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Duluth Campus

American Indian Studies B.A.

American Indian Studies
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2018
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 40
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
American Indian Studies (AIS) is an interdisciplinary academic department offering coursework committed to broadening knowledge of the worldview, histories, languages, literatures, cultures, arts, and contemporary experiences of American Indian nations and peoples. As American Indian nations maintain a distinct political relationship with the federal government rooted in historical treaties, congressional laws, and executive orders, AIS promotes an awareness for and understanding of tribal sovereignty and self-determination. AIS strives to protect the integrity and identity of the indigenous population of North America and to create an intellectual learning environment conducive to critical and creative thought. A degree in American Indian studies is designed to give students a broad background while allowing concentrated study in an area(s) of interest. The core of the program includes study in Ojibwe language, historical and contemporary foundations, politics and law, art and literature, and societies and cultures. Majors and minors develop skills in analytical and critical thinking, as well as verbal and written communication. They acquire knowledge of historical and contemporary American Indian experiences, cultures, and (inter)governmental affairs. Additionally, students may focus their area of study in Ojibwe language. Graduates are prepared for careers in a variety of professional fields, including social services, for-profit and not-for-profit organizations, tribal, local, state or federal government, criminal and social justice fields, tribal economic development, as well as business and management. In addition, some graduates pursue advanced degrees in law, health, business, social work, education, museum studies, and fine arts. Honors Requirements: Students must have a 3.75 GPA in the major.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Introductory Requirement (1 cr)
Transfer students with 24 or more credits and current UMD students who change colleges to CLA are exempt from this requirement. New first-year students with 24 or more PSEO credits may request to be waived from this requirement.
UST 1000 - UMD Seminar (1.0-2.0 cr)
General Requirements
The Board of Regents, on recommendation of the faculty, grants degrees from the University of Minnesota. Requirements for an undergraduate degree from University of Minnesota Duluth include the following:
  1. Students must meet all course and credit requirements of the departments and colleges or schools in which they are enrolled including an advanced writing course. Students seeking two degrees must fulfill the requirements of both degrees. However, two degrees cannot be awarded for the same major.
  2. Students must complete all requirements of the Liberal Education Program.
  3. Students must complete a minimum of 120 semester credits.
  4. At least 30 of the last 60 degree credits earned immediately before graduation must be awarded by UMD.
  5. Students must complete at least half of their courses at the 3xxx-level and higher at UMD. Study-abroad credits earned through courses taught by UM faculty and at institutions with which UMD has international exchange programs may be used to fulfill this requirement.
  6. If a minor is required, students must take at least three upper division credits in their minor field from UMD.
  7. The minimum cumulative UM GPA required for graduation will be 2.00 and will include only University of Minnesota coursework. A minimum UM GPA of 2.00 is required in each UMD undergraduate major and minor. No academic unit may impose higher grade point standards to graduate.
  8. Diploma, transcripts, and certification will be withheld until all financial obligations to the University have been met.
Program Requirements
A second field of study (either a minor or another major) is required.
Core (12 cr)
AMIN 1001 - Introduction to American Indian Studies [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
AMIN 1010 - American Indian Experience to 1900 [LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
AMIN 1020 - American Indian Experiences: 1900-present [LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AMIN 3997 - Internship in American Indian Studies (4.0-8.0 cr)
· AMIN 4191 - Senior Study of Ojibwe Language (1.0-6.0 cr)
· AMIN 4990 - Directed Research (1.0-6.0 cr)
Subject Area Electives (24 cr)
One course from four of the five subject areas is required, a minimum of nine AMIN credits must be at the 3xxx-4xxx level and one course from the optional elective area may apply to the 24 credit total. AMIN 3997, 4191, and 4990 do not count toward this requirement.
Take 24 or more credit(s) from the following:
Language
AMIN 11xx, 21xx, 31xx, 41xx courses apply here.
· AMIN 1103 - Beginning Ojibwe I [LE CAT3, LECD CAT03, COMM & LAN] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 1104 - Beginning Ojibwe II [LE CAT3, LECD CAT03, COMM & LAN] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 2103 - Intermediate Ojibwe I [LE CAT3, LECD CAT03, COMM & LAN] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 2104 - Intermediate Ojibwe II [LE CAT3, LECD CAT03, COMM & LAN] (3.0 cr)
· Politics and Law
AMIN 12xx, 22xx, 32xx, 42xx courses apply here.
