will be highlighted.
HORT 4113 - Identifying Plants for the Home and Garden: Garden, Annual, and Potted Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
There are many strange and usual plants that are grown as horticulture crops, ornamentals, or collectable plants. Venus fly traps, bulbs, orchids, vines, cacti and succulents. Students will learn how to identify these crops, learn their common and scientific names, and how these plants have adapted physiologically to survive stressful conditions. At least 100 different crops will be covered during this course (approximately 20 per class). Students will be expected to be able to identify these plants from images, whole plants, and/or plant parts. Information will be presented and/or learned using lectures, field trips, exercises, and homework, and a course project. Students will also grow potted herbs/vegetables crops as part of this class.
AGRO 2501 - Plant Identification for Urban and Rural Landscapes
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Identification of weed species and native herbaceous plants that are important in crop production, turf management, horticulture production, and landscapes systems. This course will emphasize the identification of weed species and other plants found in Minnesota and the upper Midwest area of the United States. Plant families, life cycles, habitats and relationships to humans. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01929 - Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biology of the major groups of plant pathogens, symptoms and signs of plant disease, plant disease diagnosis, and principles of disease management. Lecture and laboratory. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
AGRO 3660 - Plant Genetic Resources: Identification, Conservation, and Utilization
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Importance of plant genetic diversity. Morphological, molecular, and computational methods of identifying/conserving genetic resources. Biological basis of genetic diversity. Case studies in crop improvement. prereq: Introductory biology
GCD 4034 - Molecular Genetics and Genomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Molecular genetics and genomics of eukaryotes. Course emphasizes mechanisms of gene regulation and how these are studied. Current strategies used to study the activity and function of genes and genomes, including the role of chromatin, will be covered. Techniques will include gene knockouts/knockdown, genome engineering, genome-wide analysis of RNA and protein expression and function, as well as genome-wide protein binding and chromatin interaction mapping. Technologies covered will include next-generations and third-generation sequencing and CRISPR-based strategies for gene modification and precision gene regulation. Students will analyze and present recent primary papers in molecular genetic and genomics.
HORT 4071W - Applications of Biotechnology to Plant Improvement (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamentals of plant genetics, molecular biology, and plant biotechnology. Emphasizes their applications to plant propagation and crop improvement. Hands-on experience with crossing plants, analysis of phenotypes and segregation data, plant tissue culture/transformation, gel electrophoresis, molecular cloning, use of genetically modified crops. Principles of ethics/citizenship to decision making in plant genetics and biotechnology. Debate, discussion, writing exercises. prereq: [Biol 1009 or equiv or grad student], instr consent
AGRO 5021 - Plant Breeding Principles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is intended for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students that are either: 1) not plant breeding majors who will benefit from a basic understanding of how genetics is applied to plant improvement; or 2) plant breeding majors lacking prior coursework in plant breeding. The objective of this course is to develop an understanding of the underlying principles, ideas, and concepts important to applying genetic principles to plant breeding, evaluating breeding methods, and enhancing genetic progress and efficiency.
AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Ecology/biology of invasive plant species (weeds). Principles of invasive plant management in agricultural/horticultural, urban, wetland, aquatic, and other non-cropland landscape systems, utilizing biological, cultural, and chemical means. Management strategies to design systems that optimize invasive plant management in terms of economic, environmental, and social impacts. prereq: 4005, [Bio 3002 or equiv], Soil 2125, [Agro 2501 or Hort 1011]
HORT 4141W - Scheduling Crops for Protected Environments (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the identification, scheduling and cultural requirements of commercially produced potted plants, gain experience in growing them, and conduct experiments to understand current problems. The course builds on knowledge obtained in Hort 1001 or Hort 1015, by adding in additional factors of plant growth coupled with scheduling and growing a of crops which commercial growers would experience. The role of ornamental plants in the human environment will be discussed, with special emphasis on future issues. Writing is an integral component of this course; one major paper is revised and expanded multiple times plus other course writing fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Through the use of interactive learning, field trips, written assignments, and in-class discussions students learn crop requirements and the interactions between the marketing distribution system of breeders, producers, distributors, growers, retailers, and consumers.
HORT 4461 - Horticultural Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01519 - ApEc 4461/Hort 4461
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major areas in horticultural marketing. Difference between horticultural products and commercial commodities. Core marketing components that should be used by every small horticultural business. Approaches to consumer research.
