Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Epidemiology Ph.D.

School of Public Health - Adm
School of Public Health
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
School of Public Health, MMC 819, A395 Mayo Memorial Building, 420 Delaware Street, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-626-3500 OR 1-800-774-8636)
  • Program Type: Doctorate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2020
  • Length of program in credits: 51 to 61
  • This program requires summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Doctor of Philosophy
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The Epidemiology PhD program is designed for students interested in research and teaching careers in the health sciences. Students select one of two formal tracks: clinical/biological epidemiology (CBE) or social/behavioral epidemiology (SBE). The two tracks, each with a minimum of 61 credits, emphasize advanced epidemiologic design, methodology, and analytic skills. The CBE track focuses on the etiology of diseases, particularly cardiovascular, cancer, genetics, and infectious diseases. The SBE track focuses on origins and development of human behavior patterns and how they are influenced and formed by personality, family, culture, and environment.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.00.
Applicants must be in process, or have completed, a master's degree in a related field.
Special Application Requirements:
Strong quantitative aptitude, demonstrated by scoring at or above the 70th percentile on the quantitative section of the GRE, along with satisfactory grades in college-level quantitative courses. At least three recommendations (form and separate letter) from faculty and/or work supervisors with knowledge of the applicant's scholastic and professional capabilities and potential; Statement of goals and objectives (letter of intent) for seeking a career in epidemiology. In addition, applicants must submit a separate essay (statement of research interests) beyond what is required for the SOPHAS application process that provides evidence of their potential to conduct original research in a specific epidemiologic area and, if possible, indicates an interest in particular methodologies or study designs. Serious applicants are encouraged to contact the program coordinator at epichstu@umn.edu before applying. Students begin their studies in the fall semester. Applications must be completed by December 1 of the year prior to beginning the doctoral program for scholarship consideration; the final deadline is February 1.
Applicants must submit their test score(s) from the following:
  • GRE
    • General Test - Analytical Writing: 4.0
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 100
    • Paper Based - Total Score: 600
  • IELTS
    • Total Score: 7.0
  • MELAB
    • Final score: 80
Key to test abbreviations (GRE, TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
27 to 37 credits are required in the major.
24 thesis credits are required.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
A minimum GPA of 3.25 is required for students to remain in good standing.
At least 2 semesters must be completed before filing a Degree Program Form.
Courses must be taken A/F, unless offered only S/N. The minimum grade required for each A/F-graded course is B-. Students pursuing the joint MD/PhD-Epidemiology program are required to complete 3 elective credits rather than the 13 required of other Epidemiology doctoral students.
Core Coursework (13 credits)
Take the following courses:
PUBH 6348 - Writing Research Grants (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6742 - Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7401 - Fundamentals of Biostatistical Inference (4.0 cr)
PUBH 8341 - Advanced Epidemiologic Methods: Concepts (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8342 - Advanced Epidemiologic Methods: Applications (3.0 cr)
Teaching Course (1-3 credits)
Select one of the following, in consultation with the advisor. Students choosing GRAD 8200 must complete it with the following topic, 'Teaching & Learning: An Online Course'.
GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education (3.0 cr)
or GRAD 8200 - Teaching and Learning Topics in Higher Education (1.0 cr)
Thesis Credits
Take at least 24 doctoral thesis credits.
PUBH 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral (1.0-24.0 cr)
Joint- or Dual-degree Coursework:
MD/PhD-Epidemiology
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
Clinical/Biological Epidemiology
Clinical/Biological Track (13-23 credits)
Biological Methods/Statistics Courses (3 credits)
Select one of the following 3-credit courses in consultation with the advisor:
PUBH 6363 - Design and Analysis of Cluster-Randomized Trials in Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7420 - Clinical Trials: Design, Implementation, and Analysis (3.0 cr)
Select at least 3 credits from the following courses in consultation with advisor:
PUBH 6915 - Nutrition Assessment (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7402 - Biostatistics Modeling and Methods (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7405 - Biostatistics: Regression (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7406 - Advanced Regression and Design (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7445 - Statistics for Human Genetics and Molecular Biology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8141 - Doctoral Seminar in Observational Inference (2.0 cr)
PUBH 8300 - Topics: Epidemiology (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 8343 - Synthesis and Application of Methods in Epidemiologic Research (4.0 cr)
PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar (3.0 cr)
Content Area Courses (2-4 credits)
Students pursuing the joint MD/PhD degree select at least 2 credits in consultation with the advisor. All other students complete at least 4 credits.