· AMIN 2210 - American Indian Politics: Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights [LE CAT6, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3206 - Federal Indian Policy [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3230 - American Indian Tribal Government and Law [SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4230 - Introduction to Federal Indian Law [SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4240 - American Indian Education Policy Development in the 20th Century [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4250 - American Indian Diplomacy: Treaties, Compacts, and Agreements [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· Art and Literature
AMIN 16xx, 26xx, 36xx, 46xx courses apply here.
· AMIN 1606 - Introduction to American Indian Literature [LE CAT9, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 2605 - Survey of American Indian Arts [LE CAT9, FINE ARTS, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3620 - Ojibwe Literatures: Sovereignty and Survivance [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3660 - American Indian Novel [HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4630 - American Indians and the Media [HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4640 - American Indians in the Movies [HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· Societies and Cultures
AMIN 14xx, 24xx, 34xx, 44xx courses apply here.
· AMIN 2015 - Ojibwe History and Culture [SUSTAIN] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 2405 - American Indian Families and Society [LE CAT8, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 2407 - Boarding Schools and Beyond: A History of American Indian Education [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3410 - Fur Trade in Canada and the United States [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3420 - American Indians in Sports [LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3430 - Global Indigenous Studies [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3450 - American Indian Women [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· Tribal Administration
AMIN 18xx, 28xx, 38xx, 48xx courses apply here.
· AMIN 2801 - Introduction to Tribal Administration and Governance (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 2820 - Foundations of Indigenous Leadership (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3810 - Fundamentals of Tribal Strategic Management (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3820 - Fundamentals of Tribal Project Management (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4810 - Best Practices in Tribal Administration (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4840 - Current Issues and Opportunities in Tribal Administration and Governance (3.0 cr)
Optional Elective (0-3 cr)
To reach the 24 credit minimum elective requirement students can apply one course from the following list.
ANTH 1604 - Cultural Anthropology [LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 3628 - Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 4621 - Myth and Sacred Symbols (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 4631 - Anthropology and Environment [SUSTAIN] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 4633 - Ethnobotany [SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
or AST 1050 - Native Skywatchers: Indigenous Ethno- and ArchaeoAstronomy [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3535 - Intercultural Communication [LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
or CRIM 3322 - Law and Society (3.0 cr)
or CRIM 3375 - Restorative Justice (3.0 cr)
or CRIM 4340 - Race, Crime and Justice (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 1101 - Literature Appreciation [LE CAT9, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 1582 - Introduction to World Literatures [LE CAT9, LEIP CAT09, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 2305 - Geography of Cultural Diversity [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 4393 - Political Geography (3.0 cr)
or HIST 1304 - US History Part I: 1607-1877 [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 1305 - US History Part II: 1865-Present [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2350 - Nutrition and American History [HUMANITIES, SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3939 - Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648 (4.0 cr)
or LING 1811 - Introduction to Linguistics [LE CAT2, LOGIC & QR] (3.0 cr)
or POL 1500 - Introduction to Comparative Politics [LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
or POL 3515 - Theories of Comparative Politics (4.0 cr)
or POL 3600 - Political Concepts (4.0 cr)
or SOC 4949 - Race and Ethnic Relations (3.0 cr)
or SW 1619 - Race, Class, and Gender in the United States [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or WS 2101 - Women, Race, and Class [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
American Indian Studies Upper Division Electives (9 cr)
Between the subject area electives and this area, a minimum of nine AMIN credits must be at the 3xxx-4xxx level. AMIN 3393 & 3995 apply to this area. AMIN 3997, 4191, and 4990 do not count toward this requirement.
AMIN 3xxx-4xxx level courses
Advanced Writing Requirement (3 cr)
WRIT 31xx - Adv Writing (3 cr)
 
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UST 1000 - UMD Seminar
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02403 - EHS 1000/UST 1000
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Facilitates the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD. Credit will not be granted if already received for EHS 1000.
