Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Gerontology Minor

School of Public Health - Adm
School of Public Health
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
School of Public Health, MMC 819, A395 Mayo Memorial Building, 420 Delaware Street, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-626-3500 OR 1-800-774-8636, Fax: 612-624-4498)
  • Program Type: Graduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2018
  • Length of program in credits (master's): 8
  • Length of program in credits (doctoral): 12
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
The gerontology minor is available to master's (MA and MS) and doctoral students. The minor provides a multidisciplinary foundation in gerontology for the master's minors and a more intensive preparation in aging for PhD minors. Past students who have minored in gerontology have majored in many departments, including but not limited to: curriculum and instruction (adult education); communication disorders; dentistry; design, housing, and apparel; family medicine and community health; family social science; journalism and mass communication; kinesiology; nursing; psychology; social work; and sociology. The program of courses is tailored in advance, with consultation between the student and the director of graduate studies of the gerontology minor.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.00.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Admission to the gerontology minor is contingent upon prior admission to a master's or doctoral degree-granting program. Students should first consult with their major program adviser about the advisability of a minor in gerontology. They will then need to contact the director of graduate studies, Dr. Robert Kane at kanex001@umn.edu, for minor information and to design their course program.
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
The master's and doctoral minors are developed in consultation with, and should be approved in advance by, the director of graduate studies for gerontology. The master's minor requires at least 8 credits, including GERO 5105 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Aging (3 cr), or an alternative course approved by the director of graduate studies. The doctoral minor requires at least 12 credits. Courses are ordinarily taken from a designated course list provided by the Center on Aging and annually updated by the minor program. Students are welcome to identify and propose to the director of graduate studies additional courses on aging that might fulfill the minor requirements.
Graduate Program Requirements
Master's Minor
Take 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· FSOS 8105 - Family Gerontology (3.0 cr)
· GERO 5100 - Topics in Gerontology (0.5-4.0 cr)
· GERO 5105 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Aging (3.0 cr)
· GERO 5110 - Biology of Aging (3.0 cr)
· GERO 5111 - Studying Aging and Chronic Illness (2.0 cr)
· GERO 5115 - Introduction to Geriatrics (2.0 cr)
· GERO 5125 - Gerontology Service Learning (3.0 cr)
· GERO 8021 - Application of Proteomics to Aging (1.0 cr)
· GERO 8022 - Fostering a Career in Aging Research (1.0 cr)
· GERO 8023 - Aging Policy Seminar (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6904 - Nutrition and Aging (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 8803 - Long-Term Care: Principles, Programs, and Policies (2.0 cr)
· SW 5810 - Seminar: Special Topics (1.0-4.0 cr)
-OR-
Doctoral Minor
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· FSOS 8105 - Family Gerontology (3.0 cr)
· GERO 5100 - Topics in Gerontology (0.5-4.0 cr)
· GERO 5105 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Aging (3.0 cr)
· GERO 5110 - Biology of Aging (3.0 cr)
· GERO 5111 - Studying Aging and Chronic Illness (2.0 cr)
· GERO 5115 - Introduction to Geriatrics (2.0 cr)
· GERO 5125 - Gerontology Service Learning (3.0 cr)
· GERO 8021 - Application of Proteomics to Aging (1.0 cr)
· GERO 8022 - Fostering a Career in Aging Research (1.0 cr)
· GERO 8023 - Aging Policy Seminar (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6904 - Nutrition and Aging (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 8803 - Long-Term Care: Principles, Programs, and Policies (2.0 cr)
· SW 5810 - Seminar: Special Topics (1.0-4.0 cr)
 
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FSOS 8105 - Family Gerontology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Integrates gerontology and family studies; new lines of inquiry, qualitative and quantitative, into aging families. Family gerontological research, family relationships, family and long-term care institutions, theoretical frameworks and research methods, and research and interventions. prereq: 4154 or equiv or instr consent
GERO 5100 - Topics in Gerontology
Credits: 0.5 -4.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Timely topics related to the biology, sociology, and psychology of aging and applied aging services.
GERO 5105 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Aging
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Sociological, psychological aspects of aging. Theories of aging. Death/bereavement. Issues/problems of older adults in America. Human services, their delivery systems (health, nutrition, long-term care, education). Public policy, legislation. Environment/housing. Retirement.
GERO 5110 - Biology of Aging
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biological changes that occur with aging. Methods for studying aging, descriptions of population aging, theories on how/why we age. Process of aging in each body system, variation between individuals/populations. Clinical implications of biological changes with age. Guest lecturers from different disciplines.
GERO 5111 - Studying Aging and Chronic Illness
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Methodological issues unique to studies of older populations. Focuses on measurement of epidemiological characteristics. Health conditions/disorders of older Americans. prereq: Introductory course in epidemiology or instr consent
GERO 5115 - Introduction to Geriatrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Online course. Major topics in geriatrics. How to diagnose/treat conditions common in caring for older people.
