Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Community Health Promotion M.P.H.

School of Public Health - Adm
School of Public Health
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
School of Public Health, MMC 819, A395 Mayo Memorial Building, 420 Delaware Street, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-626-3500 OR 1-800-774-8636)
  • Program Type: Master's
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Length of program in credits: 48
  • This program requires summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Master of Public Health
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The Community Health Promotion (CHP) MPH program trains students to work with populations to improve health. The curriculum emphasizes the importance of using research and social science to assess population behavioral health patterns and psychosocial risk factors: students learn to design community wide prevention and intervention programs, how to influence health policies, and evaluate outcomes of behavioral health change. The School of Public Health is accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH).
Accreditation
This program is accredited by Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH).
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.00.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Baccalaureate degree or higher from an accredited college or university. College-level courses in the following areas: social and behavioral sciences (at least 3 courses) and introductory statistics (1 course).
Special Application Requirements:
Applicants must have one year of paid or volunteer experience in a public health, social service, or community setting.
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 100
    • Paper Based - Total Score: 600
  • IELTS
    • Total Score: 7.0
Key to test abbreviations (TOEFL, IELTS).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Plan C: Plan C requires 48 major credits and 0 credits outside the major. There is no final exam. A capstone project is required.
Capstone Project: Students complete an Integrated Learning Experience (ILE) in consultation with the advisor.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
A minimum GPA of 3.00 is required for students to remain in good standing.
The following courses must be completed with a minimum grade of B-: PUBH 6050, 6051, 6034, 6035. All Health Behavior and Policy Interventions coursework requires a B- grade.
Public Health Core Requirements (15 credits)
PUBH 6050 - Community Health Promotion I: Integrating Theory, Evidence, and Context (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6102 - Issues in Environmental Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6450 - Biostatistics I (4.0 cr)
PUBH 6741 - Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6751 - Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations (2.0 cr)
Epidemiology
Select one of the following:
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
or PUBH 6341 - Epidemiologic Methods I (3.0 cr)
Community Health Promotion Requirements (12-13 credits)
The following courses must be taken A-F and completed with a minimum of a B-: PUBH 6034, 6035, and 6051.
PUBH 6034 - Evaluation I: Concepts (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6035 - Evaluation II: Applications (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6051 - Community Health Promotion II: Developing, Implementing, and Justifying Interventions (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6852 - Program Evaluation in Health and Mental Health Settings (2.0 cr)
Policy course
PUBH 6045 - Skills for Policy Development (1.0 cr)
or PUBH 6078 - Public Health Policy as a Prevention Strategy (2.0 cr)
Evaluation-related Methods
Select one of these courses in consultation with your advisor.
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· PUBH 6107 - Excel Skills for Data Management in Public Health Settings (1.0 cr)
· PUBH 6243 - American Indian Research, Evaluation and Collaborations (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6342 - Epidemiologic Methods II (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6414 - Biostatistical Literacy (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6451 - Biostatistics II (4.0 cr)
· PUBH 6636 - Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health Practice (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6806 - Principles of Public Health Research (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6815 - Community-based Participatory Research (2.0 cr)
Health Behavior and Policy Interventions (8 credits)
All Health Behavior and Policy Interventions coursework requires a B- grade.
Take 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PUBH 5231 - Emergency Preparedness: A Public Health Perspective (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6011 - Public Health Approaches to HIV/AIDS (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6045 - Skills for Policy Development (1.0 cr)
· PUBH 6049 - Legislative Advocacy Skills for Public Health (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6055 - Social Inequalities in Health (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6066 - Building Communities, Increasing Health: Preparing for Community Health Work (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6074 - Mass Communication and Public Health (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6078 - Public Health Policy as a Prevention Strategy (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6081 - Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Health (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6094 - Interventions to Address Weight-Related Health and Eating Disorders (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6120 - Injury Prevention in the Workplace, Community, and Home (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6123 - Violence Prevention and Control: Theory, Research, and Application (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6131 - Working in Global Health (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6242 - Cultural Humility with American Indian Populations (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6627 - Sexuality Education: Criteria, Curricula, and Controversy (1.0 cr)
Applied Practice Experience (1-2 credits)
Take at least 1 credit, in consultation with the advisor:
PUBH 7096 - Applied Practice Experience: Community Health Promotion (1.0-5.0 cr)
Integrated Learning Experience (1 credit)
Take at least 1 credit, in consultation with the advisor:
PUBH 7094 - Integrative Learning Experience: Community Health Promotion (1.0-6.0 cr)
Electives
Select electives, in consultation with the advisor, to complete the 48-credit requirement.
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5115 - Cultural Awareness, Knowledge and Health (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5118 - Whole Person, Whole Community: The Reciprocity of Wellbeing (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5215 - Forgiveness and Healing: A Journey Toward Wholeness (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5303 - Pain Management and Evidence Based Complementary Health Approaches (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5305 - Introduction to Integrative Mental Health (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5701 - Fundamentals of Health Coaching I (4.0 cr)
CSPH 5702 - Fundamentals of Health Coaching II (4.0 cr)
CSPH 5703 - Advanced Health Coaching Practicum (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5704 - Business of Health Coaching (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5706 - Lifestyle Medicine (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5707 - Coaching People with Clinical Conditions (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5708 - Mind-Body Science and the Art of Transformation (1.0 cr)
CSPH 5709 - Health and Wellbeing Group Coaching (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5713 - Health Coaching for Health Professionals (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5805 - Wellbeing in the Workplace (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5806 - Wellbeing and Resiliency for Health Professionals (1.0 cr)
CSPH 5807 - Mindfulness in the Workplace: Pause, Practice, Perform (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5905 - Food Matters: Cook Like Your Life Depends On It (1.0 cr)
EPSY 5114 - Psychology of Student Learning (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5244 - Survey Design, Sampling, and Implementation (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5247 - Qualitative Methods in Educational Psychology (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5609 - Infants and Toddlers with Delays/Disabilities: Family-Centered Approaches to Early Intervention (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8282 - Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data (3.0 cr)
FSCN 4612W - Advanced Human Nutrition [WI] (4.0 cr)
FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
FSCN 4621 - Nutrition and Metabolism (4.0 cr)
FSCN 4622 - Nutritional Toxicology, the basic science of diet-related toxicants (3.0 cr)
FSCN 4665 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I (3.0 cr)
FSCN 4666 - Medical Nutrition Therapy II (3.0 cr)
FSCN 4732 - Food and Nutrition Management (3.0 cr)
FSCN 5131 - Food Quality for Graduate Credit (3.0 cr)
FSCN 5312 - Food Analysis (4.0 cr)
FSCN 5601 - Management of Eating Disorders (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5014 - Quantitative Family Research Methods I (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5015 - Family Research Laboratory (1.0 cr)
FSOS 5111 - Introduction to Family Therapy (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5701 - Prevention Science: Principles and Practices (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5937 - Parent-Child Interaction (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5942 - Diverse Family Experiences (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5944 - Curricular Design in Parent Education (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5945 - Teaching and Learning in Parent Education (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5946 - Assessment and Evaluation in Parent Education (3.0 cr)
FSOS 8001 - Conceptual Frameworks in the Family (3.0 cr)
FSOS 8002 - Advanced Family Conceptual Frameworks (3.0 cr)
FSOS 8014 - Quantitative Family Research Methods II (3.0 cr)
FSOS 8036 - Couple/Marriage and Family Therapy Research (3.0 cr)
FSOS 8101 - Family Stress, Coping, and Adaptation (3.0 cr)
HINF 5430 - Foundations of Health Informatics I (3.0 cr)
HINF 5431 - Foundations of Health Informatics II (3.0 cr)