PUBH 6140 - Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6381 - Genetics in Public Health in the Age of Precision Medicine (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6385 - Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6386 - Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6387 - Cancer Epidemiology (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6389 - Nutritional Epidemiology (2.0 cr)
Electives (5-13 credits)
Students pursuing the joint MD/PhD degree select at least 5 elective credits in consultation with the advisor. All other students complete at least 13 elective credits.
PUBH 6355 - Pathophysiology of Human Disease (4.0 cr)
PUBH 6375 - Screening for Disease: a Double-Edged Sword? (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6383 - Vaccines (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7391 - Independent Study: Epidemiology (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 7392 - Readings in Epidemiology (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 7405 - Biostatistics: Regression (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7406 - Advanced Regression and Design (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7445 - Statistics for Human Genetics and Molecular Biology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7450 - Survival Analysis (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8300 - Topics: Epidemiology (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 8343 - Synthesis and Application of Methods in Epidemiologic Research (4.0 cr)
VMED 5180 - Ecology of Infectious Disease (3.0 cr)
VMED 8090 - Epidemiology of Zoonoses and Diseases Common to Animals and Humans (3.0 cr)
Social/Behavioral Epidemiology
Social/Behavioral Track (13-23 credits)
Behavioral Methods/Statistics Courses (3 credits)
Select one of the following 3-credit courses in consultation with the advisor:
PUBH 6363 - Design and Analysis of Cluster-Randomized Trials in Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
or PUBH 7420 - Clinical Trials: Design, Implementation, and Analysis (3.0 cr)
Select at least 3 credits from the following courses, in consultation with the advisor:
PUBH 6915 - Nutrition Assessment (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7402 - Biostatistics Modeling and Methods (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7405 - Biostatistics: Regression (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7406 - Advanced Regression and Design (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8300 - Topics: Epidemiology (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 8343 - Synthesis and Application of Methods in Epidemiologic Research (4.0 cr)
PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar (3.0 cr)
Content Area Courses (4 credits)
Take the following courses:
PUBH 6333 - Principles of Human Behavior I (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6334 - Human Behavior II (2.0 cr)
Electives (3-13 credits)
Students pursuing the joint MD/PhD degree select at least 3 elective credits in consultation with the advisor. All other students complete at least 13 elective credits.
PUBH 6074 - Mass Communication and Public Health (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6078 - Public Health Policy as a Prevention Strategy (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6094 - Obesity and Eating Disorder Interventions (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6370 - Social Epidemiology (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6375 - Screening for Disease: a Double-Edged Sword? (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6381 - Genetics in Public Health in the Age of Precision Medicine (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6383 - Vaccines (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6385 - Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6386 - Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6387 - Cancer Epidemiology (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7391 - Independent Study: Epidemiology (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 7392 - Readings in Epidemiology (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 7405 - Biostatistics: Regression (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7406 - Advanced Regression and Design (4.0 cr)
PUBH 8300 - Topics: Epidemiology (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 8343 - Synthesis and Application of Methods in Epidemiologic Research (4.0 cr)
 
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PUBH 6348 - Writing Research Grants
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Focuses on NIH research grants. Mechanisms of grant writing: specific aims, hypotheses, innovation, background, approaches, evaluation analyses, principles of informed consent, budget development, and grant-review process.
PUBH 6742 - Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to ethical issues in public health research/policy. Ethical analysis. Recognizing/analyzing moral issues.
PUBH 7401 - Fundamentals of Biostatistical Inference
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Part of two-course sequence intended for PhD students in School of Public Health who need rigorous approach to probability/statistics/statistical inference with applications to research in public health. prereq: Background in calculus; intended for PhD students in public hlth and other hlth sci who need rigorous approach to probability/statistics and statistical inference with applications to research in public hlth
PUBH 8341 - Advanced Epidemiologic Methods: Concepts
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual foundations of fundamental issues in epidemiologic methodology. How/why a given method, design, or approach might help explain population health. Strengths, limits, and potential alternatives for a given approach.
PUBH 8342 - Advanced Epidemiologic Methods: Applications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Applied methodology course designed for students in the Epi PhD program. Examples and readings are aimed at clinical/biological and social/behavioral track students.
GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Teaching methods/techniques. Active learning, critical thinking, practice teaching, and preparing a portfolio to document/reflect upon teaching. Readings, discussion, peer teaching, e-mail dialog, reflective writing, co-facilitation of course. prereq: Non-Degree Students: contact pffcollege consentumn.edu with questions about registration. If adding a section after first class meeting, contact your instructor as soon as you enroll.