AGRO 2022 - Growth and Development of Minnesota Field Crops
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students learn how field crop species grow and develop, how unique traits of crop species contribute to ecosystem services, and how to identify important growth stages of crops. In addition to traditional agronomic crops (small grains, alfalfa, soybean and corn), students will work with annual and perennial species that represent emerging crops grown for grain, oil seed, novel products, cover crops and biomass. Course work includes lectures, labs (greenhouse and field), and online assignments and quizzes. prereqs: AGRO 1101 or HORT 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1001 and AGRO 1103
PLSC 3002 - Seed Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cultivate an understanding of seed and appreciation for seed with respect to agriculture. Focus of this course will be on agronomic crop seeds produced in the upper Midwest. prereq: HORT 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or consent of the instructor
BIOL 4003 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00052 - Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations. prereq: Biol 3020 or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 or grad MSB
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
AGRO 5431 - Applied Plant Genomics and Bioinformatics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis, interpretation, visualization of large plant genomic datasets. Basic computer programming, applying large-scale genomics to answer basic/applied biological questions, understanding limitations of each application, presenting concise visual findings from large-scale datasets. prereq: Grad student or [undergrad with genetics course]
PLPA 5301 - Large Scale Omic Data in Plant Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to large scale data in plant biology. Emphasizes model plants and important agricultural crops focusing on new approaches and technologies in the field. Fundamentals, acquisition, and analysis of high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing, high-throughput plant phenotyping, functional and comparative genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and microbiomics. prereq: Intro course in genetics or instr consent
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01929 - Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Ecology/biology of invasive plant species (weeds). Principles of invasive plant management in agricultural/horticultural, urban, wetland, aquatic, and other non-cropland landscape systems, utilizing biological, cultural, and chemical means. Management strategies to design systems that optimize invasive plant management in terms of economic, environmental, and social impacts. prereq: 4005, [Bio 3002 or equiv], Soil 2125, [Agro 2501 or Hort 1011]
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
ENT 3925 - Insects, Aquatic Habitats, and Pollution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Effects differing classes of pollutants have on insects that are aquatic. Insect life-cycle dynamics, trophic guilds, community structure. Hypotheses to explain community structure in streams, rivers, wetlands, ponds, lakes, reservoirs. Organic pollution, eutrophication, heavy metal pollution, runoff/siltation, acidification, thermal pollution. Changes in aquatic insect community structure. Designing/maintaining biological monitoring networks. prereq: [[3005 or Biol 3407 or FW 2001], [jr or sr]] or instr consent
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02353
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecological/physiological concepts for revegetation of grasslands, wetlands, forests, and landscapes. Plant selection, stand establishment/evaluation. State/federal programs that administer restoration/reclamation. Field trips. prereq: [One college course in ecology, one college course in [plant science or botany]] or instr consent
PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biology of the major groups of plant pathogens, symptoms and signs of plant disease, plant disease diagnosis, and principles of disease management. Lecture and laboratory. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01229 - ESPM 3108/ESPM 5108
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecology of ecosystems that are primarily composed of managed plant communities, such as managed forests, field-crop agroecosystems, rangelands and nature reserves, parks, and urban open-spaces. Concepts of ecology and ecosystem management. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or HORT 1001 or instr consent
FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Selection, growth, propagation, and maintenance of trees for urban spaces. Tree selection, site preparation, plant health care management. Prevention, diagnosis, and remediation of urban tree risks such as insects, pathogens, pollution, development, and climate change.
AGRO 2022 - Growth and Development of Minnesota Field Crops
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students learn how field crop species grow and develop, how unique traits of crop species contribute to ecosystem services, and how to identify important growth stages of crops. In addition to traditional agronomic crops (small grains, alfalfa, soybean and corn), students will work with annual and perennial species that represent emerging crops grown for grain, oil seed, novel products, cover crops and biomass. Course work includes lectures, labs (greenhouse and field), and online assignments and quizzes. prereqs: AGRO 1101 or HORT 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1001 and AGRO 1103
HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Tracing our relationship with edible landscapes traces to our hunting-gathering origins. Technological/social changes that have distanced us from our food. Integrating food plants into pleasing, sustainable, and edible landscapes in yards, neighborhoods, and cities.
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology, ecology, population management of forest/shade tree insects. Emphasizes predisposing factors/integrated management. Lecture/lab.
PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides an overview of tree diseases in urban and forested areas. It covers diseases that have had a significant impact on society such as Dutch Elm disease; oak wilt, chestnut blight, white pine blister rust, sudden oak death and many others. It also provides an overview of important cankers, leaf diseases, wilts, rusts, root rots and other tree problems. Laboratory sessions enable students to get hands-on experience identifying disease agents, examining symptoms and learning appropriate control procedures. Emphasis will also be placed on ecological processes, biological and cultural control, and host-parasite interactions. This course should be of value to anyone interested in biological sciences, natural resources or ecology. It is a must for individuals that will have a career in natural resources but should also be useful to those interested in maintaining healthy trees at home, in urban areas or woodlands. Alumni of the University working with trees or woody ornamentals indicate this is one of the most important courses you can take as a student.