HINF 5440 - Foundations of Translational Bioinformatics (3.0 cr)
HINF 5450 - Foundations of Precision Medicine Informatics (3.0 cr)
HINF 5502 - Python Programming Essentials for the Health Sciences (1.0 cr)
HINF 5510 - Applied Health Care Databases: Database Principles and Data Evaluation (3.0 cr)
HINF 5520 - Informatics Methods for Health Care Quality, Outcomes, and Patient Safety (2.0 cr)
HINF 5531 - Health Data Analytics and Data Science (3.0 cr)
HINF 5610 - Foundations of Biomedical Natural Language Processing (3.0 cr)
HINF 5620 - Data Visualization for the Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
HINF 5630 - Clinical Data Mining (3.0 cr)
HSEX 6001 - Foundations of Human Sexuality (3.0 cr)
HSEX 6011 - Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses (3.0 cr)
HSEX 6211 - Dimensions of Sexual Functioning (3.0 cr)
HSEX 6013 - Perspectives and Practices in Sexual Health Education (3.0 cr)
LAW 6036 - Reproductive Rights (3.0 cr)
LAW 6046 - Human Trafficking (2.0 cr)
LAW 6058 - Human Rights Advocacy (3.0 cr)
LAW 6621 - Rights in Conflict: Citizenship and Human Rights (2.0 cr)
LAW 6718 - Immigration and Criminal Law: Immigration Consequences of Crimes and Criminalizing Migration (2.0 cr)
LAW 6827 - Women's International Human Rights (2.0 cr)
LAW 6862 - Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Human Rights (2.0 cr)
NURS 5029 - Introduction to Nursing Interventions (3.0 cr)
NURS 5031 - Human Response to Health and Illness: Adults and Elders (4.0 cr)
NURS 5032 - Human Response to Health and Illness: Children and Childbearing Families (5.0 cr)
NURS 5115 - Interprofessional Health Care Informatics (3.0 cr)
NURS 5116 - Consumer Health Informatics (2.0 cr)
NURS 5117 - Consumer Health Informatics Practicum (2.0 cr)
NURS 5190 - Essentials of Holistic Health Assessment and Foundational Clinical (3.0 cr)
NURS 5284 - Supporting Physiologic Labor and Childbirth for Nurses (2.0 cr)
NURS 5505 - Assessment and Support of Individuals in Labor (2.0 cr)
NURS 6110 - Epidemiology in Nursing (2.0 cr)
NURS 6213 - Reproductive Healthcare for Patients with Complex Conditions (2.0 cr)
NURS 6305 - Reproductive and Sexual Health Care (3.0 cr)
NURS 6600 - Health Systems and Care Models (3.0 cr)
NURS 6895 - Adult Acute Care Holistic Health Assessment and Wellness (2.0 cr)
NURS 6924 - Assessment and Interventions for Children and Youth With Special Health Care Needs (2.0 cr)
NURS 7100 - Quality Improvement and Implementation Science in Health Care (3.0 cr)
NURS 7108 - Population Health Informatics (2.0 cr)
NURS 7209 - Integrative Nursing I (1.0 cr)
NURS 7300 - Program Planning and Evaluation (3.0 cr)
NURS 8134 - Interventions and Outcomes Research (3.0 cr)
NURS 8171 - Qualitative Research Design and Methods (3.0-4.0 cr)
NURS 8185 - Qualitative Data Analysis for Health Care Research (3.0-4.0 cr)
NUTR 5624 - Nutrition and Genetics (2.0 cr)
NUTR 5626 - Nutritional Physiology (3.0 cr)
NUTR 5627 - Nutritional and Food Toxicology (3.0 cr)
NUTR 8620 - Advances in Nutrition (2.0 cr)
OLPD 5011 - Leading Organizational Change: Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5095 - Problems: Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (1.0-3.0 cr)
OLPD 5096 - Internship: Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (1.0-9.0 cr)
OLPD 5103 - Comparative Education (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5104 - Strategies for International Development of Education Systems (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5107 - Gender, Education, and International Development (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5124 - Critical Issues in International Education and Educational Exchange (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5132 - Intercultural Education and Training: Theory and Application (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5201 - Strategies for Teaching Adults (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5202 - Perspectives of Adult Learning and Development (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5346 - Politics of Education (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5501 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5502 - Comparative evaluation theory for practice (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5607 - Organization Development (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5611 - Facilitation and Meeting Skills (1.0 cr)
OLPD 5619 - Planning and Decision-Making Skills (1.0 cr)
OLPD 5819 - Evaluating and Using Research in Organizations and Education (3.0 cr)
OLPD 8502 - Advanced Evaluation Theory and Theory crafting (3.0 cr)
PA 5002 - Introduction to Policy Analysis (1.5 cr)
PA 5003 - Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management (1.5 cr)
PA 5004 - Introduction to Planning (3.0 cr)
PA 5011 - Management of Organizations (3.0 cr)
PA 5012 - The Politics of Public Affairs (3.0 cr)
PA 5013 - Law and Urban Land Use (1.5 cr)
PA 5021 - Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (3.0 cr)
PA 5022 - Applications of Economics for Policy Analysis (1.5-3.0 cr)
PA 5031 - Statistics for Public Affairs (4.0 cr)
PA 5032 - Applied Regression (2.0 cr)
PA 5033 - Multivariate Techniques (2.0 cr)
PA 5041 - Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (4.0 cr)
PA 5042 - Urban and Regional Economics (2.0 cr)
PA 5043 - Economic and Demographic Data Analysis (2.0 cr)
PA 5044 - Applied Regression, Accelerated (2.0 cr)
PA 5051 - Leadership Foundations (2.0 cr)
PA 5053 - Policy Analysis in Public Affairs (2.0 cr)
PA 5054 - Program Design and Implementation Analysis (2.0 cr)
PA 5055 - Qualitative Research Methods and Analysis (2.0 cr)
PA 5056 - Quantitative Research Methods and Analysis (2.0 cr)
PA 5081 - Understanding Power and Teamwork in Public Affairs Education (0.5 cr)
PA 5101 - Management and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations (3.0 cr)
PA 5103 - Leadership and Change (1.5-3.0 cr)
PA 5104 - Strategic Human Resource Management (3.0 cr)
PA 5105 - Integrative Leadership: Leading Across Sectors to Address Grand Challenges (3.0 cr)
PA 5113 - State and Local Public Finance (3.0 cr)
PA 5114 - Budget Analysis in Public and Nonprofit Orgs (1.5 cr)
PA 5116 - Financing Public and Nonprofit Organizations (1.5 cr)
PA 5122 - Law and Public Affairs (3.0 cr)
PA 5123 - Philanthropy in America: History, Practice, and Trends (1.5-3.0 cr)
PA 5135 - Managing Conflict: Negotiation (3.0 cr)
PA 5136 - Group Process Facilitation for Organizational and Public/Community Engagement (1.0 cr)
PA 5137 - Project Management in the Public Arena (1.5 cr)
PA 5145 - Civic Participation in Public Affairs (3.0 cr)
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance (3.0 cr)
PA 5209 - Urban Planning and Health Equity (3.0 cr)
PA 5211 - Land Use Planning (3.0 cr)
PA 5212 - Managing Urban Growth and Change (3.0 cr)
PA 5213 - Introduction to Site Planning (3.0 cr)
PA 5231 - Transit Planning and Management (3.0 cr)
PA 5234 - Urban Transportation Planning and Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5242 - Environmental Planning, Policy, and Decision Making (3.0 cr)
PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management (3.0 cr)
PA 5261 - Housing Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5262 - Neighborhood Revitalization Theories and Strategies (3.0 cr)
PA 5281 - Immigrants, Urban Planning and Policymaking in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
PA 5301 - Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South (3.0 cr)
PA 5311 - Program Evaluation (3.0 cr)
PA 5401 - Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation (3.0 cr)
PA 5413 - Early Childhood and Public Policy (1.5-3.0 cr)
PA 5415 - Effective Policies for Children in the First Decade (1.5-3.0 cr)
PA 5421 - Racial Inequality and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5426 - Community-Engaged Research and Policy with Marginalized Groups (3.0 cr)
PA 5431 - Public Policies on Work and Pay (3.0 cr)
PA 5451 - Immigration, Health and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5521 - Development Planning and Policy Analysis (4.0 cr)
PA 5561 - Gender and International Development (3.0 cr)
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5711 - Science, Technology & Environmental Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5721 -  Energy Systems and Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5723 - Water Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5724 - Climate Change Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5741 - Risk, Resilience and Decision Making (1.5 cr)
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5805 - Global Economics (3.0 cr)
PA 5813 - US Foreign Policy: Issues and Institutions (3.0 cr)
PA 5814 - Global Diplomacy in a Time of Change (3.0 cr)
PA 5823 - Human Rights and Humanitarian Crises: Policy Challenges (3.0 cr)
PA 5825 - Crisis Management in Foreign Affairs (1.5 cr)
PA 5826 - National Security Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5885 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors (3.0 cr)
PA 5927 - Effective Grantwriting for Nonprofit Organizations (1.5 cr)
PA 5928 - Data Management and Visualization with R (1.0 cr)
PA 5929 - Data Visualization: Telling Stories with Numbers (2.0 cr)
PA 5933 - Survey Methods: Designing Effective Questionnaires (2.0 cr)
