Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Gerontology Minor

School of Public Health - Adm
School of Public Health
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
School of Public Health, MMC 819, A395 Mayo Memorial Building, 420 Delaware Street, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-626-3500 OR 1-800-774-8636, Fax: 612-624-4498)
  • Program Type: Graduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Length of program in credits (master's): 8
  • Length of program in credits (doctoral): 12
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
As the population continues to age, the demand for graduates with knowledge of aging increases. The Gerontology minor provides an opportunity to enrich graduate studies with an interdisciplinary program focused on aging. Students enroll in a multidisciplinary foundation course and then select courses from core areas of psychosocial aging, geroscience/geriatrics, and policy. The School of Public Health is accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH).
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.00.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Students interested in the minor are strongly encouraged to confer first with their major field advisor and director of graduate studies, and the Gerontology director of graduate studies regarding feasibility and requirements.
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
Required courses must be taken A-F, and a minimum grade of B- must be earned for each course. The minimum cumulative GPA for coursework applied to the minor is 3.00.
Required Course (2 credits)
Select 1 of the following in consultation with the Gerontology director of graduate studies:
GERO 5105 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Aging (2.0 cr)
or PUBH 6883 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Aging (2.0 cr)
Core Courses (6 credits)
Select 1 course from each of the 3 areas, in consultation with the Gerontology director of graduate studies, to meet the 6-credit minimum.
Behavioral and Social Science Core
GERO 5103 - Aging and Society (2.0 cr)
GERO 5117 - Adult Development and Aging (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6817 - Adult Development and Aging (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6882 - Aging and Society (2.0 cr)
Geroscience and Geriatrics Core
HSM 6584 - Long Term Care Health and Medical Needs (1.0 cr)
or RSC 5814 - Age, Exercise, and Rehabilitation (2.0 cr)
Policy and Long-term Care Core
SW 8805 - Aging and Disability Policy (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6518 - Equity and Long-Term Care Quality (2.0 cr)
GERO 5518 - Equity and Long-Term Care Quality (2.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
Masters
Doctoral
Electives
Select credits, in consultation with the Gerontology director of graduate studies, to complete the 12-credit requirement.
ANES 7185 - Anesthesiology Advanced Elective (4.0 cr)
BIOC 8102 - Hot Topics in the Biology of Aging (1.0 cr)
FMCH 7520 - Rural Rotation in Family Medicine (4.0 cr)
GERI 7200 - Advanced Clinical Geriatric Dentistry (1.0-10.0 cr)
GERI 7210 - Geriatric Hospital Dentistry (1.0-6.0 cr)
GERO 5125 - Gerontology Service Learning (3.0 cr)
GERO 8022 - Fostering a Career in Aging Research (1.0 cr)
HSM 6582 - Practicum in Long Term Care (1.0 cr)
HSM 6583 - Long Term Care Supports and Services (2.0 cr)
HSM 6584 - Long Term Care Health and Medical Needs (1.0 cr)
HSM 6585 - Long Term Care Organizational Management (1.0 cr)
HSM 6586 - Management in Assisted Living and Senior Care Settings (3.0 cr)
HSM 6587 - Long Term Care Regulatory Management (1.0 cr)
HSM 6588 - Long Term Care Quality Management and Performance Improvement (2.0 cr)
HSM 6592 - Long Term Care Health Care Law (1.0 cr)
HSM 6593 - Gerontology for Health Care Managers (1.0 cr)
KIN 5385 - Exercise for Healthy Aging & Disease Prevention and Management (3.0 cr)
NURS 6903 - Nurse Anesthesia Care: Special Populations Across the Lifespan (2.0 cr)
OLPD 5202 - Perspectives of Adult Learning and Development (3.0 cr)
ORSU 7190 - Acting Intern General, Reconstructive, and Geriatric Orthopaedics (4.0 cr)
OT 7223 - Occupational Therapy Process for Older Adults I (3.0 cr)
PA 8461 - Global and U.S. Perspectives on Health and Mortality (3.0 cr)
PHAR 6754 - Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome (2.1 cr)
PHAR 6758 - Pulmonary Pharmacotherapy (1.1 cr)
PHAR 6971 - Geriatric Pharmacotherapy (2.0 cr)
PT 7011 - Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation II (2.0 cr)
SLHS 5605 - Language and Cognitive Disorders in Adults (3.0 cr)
SW 8262 - Empowerment Practice With Persons With Disabilities (3.0 cr)
SW 8805 - Aging and Disability Policy (3.0 cr)
 
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GERO 5105 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Aging
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Obtain a broad understanding of the multidisciplinary perspectives, theoretical underpinnings, and advancements in the study of aging ("gerontology"), in the inter-related domains of clinical geriatrics, psychology, sociology, and policy as related to aging.
