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Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature B.A.

Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2017
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 32
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
Courses in the Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature (CSCL) pursue questions and ways of knowing that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries. Students study literature, film, and culture as sets of complex connections and interrelations: between texts and everyday life, ideas and the material world, discourse and power. The CSCL major strives for a broad, international scope, ranging widely across history and geography. The central focus is on the ways literature and culture, broadly conceived, disseminate, challenge and reinvent modes of knowing, value systems and individual and collectives identities. The program’s goal is to produce critical and self-critical readers prepared to actively participate in the intellectual conversations, forms of artistic expression and social struggles that shape global culture in our time.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
CLA BA degrees require 4 semesters or the equivalent of a second language. CLA BA degrees require 18 upper-division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature BA is CSCL. Students must complete a minimum of 10 courses for the major: 2 introductory (1xxx) courses, plus 7 upper division courses. To allow for flexibility, the tenth course may be taken at any level. At least one upper division course in the major must be writing intensive. In exceptional cases, courses from other units may be substituted for department major courses if approved by the undergraduate adviser or the director of undergraduate studies. All major coursework must be taken A-F. Students may earn a BA or a minor in cultural studies and comparative literature, but not both. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First Year Experience course sequence.
Preparatory Courses
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 6 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· CSCL 1001 - Introduction to Cultural Studies: Rhetoric, Power, Desire [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1101 - Literature [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1301W - Reading Culture: Theory and Practice [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1401W - Reading Literature: Theory and Practice [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1501W - Reading History: Theory and Practice [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1201W - Cinema [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or SCMC 1201W - Cinema [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or SCMC 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
Major Courses
Take at least 1 course from at least 3 of the 4 subfields: Discursive Practices and Genres, Subjectivity and History, Ideologies and Disciplines, and Critical Theories and Methods. The remaining courses can be taken in the subfields, or from the Electives course group. At least 5 classes must be 3xxx, and at least 2 courses must be 4xxx or 5xxx. Depending on whether a student takes 6-8 credits of Preparatory Courses, students will need 24-26 credits of Major Courses.
Take 24 - 26 credit(s) from the following:
The Subfields
Take 3 or more course(s) from the following:
Discursive Practices and Genres
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· CSCL 3120 - Poetry as Cultural Critique (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3122 - Reading Literary Movements [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3173W - The Rhetoric of Everyday Life [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3175 - Comedy: Text and Theory [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3177 - On Television [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3212W - Documentary Cinema: History and Politics [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 3250 - Music as Discourse [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3220 - Screen Cultures (3.0 cr)
or SCMC 3220 - Screen Cultures (3.0 cr)
· Subjectivity and History
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· CSCL 3130W - Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures and Theory: 1700 to the Present [LITR, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3352 - Queer Aesthetics, Queer Critique (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3458W - The Body and the Politics of Representation [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3461 - Monsters, Robots, Cyborgs [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3465 - Aliens [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Ideologies and Disciplines
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· CSCL 3115 - Cinema and Ideology [AH] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 3176 - Oppositional Cinemas [GP] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· Critical Theories and Methods
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· CSCL 3005 - Seminar in Critical Thought (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3110 - Basic Concepts of Literary Study (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3311W - Theories of Culture [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3331 - Science and Culture [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3405 - Marx for Today (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3412W - Psychoanalysis and Literature Part I: The Essential Freud [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3413W - Psychoanalysis and Literature Part II: Post Freudian Criticism [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3111W - Close Reading [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Electives
1xxx-level Electives
Courses that were taken to fulfill the Preparatory Courses requirement cannot also count towards the Electives course group.