AMIN 1001 - Introduction to American Indian Studies (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course serves non-majors, majors, and minors, introducing them to the history, methodologies, and community-oriented aspirations of American Indian studies. Students will collaboratively explore texts, topics, intellectuals, and issues crucial to the field, thereby preparing themselves and one another to be ethically-engaged residents of the Anishinaabe lands in which our campus is situated, and to excel in other courses both within and well-beyond UMD's AMIN curriculum.
AMIN 1010 - American Indian Experience to 1900 (LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the social, economic, political, and cultural changes and continuities of American Indian life up to 1900. Native-European encounters, the formation of the United States, and the establishments of hundreds of treaties between the federal government and Native nations has continued relevance for both Native peoples and Americans today. Students will critically interrogate how we interpret the past and how these narratives shape and inform the present. Credit will not be granted if already received for 1110.
AMIN 1020 - American Indian Experiences: 1900-present (LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Through a chronological and biographical approach, the social, economic, political, and cultural changes and continuities of American Indian life from 1900 to the present will be introduced. Significant changes experienced by American Indians as well as their ability to adapt, resist, and thrive will be analyzed. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for 1120.
AMIN 3997 - Internship in American Indian Studies
Credits: 4.0 -8.0 [max 24.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02190 - AMIN 3997/TAG 3997
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Supervised lab experience in American Indian agency or project or with significant Indian clientele. Advance, concurrent, and follow-up written and oral presentations. prereq: instructor consent
AMIN 4191 - Senior Study of Ojibwe Language
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 12.0]
Prerequisites: 1103, instructor consent; no grad credit; a total of 12 credits may be taken between AMIN 4191 and AMIN 4302
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual opportunity to devise and/or be involved in programs to increase fluency. prereq: 1103, instructor consent; no grad credit; a total of 12 credits may be taken between AMIN 4191 and AMIN 4302
AMIN 4990 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 72.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Qualified seniors and graduate students may register for work on tutorial basis in research of an advanced nature in American Indian Studies. prereq: instructor consent, max 8 credits to grad program
AMIN 1103 - Beginning Ojibwe I (LE CAT3, LECD CAT03, COMM & LAN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Speaking and comprehension of basic Ojibwe speech patterns. Development of rudimentary reading knowledge.
AMIN 1104 - Beginning Ojibwe II (LE CAT3, LECD CAT03, COMM & LAN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Speaking and comprehension of basic Ojibwe speech patterns. Development of rudimentary reading knowledge. prereq: 1103 or instructor consent
AMIN 2103 - Intermediate Ojibwe I (LE CAT3, LECD CAT03, COMM & LAN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Speaking basic Ojibwe sentences and paragraphs at fluent level so listener can understand speaking pattern context. Ability to write and read Ojibwe language proficiently. prereq: 1104 or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for 2203.
AMIN 2104 - Intermediate Ojibwe II (LE CAT3, LECD CAT03, COMM & LAN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Speaking basic Ojibwe sentences and paragraphs at fluent level so listener can understand speaking pattern context. Ability to write and read Ojibwe language proficiently. prereq: 2103 or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for 2204.
AMIN 2210 - American Indian Politics: Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights (LE CAT6, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduces critical terms and issues facing American Indian nations in their relationships with federal and state governments as well as their own conceptions of nationhood and law by critically analyzing the principal actors and discussing the roles national mythologies, media, identity, and activism play in law and policy formation. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for 2110.
AMIN 3206 - Federal Indian Policy (LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the formulation, implementation, evolution, and comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial to self-governance. Introduces students to the theoretical approaches structuring research of federal Indian policy, views, and attitudes of the policy-makers and reaction of indigenous nations. Discussion of the policies and the impact related to those policies. prereq: minimum 30 credits; this course previously titled: Indian-White Relations; credit will not be granted if already received for 3106.