PUBH 6883 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Aging
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Obtain a broad understanding of the multidisciplinary perspectives, theoretical underpinnings, and advancements in the study of aging ("gerontology"), in the inter-related domains of clinical geriatrics, psychology, sociology, and policy as related to aging. Grad student or instructor consent.
GERO 5103 - Aging and Society
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the broad range of topics and issues related to aging, and how the process of aging is shaped by social context and relationships in connection with individual factors, including family, the economy, health care, and the political system. Students in Master's or doctoral programs most likely to benefit. Students new to the field of aging studies are recommended to begin with GERO 5105/PubH 6883: Multidisciplinary Perspectives in Aging.
GERO 5117 - Adult Development and Aging
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course examines the dynamic interaction of individual development and aging. Students will review the principal theories applied to understand individual development and aging, and explore methodological issues in adult development and aging; cognitive aging; social and health factors that influence developmental trajectories in aging and vice versa; and psychopathological issues in aging. It is recommended that those new to the field of aging students take PubH 6883/GERO 5105: Multidisciplinary Perspectives in Aging prior to taking this course. This course fulfills the Behavioral and Social Sciences concentration area requirement of the Gerontology Minor.
PUBH 6817 - Adult Development and Aging
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The objective of this course is to examine the dynamic interaction of individual development and aging. Students will review the principal theories applied to understand individual development and aging. Subsequent course models will explore methodological Issues in adult development and aging; cognitive aging; social and health factors that influence developmental trajectories in aging and vice versa; and psychopathological issues in aging. Grad student or instructor consent.
PUBH 6882 - Aging and Society
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the broad range of topics and issues related to aging, and how the process of aging is shaped by social context and relationships in connection with individual factors, including family, the economy, health care, and the political system. Students in Master's or doctoral programs most likely to benefit. Students new to the field of aging studies are recommended to begin with GERO 5105/PubH 6883: Multidisciplinary Perspectives in Aging. Grad student or instructor consent.
HSM 6584 - Long Term Care Health and Medical Needs
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSM 4584/HSM 6584
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Minnesota Board of Examiners for Nursing Home Administrators (BENHA) requires applicants for initial licensure (and those who are licensed in other states but do not meet Minnesota's regulatory requirements for experience or certification) to complete accredited post-secondary academic courses covering key competencies. This course covers the medical and health needs of nursing facility residents and persons living in community-based settings. Topics include the following: - How anatomic and physiologic changes associated with the aging process affect disease processes and clinical needs - Impact and management of common syndromes associated with aging including vision/hearing impairment, nutrition/malnutrition, and balance and mobility impairment - Prevention and management of common conditions such as pressure ulcers and delirium - Common psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders such as dementias (including Alzheimer's), depression, anxiety, psychotic disorders, and alcohol and drug abuse - Advance care planning and the role of palliative care and end-of-life care - Basic medical and pharmacological terminology - Innovative medical trends and emergent technologies used in long-term care settings Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of the long-term care field. Students who do not have this knowledge are encouraged to meet with the instructor to discuss strategies for obtaining it prior to registering for this course.