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
AGRO 3305 - Agroecosystems of the world (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explore four different areas of world (Minnesota, Morocco, Nepal, Costa Rica) by networking with locals on ground in each region through online interactions. Food, agriculture, environment. Biophysical/socio-cultural aspects of agroecosystems through unique multi-disciplinary lens.
AGRO 3660 - Plant Genetic Resources: Identification, Conservation, and Utilization
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Importance of plant genetic diversity. Morphological, molecular, and computational methods of identifying/conserving genetic resources. Biological basis of genetic diversity. Case studies in crop improvement. prereq: Introductory biology
AGRO 4605 - Strategies for Agricultural Production and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Information/tools necessary to make informed land management decisions in ever-evolving economic, policy, climate environments. Evaluate hows, whats, whys of crop management by solving real-world problems that agricultural professionals face. State-of-the-art production/management practices for major agricultural crops in Minnesota. Lectures feature agricultural professionals/experts. Lab component provides hands-on experience with modern equipment/data interpretation. prereq: 1101 or equivalent, [CHEM1015/17 or equivalent], SOIL1125 or equivalent], [jr or sr or grad student or instr consent]
PLSC 3002 - Seed Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cultivate an understanding of seed and appreciation for seed with respect to agriculture. Focus of this course will be on agronomic crop seeds produced in the upper Midwest. prereq: HORT 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or consent of the instructor
SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation, interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient problems. prereq: SOIL 2125
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02414 - ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
HORT 3131 - Student Organic Farm Planning, Growing, and Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organic fruit and vegetable production has been one of the fastest growing segments of the US economy for almost two decades, stimulating an overwhelming number of biological and ecological innovations to produce food using organic approaches. This course aims to increase student?s knowledge of ecological concepts as applied to managing organic systems, with an emphasis on soil nutrient cycles and plant-soil-microbe interactions that serve as the cornerstone of organic systems. Students in this course will learn tools needed to manage an organic diversified vegetable operation. The course consists of two components: a classroom session two times each week for 50 minutes, and a laboratory session that meets before class on Tuesdays for two hours. The classroom session is designed to help students think about concepts and principles that are useful in planning and managing production strategies on organic farms. We spend a significant amount of our time reviewing soil nutrient cycling and its critical importance for organic farms, including how to effectively use soil and organic nutrient inputs such as cover crops, manure and fertilizers, to provide vegetable crops with the nutrients they need to grow. We also learn about successful marketing strategies for organic produce. Finally, near the end of the semester we will discuss pest management, including both weeds and disease/insect pests, and compare different tillage options available to organic producers. What we learn is then applied to planning next year?s season of the UMN student organic farm. Throughout, we will use case studies, guest speakers, games, and active learning discussion approaches to move these classroom sessions "beyond the lecture" and allow students to engage with the material in a meaningful way. The lab is designed to allow a space to put into action some of the concepts students learn in lecture, including soil organic matter analysis, microgreen propagation, calculation of organic fertilizer rates, and operation of driven and walk-behind tractors.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Ecology/biology of invasive plant species (weeds). Principles of invasive plant management in agricultural/horticultural, urban, wetland, aquatic, and other non-cropland landscape systems, utilizing biological, cultural, and chemical means. Management strategies to design systems that optimize invasive plant management in terms of economic, environmental, and social impacts. prereq: 4005, [Bio 3002 or equiv], Soil 2125, [Agro 2501 or Hort 1011]
AGRO 4888 - Issues in Sustainable Agriculture
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Agroecology, sustainable practices, production economics, environmental quality, holistic resource management, healthy food/water, rural communities. Meet sustainable-agriculture advocates, including farmers, faculty, and representatives of non-profit sustainable-agriculture organizations. prereq: 1103, Soil 1125 or 2125 or equiv
ENT 1005 - Insect Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01880
Typically offered: Every Fall
Diverse biology of insects and their arthropod relatives. Insect behavior (including social insects), pollination, herbivory, insects as disease vectors, beneficial insects, insect population dynamics/ecology. Insects' role in natural, agricultural, and urban, systems. Lecture/lab.
PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biology of the major groups of plant pathogens, symptoms and signs of plant disease, plant disease diagnosis, and principles of disease management. Lecture and laboratory. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
AGRO 4605 - Strategies for Agricultural Production and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Information/tools necessary to make informed land management decisions in ever-evolving economic, policy, climate environments. Evaluate hows, whats, whys of crop management by solving real-world problems that agricultural professionals face. State-of-the-art production/management practices for major agricultural crops in Minnesota. Lectures feature agricultural professionals/experts. Lab component provides hands-on experience with modern equipment/data interpretation. prereq: 1101 or equivalent, [CHEM1015/17 or equivalent], SOIL1125 or equivalent], [jr or sr or grad student or instr consent]
HORT 4141W - Scheduling Crops for Protected Environments (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the identification, scheduling and cultural requirements of commercially produced potted plants, gain experience in growing them, and conduct experiments to understand current problems. The course builds on knowledge obtained in Hort 1001 or Hort 1015, by adding in additional factors of plant growth coupled with scheduling and growing a of crops which commercial growers would experience. The role of ornamental plants in the human environment will be discussed, with special emphasis on future issues. Writing is an integral component of this course; one major paper is revised and expanded multiple times plus other course writing fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Through the use of interactive learning, field trips, written assignments, and in-class discussions students learn crop requirements and the interactions between the marketing distribution system of breeders, producers, distributors, growers, retailers, and consumers.
HORT 5031 - Fruit Production and Viticulture for Local and Organic Markets
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Principles of fruit production. Temperature fruit crops. Integrated management of fruit cropping systems. Site selection, cultural management practices, taxonomic classification, physiological/environmental control of plant development. Writing. prereq: [1001, 3005] or instr consent
HORT 5032 - Organic Vegetable Production
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Integrated management of vegetable cropping. Site selection/environment, seed/stand establishment, cultural management, commodity use, handling. Types of vegetable cultivars. Breeding, physiological/environmental control.
HORT 4461 - Horticultural Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01519 - ApEc 4461/Hort 4461
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major areas in horticultural marketing. Difference between horticultural products and commercial commodities. Core marketing components that should be used by every small horticultural business. Approaches to consumer research.
PLSC 3002 - Seed Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cultivate an understanding of seed and appreciation for seed with respect to agriculture. Focus of this course will be on agronomic crop seeds produced in the upper Midwest. prereq: HORT 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or consent of the instructor
HORT 1003 - Organic Gardening: From Balconies to Backyards
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This fully online course focuses on the principles and practices of growing fruits, vegetables, and herbs with an ecological approach. You'll explore basic botany, soils and compost, species and variety selection, planning and design, container gardening, pest management, season extension, and more so you can approach your gardening projects with confidence.
HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Tracing our relationship with edible landscapes traces to our hunting-gathering origins. Technological/social changes that have distanced us from our food. Integrating food plants into pleasing, sustainable, and edible landscapes in yards, neighborhoods, and cities.
HORT 1031 - Vines and Wines: Introduction to Viticulture and Enology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
History of wine, principles of biology, culture of grapevine, fermentation, sensory evaluation of wine. prereq: 21 yrs of age by date of 1st class meeting
PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides an overview of tree diseases in urban and forested areas. It covers diseases that have had a significant impact on society such as Dutch Elm disease; oak wilt, chestnut blight, white pine blister rust, sudden oak death and many others. It also provides an overview of important cankers, leaf diseases, wilts, rusts, root rots and other tree problems. Laboratory sessions enable students to get hands-on experience identifying disease agents, examining symptoms and learning appropriate control procedures. Emphasis will also be placed on ecological processes, biological and cultural control, and host-parasite interactions. This course should be of value to anyone interested in biological sciences, natural resources or ecology. It is a must for individuals that will have a career in natural resources but should also be useful to those interested in maintaining healthy trees at home, in urban areas or woodlands. Alumni of the University working with trees or woody ornamentals indicate this is one of the most important courses you can take as a student.
SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation, interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient problems. prereq: SOIL 2125
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02414 - ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
HORT 4141W - Scheduling Crops for Protected Environments (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the identification, scheduling and cultural requirements of commercially produced potted plants, gain experience in growing them, and conduct experiments to understand current problems. The course builds on knowledge obtained in Hort 1001 or Hort 1015, by adding in additional factors of plant growth coupled with scheduling and growing a of crops which commercial growers would experience. The role of ornamental plants in the human environment will be discussed, with special emphasis on future issues. Writing is an integral component of this course; one major paper is revised and expanded multiple times plus other course writing fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Through the use of interactive learning, field trips, written assignments, and in-class discussions students learn crop requirements and the interactions between the marketing distribution system of breeders, producers, distributors, growers, retailers, and consumers.
HORT 5031 - Fruit Production and Viticulture for Local and Organic Markets
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Principles of fruit production. Temperature fruit crops. Integrated management of fruit cropping systems. Site selection, cultural management practices, taxonomic classification, physiological/environmental control of plant development. Writing. prereq: [1001, 3005] or instr consent
FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Selection, growth, propagation, and maintenance of trees for urban spaces. Tree selection, site preparation, plant health care management. Prevention, diagnosis, and remediation of urban tree risks such as insects, pathogens, pollution, development, and climate change.
PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biology of the major groups of plant pathogens, symptoms and signs of plant disease, plant disease diagnosis, and principles of disease management. Lecture and laboratory. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
HORT 5023 - Public Garden Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Overview of knowledge/skills necessary to manage a public garden. History of public gardens. Development of mission and vision. Planning and design. Operations. Education and research. Fund raising, business management, personnel, marketing, conservation.
HORT 4461 - Horticultural Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01519 - ApEc 4461/Hort 4461
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major areas in horticultural marketing. Difference between horticultural products and commercial commodities. Core marketing components that should be used by every small horticultural business. Approaches to consumer research.
HORT 1013 - Floral Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Design for use in commercial flower shops and at home. Principles and elements of design. Wedding arrangements. Corsages. Decorative use of dried materials.
AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Ecology/biology of invasive plant species (weeds). Principles of invasive plant management in agricultural/horticultural, urban, wetland, aquatic, and other non-cropland landscape systems, utilizing biological, cultural, and chemical means. Management strategies to design systems that optimize invasive plant management in terms of economic, environmental, and social impacts. prereq: 4005, [Bio 3002 or equiv], Soil 2125, [Agro 2501 or Hort 1011]
PLSC 3002 - Seed Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cultivate an understanding of seed and appreciation for seed with respect to agriculture. Focus of this course will be on agronomic crop seeds produced in the upper Midwest. prereq: HORT 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or consent of the instructor
HORT 1003 - Organic Gardening: From Balconies to Backyards
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This fully online course focuses on the principles and practices of growing fruits, vegetables, and herbs with an ecological approach. You'll explore basic botany, soils and compost, species and variety selection, planning and design, container gardening, pest management, season extension, and more so you can approach your gardening projects with confidence.
HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Tracing our relationship with edible landscapes traces to our hunting-gathering origins. Technological/social changes that have distanced us from our food. Integrating food plants into pleasing, sustainable, and edible landscapes in yards, neighborhoods, and cities.
HORT 1031 - Vines and Wines: Introduction to Viticulture and Enology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
History of wine, principles of biology, culture of grapevine, fermentation, sensory evaluation of wine. prereq: 21 yrs of age by date of 1st class meeting
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology, ecology, population management of forest/shade tree insects. Emphasizes predisposing factors/integrated management. Lecture/lab.
PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides an overview of tree diseases in urban and forested areas. It covers diseases that have had a significant impact on society such as Dutch Elm disease; oak wilt, chestnut blight, white pine blister rust, sudden oak death and many others. It also provides an overview of important cankers, leaf diseases, wilts, rusts, root rots and other tree problems. Laboratory sessions enable students to get hands-on experience identifying disease agents, examining symptoms and learning appropriate control procedures. Emphasis will also be placed on ecological processes, biological and cultural control, and host-parasite interactions. This course should be of value to anyone interested in biological sciences, natural resources or ecology. It is a must for individuals that will have a career in natural resources but should also be useful to those interested in maintaining healthy trees at home, in urban areas or woodlands. Alumni of the University working with trees or woody ornamentals indicate this is one of the most important courses you can take as a student.
SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation, interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient problems. prereq: SOIL 2125
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02414 - ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
HORT 4061W - Turfgrass Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology of turfgrasses, ecology of landscape systems. Installation, management, and culture of turfgrass communities and landscape plant systems. Sod production, industrial grounds, lawn care, park/recreation areas, athletic field/business management. Case studies. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
HORT 4062 - Turfgrass Weed and Disease Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Turfgrass weed/disease problems. How to deal with these problems using an integrated approach. Biology, identifying features, and management strategies for several turfgrass diseases/weeds. How to apply IPM principles to turfgrass weed/disease problems. prereq: [4061, PLPA 2001] or instr consent
HORT 4063 - Turfgrass Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecology, physiology, and theory of turf population dynamics. Specialized management situations such as golf course, commercial sod production, and fine turf athletic settings. prereq: 4061
PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biology of the major groups of plant pathogens, symptoms and signs of plant disease, plant disease diagnosis, and principles of disease management. Lecture and laboratory. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
ENT 4015 - Ornamentals and Turf Entomolgy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Diagnosis and management of insect pests in landscape plants. Emphasis on the principles of biological control, biorational pesticides, and integrated pest management. prereq: 1xxx course in biol or hort or forest resources
SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation, interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient problems. prereq: SOIL 2125
HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Importance of pollinators in agricultural/other natural landscapes. Risks to pollinators. Ways risks can be reduced, minimized, or overcome. Ways public policy has impacted pollinators/how future policy decisions will affect pollinator protection efforts. prereq: [1001 or AGRO 1101 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1001 or ENT 1001 or PLPA 1005], 30 credits completed (non-freshman status)
AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Ecology/biology of invasive plant species (weeds). Principles of invasive plant management in agricultural/horticultural, urban, wetland, aquatic, and other non-cropland landscape systems, utilizing biological, cultural, and chemical means. Management strategies to design systems that optimize invasive plant management in terms of economic, environmental, and social impacts. prereq: 4005, [Bio 3002 or equiv], Soil 2125, [Agro 2501 or Hort 1011]
PLSC 3002 - Seed Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cultivate an understanding of seed and appreciation for seed with respect to agriculture. Focus of this course will be on agronomic crop seeds produced in the upper Midwest. prereq: HORT 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or consent of the instructor
ENT 1005 - Insect Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01880
Typically offered: Every Fall
Diverse biology of insects and their arthropod relatives. Insect behavior (including social insects), pollination, herbivory, insects as disease vectors, beneficial insects, insect population dynamics/ecology. Insects' role in natural, agricultural, and urban, systems. Lecture/lab.
PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides an overview of tree diseases in urban and forested areas. It covers diseases that have had a significant impact on society such as Dutch Elm disease; oak wilt, chestnut blight, white pine blister rust, sudden oak death and many others. It also provides an overview of important cankers, leaf diseases, wilts, rusts, root rots and other tree problems. Laboratory sessions enable students to get hands-on experience identifying disease agents, examining symptoms and learning appropriate control procedures. Emphasis will also be placed on ecological processes, biological and cultural control, and host-parasite interactions. This course should be of value to anyone interested in biological sciences, natural resources or ecology. It is a must for individuals that will have a career in natural resources but should also be useful to those interested in maintaining healthy trees at home, in urban areas or woodlands. Alumni of the University working with trees or woody ornamentals indicate this is one of the most important courses you can take as a student.
AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Ecology/biology of invasive plant species (weeds). Principles of invasive plant management in agricultural/horticultural, urban, wetland, aquatic, and other non-cropland landscape systems, utilizing biological, cultural, and chemical means. Management strategies to design systems that optimize invasive plant management in terms of economic, environmental, and social impacts. prereq: 4005, [Bio 3002 or equiv], Soil 2125, [Agro 2501 or Hort 1011]
HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Importance of pollinators in agricultural/other natural landscapes. Risks to pollinators. Ways risks can be reduced, minimized, or overcome. Ways public policy has impacted pollinators/how future policy decisions will affect pollinator protection efforts. prereq: [1001 or AGRO 1101 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1001 or ENT 1001 or PLPA 1005], 30 credits completed (non-freshman status)
ENT 5341 - Biological Control of Insects and Weeds
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Biological control of arthropod pests and weeds. Analysis of relevant ecological theory and case studies; biological control agents. Lab includes natural enemy identification, short experiments, and computer exercises. prereq: 3001, Biol 1009, EEB 3001 or grad
PLPA 5660 - Plant Disease Resistance and Applications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamentals of disease resistance in plants and the genetics of host-parasite interactions as they relate to the sustainable control of plant diseases. Examples explored at the Mendelian, populational, and molecular level of organization. prereq: 2001, BIOL 4003
ENT 3925 - Insects, Aquatic Habitats, and Pollution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Effects differing classes of pollutants have on insects that are aquatic. Insect life-cycle dynamics, trophic guilds, community structure. Hypotheses to explain community structure in streams, rivers, wetlands, ponds, lakes, reservoirs. Organic pollution, eutrophication, heavy metal pollution, runoff/siltation, acidification, thermal pollution. Changes in aquatic insect community structure. Designing/maintaining biological monitoring networks. prereq: [[3005 or Biol 3407 or FW 2001], [jr or sr]] or instr consent
HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Tracing our relationship with edible landscapes traces to our hunting-gathering origins. Technological/social changes that have distanced us from our food. Integrating food plants into pleasing, sustainable, and edible landscapes in yards, neighborhoods, and cities.
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology, ecology, population management of forest/shade tree insects. Emphasizes predisposing factors/integrated management. Lecture/lab.
PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biology of the major groups of plant pathogens, symptoms and signs of plant disease, plant disease diagnosis, and principles of disease management. Lecture and laboratory. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
PLPA 5480 - Principles of Plant Pathology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is intended for graduate students and undergraduate students in their third or fourth year that are interested in learning about principles of plant pathology, diseases that affect plants, microbiology and microbial and plant interactions. In this course students will learn principles of plant pathology through lectures and demonstrations and exercises in laboratory. Students will gain knowledge of mycology and select diseases caused by fungi within Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and the fungal-like Oomycota. Diseases caused by bacteria, nematodes, viruses, parasitic plants and abiotic damage are also examined. Lectures will include information concerning the history and importance of plant pathology, mycology, bacteriology, nematology, virology, infection process, genetics of host and microorganism interactions, epidemiology of diseases and disease control strategies. In the hands-on laboratory period the student will learn laboratory skills, gain experience using the microscope, work with microorganisms, learn diagnostic skills, and be able to recognize 30 plant diseases. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation, interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient problems. prereq: SOIL 2125
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02414 - ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
AGRO 4015 - Topics in Agronomy
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course focuses on current topics in crops, cropping systems, and plant improvement.