Take no more than 1 course(s) from the following:
· CSCL 1001 - Introduction to Cultural Studies: Rhetoric, Power, Desire [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1101 - Literature [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1301W - Reading Culture: Theory and Practice [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1401W - Reading Literature: Theory and Practice [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1501W - Reading History: Theory and Practice [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1201W - Cinema [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or SCMC 1201W - Cinema [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or SCMC 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
4xxx and 5xxx-level Electives
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CSCL 5305 - Vision and Visuality: An Intellectual History (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5331 - Discourse of the Novel (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5411 - Avant-Garde Cinema (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 5666 - Film Music: Theory, History, Practice (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 5800 {Inactive} (1.0 cr)
· CSCL 5833 - Marx, Freud, Nietzsche: Intellectual Foundations (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750 (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750 (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5401 - Origins of Cultural Studies (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 5501 - Origins of Cultural Studies (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5555 - Introduction to Semiotics (3.0 cr)
or CL 5555 - Introduction to Semiotics (3.0 cr)
or CSDS 5555 - Introduction to Semiotics (3.0 cr)
Directed Study, Internships, and Topics
Students may count a maximum of 3 directed studies courses, internships, and topics courses toward the major. No more than 2 topics courses may count, and no more than 2 directed studies/internships may count.
Take no more than 3 course(s) from the following:
Directed Study/Internship
For both internships and directed studies, students work with a faculty member of their choice to complete and submit a Faculty/Student Contract outlining the goals and scope of coursework. The course number of the internship or directed study should be selected appropriate to the home department (3993, 4993, or 5993).
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· CSCL 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· CSCL 4944H - Honors Thesis (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· CSDS 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· Topics
With prior written approval from the CSCL undergraduate adviser or director of undergraduate studies, topics courses may count towards a subfield above.
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· CSCL 3910 - Topics in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3910H - Topics in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature: Honors (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5910 - Topics in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature (3.0-4.0 cr)
· CL 5910 - Topics in Comparative Literature (3.0-4.0 cr)
Senior Project
The senior project requirement is fulfilled by completing one of the following options as part of the 32-credit graduation minimum:
Take 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· (1) Completion of a project within a directed study (CSCL 3993, 4993, 5993)
· (2) Completion of a project within a 3xxx or 4xxx course (arrangement with instructor)
· (3) Completion of coursework, including substantial writing, in any CSCL 5xxx course
· (4) Completion of an Honors thesis or project (CSCL 4944H)
· CSCL 4944H - Honors Thesis (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· CSCL 3130W - Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures and Theory: 1700 to the Present [LITR, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3173W - The Rhetoric of Everyday Life [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3212W - Documentary Cinema: History and Politics [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 3311W - Theories of Culture [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3412W - Psychoanalysis and Literature Part I: The Essential Freud [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3413W - Psychoanalysis and Literature Part II: Post Freudian Criticism [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3458W - The Body and the Politics of Representation [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3111W - Close Reading [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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CSCL 1001 - Introduction to Cultural Studies: Rhetoric, Power, Desire (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ways of reading texts, artistic forms, everyday practices that define ongoing conflicts over meaning, value, truth. Examples from visual arts, music, film, literature, myth, ritual, built environment.
CSCL 1101 - Literature (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to literature across time, national boundaries. Basic genres, including poetry, novel, drama, historical/philosophical writing. Key questions: What is literature? What forms does it take? Why does literature matter?
CSCL 1301W - Reading Culture: Theory and Practice (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Culture and cultural conflict. Reading cultural theory/texts such as film, literature, music, fashion, commercial art, and built environment.
CSCL 1401W - Reading Literature: Theory and Practice (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How can we read/understand different ways that literature is meaningful? Emphasizes practice in reading a broad spectrum of world literature, literary theory.
CSCL 1501W - Reading History: Theory and Practice (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
What is history? How can we understand its meanings/uses? Emphasizes practice in reading cultural texts from various historical perspectives.
CSCL 1201W - Cinema (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00388 - ArtH 1921W/CSCL 1201W/SCMC 120
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical study of the visual in modernity, presented through sustained analysis of the cinema and cinematic codes. Emphases on formal film analysis and major film movements and conventions in the international history of cinema. Students develop a vocabulary for formal visual analysis and explore major theories of the cinema. *Students will not receive credit for CSCL 1201W if they have already taken SCMC 1201W, ARTH 1921W, CSCL 1921W, CSCL 1201 or SCMC 1201
SCMC 1201W - Cinema (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00388 - ArtH 1921W/CSCL 1201W/SCMC 120
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical study of the visual in modernity, presented through sustained analysis of the cinema and cinematic codes. Emphases on formal film analysis and major film movements and conventions in the international history of cinema. Students develop a vocabulary for formal visual analysis and explore major theories of the cinema. *Students will not receive credit for CSCL 1201W if they have already taken SCMC 1201W, ARTH 1921W, CSCL 1921W, CSCL 1201 or SCMC 1201
CSCL 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02316 - CSCL 1202W/SCMC 1202W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical and theoretical study of media and technology from Aristotle to the modern world. The first half of the course emphasizes theoretical readings in dialogue with historical apparatuses (printing press, photography, radio, cinema, television) and various expressive objects (the bible, early film, ethnographic sound recordings). The second half turns to the modern culture industry since World War II, and introduces students to the critical study of mass culture, the concept of ideology, and of the relationship between corporate power and media conglomerates.