PUBH 5231 - Emergency Preparedness: A Public Health Perspective (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6004 - Global Health Capstone (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6011 - Public Health Approaches to HIV/AIDS (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6020 - Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6034 - Evaluation I: Concepts (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6035 - Evaluation II: Applications (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6045 - Skills for Policy Development (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6049 - Legislative Advocacy Skills for Public Health (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6050 - Community Health Promotion I: Integrating Theory, Evidence, and Context (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6051 - Community Health Promotion II: Developing, Implementing, and Justifying Interventions (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6055 - Social Inequalities in Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6060 - Motivational Interviewing: Strategies to Effect Behavior Change (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6066 - Building Communities, Increasing Health: Preparing for Community Health Work (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6074 - Mass Communication and Public Health (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6078 - Public Health Policy as a Prevention Strategy (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6081 - Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6094 - Interventions to Address Weight-Related Health and Eating Disorders (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6102 - Issues in Environmental Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6107 - Excel Skills for Data Management in Public Health Settings (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6108 - Foundations of Global Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6116 - Environmental Law (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6120 - Injury Prevention in the Workplace, Community, and Home (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6123 - Violence Prevention and Control: Theory, Research, and Application (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6130 - Occupational Medicine: Principles and Practice (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6131 - Working in Global Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6132 - Air, Water, and Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6134 - Sustainable Development and Global Public Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6135 - Job Search Strategies and Career Professional Development (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6140 - Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6150 - Interdisciplinary Evaluation of Occupational Health and Safety Field Problems (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6154 - Climate Change and Global Health (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6159 - Principles of Toxicology I (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6161 - Regulatory Toxicology (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6170 - Introduction to Occupational Health and Safety (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6173 - Exposure to Physical Agents (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6175 - Environmental Measurements Laboratory (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6177 - Nanotechnology Health and Safety (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6181 - Surveillance of Foodborne Diseases and Food Safety Hazards (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6182 - Emerging Infectious Disease: Current Issues, Policies, and Controversies (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6183 - Theory and Practice in Foodborne Disease Outbreak Detection, Investigation and Control (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6184 - Field and laboratory methods in public health entomology (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6192 - Measurement and Properties of Air Contaminants (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6193 - Advanced Topics in Human Exposure Science (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6241 - American Indian Public Health and Wellness, Health Policy, Law, Health Services Administration (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6242 - Cultural Humility with American Indian Populations (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6243 - American Indian Research, Evaluation and Collaborations (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6250 - Foundations of Public Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6261 - Human Centered Design for Public Health Leadership, Practice and Innovation (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6301 - Fundamentals of Clinical Research (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6303 - Clinical Research Project Seminar (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6310 - Clinical Epidemiology 1 (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6311 - Clinical Epidemiology II (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6325 - Data Processing with PC-SAS (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6333 - Principles of Human Behavior I (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6341 - Epidemiologic Methods I (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6342 - Epidemiologic Methods II (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6344 - Completing the Integrated Learning Experience: Secondary Data Analysis (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6350 - Epidemiologic Methods III: Lab (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6355 - Pathophysiology of Human Disease (4.0 cr)
PUBH 6365 - Global Challenges in Infectious Disease Epidemiology (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6381 - Genetics in Public Health in the Age of Precision Medicine (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6386 - Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6387 - Cancer Epidemiology (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6389 - Nutritional Epidemiology (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6396 - Applied Practice Experience Global Health (0.5-8.0 cr)
PUBH 6414 - Biostatistical Literacy (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6420 - Introduction to SAS Programming (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6432 - Biostatistical Methods in Translational and Clinical Research (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6450 - Biostatistics I (4.0 cr)
PUBH 6451 - Biostatistics II (4.0 cr)
PUBH 6525 - Introduction to Population Health: A Health System (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6535 - Managerial Accounting for Health Services (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6541 - Statistics for Health Management Decision Making (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6542 - Management of Health Care Organizations (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6544 - Principles of Problem Solving in Health Services Organizations (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6553 - Health Care Management Ethics (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6554 - Healthcare Strategy and Marketing (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6555 - Health Economics (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6556 - Health and Health Systems (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6558 - Health Finance II (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6560 - Operations Research and Quality in Health Care (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6562 - Information Technology in Health Care (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6564 - Private Purchasers of Health Care: Roles of Employers and Health Plans in U.S. Health Care System (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6565 - Innovation of Healthcare Services (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6570 - Healthcare Administration (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 6571 - Quality, Patient Safety, and Performance Improvement (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6576 - Understanding Clinical Quality Using Administrative Data (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6577 - Advanced Problem Solving in Health Services Administration (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6578 - Negotiation Strategies (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6596 - Legal Considerations in Health Services Organizations (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6601 - Born a Girl: Global Women's Health (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6605 - Sexual, Reproductive, and Perinatal Public Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6606 - Children's Health: Life Course and Equity Perspectives (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6607 - Adolescent Health: Issues, Programs, and Policies (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6613 - Children and Youth With Special Health Care Needs (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6627 - Sexuality Education: Criteria, Curricula, and Controversy (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6630 - Foundations of Maternal and Child Health Leadership (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6636 - Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health Practice (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6673 - Grant Writing for Public Health (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6675 - Women's Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6711 - Public Health Law (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6717 - Decision Analysis for Health Care (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6724 - The Health Care System and Public Health (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6727 - Health Leadership and Effecting Change (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6730 - International Comparative Health Systems (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6735 - Principles of Health Policy (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6737 - Structural Racism and Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6741 - Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6742 - Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6744 - State Health Policy and Politics (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6745 - Rural Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6751 - Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6755 - Planning and Budgeting for Public Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6765 - Continuous Quality Improvement: Methods and Techniques (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6772 - Health Disparities Capstone Seminar (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6780 - Topics in Public Health Administration and Policy (1.0-3.0 cr)
PUBH 6803 - Conducting a Systematic Literature Review (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6805 - Introduction to Project Management for Health Professionals (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6806 - Principles of Public Health Research (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6809 - Advanced Methods in Health Decision Science (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6813 - Managing Electronic Health Information (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6815 - Community-based Participatory Research (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6832 - Economics of the Health Care System (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6845 - Using Demographic Data for Policy Analysis (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6852 - Program Evaluation in Health and Mental Health Settings (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6864 - Conducting Health Outcomes Research (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6901 - Foundations of Public Health Nutrition Leadership (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6904 - Nutrition and Aging (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6906 - Global Nutrition (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6907 - Maternal, Infant, Child and Adolescent Nutrition (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6914 - Community Nutrition Intervention (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6915 - Nutrition Assessment (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6933 - Nutrition and Chronic Diseases (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6954 - Personal, Social and Environmental Influences on the Weight-Related Health of Pediatric Populations (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6955 - Using Policy to Address the Weight-Related Health of Child and Adolescent Populations (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6995 - Community Nutrition Practicum (7.0 cr)