GRAD 8200 - Teaching and Learning Topics in Higher Education
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Create course materials for context/discipline. Assess student learning. Write action plan. Topics may include active learning in sciences, teaching with technology, multicultural education, teaching in clinical settings, learning-community course design.
PUBH 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral
Credits: 1.0 -24.0 [max 100.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required; For Environmental Health Students ONLY: Contact Director of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Student Coordinator.
PUBH 6363 - Design and Analysis of Cluster-Randomized Trials in Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Community, school-based, and work-site trials. Trials involving randomization of other identifiable groups to study conditions. Experimental and quasi-experimental designs and threats to their validity.
PUBH 7420 - Clinical Trials: Design, Implementation, and Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to and methodology of randomized clinical trials. Design issues, sample size, operational details, interim monitoring, data analysis issues, overviews. prereq: 6451 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 6451 or 7406 or instr consent
PUBH 6915 - Nutrition Assessment
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: Public health nutrition major or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Common nutritional assessment using dietary, biochemical, and anthropometric approaches. Applications of methods, interpretation of results. Hands-on experience, training in common anthropometric methods. prereq: Public health nutrition major or instr consent
PUBH 7402 - Biostatistics Modeling and Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Second of two-course sequence. Rigorous approach to probability/statistics, statistical inference. Applications to research in public health. prereq: 7401; intended for PhD students in health sciences
PUBH 7405 - Biostatistics: Regression
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
T-tests, confidence intervals, power, type I/II errors. Exploratory data analysis. Simple linear regression, regression in matrix notation, multiple regression, diagnostics. Ordinary least squares, violations, generalized least squares, nonlinear least squares regression. Introduction to General linear Model. SAS and S-Plus used. prereq: [[Stat 5101 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5101], biostatistics major] or instr consent
PUBH 7406 - Advanced Regression and Design
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: [7405, [STAT 5102 or &STAT 5102], biostatistics major] or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Topics include maximum likelihood estimation, single and multifactor analysis of variance, logistic regression, log-linear models, multinomial logit models, proportional odds models for ordinal data, gamma and inverse-Gaussian models, over-dispersion, analysis of deviance, model selection and criticism, model diagnostics, and an introduction to non-parametric regression methods. R is used. prereq: [7405, [STAT 5102 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in STAT 5102], biostatistics major] or instr consent
PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated data arise in many situations, particularly when observations are made over time and space or on individuals who share certain underlying characteristics. This course covers techniques for exploring and describing correlated data, along with statistical methods for estimating population parameters (mostly means) from these data. The focus will be primarily on generalized linear models (both with and without random effects) for normally and non-normally distributed data. Wherever possible, techniques will be illustrated using real-world examples. Computing will be done using R and SAS.
PUBH 7445 - Statistics for Human Genetics and Molecular Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical problems arising in molecular biology. Problems in physical mapping (radiation hybrid mapping, DDP), genetic mapping (pedigree analysis, lod scores, TDT), biopolymer sequence analysis (alignment, motif recognition), and micro array analysis. prereq: [6450, [6451 or equiv]] or instr consent; background in molecular biology recommended
PUBH 8141 - Doctoral Seminar in Observational Inference
Credits: 2.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of epidemiologic inference. Methods for designing, analyzing, and interpreting epidemiologic studies.
PUBH 8300 - Topics: Epidemiology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 80.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
New course offerings or topics of interest in epidemiology.
PUBH 8343 - Synthesis and Application of Methods in Epidemiologic Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Focuses on the extension, synthesis, and integration of research methods taught in the advanced epidemiology methods sequence (PubH 8341 and PubH 8342) and the application of these methods. Discussion of novel methods such as causal inferences related to the g-formula and penalized regression. Fosters a deeper understanding of current epidemiologic methods and how they are actually implemented in research.
PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Understand/competently use advanced quantitative methods in applied social science, policy, demographic research. Methods considered largely within or related to framework of regression analysis. Effort will be made to reflect interests of class. prereq: This is an advanced, doctoral-level course. Students are expected to have completed a full year of doctoral-level introductory statistical and/or econometric classes in their respective field prior to enrolling in this course (e.g., PubH 7401-2, ApEc8211-2, SOC 8801-8811). Exceptions may be granted with instr consent.
PUBH 6140 - Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/concepts in identifying health effects in workplace. Strategies for identifying excess risk, evaluating strengths/weaknesses of research techniques, assessing bias/confounding. prereq: Coursework in epidemiology, biostatistics
PUBH 6381 - Genetics in Public Health in the Age of Precision Medicine
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Mechanisms of molecular genetics. Issues related to medical/public health genetics, including basis of human diversity, Human Genome Project, novel genetic mechanisms underlying diseases, ethical/legal issues. prereq: Grad student or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 6385 - Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles and/ methods. Strategies for disease control and prevention, including immunization. Relevance of modes of transmission of specific agents for disease spread and prevention. Public health consequences of infectious diseases at local, national, and international levels.