RSC 5814 - Age, Exercise, and Rehabilitation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: Rehabilitation science student or program permission
Typically offered: Every Fall
Overview of normal physiological responses to exercise in the elderly. Comparison of exercise-induced responses of physiological systems throughout aging process. Focuses on importance of exercise from rehabilitation perspective. Offered Fall semesters of even-numbered years. prereq: Rehabilitation science student or program permission
SW 8805 - Aging and Disability Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Social policy related to disability/aging. Major policy areas of income support, health, education, caregiving, employment, housing, retirement.
PUBH 6518 - Equity and Long-Term Care Quality
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The objective of this course is to help students gain a deeper understanding of long-term care quality with a focus on equity. We will pay particular attention to post-acute care settings, care integration across settings, the role of the workforce, and equity considerations across all these topics. Post-acute care settings reviewed will include home care, assisted living, alternative care arrangements, nursing homes, and hospice. There are no required prerequisites but students are encouraged to take a course on U.S. health care (e.g., PubH 6556, Health and Health Systems) prior to taking the course. Cross-listed with: GERO 5518 preq: Public Health [MPH or MHA or certificate] student or instr consent
GERO 5518 - Equity and Long-Term Care Quality
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The objective of this course is to help students gain a deeper understanding of long-term care quality with a focus on equity. We will pay particular attention to post-acute care settings, care integration across settings, the role of the workforce, and equity considerations across all these topics. Post-acute care settings reviewed will include home care, assisted living, alternative care arrangements, nursing homes, and hospice. There are no required prerequisites but students are encouraged to take a course on U.S. health care (e.g., PubH 6556, Health and Health Systems) prior to taking the course. Cross-listed with: PubH 6518
ANES 7185 - Anesthesiology Advanced Elective
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anes 7185/Anes 7195/Anes 7196
Grading Basis: H-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This 4-week advanced rotation is focused on the medical student who is interested in pursuing a career in anesthesiology and/or desires additional anesthesia experience in managing medically complex patients undergoing medium to high-risk surgery. Students will have the opportunity to care for the aging veteran population. There will be an emphasis on managing patients with multiple co-morbid conditions undergoing cardiac and vascular surgery. Additionally, medical students will learn more advanced concepts during cases that include ENT, thoracic, and abdominal surgery. The medical student will develop skills including placing peripheral intravenous catheters, endotracheal intubation, arterial lines, and central lines. The medical student will develop a greater understanding of perioperative cardiovascular physiology/hemodynamics and pulmonary physiology, ventilator management and interpretation of data from multiple simultaneous monitors. They will function at the level of a sub-intern and will be given advanced responsibilities consistent with their level of knowledge and skill.
BIOC 8102 - Hot Topics in the Biology of Aging
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This course is intended to provide a platform of understanding about the major issues surrounding biological research in aging. This course will include a combination of student- and faculty-led discussions on select research topics that are highly relevant to the field of biogerontology research, along with instruction/discussions on scientific integrity. Student participants will lead discussions focused on their area of research expertise, utilizing a combination of review articles and research articles. Discussion of scientific misconduct will include case studies. This course is open to graduate students and post-doctoral fellows involved in the National Institutes on Aging (NIA) training grant ?Functional Proteomics of Aging?. This course is also open to other graduate students or post-doctoral fellows who are conducting biological research in aging with instructor?s permission.
FMCH 7520 - Rural Rotation in Family Medicine
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis:
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is intended for students interested in observing and participating in Family Medicine in the rural setting. Students participate in patient care in the patient's home, in long-term facilities, in the doctor's office and in the hospital. Students observe close interrelationships between practicing physicians and the community.
GERI 7200 - Advanced Clinical Geriatric Dentistry
Credits: 1.0 -10.0 [max 10.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Practical clinical experience in examination, diagnosis, treatment planning, and treatment of older adult patients in the dental clinic at the Amherst H. Wilder Senior Health Center.
GERI 7210 - Geriatric Hospital Dentistry
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Rotations at University of Minnesota Hospital Dental Clinic and/or Minneapolis V.A. Medical Center Dental Clinic. Management of elderly patients in acute care settings. Dental management of patients compromised by medical therapies such as radiation treatment or chemotherapy, as well as those with acute illnesses.