AMIN 3230 - American Indian Tribal Government and Law (SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02189
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
American Indian tribal governments and leadership, historically and today, have aimed at the promotion and protection of the nation, overseen domestic and foreign affairs, and provided for the basic needs and desires of their citizens. This course provides students a general background of the history, development, structure, and politics associated with indigenous governments, analyzing how these institutions have been modified to meet ever-changing internal needs and external pressures. prereq: minimum 30 credits
AMIN 4230 - Introduction to Federal Indian Law (SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02191
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Federal Indian law has had a profound effect on our lives, liberties, and properties of indigenous peoples. At times, U.S. policy and Supreme Court ruling shave worked to protect aboriginal rights, while at other times they have had devastating consequences. This course examines the role of the U.S. Supreme Court as a policy-making institution in their dealings with Indigenous nations, requiring us to ask about the origins of federal judicial power and their application indigenous peoples. prereq: minimum 60 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for AMIN 3333; no grad credit
AMIN 4240 - American Indian Education Policy Development in the 20th Century (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02322 - AMIN 4240/EDUC 4081
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Development of educational policies for American Indian people through the 20th Century and examines shifts in educational policy the impact of such policy and how American Indians reacted to the nature of education programs and sought to reform schools to better meet tribal and community needs.Features of American Indian education policy development such as the relationship and role of research and science, public perceptions of American Indians, Indian activism, and tribal and community involvement in educational policy will be discussed and analyzed. A number of policy themes will be explored such as language and culture, self- determination and control, expansion of education opportunities and the well being of American Indian children and youth through the statutory and programmatic iterations of these themes. The focus will be on cultural pluralism and the importance of education today that support American Indian/Alaska Native self- determination, identity and cultural integrity. Minimum 60 cr, no grad cr; credit will not be granted if already received for EDUC 4081/5081
AMIN 4250 - American Indian Diplomacy: Treaties, Compacts, and Agreements (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02192
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Indigenous Nations have long engaged in diplomatic arrangements with one another, foreign nations, colonial/state governments, and the United States. Such political engagements affirm the inherent sovereignty of First Nations, recognizing the distinctive rights and power unique to Native peoples and were used to forge friendships, end wars, cede lands and resources, create reservations, and reserve hunting and fishing rights. This course examines the history of First Nations treaty making, the legal and political status of Indian treaties and agreement, the ambiguities and problems in indigenous-state diplomacy and treaty litigation. prereq: minimum 60 credits, no grad credit
AMIN 1606 - Introduction to American Indian Literature (LE CAT9, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
Introduces American Indian literatures from a variety of tribal perspectives as well as a wide range of genres including oratory, poetry, short stories, and novels. The major tropes and significant theories of American Indian literature will be covered. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for 1106.
AMIN 2605 - Survey of American Indian Arts (LE CAT9, FINE ARTS, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Traditional arts of American Indians and the cultures that produced them; techniques, motifs, and aesthetics of Indian textiles and utilitarian and ceremonial arts. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for 2105.
AMIN 3620 - Ojibwe Literatures: Sovereignty and Survivance (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Study of a selection of Ojibwe literatures from the 1800s to the present including traditional stories, poetry, political/activist writings, journalism, novels and short stories. Works will reflect the diversity, resistance, adaptation, and survivance of Ojibwe people. prereq: 1106, 1606; 30 credits; Credit will not be granted if already received for 3520.
AMIN 3660 - American Indian Novel (HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Approximately four novels by American Indian authors are read with an explanation of the novels and the milieu that produced them. Credit will not be granted if already received for 3260.
AMIN 4630 - American Indians and the Media (HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of Native controlled and non-Native images of American Indians in varied media including journalism, television, and advertising from the times of European contact to the present. Explorations and comparisons of historic images with the contemporary. Students will participate in a hands-on media watch research project. prereq: minimum 60 credits; no grad credit
AMIN 4640 - American Indians in the Movies (HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Indian Country at the beginning of the film era; government Indian policies during the film era; silent film; war and romance; westerns; Indian and White heroes and heroines; stereotypes; modern Native-made film. prereq: 60 credits; no grad cr
AMIN 2015 - Ojibwe History and Culture (SUSTAIN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Credit will not be granted if already received for 2115.
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Anishinabe, Ojibwe, and Chippewa. Origins and lifestyle; relationship between traditional and contemporary times. Emphasis on Minnesota. Through spring 2015 this course will carry Liberal Education Cultural Diversity credit and effective fall 2015 it will carry Liberal Education Sustainability credit. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for 2115.