PUBH 6386 - Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Well-established risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), prevention of CVD, and national recommendations for treatment/prevention. Emerging risk factors, current controversies in CVD. prereq: [PubH 6320 OR 6341 AND 6450] OR [equivalent] OR [permission of instructor]
PUBH 6387 - Cancer Epidemiology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Epidemiologic aspects of cancer. Theories of carcinogenesis, patterns of incidence and mortality, site-specific risk factors. Issues of cancer control and prevention.
PUBH 6389 - Nutritional Epidemiology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Nutrition/disease relationships through application of epidemiologic methods. Characterization of various exposures to food/nutrient intakes, biological basis for nutrition/disease relationships. Studies of specific chronic diseases and nutritional intake. Design/interpretation of studies using nutritional measures. prereq: [[6320 or 6330 or 6341], [Epidemiology MPH or Public Health Nutrition MPH or Epidemiology PhD student]] or instr consent
PUBH 6355 - Pathophysiology of Human Disease
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Compendium of human diseases relevant to public health professionals. Focuses on cardiovascular disease, cancer, and infectious disease. Presented from epidemiologic perspective. Significance of diseases in terms of prevalence, incidence, morbidity, and mortality. Risk factors, prevention strategies. prereq: Epidemiology major or public health nutrition major or instr consent
PUBH 6375 - Screening for Disease: a Double-Edged Sword?
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The earliest concept of screening for disease arose in the early 1900's with the advent of x-rays, which allowed, literally, for viewing lungs on a "screen". The rise of screening has also been attributed to public health approaches that were employed to "screen" out pollutants from water or to protect from vector-borne diseases. The earliest application of x-rays was to identify tuberculosis. Use of x-rays for tuberculosis led to realization that the technology allowed for the early diagnosis of latent tuberculosis, thereby offering the opportunity for treatment and control of its spread in the population. Another early application of screening was to determine the mental health suitability of army recruits in World War I. Since the World War II era, screening for disease has become a routine part of medical care. Thirty-six of the 55 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force evidence-based recommendations with an A or B grade are for screening in areas such as cancer, pregnancy, cardiovascular disease, mental health, and obesity, among others. Despite the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force imprimatur on screening recommendations, routine screening is complicated not only by conflicting evidence of its efficacy, leading to disagreement among professional medical societies, but also by increasing recognition of potential physical and psychological harms that may outweigh benefits. In addition, social, economic and political forces shape screening application and policy decisions, such as whether or not to provide insurance coverage for screening tests. For example, the 2009 U.S. Preventive Task Force recommendations to change the age at which to begin and frequency of mammography for breast cancer led to a public outcry. Advocacy groups and professional medical societies opposed to the changes lobbied Congress to keep the old recommendations. They claimed the revised recommendations would result in unnecessary deaths. However, it should be noted that reducing mammography frequency and narrowing the age range for women to be screened would also likely reduce reimbursement for clinical screening services. The aim of this course, then, is to provide a comprehensive overview of screening methods and evaluation, and to examine the efficacy, benefits versus harms, population uptake, screening promotion, and controversies surrounding specific screening tests for various health conditions. These include, but are not limited to, cancer, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, mental health and newborn metabolic and genetic defects. Such controversies can range from overdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment, informed decision-making, screening policies, and ethical issues. The course is designed to appeal to students in Public Health, Nursing, Pharmacy, Medicine, genetic counseling and public policy.