GERO 5125 - Gerontology Service Learning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
At least 100 hours of service to seniors or organizations serving seniors required. Longitudinal one-on-one relationship with at least two seniors. Service activities may include: friendly visiting, escorting seniors to medical appointments, chore services, teaching health education to groups of seniors and staff, participating in social or recreational activities with seniors, assisting with immunization and screening programs, assisting seniors with selection of health plans, or providing volunteer home health aide or nursing assistant services or emergency non-medical response under the supervision of a nurse. Students may use up to 25 percent of their service time for project that benefits the campus as a whole. Reading, monthly class discussions, a term paper and weekly self-reflection
GERO 8022 - Fostering a Career in Aging Research
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Gero 8022/RSC 8022
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Prepare pre-doctoral students/post-doctoral fellows for next step in academic career. Student/faculty led discussions on preparing for job interviews, including composing CV/cover letter, preparing grant applications/manuscripts, developing course syllabus based on biology of aging. prereq: Grad students/post-doctoral fellows involved in National Institutes on Aging training grant Functional Proteomics of Aging or grad students or post-doctoral fellows with instr consent
HSM 6582 - Practicum in Long Term Care
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSM 4582/HSM 6582
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The Practicum course is the final component of the long term care administrator's education. A broad range of performance parameters are affected by management practices (e.g., employee morale, clinical processes, financial performance, regulatory compliance, quality of life for residents, customer satisfaction, and community/public relations). The course is a transition between the classroom and this executive level of management. Students will undertake a formal practicum project that must be coordinated with 1) the practicum site, 2) a preceptor who is a licensed nursing home administrator at the sponsoring organization, and 3) the course instructor. The intern is expected to make positive contributions to the sponsoring organization. The preceptor functions as a mentor, coach, and tutor. The intern identifies learning objectives and opportunities to meet both short-range goals for gaining work experience and long-range goals for career development through the development of a learning agreement. HSM 6582 is cross-listed with the undergraduate version of the practicum (HSM 4582) and contains additional required content at the graduate level. prereqs: Most prelicensure courses completed--at a minimum, HSM 4583/6583-LTC Supports and Services; HSM 4585/6585 -LTC Organizational Management; HSM 4589/6589-LTC Human Resource Management; HSM 4593/6593-Gerontology for Health Care Managers.
HSM 6583 - Long Term Care Supports and Services
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSM 4583/HSM 6583
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The Minnesota Board of Examiners for Nursing Home Administrators (BENHA) requires applicants for initial licensure to complete accredited postsecondary academic courses covering key competencies. This course covers the organization, operations, functions, services, and programs of long-term care supports and services, including the following: governing and oversight bodies and their relationship to the administrator; administrative responsibilities and structures; operations and functions of each facility department; functions and roles of professional and nonprofessional staff and consulting personnel. Prerequisites: Some basic knowledge of the long- term care field. Students without this knowledge are encouraged to meet with the instructor to explore preparation strategies.
HSM 6584 - Long Term Care Health and Medical Needs
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSM 4584/HSM 6584
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Minnesota Board of Examiners for Nursing Home Administrators (BENHA) requires applicants for initial licensure (and those who are licensed in other states but do not meet Minnesota's regulatory requirements for experience or certification) to complete accredited post-secondary academic courses covering key competencies. This course covers the medical and health needs of nursing facility residents and persons living in community-based settings. Topics include the following: - How anatomic and physiologic changes associated with the aging process affect disease processes and clinical needs - Impact and management of common syndromes associated with aging including vision/hearing impairment, nutrition/malnutrition, and balance and mobility impairment - Prevention and management of common conditions such as pressure ulcers and delirium - Common psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders such as dementias (including Alzheimer's), depression, anxiety, psychotic disorders, and alcohol and drug abuse - Advance care planning and the role of palliative care and end-of-life care - Basic medical and pharmacological terminology - Innovative medical trends and emergent technologies used in long-term care settings Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of the long-term care field. Students who do not have this knowledge are encouraged to meet with the instructor to discuss strategies for obtaining it prior to registering for this course.