PUBH 6996 - Clinical Nutrition Practicum (7.0 cr)
PUBH 7091 - Independent Study: Community Health Promotion (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 7193 - Directed Study: Environmental Health (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 7200 - Topics: Public Health Practice (0.5-4.0 cr)
PUBH 7210 - Topics: Global Food Systems (0.5 cr)
PUBH 7214 - Principles of Risk Communication (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7221 - Planning for Urgent Threats (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7230 - Topics in Infectious Disease (0.5-4.0 cr)
PUBH 7231 - Surveillance of Foodborne Diseases in Humans (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7235 - Surveillance of Zoonotic Pathogens in Animals (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7242 - War and Public Health (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7250 - Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7253 - Introduction to GIS (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7257 - Qualitative Data Analysis (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7262 - Globalization and Health (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7391 - Independent Study: Epidemiology (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 7392 - Readings in Epidemiology (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 7401 - Fundamentals of Biostatistical Inference (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7402 - Biostatistics Modeling and Methods (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7405 - Biostatistical Inference I (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7406 - Biostatistical Inference II (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7415 - Introduction to Clinical Trials (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7420 - Clinical Trials: Design, Implementation, and Analysis (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7440 - Introduction to Bayesian Analysis (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7445 - Statistics for Human Genetics and Molecular Biology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7450 - Survival Analysis (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7461 - Exploring and Visualizing Data in R (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7462 - Advanced Programming and Data Analysis in R (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7465 - Biostatistics Consulting (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7470 - Study Designs in Biomedical Research (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7475 - Statistical Learning and Data Mining (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7485 - Methods for Causal Inference (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7534 - Marketing for Health Care Professionals (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7537 - Healthcare Finance (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7542 - Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7547 - Health Care Human Resource Management (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7551 - Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7553 - Health Care Management Ethics (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7554 - Health Care Strategy and Marketing (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7555 - Health Economics (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7556 - Health and Health Systems (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7560 - Operations Research and Quality in Health Care (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7562 - Information Technology in Health Care (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7564 - Private Purchasers of Health Care (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7565 - Innovation of Healthcare Services (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7569 - Health Care Policy (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7570 - Topics: Healthcare Administration (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7576 - Legal Considerations in Health Services Organizations (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7590 - Gerontology for Healthcare Managers (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7591 - Independent Study: Health Care Administration (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 7691 - Independent Study: Maternal and Child Health (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 7720 - Data to Drive Public Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7730 - Public Health Laws, Rules, and Regulations (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7791 - Independent Study: Public Health Administration and Policy (1.0-6.0 cr)
PUBH 7991 - Independent Study: Public Health Nutrition (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 8120 - Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences Research Seminar (1.0 cr)
PUBH 8160 - Advanced Toxicology (2.0 cr)
PUBH 8166 - Experiences in Toxicology Research (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8194 - Directed Research: Environmental Health (1.0-6.0 cr)
PUBH 8341 - Advanced Epidemiologic Methods: Concepts (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8342 - Advanced Epidemiologic Methods: Applications (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8344 - Advanced Epidemiologic Methods Workshop (1.0 cr)
PUBH 8392 - Readings in Clinical Research (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 8393 - Directed Study: Clinical Research (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 8401 - Linear Models (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8403 - Research Skills in Biostatistics (1.0 cr)
PUBH 8432 - Probability Models for Biostatistics (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8445 - Statistics for Human Genetics and Molecular Biology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8446 - Advanced Statistical Genetics and Genomics (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8475 - Statistical Learning and Data Mining (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8482 - Sequential and Adaptive Methods for Clinical Trials (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8485 - Methods for Causal Inference (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8492 - Theories of Hierarchical and Other Richly Parametrized Linear Models (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8810 - Research Studies in Health Care (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8811 - Research Methods in Health Care (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8814 - Mixed Methods: Quantitative and Qualitative Strategies in Research (2.0 cr)
PUBH 8816 - Implementation Science (2.0 cr)
PUBH 8821 - Health Economics II (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8830 - Writing for Research (2.0 cr)
PUBH 8831 - Writing for Research (2.0 cr)
SW 5051 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment (2.0 cr)
SW 5101 - Historical Origins and Contemporary Policies in Social Welfare (3.0 cr)
SW 5562 - Global Social Work and Social Development (3.0 cr)
SW 5904 - Facilitation and Conflict Management: Humanistic Approach (2.0 cr)
SW 5912 - Grief and Loss in Social Work Practice (1.0 cr)
SW 8151 - Social Work Methods: Practice With Individuals and Systems (2.0 cr)
SW 8152 - Social Work Practice Methods: Families and Groups (2.0 cr)
SW 8153 - Social Work Practice Methods: Macro Practice and Organizations (2.0 cr)
SW 8251 - Social Work Practice in Health, Disabilities, and Aging (3.0 cr)
SW 8262 - Empowerment Practice With Persons With Disabilities (3.0 cr)
SW 8263 - Essential Skills and Perspectives for Working with Older Adults (3.0 cr)
SW 8351 - Assessment and Engagement with Families and Children (3.0 cr)
SW 8352 - Intervention Methods with Families (3.0 cr)
SW 8361 - Identification and Assessment of Family Violence (3.0 cr)
SW 8363 - Social Work in Child Welfare (3.0 cr)
SW 8451 - Assessment and Engagement in Clinical Social Work Practice (3.0 cr)
SW 8452 - Core Concepts in Clinical Social Work Practice (3.0 cr)
SW 8461 - Advanced Clinical Social Work Practice with Adults (3.0 cr)
SW 8462 - Advanced Clinical Practice With Children and Adolescents (3.0 cr)
SW 8463 - Practice Interventions with Persons Who Experience Serious Mental Illness (3.0 cr)
SW 8551 - Advanced Community Practice: Assessment, Organizing, and Advocacy (3.0 cr)
SW 8552 - Advanced Community Practice: Leadership, Planning, and Program Development (3.0 cr)
SW 8563 - Advanced Policy Advocacy (3.0 cr)
SW 8804 - Child Welfare Policy (3.0 cr)
SW 8806 - Health and Mental Health Policy (3.0 cr)
SW 8807 - International and Comparative Social Welfare Policy (3.0 cr)
SW 8821 - Social Work and Difference, Diversity and Privilege (2.0 cr)
SW 8841 - Social Work Research Methods (2.0 cr)
SW 8842 - Advanced Social Work Evaluation (1.0-3.0 cr)
SW 8843 - Social Work Program Evaluation (1.0-2.0 cr)
SW 8851 - Social Welfare History and Historical Research Methods (3.0 cr)
SW 8901 - Assessment and Treatment of Trauma (2.0 cr)
SW 8902 - Social Work Supervision, Consultation, and Leadership (2.0 cr)
VMED 5101 - Molecular and Cellular Basis of Nanoparticle Toxicity (3.0 cr)
VMED 5165 - Surveillance of Foodborne Diseases and Food Safety Hazards (2.0 cr)
VMED 5180 - Ecology of Infectious Disease (3.0 cr)
VMED 5181 - Spatial Analysis in Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
VMED 5915 - Essential Statistics for Life Sciences (3.0 cr)
VMED 8134 - Ethical Conduct of Animal Research (3.0 cr)
Joint- or Dual-degree Coursework:
MSW/MPH-Community Health PromotionJD/MPH-Community Health Promotion Students may take a total of 12 credits in common among the academic programs.