AMIN 2405 - American Indian Families and Society (LE CAT8, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Indigenous North American families before European contact; impact of contact, events and governmental policies upon family structure and survival: Native parenting past and present; current issues for American Indian families.
AMIN 2407 - Boarding Schools and Beyond: A History of American Indian Education (LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Explores the diverse experiences American Indians have had in the U.S. educational system from federal boarding schools to contemporary public schools and tribal colleges. Students will be exposed to rhetorical and political aspects of education. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for 2707.
AMIN 3410 - Fur Trade in Canada and the United States (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Historical review and analysis of Canadian and U.S. Indians in the fur trades. prereq: minimum 30 credits
AMIN 3420 - American Indians in Sports (LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
The role of sports and games in Native tradition and tribal sovereignty; development of individual and tribal self-determination; indigenous and adapted games and sports integration of tribal epistemologies into sports; Native sports figures and leaders; history of Native sports pre-Contact through the present. prereq: 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for 3110.
AMIN 3430 - Global Indigenous Studies (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course fosters a consideration of the planet's indigenous peoples, emphasizing their various and varying cultural, territorial, political, social, legal, aesthetic, economic, and intellectual contributions and claims. Exploring indigenous peoples' relationships with one another, with settler governments, with non-governmental organizations, and with supranational institutions, students in the course will develop a broad understanding of the increasingly global trajectories of indigenous studies.
AMIN 3450 - American Indian Women (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
American Indian women in tribal societies before and after European contact; Indian women as stewards of knowledge, tradition, and society; impact of colonization; traditional and contemporary female leadership. prereq: minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for 3250.
AMIN 2801 - Introduction to Tribal Administration and Governance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02254 - AMIN 2801/TAG 2801
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will provide an overview of tribal administration and governance. It will introduce students to principles of tribal sovereignty, tribal self-determination, and self-governance. Students will learn the significance of tribal constitutions, tribal jurisdiction and tribal laws. Students will be introduced to the interaction of federal, state, and tribal governments and how these interactions impact the governance of Native Nations. Students will be introduced to a variety of tribal government systems, and some common practices and problems in the administration of a tribal government.
AMIN 2820 - Foundations of Indigenous Leadership
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02255 - AMIN 2820/TAG 2820
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Foundations of Indigenous Leadership is an historical survey of indigenous leaders with special emphasis on the Great Lakes region. By examining the histories of indigenous leaders and communities we will explore what makes for effective indigenous leaders. The role of traditional ethics in leadership will be a central theme of the course.
AMIN 3810 - Fundamentals of Tribal Strategic Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02256
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the theory and practice of strategic planning and management for tribal governments, public agencies, nonprofit organizations, collaborations, and tribal communities.
AMIN 3820 - Fundamentals of Tribal Project Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02257
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course covers the processes of project management based upon the Project Management Institute (PMI) standards and knowledge areas. By the completion of the course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of project management terms and techniques such as: the triple constraint of project management and project management knowledge areas. They will also have have the tools and techniques of project management such as: selection methods; work breakdown structures; Gantt charts, network diagrams, critical path analysis; cost estimates; earned value management; and motivation theory and team building.
AMIN 4810 - Best Practices in Tribal Administration
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02258
Prerequisites: no grad credit
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines fundamental business "best practices" in accounting, economics, operations, organizational management, statistics, financial management, marketing, and human resources within the specific context of Tribal enterprises and government. prereq: no grad credit
AMIN 4840 - Current Issues and Opportunities in Tribal Administration and Governance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02259
Prerequisites: no grad credit
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will study central issues and opportunities for tribal governments and consider innovative administrative/governance approaches. New Supreme Court cases, Congressional Acts and administrative policies provide new issues for tribal governments to react to and possibly may require a change to their administrative approaches to policy matters. Examples include Supreme Court decisions which have reduced tribal jurisdiction or Acts of Congress, such as the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, which changes or enhances health care delivery. Students will learn the significance of how external decisions by the federal or state government might impact tribal decision making. Students will also learn how enhancement and improvements to tribal constitutions or laws may benefit tribal members, communities as well as the surrounding non-Indian communities. Students will learn how problems can become opportunities, and how jurisdictional challenges require agile, innovative approaches by Native Nations. prereq: no grad credit
ANTH 1604 - Cultural Anthropology (LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to representative cultures of the world and to concepts and methods of cultural anthropology, focusing on range of variation and degree of uniformity in human behavior and in cultural adaptations.