HSM 6585 - Long Term Care Organizational Management
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSM 4585/HSM 6585
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Minnesota Board of Examiners for Nursing Home Administrators (BENHA) requires applicants for initial licensure (and those who are licensed in other states but do not meet Minnesota's regulatory requirements for experience or certification) to complete accredited postsecondary academic courses covering key competencies. HSM 6585 covers the following basic management functions: planning and objective setting; organizing and delegating; and observing, monitoring and evaluating outcomes, including customer satisfaction prereq: Basic knowledge of the long term care field. Students without this knowledge are encouraged to consult with the instructor prior to registering to explore preparatory strategies.
HSM 6586 - Management in Assisted Living and Senior Care Settings
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSM 4586/HSM 6586
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
HSM 6586 is the graduate version of HSM 4586. Assisted living directors increasingly lead complex organizations that provide many different types of services to residents and their families. This course helps students understand aging as well as the operations and functions of assisted living communities, governance and leadership, administrative structures and responsibilities, and the roles of professional and nonprofessional staff. In 2019, the Minnesota State Legislature passed historic regulatory reform in assisted living, culminating in a new facility license and a new director license. State statute sets forth domains of practice for assisted living directors. Education in these domains is required prior to licensure. This course is designed to meet the Assisted Living Director license requirements of the State of Minnesota Board of Examiners for Long Term Services and Supports. Prerequisites: While there are no formal prerequisites, the successful student must have some basic knowledge of aging services and/or the long term care field. Students who are unfamiliar with this field are encouraged to meet with the instructor prior to registering for this course.
HSM 6587 - Long Term Care Regulatory Management
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSM 4587/HSM 6587
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The Minnesota Board of Examiners for Nursing Home Administrators (BENHA) requires applicants for initial licensure (and those who are licensed in other states but do not meet Minnesota's regulatory requirements for experience or certification) to complete accredited post-secondary academic courses covering key competencies. HSM 6587 is one of those areas. It covers regulatory and funding provisions and requirements governing operation of long-term care services and related health care programs. Topics include Resident rights, resident choice/resident risk and protection from maltreatment; Guardianship and conservatorship; Health and safety codes including OSHA and National Life Safety Code; Medicare and Medicaid, standards for managed care and sub-acute care, and third-party payer requirements and reimbursement; Federal and state nursing home survey and compliance regulations and processes; Requirements affecting the quality of care and life of residents; Resident acuity and assessment methodology; Quality assurance and performance improvement. prereq: Basic knowledge of the long term care field. Students without this knowledge are encouraged to meet with the instructor prior to registering to discuss options.
HSM 6588 - Long Term Care Quality Management and Performance Improvement
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSM 4588/HSM 6588
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course integrates competencies, knowledge, and skills from three interrelated areas to support evidence-based management decision making in long term care. These areas include 1) problem-solving skills, 2) quality management and quality improvement practices, and 3) data analytics. Classwork consists of preclass readings, online preclass discussion, face-to-face one-day seminar, one-day comprehensive Excel homework assignment, and homework assignments. Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of the long term care field. Students without this knowledge are encouraged to meet with the instructor prior to registering to discuss ways of acquiring it. Skill with Excel is strongly recommended.
HSM 6592 - Long Term Care Health Care Law
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSM 4592/HSM 6592
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The Minnesota Board of Examiners for Nursing Home Administrators (BENHA) requires applicants for initial licensure (and those who are licensed in other states but do not meet Minnesota's regulatory requirements for experience or certification) to complete accredited post-secondary academic courses covering key competencies. HSM 6592 covers legal and regulatory issues, ethical perspectives, public policy advocacy and professional reporting requirements related to the operation of long-term care service delivery organizations. The following topics are covered: Professional and biomedical ethics; Liability, negligence, and malpractice; Data confidentiality, privacy and practices; Professional licensing, certification and reporting for staff and consulting personnel; and Advocacy for public policies. Prerequisites: Knowledge of the long-term care field. Students who do not have this knowledge are encouraged to meet with the instructor prior to registering to discuss strategies for gaining this knowledge.