SCMC 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02316 - CSCL 1202W/SCMC 1202W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical and theoretical study of media and technology from Aristotle to the modern world. The first half of the course emphasizes theoretical readings in dialogue with historical apparatuses (printing press, photography, radio, cinema, television) and various expressive objects (the bible, early film, ethnographic sound recordings). The second half turns to the modern culture industry since World War II, and introduces students to the critical study of mass culture, the concept of ideology, and of the relationship between corporate power and media conglomerates.
CSCL 3120 - Poetry as Cultural Critique
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examines the status of "poetry" in several cultures of the Americas bringing together techniques of close reading and broad cultural inquiry.
CSCL 3122 - Reading Literary Movements (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Literary movements that emerge when group of writers puts forth new definition of literature. Literary movements created by scholars after the fact. Focuses on one or two related movements (e.g., surrealism, dadaism).
CSCL 3173W - The Rhetoric of Everyday Life (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How discourse reproduces consciousness and persuades us to accept that consciousness and the power supporting it. Literary language, advertising, electronic media; film, visual and musical arts, built environment and performance. Techniques for analyzing language, material culture, and performance.
CSCL 3175 - Comedy: Text and Theory (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comedy as a discursive/political practice. Jokes, stand-up routines, plays, films, satire, and social ritual. Philosophical, literary, psychological, anthropological, feminist, and postmodern theory.
CSCL 3177 - On Television (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Key debates in the history, theory, and criticism of television. Focuses on critical/creative "readings" of television's past/present forms. TV's influence on film, music, and digital media.
CSCL 3212W - Documentary Cinema: History and Politics (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Documentary cinema from its emergence in 1920s to present. Complex power relations between filmmakers and their subjects. Political appropriations of the genre.
CSCL 3250 - Music as Discourse (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Close examination of widely varying musical forms and styles, "classical" and "popular," in relation to human subjectivity and configurations of culture, ideology, and power.
CSCL 3220 - Screen Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01516
Typically offered: Every Spring
Study of the ways that technologies of film, television, and computing have shaped the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, especially our forms of cultural expression and identity. These topics are approached from both critical and historical perspectives in order to explore the complex relationship between media technologies and audiences.
SCMC 3220 - Screen Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01516
Typically offered: Every Spring
Study of the ways that technologies of film, television, and computing have shaped the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, especially our forms of cultural expression and identity. These topics are approached from both critical and historical perspectives in order to explore the complex relationship between media technologies and audiences.
CSCL 3130W - Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures and Theory: 1700 to the Present (LITR, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Readings in colonial/postcolonial literatures/theory from at least two world regions: Africa, the Americas, the Arab world, Asia, Europe, and the Pacific. Cultural/psychological dynamics and political economy of world under empire, decolonization, pre- vs. post-coloniality, globalization.
CSCL 3352 - Queer Aesthetics, Queer Critique
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Is there such a thing as global queer aesthetic? If so, how do various modes of representation and expression—paintings and photographs, films and videos, novels and poems, pop music and punk—elaborate and enact queerness in particular material ways while also helping to create a larger, intermedial queer culture?
CSCL 3458W - The Body and the Politics of Representation (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Western representation of the human body, 1500 to present. Body's appearance as a site and sight for production of social and cultural difference (race, ethnicity, class, gender). Visual arts, literature, music, medical treatises, courtesy literature, erotica.
CSCL 3461 - Monsters, Robots, Cyborgs (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical/critical reading of figures (e.g., uncanny double, monstrous aberration, technological hybrid) in mythology, literature, and film, from classical epic to sci-fi, cyberpunk, and Web.