ANTH 3628 - Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cross-cultural survey of gender systems, focusing on contemporary women's lives around the world. prereq: minimum 30 credits
ANTH 4621 - Myth and Sacred Symbols
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Interpretation of myths and sacred symbols found in beliefs and rituals of selected traditional cultures. prereq: 1604, min 60 cr
ANTH 4631 - Anthropology and Environment (SUSTAIN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In-depth study of some of the methods and concepts concerning the interrelations of certain human populations with their environments in diverse natural, cultural, historical, and evolutionary settings. prereq: 1604, min 60 cr
ANTH 4633 - Ethnobotany (SUSTAIN)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: minimum 60 credits or instructor consent
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced survey and study of interrelations between humans and plants, including material, symbolic, ritualistic and other aspects of human-plant interactions. Combines cultural anthropology and botany to investigate the roles of plants as food, medicine, natural resources and/or gateways to culturally sanctioned religious experiences. Liberal Education sustainability credit will be effective fall 2015. prereq: minimum 60 credits or instructor consent
AST 1050 - Native Skywatchers: Indigenous Ethno- and ArchaeoAstronomy (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students are informed about the regional-historical, socio-cultural, philosophical and scientific-technical foundations of Turtle Island (American Indian) Indigenous astronomy in several contextual settings well enough to critically understand, in a conscientized manner, how to approach and address contemporary issues such as star knowledge preservation and transmission protocols, indigenous language and sacred site preservation, light pollution and dark sky preservation, telescope construction ethics and the implications for establishing and maintaining place-based, indigenous education standards in mainstream science at schools, universities, museums and parks.
COMM 3535 - Intercultural Communication (LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is a skills course in which students learn how to engage in effective intercultural communication and relationships. Students apply what they are learning by participating in intercultural communication with classmates from a wide variety of cultures. Students learn about variations in cultural practices and values and how social, political and economic forces have both been influenced by and influence those cultures. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for 2929
CRIM 3322 - Law and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Complexities, organization, and elements of legal systems, particularly in the United States. Legal theory used to explain the "working" of the law, historical development of law, current issues in law, and overall interrelationship between law and society. prereq: 30 credits or instructor consent
CRIM 3375 - Restorative Justice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines the principles and practices of restorative justice, a community-based approach to conflict, crime, and justice. The course involves direct practice of victim-offender mediation, family group conferencing, peacemaking and sentencing circles, and other restorative approaches. Analyzes research on its effectiveness in school settings, prison, for various crimes, and for reconciliation efforts after war, genocide, and racial segregation. Includes both domestic and international examples. prereq: 60 credits or instructor consent
CRIM 4340 - Race, Crime and Justice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Examines the intersection of race/ethnicity, gender, and class within the U.S. criminal justice system, with some attention given to global trends and international comparisons. Considers the racialized effects of crime control and criminal justice practices, including law enforcement, prosecution, sentencing, police-minority community relations, and the disproportionate representation of racial/ethnic groups in the prison system. Explores attitudes and perceptions of crime from the perspective of racial/ethnic minorities, and differential crime rates among majority/minority groups. prereq: 1301 or SOC 1101 or Anth 1604 or CSt 1101, 60 credits or grad student or instructor consent
ENGL 1101 - Literature Appreciation (LE CAT9, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01390 - ENGL 1101/1907
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Developing critical reading skills in fiction, poetry, and drama. prereq: Primarily for nonmajors but also for potential majors and creative writers
ENGL 1582 - Introduction to World Literatures (LE CAT9, LEIP CAT09, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sampling of literary works mainly from Middle East, Africa, Far East, and South America.