HSM 6593 - Gerontology for Health Care Managers
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSM 4593/HSM 6593
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The Minnesota Board of Examiners for Nursing Home Administrators (BENHA) requires applicants for initial licensure (and those who are licensed in other states but do not meet Minnesota?s regulatory requirements for experience or certification) to complete accredited post-secondary academic courses covering key competencies. This course covers the requirement related to Gerontology. HSM 6593 covers the following: Issues of cultural diversity and human relationships between and among employees and residents of nursing facilities and their family members. Physical, biological, social and psychological aspects of the aging process. Policies and programs designed to meet the needs of a rapidly aging population. Therapeutic programs for individuals with cognitive impairments. Services to support the needs of family caregivers. Prerequisites: Knowledge of the long-term care field. Students without this knowledge are encouraged to meet with the instructor prior to registering to discuss strategies for acquiring it.
KIN 5385 - Exercise for Healthy Aging & Disease Prevention and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Physiology or biology undergrad
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Exercise testing/prescription with modifications required because of special considerations associated with aging, gender differences, or presence of medical conditions. prereq: Physiology or biology undergrad
NURS 6903 - Nurse Anesthesia Care: Special Populations Across the Lifespan
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Examine/apply principles used to deliver anesthesia by nurse anesthetists to special populations: pediatric, trauma, obstetric/gynecologic, and acute and chronic pain patients. prereq: 6900, 6901, 6902, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 6912, admission to BSN-DNP nurse anesthesia specialty
OLPD 5202 - Perspectives of Adult Learning and Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Emphasis on major adult development theorists, theories, and current applications. Transformative learning, self-directed learning, experiential learning, and cooperative learning provide theoretical framework for exploring physiological, psychological, sociological, and cultural aspects of adult development through the life span.
ORSU 7190 - Acting Intern General, Reconstructive, and Geriatric Orthopaedics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: H-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course consists of supervised clinical experience in the primary care of both adult inpatients and outpatients with an emphasis on reconstructive types of orthopaedic surgery. The student has a great deal of individual ward and surgical responsibility and is expected to present their cases. The student functions at the junior resident level. While the student does not take call individually, they may choose to take call with the resident to whom they are assigned. Recommended for the student interested in an orthopaedic surgery career and for the student choosing a non-orthopaedic surgery career. Primary text for externship: Salter RB: Textbook of Disorders and Injuries of the Musculoskeletal System, Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins.
OT 7223 - Occupational Therapy Process for Older Adults I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course, the first in a three-part series, focuses on occupations and roles, habits, and routines that are typical in young-old adults ages 65 to 75 and the impact of disruption on participation. Students will apply the OT process using case-based learning for cognitive conditions and substance abuse. This course aligns with experiential learning activities to integrate concurrent coursework.
PA 8461 - Global and U.S. Perspectives on Health and Mortality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The health of populations in developing and developed countries is very different. Within countries, great health disparities exist between more advantaged and more disadvantaged populations. When crafting policies that aim to improve population health, it is crucial to know how to measure health and how to think about the health needs of the specific population in question. This course will provide an overview to the factors driving health, mortality, and aging across different populations. In addition, students will learn the best sources of data and measures to use to describe the health status of a population. They will also be able to assess policy options that address the health of their population.
PHAR 6754 - Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome
Credits: 2.1 [max 2.1]
Prerequisites: Students will need to have successfully completed: Molecular Metabolism/Nutrition, Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy & Pharmaceutical Care Skills Lab 1-3. Students should be able to describe the physiology of insulin action, incretin hormones, amylin, and the fasting and fed states. Students should be able to describe how insulin is designed and manufactured. Students should be able to describe the following biochemistry topics: carbohydrate metabolism and lipid metabolism, and protein. Students should be able to assess a patient and determine most appropriate pharmacotherapy treatment options for a patient's hypertension and dyslipidemia treatments, including ability to describe, interpret and apply evidence-based guidelines. Students should be able to describe how nutrition impacts energy production, utilization and storage, and obesity. Students need to be able to describe the caloric content of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids and be able to apply that knowledge to reading food labels and evaluating a patient's nutritional status.