AGRO 4093 - Directed Studies for Advanced Students
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Allows study of agronomy in greater depth or in areas not currently offered in formal courses. Tutorial instruction under staff guidance. prereq: 15 cr in agronomy, instr consent
AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Ecology/biology of invasive plant species (weeds). Principles of invasive plant management in agricultural/horticultural, urban, wetland, aquatic, and other non-cropland landscape systems, utilizing biological, cultural, and chemical means. Management strategies to design systems that optimize invasive plant management in terms of economic, environmental, and social impacts. prereq: 4005, [Bio 3002 or equiv], Soil 2125, [Agro 2501 or Hort 1011]
AGRO 4605 - Strategies for Agricultural Production and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Information/tools necessary to make informed land management decisions in ever-evolving economic, policy, climate environments. Evaluate hows, whats, whys of crop management by solving real-world problems that agricultural professionals face. State-of-the-art production/management practices for major agricultural crops in Minnesota. Lectures feature agricultural professionals/experts. Lab component provides hands-on experience with modern equipment/data interpretation. prereq: 1101 or equivalent, [CHEM1015/17 or equivalent], SOIL1125 or equivalent], [jr or sr or grad student or instr consent]
CFAN 3001 - Pests and Crop Protection
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to biology/identification of insects, weeds, and diseases that affect agricultural crops. Management of these organisms based on principles of integrated pest management. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv or instr consent
ENT 1005 - Insect Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01880
Typically offered: Every Fall
Diverse biology of insects and their arthropod relatives. Insect behavior (including social insects), pollination, herbivory, insects as disease vectors, beneficial insects, insect population dynamics/ecology. Insects' role in natural, agricultural, and urban, systems. Lecture/lab.
PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biology of the major groups of plant pathogens, symptoms and signs of plant disease, plant disease diagnosis, and principles of disease management. Lecture and laboratory. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation, interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient problems. prereq: SOIL 2125
SOIL 4111 - Introduction to Precision Agriculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Soil, landscape, and crop spatial variability. GIS, DEM, GPS technologies. Variable rate machinery, PA software, remote sensing. Geostatistics, sampling, experimental designs. Precision integrated crop management. Data acquisition, processing, and management. Socio-economical and e-marketing aspects. prereq: Basic sciences, statistics, soil, agronomy
HORT 4141W - Scheduling Crops for Protected Environments (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the identification, scheduling and cultural requirements of commercially produced potted plants, gain experience in growing them, and conduct experiments to understand current problems. The course builds on knowledge obtained in Hort 1001 or Hort 1015, by adding in additional factors of plant growth coupled with scheduling and growing a of crops which commercial growers would experience. The role of ornamental plants in the human environment will be discussed, with special emphasis on future issues. Writing is an integral component of this course; one major paper is revised and expanded multiple times plus other course writing fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Through the use of interactive learning, field trips, written assignments, and in-class discussions students learn crop requirements and the interactions between the marketing distribution system of breeders, producers, distributors, growers, retailers, and consumers.
AGRO 2022 - Growth and Development of Minnesota Field Crops
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students learn how field crop species grow and develop, how unique traits of crop species contribute to ecosystem services, and how to identify important growth stages of crops. In addition to traditional agronomic crops (small grains, alfalfa, soybean and corn), students will work with annual and perennial species that represent emerging crops grown for grain, oil seed, novel products, cover crops and biomass. Course work includes lectures, labs (greenhouse and field), and online assignments and quizzes. prereqs: AGRO 1101 or HORT 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1001 and AGRO 1103
HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Tracing our relationship with edible landscapes traces to our hunting-gathering origins. Technological/social changes that have distanced us from our food. Integrating food plants into pleasing, sustainable, and edible landscapes in yards, neighborhoods, and cities.
PLSC 3002 - Seed Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cultivate an understanding of seed and appreciation for seed with respect to agriculture. Focus of this course will be on agronomic crop seeds produced in the upper Midwest. prereq: HORT 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or consent of the instructor
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
AGRO 2501 - Plant Identification for Urban and Rural Landscapes
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Identification of weed species and native herbaceous plants that are important in crop production, turf management, horticulture production, and landscapes systems. This course will emphasize the identification of weed species and other plants found in Minnesota and the upper Midwest area of the United States. Plant families, life cycles, habitats and relationships to humans. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv
AGRO 3305 - Agroecosystems of the world (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explore four different areas of world (Minnesota, Morocco, Nepal, Costa Rica) by networking with locals on ground in each region through online interactions. Food, agriculture, environment. Biophysical/socio-cultural aspects of agroecosystems through unique multi-disciplinary lens.
SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation, interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient problems. prereq: SOIL 2125
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02414 - ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01929 - Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
AGRO 3660 - Plant Genetic Resources: Identification, Conservation, and Utilization
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Importance of plant genetic diversity. Morphological, molecular, and computational methods of identifying/conserving genetic resources. Biological basis of genetic diversity. Case studies in crop improvement. prereq: Introductory biology
AGRO 4888 - Issues in Sustainable Agriculture
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Agroecology, sustainable practices, production economics, environmental quality, holistic resource management, healthy food/water, rural communities. Meet sustainable-agriculture advocates, including farmers, faculty, and representatives of non-profit sustainable-agriculture organizations. prereq: 1103, Soil 1125 or 2125 or equiv
AGRO 5021 - Plant Breeding Principles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is intended for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students that are either: 1) not plant breeding majors who will benefit from a basic understanding of how genetics is applied to plant improvement; or 2) plant breeding majors lacking prior coursework in plant breeding. The objective of this course is to develop an understanding of the underlying principles, ideas, and concepts important to applying genetic principles to plant breeding, evaluating breeding methods, and enhancing genetic progress and efficiency.
AGRO 5431 - Applied Plant Genomics and Bioinformatics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis, interpretation, visualization of large plant genomic datasets. Basic computer programming, applying large-scale genomics to answer basic/applied biological questions, understanding limitations of each application, presenting concise visual findings from large-scale datasets. prereq: Grad student or [undergrad with genetics course]
EEB 5042 - Quantitative Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamentals of quantitative genetics. Genetic/environmental influences on expression of quantitative traits. Approaches to characterizing genetic basis of trait variation. Processes that lead to change in quantitative traits. Applied/evolutionary aspects of quantitative genetic variation. prereq: [BIOL 4003 or GCD 3022] or instr consent; a course in statistics is recommended
GCD 4034 - Molecular Genetics and Genomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Molecular genetics and genomics of eukaryotes. Course emphasizes mechanisms of gene regulation and how these are studied. Current strategies used to study the activity and function of genes and genomes, including the role of chromatin, will be covered. Techniques will include gene knockouts/knockdown, genome engineering, genome-wide analysis of RNA and protein expression and function, as well as genome-wide protein binding and chromatin interaction mapping. Technologies covered will include next-generations and third-generation sequencing and CRISPR-based strategies for gene modification and precision gene regulation. Students will analyze and present recent primary papers in molecular genetic and genomics.
HORT 4071W - Applications of Biotechnology to Plant Improvement (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamentals of plant genetics, molecular biology, and plant biotechnology. Emphasizes their applications to plant propagation and crop improvement. Hands-on experience with crossing plants, analysis of phenotypes and segregation data, plant tissue culture/transformation, gel electrophoresis, molecular cloning, use of genetically modified crops. Principles of ethics/citizenship to decision making in plant genetics and biotechnology. Debate, discussion, writing exercises. prereq: [Biol 1009 or equiv or grad student], instr consent
HORT 5058 - Plant Cytogenetics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Hybrid science of plant cytology/genetics. History, concepts, current research, technological development in plant cytogenetics. Function, movement, number/structure of chromosomes. Methods/application of chromosome modification in plant improvement. prereq: [HORT/AGRO 4401, BIOL 4004] or instr consent
HORT 5059 - Plant Cytogenetics Lab
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Consolidate knowledge of plant cytogenetics by practicing series of microscopy/computational technologies. Examine number, movement, structure/structure modification of chromosomes. Application in plant improvement. prereq: [HORT/AGRO 4401, BIOL 4004] or instr consent
PLPA 2001 - Introductory Plant Pathology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biology of the major groups of plant pathogens, symptoms and signs of plant disease, plant disease diagnosis, and principles of disease management. Lecture and laboratory. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
PLPA 5301 - Large Scale Omic Data in Plant Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to large scale data in plant biology. Emphasizes model plants and important agricultural crops focusing on new approaches and technologies in the field. Fundamentals, acquisition, and analysis of high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing, high-throughput plant phenotyping, functional and comparative genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and microbiomics. prereq: Intro course in genetics or instr consent
AGRO 4093 - Directed Studies for Advanced Students
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Allows study of agronomy in greater depth or in areas not currently offered in formal courses. Tutorial instruction under staff guidance. prereq: 15 cr in agronomy, instr consent
HORT 3090 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Prerequisites: Nonfr, #
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Approved field, lab, or greenhouse experiences in application of horticultural information/practices. prereq: Nonfr, instr consent
PLPA 3090 - Research in Plant Pathology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Assignment of special problems to undergraduates desiring opportunity for independent research in plant pathology.