PUBH 6383 - Vaccines
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Vaccines are one of the most successful public health interventions ever developed. Yet, fundamental misconceptions about how and why vaccines work and about the scientific evidence about their efficacy and safety limit the ability of public health professionals to prevent and control the spread of vaccine-preventable diseases. Vaccinology is the branch of infectious disease epidemiology that addresses these issues, building upon core concepts in epidemiologic methods and study designs to understand both the individual- and population-level impact of vaccines. In this graduate level course, students will focus on critical concepts and methods in epidemiology, infectious diseases, vaccinology, and public health needed to: 1) Understand the principles of infectious disease transmission dynamics that determine how and why vaccines reduce the burden of disease 2) Utilize epidemiologic methods and study designs to assess both individual and population-level vaccine efficacy/effectiveness 3) Develop and implement strategies to address the challenges of achieving and maintaining high vaccine coverage in diverse communities across the US and globally. More than 25 human diseases can be prevented by vaccination and dozens of novel and next-generation vaccines are currently under development. From ongoing efforts to eradicate polio worldwide to measles outbreaks in the US where the disease had once been eliminated to the development of fast-tracked Ebola vaccines during the West African outbreak, vaccines have taken center stage in the field of infectious diseases over the past several decades because of the incredible impact vaccines have had on saving lives, preventing disease, and preserving health. However, despite the success of vaccination programs against many serious diseases, challenges to designing, delivering, and maintaining trust in vaccines persist. Globally, vaccine-preventable diseases (pneumonia and diarrheal diseases including rotavirus) remain top causes of death in children under 5 years old. Yet vaccine access continues to be a challenge. The field of vaccinology allows us to examine, from an epidemiologic methods perspective, how and why vaccines protect individuals and populations and how and why we face challenges to achieving and maintaining high vaccine uptake among at-risk populations worldwide. In doing so, we gain the knowledge needed to develop strategies that can successfully protect all individuals from vaccine-preventable diseases. From the perspective of researchers, public health practitioners, and medical professionals, we will learn about numerous study designs to assess vaccine efficacy, effectiveness, and safety, and we will learn to apply communication skills critical to translating epidemiologic evidence about vaccines to the public. Specifically, we will draw upon the primary literature to understand concepts in infectious disease transmission dynamics, herd immunity, maternal immunity, and waning/boosting of immune responses. These concepts will set the foundation for understanding how and why vaccines protect both individuals and populations and how individuals interact with populations in complex ways. Throughout this course, we will apply principles of epidemiology and epi methods to understand how vaccines have successfully reduced the burden of disease in many different settings across the globe and to examine how the challenges of vaccine hesitancy, vaccine refusal, and lack of access threaten the advances that have been made in reducing the burden of infectious diseases. Students from many different disciplines who are interested in understanding why vaccines have been regarded as one of the greatest public health achievements of all time will gain a clear understanding of the essential role that they play in preventing disease and maintaining health populations.
PUBH 7391 - Independent Study: Epidemiology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Independent study supervised by epidemiology faculty member. prereq: [EPI major or grad student], instr consent
PUBH 7392 - Readings in Epidemiology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Current readings in epidemiology. prereq: Epidemiology major, instr consent
PUBH 7405 - Biostatistics: Regression
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
T-tests, confidence intervals, power, type I/II errors. Exploratory data analysis. Simple linear regression, regression in matrix notation, multiple regression, diagnostics. Ordinary least squares, violations, generalized least squares, nonlinear least squares regression. Introduction to General linear Model. SAS and S-Plus used. prereq: [[Stat 5101 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5101], biostatistics major] or instr consent
PUBH 7406 - Advanced Regression and Design
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: [7405, [STAT 5102 or &STAT 5102], biostatistics major] or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Topics include maximum likelihood estimation, single and multifactor analysis of variance, logistic regression, log-linear models, multinomial logit models, proportional odds models for ordinal data, gamma and inverse-Gaussian models, over-dispersion, analysis of deviance, model selection and criticism, model diagnostics, and an introduction to non-parametric regression methods. R is used. prereq: [7405, [STAT 5102 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in STAT 5102], biostatistics major] or instr consent
PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated data arise in many situations, particularly when observations are made over time and space or on individuals who share certain underlying characteristics. This course covers techniques for exploring and describing correlated data, along with statistical methods for estimating population parameters (mostly means) from these data. The focus will be primarily on generalized linear models (both with and without random effects) for normally and non-normally distributed data. Wherever possible, techniques will be illustrated using real-world examples. Computing will be done using R and SAS.
PUBH 7445 - Statistics for Human Genetics and Molecular Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical problems arising in molecular biology. Problems in physical mapping (radiation hybrid mapping, DDP), genetic mapping (pedigree analysis, lod scores, TDT), biopolymer sequence analysis (alignment, motif recognition), and micro array analysis. prereq: [6450, [6451 or equiv]] or instr consent; background in molecular biology recommended
PUBH 7450 - Survival Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 7406, [STAT 5102 or STAT 8102]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Statistical methodologies in analysis of survival data. Kaplan-Meier estimator, Cox's proportional hazards multiple regression model, time-dependent covariates, analysis of residuals, multiple failure outcomes. Typical biomedical applications, including clinical trials and person-years data. prereq: 7406, [STAT 5102 or STAT 8102]
PUBH 8300 - Topics: Epidemiology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 80.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
New course offerings or topics of interest in epidemiology.