 
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PUBH 6050 - Community Health Promotion I: Integrating Theory, Evidence, and Context
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course examines personal, social, and environmental factors that influence health-related behaviors, as well as the role of individuals, groups, institutions, societal structures, and policy in encouraging and discouraging healthy behaviors. The course focuses on behavior change theories and application of these theories to health promotion.
PUBH 6102 - Issues in Environmental Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Current issues, principles, and methods of environmental/occupational health practice. prereq: Public health [MPH or MHA or certificate] student or health journalism MA major or nursing MS student or instr consent
PUBH 6450 - Biostatistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will cover the fundamental concepts of exploratory data analysis and statistical inference for univariate and bivariate data, including: ? study design and sampling methods, ? descriptive and graphical summaries, ? random variables and their distributions, ? interval estimation, ? hypothesis testing, ? relevant nonparametric methods, ? simple regression/correlation, and ? introduction to multiple regression. There will be a focus on analyzing data using statistical programming software and on communicating the results in short reports. Health science examples from the research literature will be used throughout the course. prereq: [College-level algebra, health sciences grad student] or instr consent
PUBH 6741 - Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to ethical issues in public health practice/policy. Ethical analysis, recognizing/analyzing moral issues. prereq: Public health [MPH or MHA or certificate] student or environmental health [MS or PhD] major or instr consent
PUBH 6751 - Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Understanding of and improvement in the competencies of managers in organizations, particularly as applied to health services and public health organizations. prereq: [Public hlth MPH or MHA or certificate] student or [environmental health MS or PhD] student or dentistry MS student or instr consent
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course provides an understanding of basic methods and tools used by epidemiologists to study the health of populations.
PUBH 6341 - Epidemiologic Methods I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6320PubH /6341
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to epidemiologic concepts and methods: (1) Study design (randomized trials and observational studies); (2) Measures of exposure-disease association; (3) Casual inference and bias; (4) Confounding and effect modification.
PUBH 6034 - Evaluation I: Concepts
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6034/PubH 6852
Typically offered: Every Spring
Developing useful program evaluations. Emphasizes skills for program administrators, planners. Needs assessments. Assessment of program design, implementation, impact. Cost-effectiveness analysis. Quantitative and qualitative data collection methods. Ethical considerations.
PUBH 6035 - Evaluation II: Applications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6035/PubH 6806
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course teaches basic research skills needed to plan, conduct, and analyze data from a quantitative research project. Skills include developing research questions;performing literature searches; performing literature searches;developing questionnaires; implementing a study; coding, entering and analyzing data using STATA software; and writing reports.
PUBH 6051 - Community Health Promotion II: Developing, Implementing, and Justifying Interventions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6051/Pubh 6673
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Skill development for developing community health interventions, budgets, implementation plans, and grant proposals. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for PubH 6673.
PUBH 6852 - Program Evaluation in Health and Mental Health Settings
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6034/PubH 6852
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Understanding an evaluation study. Program evaluation. Applications to health and mental health settings. emphasizes public health.
PUBH 6045 - Skills for Policy Development
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Skills relevant to policy development and implementation for public health-related issues.
PUBH 6078 - Public Health Policy as a Prevention Strategy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Philosophical, ethical, economic, political, efficacy rationale for policy approach to prevention. Historical/current application of prevention policy to public health problems. prereq: 2nd yr MPH or public health MS student or [Epi, Biostats, Env Hlth, HSRPconcurrent registration is required (or allowed) in A PhD student] or instr consent
PUBH 6107 - Excel Skills for Data Management in Public Health Settings
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on course on computer skills to learn a wide range of methods to manipulate public health data. Students will be given ?raw? datasets and practice computer methods to clean, filter, recode, combine, tabulate and report data within the Excel and Access environments. The course is ideal for students who may not pursue more advanced quantitative training but still want to feel comfortable using these widely available programs to produce quality datasets for further analysis, and to generate summary results or reports in their work as public health practitioners.
PUBH 6243 - American Indian Research, Evaluation and Collaborations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
As sovereign nations, American Indian Federally Recognized Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their populations, as well as controlling research and evaluation activities; and development of formal collaborations. A duly elected Tribal government is responsible for all functions and activities of the Tribe. Tribes have an inherent and legal responsibility to protect Tribal affairs, businesses, and traditional values and customs. Included in Tribal responsibilities is the ability to develop and maintain policies to protect the integrity of operations and guard against predatory and harmful use of data against the population they serve. This is an absolute and non-negotiable function of a Tribe to ensure present and continued viability of all future generations. This course will provide specific examples of data sharing agreements, Memorandums of Agreement or Understanding, legal basis for confidentially, discuss community readiness, and community evaluations. It is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with Tribes and American Indian communities, and to understand the basis of research, evaluation, and collaboration. This course focuses on stakeholder driven: participation, issue identification, data sharing, and benefit to community. To help ensure ethical and cultural values are protected an increasing number of Tribes are forming their own Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) under 45 CFR 46. The course will offer examples of Tribal IRBs and specific IRB components for American Indian populations. Tribal governments represent communities with distinctive social, cultural, and spiritual qualities that embody a unique context for the review and conduct of research. This course will provide numerous examples of Tribally developed research and review mechanisms that are tailored to specific community needs and interests.
PUBH 6342 - Epidemiologic Methods II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods and techniques for designing, implementing, analyzing, and interpreting observational epidemiologic studies, including cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies.