CSCL 3465 - Aliens (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Do interactions with people from other countries affect fears, anxieties, and desires about beings from other worlds? In whose interests are "aliens" used? Novels, radio broadcasts, and films considered from perspectives of sociology, philosophy, psychology, literary criticism, and history.
CSCL 3456W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01555 - CSCL 3456W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01555 - CSCL 3456W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
CSCL 3115 - Cinema and Ideology (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The cinema as a social institution with emphasis on the complex relations it maintains with the ideological practices that define both the form and the content of its products. Specific films used to study how mass culture contributes to the process of shaping beliefs and identities of citizens.
CSCL 3176 - Oppositional Cinemas (GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The ways diverse national cinemas engage the international hegemony of Hollywood cinema. The cinematic struggle against cultural imperialism and the role of race, class, and gender in the domain of international cultural politics.
CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Scientific and cultural theory concerning the organization of nature, human nature, and their significance for development of ethics, religion, political/economic philosophy, civics, and environmentalism in Western/other civilizations.
CSCL 3005 - Seminar in Critical Thought
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Exploration of concepts and problems foundational to the practice of critique. Focus on paradigmatic concerns and shifts underpinning humanistic inquiry, from the past to the present, such as representation, narrative, ideology, subjectivity, power and violence, and transformation. Groundwork for understanding the European critical tradition and key challenges from non-European sources.
CSCL 3110 - Basic Concepts of Literary Study
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts used when carrying out work of reading/interpretation. How analysis works: aspects of distinction between text text/context, other concepts. How to understand/justify literary interpretation. Course does not engage in the reading of literature.
CSCL 3311W - Theories of Culture (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examination of three prevalent theoretical perspectives on culture -- philosophical, anthropological, and aesthetic -- as they converge in the work of writers who have contributed to our contemporary conception of cultural diversity.
CSCL 3331 - Science and Culture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Science and technology engaged through historical and cultural manifestations from film, literature, and YouTube to scientific and philosophical essays. Relations among humanities, science, economics, politics, philosophy and history. Psychiatry and drugs, food and agriculture, sexuality, religion and science, climate change.
CSCL 3405 - Marx for Today
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides students with an introduction to Marxist theory, with particular attention to its relevance for the contemporary world. The first half of the course will focus on Marx’s writings, and the second half will turn to a range of applications and case studies. Among the many topics to be considered include topics like labour, production, consumption, primitive accumulation, the commodity, surplus value, the falling rate of profit, rent, crisis, money, imperialism, ideology, fetishism, finance capital, neoliberalism and debt. Students will be required to take two exams, in addition to completing a final paper. It is a discussion-based course, and active participation, close reading, and analytical writing will be expected.
CSCL 3412W - Psychoanalysis and Literature Part I: The Essential Freud (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical writings of Sigmund Freud; basic concepts of psychoanalytic criticism; dream and interpretation; genre of the case study; Freud's ideas concerning the constitution of ethnicity, culture, identity, and gender; fantasy vs. reality; psychoanalysis of the author/character/culture.
CSCL 3413W - Psychoanalysis and Literature Part II: Post Freudian Criticism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Impact of psychoanalytic discourses on literary studies and vice versa. Archetypal of Jung; structural of Lacan; post-structural of Derrida and Kristeva; feminist psychoanalysis of Mitchell; self/object of Kernberg and Kohut; the unconscious and society of Deleuze and Guattari.
CSCL 3111W - Close Reading (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
History/theory of 'close reading' (i.e., the most intense encounter between reader and text) exemplified through critical texts. Students perform close readings of various texts.
CSCL 1001 - Introduction to Cultural Studies: Rhetoric, Power, Desire (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ways of reading texts, artistic forms, everyday practices that define ongoing conflicts over meaning, value, truth. Examples from visual arts, music, film, literature, myth, ritual, built environment.
CSCL 1101 - Literature (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to literature across time, national boundaries. Basic genres, including poetry, novel, drama, historical/philosophical writing. Key questions: What is literature? What forms does it take? Why does literature matter?
CSCL 1301W - Reading Culture: Theory and Practice (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Culture and cultural conflict. Reading cultural theory/texts such as film, literature, music, fashion, commercial art, and built environment.