PUBH 8343 - Synthesis and Application of Methods in Epidemiologic Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Focuses on the extension, synthesis, and integration of research methods taught in the advanced epidemiology methods sequence (PubH 8341 and PubH 8342) and the application of these methods. Discussion of novel methods such as causal inferences related to the g-formula and penalized regression. Fosters a deeper understanding of current epidemiologic methods and how they are actually implemented in research.
VMED 5180 - Ecology of Infectious Disease
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00899
Typically offered: Every Fall
How host, agent, environmental interactions influence transmission of infectious agents. Environmental dissemination, eradication/control, evolution of virulence. Use of analytical/molecular tools.
VMED 8090 - Epidemiology of Zoonoses and Diseases Common to Animals and Humans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major human zoonotic diseases, methods of transmission, diagnosis, control, and prevention. prereq: Epidemiology and infectious disease course or instr consent
PUBH 6363 - Design and Analysis of Cluster-Randomized Trials in Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Community, school-based, and work-site trials. Trials involving randomization of other identifiable groups to study conditions. Experimental and quasi-experimental designs and threats to their validity.
PUBH 7420 - Clinical Trials: Design, Implementation, and Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to and methodology of randomized clinical trials. Design issues, sample size, operational details, interim monitoring, data analysis issues, overviews. prereq: 6451 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 6451 or 7406 or instr consent
PUBH 6915 - Nutrition Assessment
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: Public health nutrition major or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Common nutritional assessment using dietary, biochemical, and anthropometric approaches. Applications of methods, interpretation of results. Hands-on experience, training in common anthropometric methods. prereq: Public health nutrition major or instr consent
PUBH 7402 - Biostatistics Modeling and Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Second of two-course sequence. Rigorous approach to probability/statistics, statistical inference. Applications to research in public health. prereq: 7401; intended for PhD students in health sciences
PUBH 7405 - Biostatistics: Regression
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
T-tests, confidence intervals, power, type I/II errors. Exploratory data analysis. Simple linear regression, regression in matrix notation, multiple regression, diagnostics. Ordinary least squares, violations, generalized least squares, nonlinear least squares regression. Introduction to General linear Model. SAS and S-Plus used. prereq: [[Stat 5101 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5101], biostatistics major] or instr consent
PUBH 7406 - Advanced Regression and Design
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: [7405, [STAT 5102 or &STAT 5102], biostatistics major] or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Topics include maximum likelihood estimation, single and multifactor analysis of variance, logistic regression, log-linear models, multinomial logit models, proportional odds models for ordinal data, gamma and inverse-Gaussian models, over-dispersion, analysis of deviance, model selection and criticism, model diagnostics, and an introduction to non-parametric regression methods. R is used. prereq: [7405, [STAT 5102 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in STAT 5102], biostatistics major] or instr consent
PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated data arise in many situations, particularly when observations are made over time and space or on individuals who share certain underlying characteristics. This course covers techniques for exploring and describing correlated data, along with statistical methods for estimating population parameters (mostly means) from these data. The focus will be primarily on generalized linear models (both with and without random effects) for normally and non-normally distributed data. Wherever possible, techniques will be illustrated using real-world examples. Computing will be done using R and SAS.
PUBH 8300 - Topics: Epidemiology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 80.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
New course offerings or topics of interest in epidemiology.
PUBH 8343 - Synthesis and Application of Methods in Epidemiologic Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Focuses on the extension, synthesis, and integration of research methods taught in the advanced epidemiology methods sequence (PubH 8341 and PubH 8342) and the application of these methods. Discussion of novel methods such as causal inferences related to the g-formula and penalized regression. Fosters a deeper understanding of current epidemiologic methods and how they are actually implemented in research.
PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Understand/competently use advanced quantitative methods in applied social science, policy, demographic research. Methods considered largely within or related to framework of regression analysis. Effort will be made to reflect interests of class. prereq: This is an advanced, doctoral-level course. Students are expected to have completed a full year of doctoral-level introductory statistical and/or econometric classes in their respective field prior to enrolling in this course (e.g., PubH 7401-2, ApEc8211-2, SOC 8801-8811). Exceptions may be granted with instr consent.