PUBH 6414 - Biostatistical Literacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Develop ability to read/interpret statistical results in primary literature. Minimal calculation. No formal training in any statistical programming software. Biostatistical Literacy will cover the fundamental concepts of study design, descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, odds ratios, relative risks, adjusted models in multiple linear, logistic and Poisson regression, and survival analysis. The focus will be when to use a given method and how to interpret the results, not the actual computation or computer programming to obtain results from raw data. prereq: MPH or certificate student or environmental health or instr consent
PUBH 6451 - Biostatistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will cover more advanced aspects of statistical analysis methods with a focus on statistical modeling, including: ? two-way ANOVA, ? multiple linear regression, ? logistic regression, ? Poisson regression, ? log binomial and ordinal regression, ? survival analysis methods, including Kaplan-Meier analysis and proportional hazards (Cox) regression, ? power and sample size, and ? survey sampling and analysis. There will be a focus on analyzing data using statistical programming software and on communicating the results in short reports. Health science examples from the research literature will be used throughout the course. prereq: [PubH 6450 with grade of at least B, health sciences grad student] or instr consent
PUBH 6636 - Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health Practice
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Qualitative inquiry, selected data collection, management, analysis methods for qualitative research in public health. Current approaches to assess strength of evidence of qualitative studies in public health. Provision of practical skills that can be applied in public health settings.
PUBH 6806 - Principles of Public Health Research
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Evaluation of public health research literature and planning for independent research projects. Formulation of research question, research design, sampling techniques, use of research concepts, and data analysis. Data collection techniques, including questionnaires, interviews, and data analysis. prereq: Pub hlth or grad or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory/application of survey research in data collection. Sampling, item development, instrument design/administration to conduct survey or be aware of issues related to design/implementation. Identification of sources of error in survey research.
PUBH 6815 - Community-based Participatory Research
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This introductory course is intended for junior faculty, post-docs, graduate students and community practitioners interested in adding CBPR to their repertoire of effective approaches to understanding and addressing social and health disparities. Topics will explore the purpose and applications of CBPR; partnership formation and maintenance; issues of power, trust, race, class, and social justice; conflict resolution; ethical issues; CBPR's relationship to cultural knowledge systems, and funding CBPR projects. This is NOT a methodology course. CBPR is an approach to conducting research that is amenable to a variety of research designs and methodologies and will NOT cover topics such as survey design, quantitative methods, qualitative methods, focus groups, community needs assessment procedures, etc.
PUBH 5231 - Emergency Preparedness: A Public Health Perspective
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Public health emergency preparedness, response, recovery. Introduction to field's core competencies. Various components of course, including online modules, intended to stimulate interactions among learners. Purpose, history, organization, functions, tools, activities used in field. prereq: Upper-level undergraduate students and grad/professional students in academic health sciences and fields related to public health emergency preparedness, response, and recovery. Credit will be not granted if student has completed the PubH 5230 topic course with same title.
PUBH 6011 - Public Health Approaches to HIV/AIDS
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 3011/6011
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of public health approaches to AIDS epidemic. Epidemiological/clinical features of HIV infection. Impact of AIDS on certain communities/populations. Behavior change principles as they apply to AIDS interventions. prereq: Grad student or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 6045 - Skills for Policy Development
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Skills relevant to policy development and implementation for public health-related issues.
PUBH 6049 - Legislative Advocacy Skills for Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
State legislature as arena for public health practice. Skills necessary to operate in that arena. Analyzing emergence, development, and resolution of legislative issues of public health importance.
PUBH 6055 - Social Inequalities in Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Extent and causes of social inequalities in health. Degree to which understanding of these inequalities is hampered by methodological limitations in health research. Focuses on individual, community, and policy approaches to reducing social inequalities in health.
PUBH 6066 - Building Communities, Increasing Health: Preparing for Community Health Work
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Taught with Powderhorn-Phillips Cultural Wellness Center. Introduction to community building/organizing. Using culture as a resource for health, reducing barriers, identifying community assets, planning organizing strategy, understanding the impact of history. Emphasizes self-reflection and skill-building for authentic, grassroots community work.
PUBH 6074 - Mass Communication and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Jour 5541/PubH 6074
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an overview of theory and research that lies at the intersection of mass communication and public health. We examine the potential for media exposure to influence public health outcomes, both as a product of people's everyday interactions with media and the strategic use of media messages to accomplish public health goals. To this end, we will explore large-scale public health campaigns in the context of tobacco, obesity, and cancer screening. We also will explore news media coverage of controversial health issues, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, and health information in entertainment media, such as smoking in movies. This course seeks to understand whether media messages have had intended and/or unintended effects on public attitudes and behavior. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal, medical, and digital media sources will be considered as well.
PUBH 6078 - Public Health Policy as a Prevention Strategy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Philosophical, ethical, economic, political, efficacy rationale for policy approach to prevention. Historical/current application of prevention policy to public health problems. prereq: 2nd yr MPH or public health MS student or [Epi, Biostats, Env Hlth, HSRPconcurrent registration is required (or allowed) in A PhD student] or instr consent
PUBH 6081 - Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a graduate-level class for students preparing for careers in public health research and practice where sex, sexuality, and sexual health are key components. It is a highly applied, highly interactive course focused on developing skills needed in sex research and sexual health practice. The teaching pedagogical approach is a "flipped classroom" where students are expected to learn the content from the assigned audiotaped lectures, movies and readings, and to come to class ready to participate in exercises, discuss case studies, complete assignments and immerse themselves in public health practice and research focused on sex, sexuality, and sexual health. The purpose of this graduate level course is to prepare health professionals for a professional career addressing community and population sexual health concerns by deepening their knowledge of and exposure to research practice in the field, increasing comfort familiarity and ability to speak on sexual health topics, and by practicing their skills. The assignments focus on hot topics in sex and sexual health, and are designed to increase knowledge of the field of sexual health, while developing skills in conceptualization, measurement, intervention design, and evaluation. Please note this course addresses the greatest challenges in sexual health facing our world, including such hot topics as the zika virus and HIV prevention, clergy sexual abuse, campus sexual climate, sexual harassment, LGBT health disparities, contraception, abortion, women's rights, teen sex, and unplanned pregnancy.
PUBH 6094 - Interventions to Address Weight-Related Health and Eating Disorders
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine obesity epidemic, eating disorders, prevention and treatment approaches at multiple levels (individual, social, environmental, policy), links between obesity and eating disorders.
PUBH 6120 - Injury Prevention in the Workplace, Community, and Home
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Injury epidemiology: analyses of major injury problems affecting the public in the workplace, community, and home using epidemiologic model and conceptual framework; emphasis on strategies/program development for prevention and control.
PUBH 6123 - Violence Prevention and Control: Theory, Research, and Application
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis/critique of major theories and of epidemiological research pertinent to violence, including characteristics of violence and relevant risk factors, reporting/treatment protocols, and current/potential intervention efforts and prevention initiatives. Emphasizes interdisciplinary contributions to violence prevention/control.
PUBH 6131 - Working in Global Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to key issues in global health. Global burden of disease. Cultural issues/health. Nutrition. Infectious diseases. Environmental problems. Women/children. Prereq Grad student.
PUBH 6242 - Cultural Humility with American Indian Populations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course will present evidence that cultural humility is a lifelong quest toward achieving positive outcomes in work with American Indian Tribes and American Indian communities. It is essential that health care and health service providers learn the respective cultures of the American Indian population they are serving. Equally important is the fact that every federally recognized tribe, of which there are 573, has their own unique traditional customs, history with other tribes, and often subpopulations within the governance of a single tribal government. The realization of understanding how populations have been driven by their respective cultures to their overall health and well-being is necessary to promote achievement of positive outcomes for stakeholders and communities. The course will target methods to help health professionals to ensure that health services take into account individual understanding of the professional?s knowledge and how this knowledge should be respectful of individual cultural preferences. A systematic process will be provided to assist in how to learn community policies, learning processes, and traditions; as well as learning about various structures by which the culture of governments, organizations and individuals develop and support the attitudes, behaviors, practices and systems that are needed for effective cross-cultural interactions between health professionals and community members. Students will learn that ultimately, cultural humility effectiveness is determined by the individual who is receiving the services. The course is grounded in the understanding that cultural humility can effectively be used to strive for continuous improvement, to effectively utilize assets and address the health needs of individual American Indian communities.