GERO 5125 - Gerontology Service Learning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
At least 100 hours of service to seniors or organizations serving seniors required. Longitudinal one-on-one relationship with at least two seniors. Service activities may include: friendly visiting, escorting seniors to medical appointments, chore services, teaching health education to groups of seniors and staff, participating in social or recreational activities with seniors, assisting with immunization and screening programs, assisting seniors with selection of health plans, or providing volunteer home health aide or nursing assistant services or emergency non-medical response under the supervision of a nurse. Students may use up to 25 percent of their service time for project that benefits the campus as a whole. Reading, monthly class discussions, a term paper and weekly self-reflection
GERO 8021 - Application of Proteomics to Aging
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Proteomic technology in aging research. Faculty/student led discussions on topics relevant proteomic research. Overview of special techniques/analytical approaches complementary to proteomics, hands-on experience with data analysis, discussion of literature. prereq: [Grad students, post-doctoral fellows involved in National Institutes on Aging training grant Functional Proteomics of Aging] or grad students or post-doctoral fellows with instr consent
GERO 8022 - Fostering a Career in Aging Research
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02093 - Gero 8022/RSC 8022
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Prepare pre-doctoral students/post-doctoral fellows for next step in academic career. Student/faculty led discussions on preparing for job interviews, including composing CV/cover letter, preparing grant applications/manuscripts, developing course syllabus based on biology of aging. prereq: Grad students/post-doctoral fellows involved in National Institutes on Aging training grant Functional Proteomics of Aging or grad students or post-doctoral fellows with instr consent
GERO 8023 - Aging Policy Seminar
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: Grad student or # [recommended to have taken GERO 5105]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Topics chosen to match student interest. Potential issues include Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, policies about long-term care, preventive care for older people, employment discrimination, ethical topics. Run seminar on topic of choice, write follow-up paper. prereq: Grad student or instr consent [recommended to have taken GERO 5105]
PUBH 6904 - Nutrition and Aging
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Current literature on nutrition needs/factors affecting nutritional status of adults and the elderly. Relevant community resources. prereq: Grad student or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 8803 - Long-Term Care: Principles, Programs, and Policies
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Long-term care policy for functionally impaired persons, particularly the elderly. Team taught from healthcare and social services perspective; grounded in research literature on evidence of program effects. Innovative programs addressing current fragmentation of services. prereq: Grad-level health-care policy course or instr consent
SW 5810 - Seminar: Special Topics
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
FSOS 8105 - Family Gerontology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Integrates gerontology and family studies; new lines of inquiry, qualitative and quantitative, into aging families. Family gerontological research, family relationships, family and long-term care institutions, theoretical frameworks and research methods, and research and interventions. prereq: 4154 or equiv or instr consent
GERO 5100 - Topics in Gerontology
Credits: 0.5 -4.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Timely topics related to the biology, sociology, and psychology of aging and applied aging services.
GERO 5105 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Aging
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Sociological, psychological aspects of aging. Theories of aging. Death/bereavement. Issues/problems of older adults in America. Human services, their delivery systems (health, nutrition, long-term care, education). Public policy, legislation. Environment/housing. Retirement.
GERO 5110 - Biology of Aging
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biological changes that occur with aging. Methods for studying aging, descriptions of population aging, theories on how/why we age. Process of aging in each body system, variation between individuals/populations. Clinical implications of biological changes with age. Guest lecturers from different disciplines.
GERO 5111 - Studying Aging and Chronic Illness
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Methodological issues unique to studies of older populations. Focuses on measurement of epidemiological characteristics. Health conditions/disorders of older Americans. prereq: Introductory course in epidemiology or instr consent
GERO 5115 - Introduction to Geriatrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Online course. Major topics in geriatrics. How to diagnose/treat conditions common in caring for older people.
GERO 5125 - Gerontology Service Learning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
At least 100 hours of service to seniors or organizations serving seniors required. Longitudinal one-on-one relationship with at least two seniors. Service activities may include: friendly visiting, escorting seniors to medical appointments, chore services, teaching health education to groups of seniors and staff, participating in social or recreational activities with seniors, assisting with immunization and screening programs, assisting seniors with selection of health plans, or providing volunteer home health aide or nursing assistant services or emergency non-medical response under the supervision of a nurse. Students may use up to 25 percent of their service time for project that benefits the campus as a whole. Reading, monthly class discussions, a term paper and weekly self-reflection
GERO 8021 - Application of Proteomics to Aging
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Proteomic technology in aging research. Faculty/student led discussions on topics relevant proteomic research. Overview of special techniques/analytical approaches complementary to proteomics, hands-on experience with data analysis, discussion of literature. prereq: [Grad students, post-doctoral fellows involved in National Institutes on Aging training grant Functional Proteomics of Aging] or grad students or post-doctoral fellows with instr consent
GERO 8022 - Fostering a Career in Aging Research
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02093 - Gero 8022/RSC 8022
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Prepare pre-doctoral students/post-doctoral fellows for next step in academic career. Student/faculty led discussions on preparing for job interviews, including composing CV/cover letter, preparing grant applications/manuscripts, developing course syllabus based on biology of aging. prereq: Grad students/post-doctoral fellows involved in National Institutes on Aging training grant Functional Proteomics of Aging or grad students or post-doctoral fellows with instr consent
GERO 8023 - Aging Policy Seminar
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: Grad student or # [recommended to have taken GERO 5105]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Topics chosen to match student interest. Potential issues include Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, policies about long-term care, preventive care for older people, employment discrimination, ethical topics. Run seminar on topic of choice, write follow-up paper. prereq: Grad student or instr consent [recommended to have taken GERO 5105]
PUBH 6904 - Nutrition and Aging
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Current literature on nutrition needs/factors affecting nutritional status of adults and the elderly. Relevant community resources. prereq: Grad student or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 8803 - Long-Term Care: Principles, Programs, and Policies
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Long-term care policy for functionally impaired persons, particularly the elderly. Team taught from healthcare and social services perspective; grounded in research literature on evidence of program effects. Innovative programs addressing current fragmentation of services. prereq: Grad-level health-care policy course or instr consent
SW 5810 - Seminar: Special Topics
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.