PUBH 6333 - Principles of Human Behavior I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Theoretical perspective on etiology/modification of health behavior in individuals/communities. prereq: Epi PhD student or instr consent
PUBH 6334 - Human Behavior II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Critical evaluation of major behavioral public health intervention research. Experience in research designs/methods in health behavior intervention. prereq: [6333, Epidemiology grad student in behavioral track] or instr consent
PUBH 6074 - Mass Communication and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00291
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an overview of theory and research that lies at the intersection of mass communication and public health. We examine the potential for media exposure to influence public health outcomes, both as a product of people's everyday interactions with media and the strategic use of media messages to accomplish public health goals. To this end, we will explore large-scale public health campaigns in the context of tobacco, obesity, and cancer screening. We also will explore news media coverage of controversial health issues, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, and health information in entertainment media, such as smoking in movies. This course seeks to understand whether media messages have had intended and/or unintended effects on public attitudes and behavior. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal, medical, and digital media sources will be considered as well.
PUBH 6078 - Public Health Policy as a Prevention Strategy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Philosophical, ethical, economic, political, efficacy rationale for policy approach to prevention. Historical/current application of prevention policy to public health problems. prereq: 2nd yr MPH or public health MS student or [Epi, Biostats, Env Hlth, HSRPconcurrent registration is required (or allowed) in A PhD student] or instr consent
PUBH 6094 - Obesity and Eating Disorder Interventions
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine obesity epidemic, eating disorders, prevention and treatment approaches at multiple levels (individual, social, environmental, policy), links between obesity and eating disorders.
PUBH 6370 - Social Epidemiology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
How a society's social interactions, past and present, yield differential exposures and differences in health outcomes between persons who make up populations. New disease-specific risk factors. How well-known exposures emerge and are maintained by social system.
PUBH 6375 - Screening for Disease: a Double-Edged Sword?
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The earliest concept of screening for disease arose in the early 1900's with the advent of x-rays, which allowed, literally, for viewing lungs on a "screen". The rise of screening has also been attributed to public health approaches that were employed to "screen" out pollutants from water or to protect from vector-borne diseases. The earliest application of x-rays was to identify tuberculosis. Use of x-rays for tuberculosis led to realization that the technology allowed for the early diagnosis of latent tuberculosis, thereby offering the opportunity for treatment and control of its spread in the population. Another early application of screening was to determine the mental health suitability of army recruits in World War I. Since the World War II era, screening for disease has become a routine part of medical care. Thirty-six of the 55 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force evidence-based recommendations with an A or B grade are for screening in areas such as cancer, pregnancy, cardiovascular disease, mental health, and obesity, among others. Despite the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force imprimatur on screening recommendations, routine screening is complicated not only by conflicting evidence of its efficacy, leading to disagreement among professional medical societies, but also by increasing recognition of potential physical and psychological harms that may outweigh benefits. In addition, social, economic and political forces shape screening application and policy decisions, such as whether or not to provide insurance coverage for screening tests. For example, the 2009 U.S. Preventive Task Force recommendations to change the age at which to begin and frequency of mammography for breast cancer led to a public outcry. Advocacy groups and professional medical societies opposed to the changes lobbied Congress to keep the old recommendations. They claimed the revised recommendations would result in unnecessary deaths. However, it should be noted that reducing mammography frequency and narrowing the age range for women to be screened would also likely reduce reimbursement for clinical screening services. The aim of this course, then, is to provide a comprehensive overview of screening methods and evaluation, and to examine the efficacy, benefits versus harms, population uptake, screening promotion, and controversies surrounding specific screening tests for various health conditions. These include, but are not limited to, cancer, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, mental health and newborn metabolic and genetic defects. Such controversies can range from overdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment, informed decision-making, screening policies, and ethical issues. The course is designed to appeal to students in Public Health, Nursing, Pharmacy, Medicine, genetic counseling and public policy.