PUBH 6627 - Sexuality Education: Criteria, Curricula, and Controversy
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Issues and controversies affecting K-12 sexuality education. Current research and guidelines for effective, responsible education and curricula selection. Various curricula being used in the United States. Challenges in teaching sensitive issues inherent in sexuality education.
PUBH 7096 - Applied Practice Experience: Community Health Promotion
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
MPH students are required to complete a supervised Applied Practice Experience (APEx). Students must address five competencies and must submit two products that demonstrate attainment of the competencies. prereq: CHP program, instr consent
PUBH 7094 - Integrative Learning Experience: Community Health Promotion
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
MPH students complete an integrative learning experience (ILE) that demonstrates synthesis of foundational and concentration competencies. Students in consultation with faculty select foundational and concentration-specific competencies appropriate to the student's educational and professional goals. prereq: CHP program, instr consent
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is your opportunity to examine, challenge, and critically reflect upon your thinking about health. ?Micro-immersion experience? offers you an opportunity to explore different understandings of health through interactions with cultural communities. The brief immersions facilitate experiential glimpses into fundamentally different worldviews and systems of thought that are often excluded by the scientific/professional models emphasized on campus. Critical thinking, critical reflection, and supplemental readings support your effort to step into culturally different knowledge systems and mental models of health and well-being. Confronting cultural difference in this way offers a powerful mirror through which your own tacit perspective, thinking and assumptions of health become more visible and explicit. You are asked to challenge your own thinking as you attempt to inhabit different cognitive worlds. We will do our best to create a space that encourages us to share with sincerity our thoughts and emerging insights with one another in class de-briefing conversations. These de-briefings allow you benefit from each other?s take on the immersion experiences as you develop your own personal philosophy, narrative, and understanding of health. prereq: jr, sr, grad, or instr consent
CSPH 5115 - Cultural Awareness, Knowledge and Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How knowledge can become resource for individual, family, community health. Interactive glimpse of wisdom of cultural communities. Develop capacity to see culture within professional education/practice. Cultural constructs underpinning medical system, role of culture in interaction between practitioner/patient, role of reconnection to cultural heritage in healing. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
CSPH 5118 - Whole Person, Whole Community: The Reciprocity of Wellbeing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores the symbiotic and reciprocal relationship between individual and community health and wellbeing, as well as the many factors/forces which influence that relationship. Drawing upon recent studies in the area of reciprocal/symbiotic effects between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing, this course will include the following core topics: definitions of community and related dimensions of wellbeing, importance of Individual/Community reciprocity (Social Justice, Equity, Safety, and Trust), historical trauma and healing, and individual action and personal empowerment in community transformation. Utilizing elements of the Center for Spirituality & Healing's Wellbeing model and modes of contemplative practice, this course will ultimately assist learners through phases of individual reflection and mindfulness for the purpose of creating more open and reciprocal relationships with entities they describe as their communities. An extension of recent studies in the area of the reciprocal (or rippling) effect between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing this course will guide individuals in identifying the various communities in which they live or participate, the roles they "play" within those communities and why/ how this knowledge can help prepare them for action and leadership. Main themes of the course will include: - Mindfulness, Reflection and Healing: Historical Trauma and Marginalization. - Roles and Reciprocity: Justice, Equity, Security and Trust between individuals and their communities. - Transformation: Individual Action/Leadership as Bridge between Personal and Community Wellbeing.
CSPH 5215 - Forgiveness and Healing: A Journey Toward Wholeness
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will examine the impact of forgiveness on the process of interpersonal and intrapersonal healing, as well as healing of conflict and trauma at the intergroup level. Forgiveness and healing will be examined in the context of intense interpersonal and intrapersonal conflicts in multiple health care and social work settings, including in families, between physicians and nurses, between patients/clients and nurses/social workers, within communities, among friends, between co-workers, or within ourselves. Forgiveness will also be examined in the larger global context and how principles and practices of forgiveness are being applied in some of the most entrenched political and violent conflicts, such as in Northern Ireland, South Africa, Liberia, Rwanda, and Israel/Palestine. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the central elements of forgiveness and healing in the context of multiple micro and macro life settings. The concepts of forgiveness and healing will be examined from multiple spiritual and secular traditions. The underlying philosophical elements of forgiveness and healing will be critically assessed and beliefs and rituals from numerous indigenous and European traditions will be presented and examined. The focus will be upon gaining a more grounded understanding of the process of forgiveness and its potential impact upon emotional and relational healing. The concepts of forgiveness and healing will be addressed in a very broad and inclusive manner, with no assumptions made related to their specific cultural context or meaning. Empirical studies that have examined the impact of forgiveness upon emotional and physical healing will be reviewed. Concepts such as forgiveness and healing are inseparable from the concept of spirituality. For the purposes of the course, spirituality is not synonymous with the dogma and creeds of the major religious traditions in the world, even though religion for many may serve as a pathway to spirituality. Practices within the major religions of the world that foster forgiveness and healing, however, will be explored, along with practices within Native American, Canadian Aboriginal, Native Hawaiian, African, New Zealand Maori, and Eastern cultural traditions. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
CSPH 5303 - Pain Management and Evidence Based Complementary Health Approaches
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will cover the evidence regarding effectiveness and safety of CIH practices, and the relationship of CIH to contemporary views of pain, health, and healing. There is a growing evidence base to support some complementary and integrative healing (CIH) approaches for pain management including yoga, mindfulness meditation, chiropractic, and others. In the US, chronic pain impacts over one third of the population and affects more individuals than heart disease, diabetes, and cancer combined. While there is a wide range of conventional medical treatments available to manage pain, many are only marginally effective and are associated with troublesome side effects. Of growing concerns is the endemic problem of opioids associated with misuse, addiction, and fatal overdose. Pain sufferers and health providers need effective and safe options for pain management. Some complementary and integrative healing (CIH) approaches have a growing evidence base to support their use, particularly for pain management. This course will introduce students to the theories, mechanisms, use, effectiveness, and safety of commonly used complementary and integrative healing practices. The relationship of CIH approaches to contemporary views and research regarding pain, health and healing, and placebo effects will also be explored. Through reading, reflection, discussion, and critical appraisal, students will develop the necessary skills to synthesize different forms of information, including research, to reach evidence-informed and balanced conclusions regarding CIH for managing pain, restoring function, and enhancing overall health and wellbeing. CIH approaches covered will include: whole systems (Traditional Chinese Medicine, osteopathy, chiropractic, Ayurvedic Medicine, etc.); mind-body practices (contemplative and meditative practices; yoga, tai chi, Qigong, etc.); manipulative and body-based approaches (massage therapy, acupuncture, manipulation); and energy-based approaches (energy medicine, Reiki, therapeutic touch, healing touch). Upon completion of the course, students will have a foundational knowledge of CIH for pain management and the skills to critically appraise and determine the trustworthiness of different information sources. Prerequisite: Graduate or Professional program student.