CSCL 1401W - Reading Literature: Theory and Practice (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How can we read/understand different ways that literature is meaningful? Emphasizes practice in reading a broad spectrum of world literature, literary theory.
CSCL 1501W - Reading History: Theory and Practice (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
What is history? How can we understand its meanings/uses? Emphasizes practice in reading cultural texts from various historical perspectives.
CSCL 1201W - Cinema (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00388 - ArtH 1921W/CSCL 1201W/SCMC 120
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical study of the visual in modernity, presented through sustained analysis of the cinema and cinematic codes. Emphases on formal film analysis and major film movements and conventions in the international history of cinema. Students develop a vocabulary for formal visual analysis and explore major theories of the cinema. *Students will not receive credit for CSCL 1201W if they have already taken SCMC 1201W, ARTH 1921W, CSCL 1921W, CSCL 1201 or SCMC 1201
SCMC 1201W - Cinema (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00388 - ArtH 1921W/CSCL 1201W/SCMC 120
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical study of the visual in modernity, presented through sustained analysis of the cinema and cinematic codes. Emphases on formal film analysis and major film movements and conventions in the international history of cinema. Students develop a vocabulary for formal visual analysis and explore major theories of the cinema. *Students will not receive credit for CSCL 1201W if they have already taken SCMC 1201W, ARTH 1921W, CSCL 1921W, CSCL 1201 or SCMC 1201
CSCL 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02316 - CSCL 1202W/SCMC 1202W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical and theoretical study of media and technology from Aristotle to the modern world. The first half of the course emphasizes theoretical readings in dialogue with historical apparatuses (printing press, photography, radio, cinema, television) and various expressive objects (the bible, early film, ethnographic sound recordings). The second half turns to the modern culture industry since World War II, and introduces students to the critical study of mass culture, the concept of ideology, and of the relationship between corporate power and media conglomerates.
SCMC 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02316 - CSCL 1202W/SCMC 1202W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical and theoretical study of media and technology from Aristotle to the modern world. The first half of the course emphasizes theoretical readings in dialogue with historical apparatuses (printing press, photography, radio, cinema, television) and various expressive objects (the bible, early film, ethnographic sound recordings). The second half turns to the modern culture industry since World War II, and introduces students to the critical study of mass culture, the concept of ideology, and of the relationship between corporate power and media conglomerates.
CSCL 5305 - Vision and Visuality: An Intellectual History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02553 - CL 5305/CSCL 5305/CSDS 5305
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Central role of vision/visuality in modernity. Modern age as scopic regime. Ways that ideas/ideologies of perception have shaped aesthetic experience within social existence.
CSCL 5331 - Discourse of the Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01029 - CLit 5331/CSCL 5331
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Comparative study of the novel, 18th century to present. Its relations to ordinary language practices, emergent reading publics, technologies of cultural dissemination, problems of subjectivity, and its role in articulating international cultural relations.
CSCL 5411 - Avant-Garde Cinema
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
History/theory of avant-garde cinema, from classical period (1920s) to post-WWII. prereq: 1921 or ARTH 1921W or equiv
CSCL 5666 - Film Music: Theory, History, Practice
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Role of music in American/European film from early 20th century silent cinema to near present. Narrative features, shorts, documentary, horror, thriller, science fiction, comedy, cartoon. Film music as social/cultural practice and as part of political economy within culture industry.
CSCL 5833 - Marx, Freud, Nietzsche: Intellectual Foundations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Three thinkers who defined modernity: Marx, Freud, and Nietzsche. Central tenets of their thought/terms associated with their theories. Their careers portrayed against the background of their times; their place in intellectual history.
CSCL 5281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02231 - CSCL 3281/CSCL 528/1Hist 3281/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
First of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings from original sources.
HIST 5281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02231 - CSCL 3281/CSCL 528/1Hist 3281/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
First of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings from original sources. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
CSCL 5282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02232 - CSCL 3282/CSCL 5282/Hist 3282/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Second of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings are from original sources.
HIST 5282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02232 - CSCL 3282/CSCL 5282/Hist 3282/
Prerequisites: Grad student or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Second of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings are from original sources. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
CSCL 5401 - Origins of Cultural Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02380 - CL 5401/CSCL 5401/CSDS 5401/En
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Intellectual map of the creation of cultural studies as a unique approach to studying social meanings. Key figures and concepts, including nineteenth- and early twentieth century precursors.