GEOG 2305 - Geography of Cultural Diversity (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course utilizes social scientific approaches to cultural diversity in the United States to develop a critical understanding of the geography of our unequal society. We examine why humans spatially segregate themselves into racial, ethnic, and cultural groups, how meaning is constructed around these differences, and how the politics of difference are expressed geographically. Credit will not be granted if already received for GEOG 2405
GEOG 4393 - Political Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the geography of social power from international geopolitics, to protest politics in public space, to theories of hetero-normativity and patriarchy. The central focus of this course is the spatial organization of politics, i.e., how people organize themselves into groups, and how those groups police themselves and vie with each other in various places and at multiple scales. prereq: Minimum 60 credits including or instructor consent
HIST 1304 - US History Part I: 1607-1877 (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Evolution of the United States from colonial origins into a modern nation. Frontier and agrarian heritage, constitutional development, emergence of modern U.S. political system, expansion of democracy, and cultural diversity. Colonial period to 1877.
HIST 1305 - US History Part II: 1865-Present (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical roots of major challenges facing Americans today: global responsibility as a world power; the quest for political, economic, and social justice; and community and family changes in modern society; 1877 to present.
HIST 2350 - Nutrition and American History (HUMANITIES, SUSTAIN)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is unique in its joint appeal to students of history and student of biology, as well students from other related fields in the humanities and the sciences. Students will be exposed to cutting-edge research linking the study of early American history, American Indian history, the history of American ecology, modern nutritional science, and the development of immunity to disease. Students will be required to understand the ways in which published scientific data and research can inform historical case studies of the encounter between colonial Americans, American Indians, and European from the fifteenth century to the twentieth century and vice versa. Students will be introduced to contemporary debates on the relationship between nutritional science and human immunity, using the to understand the history of colonial American and American Indian health, farming, hunting, and ecology following European contact. These histories, in turn, will illuminate their reading of scientific papers and research. pre-req:
HIST 3939 - Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social, economic, political, and cultural development of Europe from the Black Death to the Thirty Years' War. Central themes include Renaissance humanism and art, Columbus and European expansion, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, and the era of religious wars. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3239
LING 1811 - Introduction to Linguistics (LE CAT2, LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Provides an introduction to a theoretical study of the nature of natural language, using examples primarily from present-day English. Students are expected to learn analytical skills to understand how human languages (and the human mind) work and how the sub-components (sounds, words, sentences and meaning) of natural languages are systematically organized.
POL 1500 - Introduction to Comparative Politics (LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of the politics of countries selected to reflect alternative styles of politics and forms of government; examples of Western liberal democratic, Communist and post-Communist, and Third World systems.
POL 3515 - Theories of Comparative Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1500, 45 cr including 8 cr social sciences or instructor consent
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduces the theoretical, methodological, and substantive debates in the discipline of Comparative Politics. prereq: 1500, 45 cr including 8 cr social sciences or instructor consent
POL 3600 - Political Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental political themes and concepts in political theory, including but not limited to justice, liberty, equality, power, democracy, political obligation, and community. Perspectives of diverse political philosophies and cultures may be addressed. prereq: 45 credits or instructor consent
SOC 4949 - Race and Ethnic Relations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Overview of race and ethnic relations in America; conditions of major racial and ethnic minorities; formation of racial/ethnic identities, sources of prejudice, discrimination; intergroup conflict; assimilation, persistence of ethnicity; intergroup diversity; major racial and ethnic groups; the new immigrants. prereq: 1101 or CRIM 1301 or CSt 1101 or Anth 1604, 60 cr, or instructor consent
SW 1619 - Race, Class, and Gender in the United States (LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Race, class, and gender as pivotal dimensions in American society. Similarities and differences between groups, dynamics of discrimination, and efforts to meet needs and achieve potential for all groups in America.
WS 2101 - Women, Race, and Class (LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Racism, sexism, and classism are major factors which have influenced human relations from past to present. This course examines how the social-historical construction of race, class and gender continues to affect the experience of all people in particular people of color. This course seeks to enable students to understand the processes through which these social oppressions are created, normalized, internalized, maintained and perpetuated. A core element to this course is provoking students to recognize their own contribution in perpetuating oppressive systems, and their responsibility creatively to develop individual and collective acts of resistance to all of the "isms" and to societal transformation towards the just society.