PUBH 6381 - Genetics in Public Health in the Age of Precision Medicine
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Mechanisms of molecular genetics. Issues related to medical/public health genetics, including basis of human diversity, Human Genome Project, novel genetic mechanisms underlying diseases, ethical/legal issues. prereq: Grad student or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 6383 - Vaccines
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Vaccines are one of the most successful public health interventions ever developed. Yet, fundamental misconceptions about how and why vaccines work and about the scientific evidence about their efficacy and safety limit the ability of public health professionals to prevent and control the spread of vaccine-preventable diseases. Vaccinology is the branch of infectious disease epidemiology that addresses these issues, building upon core concepts in epidemiologic methods and study designs to understand both the individual- and population-level impact of vaccines. In this graduate level course, students will focus on critical concepts and methods in epidemiology, infectious diseases, vaccinology, and public health needed to: 1) Understand the principles of infectious disease transmission dynamics that determine how and why vaccines reduce the burden of disease 2) Utilize epidemiologic methods and study designs to assess both individual and population-level vaccine efficacy/effectiveness 3) Develop and implement strategies to address the challenges of achieving and maintaining high vaccine coverage in diverse communities across the US and globally. More than 25 human diseases can be prevented by vaccination and dozens of novel and next-generation vaccines are currently under development. From ongoing efforts to eradicate polio worldwide to measles outbreaks in the US where the disease had once been eliminated to the development of fast-tracked Ebola vaccines during the West African outbreak, vaccines have taken center stage in the field of infectious diseases over the past several decades because of the incredible impact vaccines have had on saving lives, preventing disease, and preserving health. However, despite the success of vaccination programs against many serious diseases, challenges to designing, delivering, and maintaining trust in vaccines persist. Globally, vaccine-preventable diseases (pneumonia and diarrheal diseases including rotavirus) remain top causes of death in children under 5 years old. Yet vaccine access continues to be a challenge. The field of vaccinology allows us to examine, from an epidemiologic methods perspective, how and why vaccines protect individuals and populations and how and why we face challenges to achieving and maintaining high vaccine uptake among at-risk populations worldwide. In doing so, we gain the knowledge needed to develop strategies that can successfully protect all individuals from vaccine-preventable diseases. From the perspective of researchers, public health practitioners, and medical professionals, we will learn about numerous study designs to assess vaccine efficacy, effectiveness, and safety, and we will learn to apply communication skills critical to translating epidemiologic evidence about vaccines to the public. Specifically, we will draw upon the primary literature to understand concepts in infectious disease transmission dynamics, herd immunity, maternal immunity, and waning/boosting of immune responses. These concepts will set the foundation for understanding how and why vaccines protect both individuals and populations and how individuals interact with populations in complex ways. Throughout this course, we will apply principles of epidemiology and epi methods to understand how vaccines have successfully reduced the burden of disease in many different settings across the globe and to examine how the challenges of vaccine hesitancy, vaccine refusal, and lack of access threaten the advances that have been made in reducing the burden of infectious diseases. Students from many different disciplines who are interested in understanding why vaccines have been regarded as one of the greatest public health achievements of all time will gain a clear understanding of the essential role that they play in preventing disease and maintaining health populations.
PUBH 6385 - Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles and/ methods. Strategies for disease control and prevention, including immunization. Relevance of modes of transmission of specific agents for disease spread and prevention. Public health consequences of infectious diseases at local, national, and international levels.
PUBH 6386 - Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Well-established risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), prevention of CVD, and national recommendations for treatment/prevention. Emerging risk factors, current controversies in CVD. prereq: [PubH 6320 OR 6341 AND 6450] OR [equivalent] OR [permission of instructor]
PUBH 6387 - Cancer Epidemiology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Epidemiologic aspects of cancer. Theories of carcinogenesis, patterns of incidence and mortality, site-specific risk factors. Issues of cancer control and prevention.
PUBH 7391 - Independent Study: Epidemiology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Independent study supervised by epidemiology faculty member. prereq: [EPI major or grad student], instr consent
PUBH 7392 - Readings in Epidemiology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Current readings in epidemiology. prereq: Epidemiology major, instr consent
PUBH 7405 - Biostatistics: Regression
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
T-tests, confidence intervals, power, type I/II errors. Exploratory data analysis. Simple linear regression, regression in matrix notation, multiple regression, diagnostics. Ordinary least squares, violations, generalized least squares, nonlinear least squares regression. Introduction to General linear Model. SAS and S-Plus used. prereq: [[Stat 5101 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5101], biostatistics major] or instr consent
PUBH 7406 - Advanced Regression and Design
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: [7405, [STAT 5102 or &STAT 5102], biostatistics major] or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Topics include maximum likelihood estimation, single and multifactor analysis of variance, logistic regression, log-linear models, multinomial logit models, proportional odds models for ordinal data, gamma and inverse-Gaussian models, over-dispersion, analysis of deviance, model selection and criticism, model diagnostics, and an introduction to non-parametric regression methods. R is used. prereq: [7405, [STAT 5102 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in STAT 5102], biostatistics major] or instr consent
PUBH 8300 - Topics: Epidemiology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 80.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
New course offerings or topics of interest in epidemiology.
PUBH 8343 - Synthesis and Application of Methods in Epidemiologic Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Focuses on the extension, synthesis, and integration of research methods taught in the advanced epidemiology methods sequence (PubH 8341 and PubH 8342) and the application of these methods. Discussion of novel methods such as causal inferences related to the g-formula and penalized regression. Fosters a deeper understanding of current epidemiologic methods and how they are actually implemented in research.