ENGL 5501 - Origins of Cultural Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02380 - CL 5401/CSCL 5401/EngL 5401/CS
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Intellectual map of the creation of cultural studies as a unique approach to studying social meanings. Key figures and concepts, including nineteenth- and early twentieth century precursors.
CSCL 5555 - Introduction to Semiotics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01045 - CL 5555/CSCL 5555/CSDS 5555
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Problems of the nature of the sign; sign function; sign production; signifying systems as articulated in philosophy, linguistics, anthropology, psychoanalysis, and art theory. Application of semiotics to various signifying practices (literature, cinema, daily life).
CL 5555 - Introduction to Semiotics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01045 - CLit 5555/CSCL 5555
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Problems of the nature of the sign; sign function; sign production; signifying systems as articulated in philosophy, linguistics, anthropology, psychoanalysis, and art theory. Applying semiotics to various signifying practices (e.g., literature, cinema, daily life).
CSDS 5555 - Introduction to Semiotics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01045 - CL 5555/CSCL 5555/CSDS 5555
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Problems of the sign. Sign function/production. Signifying systems as articulated in philosophy, linguistics, anthropology, psychoanalysis, and art theory. Applying semiotics to various signifying practices (e.g., literature, cinema, daily life).
CSCL 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
CSCL 4944H - Honors Thesis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Honors thesis. prereq: Candidate for honors in CSCL, consent of CSCL honors adviser
CSCL 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual study.
CSCL 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
CSDS 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual reading and study. prereq: instr consent
CSCL 3910 - Topics in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 24.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
CSCL 3910H - Topics in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature: Honors
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
CSCL 5910 - Topics in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 32.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
CL 5910 - Topics in Comparative Literature
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 32.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
CSCL 4944H - Honors Thesis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Honors thesis. prereq: Candidate for honors in CSCL, consent of CSCL honors adviser
CSCL 3130W - Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures and Theory: 1700 to the Present (LITR, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Readings in colonial/postcolonial literatures/theory from at least two world regions: Africa, the Americas, the Arab world, Asia, Europe, and the Pacific. Cultural/psychological dynamics and political economy of world under empire, decolonization, pre- vs. post-coloniality, globalization.
CSCL 3173W - The Rhetoric of Everyday Life (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How discourse reproduces consciousness and persuades us to accept that consciousness and the power supporting it. Literary language, advertising, electronic media; film, visual and musical arts, built environment and performance. Techniques for analyzing language, material culture, and performance.
CSCL 3212W - Documentary Cinema: History and Politics (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Documentary cinema from its emergence in 1920s to present. Complex power relations between filmmakers and their subjects. Political appropriations of the genre.
CSCL 3311W - Theories of Culture (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examination of three prevalent theoretical perspectives on culture -- philosophical, anthropological, and aesthetic -- as they converge in the work of writers who have contributed to our contemporary conception of cultural diversity.
CSCL 3412W - Psychoanalysis and Literature Part I: The Essential Freud (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical writings of Sigmund Freud; basic concepts of psychoanalytic criticism; dream and interpretation; genre of the case study; Freud's ideas concerning the constitution of ethnicity, culture, identity, and gender; fantasy vs. reality; psychoanalysis of the author/character/culture.
CSCL 3413W - Psychoanalysis and Literature Part II: Post Freudian Criticism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Impact of psychoanalytic discourses on literary studies and vice versa. Archetypal of Jung; structural of Lacan; post-structural of Derrida and Kristeva; feminist psychoanalysis of Mitchell; self/object of Kernberg and Kohut; the unconscious and society of Deleuze and Guattari.
CSCL 3458W - The Body and the Politics of Representation (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Western representation of the human body, 1500 to present. Body's appearance as a site and sight for production of social and cultural difference (race, ethnicity, class, gender). Visual arts, literature, music, medical treatises, courtesy literature, erotica.
CSCL 3111W - Close Reading (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
History/theory of 'close reading' (i.e., the most intense encounter between reader and text) exemplified through critical texts. Students perform close readings of various texts.
CSCL 3456W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01555 - CSCL 3456W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01555 - CSCL 3456W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.