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, students will learn the principles of the pathophysiology of diabetes, pharmacology of the antidiabetic agents, evaluate key research on diabetes, interpret and apply clinical guidelines for diabetes, assess socioeconomic aspects of diabetes, and apply this information to patient cases. Special populations with diabetes will also be discussed including pediatric, gestational, and geriatric diabetes. Students will also learn the the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome, pharmacology of obesity treatments, nonpharmacological and pharmacological ways to treat metabolic syndrome, including the implications of bariatric surgery on use of pharmacologic agents in general, and apply this information to patient cases. prereq: Students will need to have successfully completed: Molecular Metabolism/Nutrition, Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Pharmaceutical Care Skills Lab 1-3. Students should be able to describe the physiology of insulin action, incretin hormones, amylin, and the fasting and fed states. Students should be able to describe how insulin is designed and manufactured. Students should be able to describe the following biochemistry topics: carbohydrate metabolism and lipid metabolism, and protein. Students should be able to assess a patient and determine most appropriate pharmacotherapy treatment options for a patient's hypertension and dyslipidemia treatments, including ability to describe, interpret and apply evidence-based guidelines. Students should be able to describe how nutrition impacts energy production, utilization and storage, and obesity. Students need to be able to describe the caloric content of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids and be able to apply that knowledge to reading food labels and evaluating a patient's nutritional status.
PHAR 6758 - Pulmonary Pharmacotherapy
Credits: 1.1 [max 1.1]
Prerequisites: Students must have completed the following courses successfully: - Applied Pharmaceutical Care - Foundations of Social and Administrative Pharmacy - Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology of Cardiovascular Agents - Pharmacokinetics, - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy, - Cellular Metabolism and Nutrition See the course syllabus for more detailed prerequisites.
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will provide students with the requisite pathophysiology and pharmacotherapeutic knowledge to care for patients with common pulmonary diseases. It will integrate concepts of pediatric and geriatric pulmonary dosing and infectious diseases. prereq: Students must have completed the following courses successfully: - Applied Pharmaceutical Care - Foundations of Social and Administrative Pharmacy - Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology of Cardiovascular Agents - Pharmacokinetics, - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy, - Cellular Metabolism and Nutrition See the course syllabus for more detailed prerequisites.
PHAR 6971 - Geriatric Pharmacotherapy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic changes and their implications in elders. Effects of drug-drug/drug-disease interactions. Drug adherence barriers to provide optimum pharmacotherapy to elderly persons. Prerequisite: 3rd year Pharmacy student
PT 7011 - Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Providing physical therapy to geriatric clients. Pphysiology, pathophysiology, and therapeutic procedures to evaluate, treat, and manage clients. How clinical issues vary in geriatric population vs. younger patients. Lecture, discussion, literature review. prereq: Licensed physical therapist enrolled in geriatric clinical residency
SLHS 5605 - Language and Cognitive Disorders in Adults
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Acquired cognitive and communicative disorders in the adult population specifically including: stroke/aphasia, right hemisphere dysfunction, traumatic brain injury, and dementia. Consideration of neurological substrates, disorder symptomology, assessment, clinical intervention, and functional impact across the lifespan and amongst diverse populations. prereq: [3302, 4301] or [CDis 3302, CDis 4301] or instr consent
SW 8262 - Empowerment Practice With Persons With Disabilities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Models of disability, types of disability, common social work practices. Knowledge/skills for use across lifespan/ cultures/various settings.
SW 8805 - Aging and Disability Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Social policy related to disability/aging. Major policy areas of income support, health, education, caregiving, employment, housing, retirement.