CSPH 5305 - Introduction to Integrative Mental Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Prerequisite: Graduate or Professional student. This course focuses on introducing students to the concept of integrative mental health (IMH). Definitions of IMH, the history and background of the concept, and how it relates to psychiatric care and health care in general will be explored. Students will explore and practice risk-benefit profiles of different modalities in the context of evidence-based mental health care. An emphasis will be placed on the connection between physical and mental health and how that can be approached from an integrative perspective. Topics such as mindfulness and mental health, nutrition and mental health, herbs and supplements in psychiatric care, and the role of functional medicine in IMH will be covered, as well as how psychotherapy and psychotropic medications fit in the IMH framework. Students will review the current diagnostic system for mental health disorders and that can both help and hinder an integrative approach to mental health care. Integrative approaches for assessing mental health concerns will be reviewed, and how to use these approaches alongside a traditional medical approach for maximum benefit will be explored. Students will further review specific modalities for mental health and wellbeing that are less focused on specific systems and more focused on holism and the interplay of systems. Students will also identity and explore different ways of viewing mental health and wellbeing based on cultural and geographical issues, and how these may impact the approaches.
CSPH 5701 - Fundamentals of Health Coaching I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides a foundation of Health Coaching theory and practice. We will explore basic tenets of the health coaching model (a 4-pillared construct), including deep listening, effective and empathic communication, and tools for self-development. We examine the core building blocks for optimal health from a holistic perspective. In Health Coaching, each person is recognized as an intrinsically healthy, whole, and wise being, who is the ultimate expert in his or her healing journey. As a student and coach in training, your own self-development becomes an organic part of your professional evolution, and you will receive support in this. It is the role of the Health Coach to provide a safe environment and professional expertise to support this journey. In this course you will learn how to facilitate the client?s process by identifying and benchmarking stages and patterns of change, effectively interfacing with a wide range of interdisciplinary health care providers,and educating clients on a variety of self-care practices. Prereq admitted to Master of Arts in Integrative Health and Wellbeing Coaching; or, Integrative Therapies and Healing Practices Certificate-Health Coaching track; or, Doctor of Nursing Practice; or, non-degree seeking graduate students or students from other graduate degree programs may enroll with permission of the course instructors.
CSPH 5702 - Fundamentals of Health Coaching II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic tenets of health coaching model. Tools for self development, deep listening, and effective communication. Core building blocks for optimal health from a holistic perspective. Identifying/benchmarking stages/patterns of change, interfacing with interdisciplinary health care providers, locating resources to assist clients in decision making, and educating clients on self-care practices. prereq: CSPH 5701; admitted to Integrative Health and Wellbeing Coaching MA program; or, Integrative Therapies and Healing Practices Certificate-Health Coaching track; or, instr consent.
CSPH 5703 - Advanced Health Coaching Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is designed to provide additional case-based learning in Health Coaching as a means to deepen and mature the process skills that were introduced in Fundamentals of Health Coaching I and II. Increasing confidence in the application of theory and process from earlier courses will be emphasized. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to hone their abilities to identify and utilize broad-based resources in guiding and supporting individual clients. Students are given the opportunity to integrate and apply all previous areas of learning and to explore their resistance, learning edges, and competencies in a supportive supervisory environment. Students will be encouraged to deepen their own style of health coaching as well as their own growth processes. Ethical issues, professional boundaries, and awareness of additional community and professional resources will be introduced here and furthered in internships. Over the course of the semester, students will be coaching 3 community volunteer clients for 5 sessions each. One client for each student will be coached during the weekend classes. prereq: Admission to the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Integrative Therapies and Healing Practices--Health Coaching track; or, Masters of Arts in Integrative Health and Wellbeing Coaching. CSPH 5701, 5702, 5706, 5707.
CSPH 5704 - Business of Health Coaching
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is designed to enable and empower students to apply health coaching skills in structures such as a private coaching business or an existing organization through discussion, reflection and writing. We will explore legal, ethical, and financial issues through visioning, marketing, strategic planning, and energetic intending necessary to start and sustain a Health Coaching practice. prereq: Admission to the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Integrative Therapies and Healing Practices-Health Coaching track; or, Masters of Arts in Integrated Health and Wellbeing Coaching program or instructor permission; CSPH 5701, 5702, 5706, 5707.
CSPH 5706 - Lifestyle Medicine
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course provides a foundation in the theory and clinical application of lifestyle medicine. Lifestyle medicine aims to address the behavioral and lifestyle bases of common illnesses through health promoting activities and reducing harmful behaviors. In this course, we will explore optimal nutrition, lifestyle, physical activity, and attitude. We will examine the emerging evidence base of lifestyle medicine and how it relates to health promotion and disease prevention. Participants will be introduced to common laboratory and imaging findings, and how they relate to optimal health. prereq: basic course in Biology or Human Physiology.
CSPH 5707 - Coaching People with Clinical Conditions
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course provides students with a basic awareness and expanded perception of prevalent clinical conditions, and supports the development of empathy related to these conditions. It continues to build coaching skills specific to coaching clients with clinical conditions. Also supports the development of professional oral and written communication skills. Prereq CSPH 5701, 5702 and 5706; Admitted to one of the following programs: Master of Arts in Integrative Health and Wellbeing Coaching, Integrative Therapies and Healing Practices Certificate-Health Coaching track, or instructor consent.
CSPH 5708 - Mind-Body Science and the Art of Transformation
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Modern technology has provided deeper insight into how our minds and bodies change based on our focus, intentions, cell environment, habits, stress, and behaviors. We will investigate these new perspectives and how to apply them through transformative practices to change our thoughts, beliefs, bodies, emotions, and paradigms to create sustainable shifts towards optimal health, wellness, and living. Prereq: Jr or Sr or Grad; or instructor consent
CSPH 5709 - Health and Wellbeing Group Coaching
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The Health and Wellbeing Group Coaching Practicum enables the student to learn and apply the theory and practice of group health and wellbeing coaching in a community site-based practicum setting, and to communicate their learning in a professional manner. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: ? Explore and demonstrate how to apply the four pillars into the structure of group coaching. ? Identify and practice skills and tools of group facilitation and coaching. ? Demonstrate the art of managing group dynamics successfully. Prereq: - Admission to the Master of Arts in Integrative Health and Wellbeing Coaching program; or - Admission to or graduation from the Integrative Therapies and Healing Practice Certificate program Health Coaching track; or - Special permission by the Instructors - Satisfactory completion of each of the following courses with a 3.0 or better: CSPH 5701, CSPH 5702, CSPH 5703, CSPH 5705, CSPH 5706, CSPH 5707.
CSPH 5713 - Health Coaching for Health Professionals
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course will explore the basic tenets of 4 Pillars of Health Coaching model--self-awareness, mindful presence, authentic communication, and safe/sacred space. Students will learn to identify/benchmark stages/patterns of change, respectfully collaborate with interdisciplinary health care providers and facilitate clients? ability to achieve sustainable lifestyle changes. Consistent, nonjudgmental application of a holistic perspective of optimal health and wellbeing in patient encounters will be discussed and demonstrated. Students will have the opportunity to see demonstrated and to practice applying tools and practices from motivational interviewing, appreciative inquiry, non-violent communication, and other authentic communication tools. Interprofessional dialogues and exercises will be guaranteed through targeted participation of second year Health Coaching students, who are not taking this course for credit but are volunteering to increase the interprofessional understanding of coaching and team work. This course is not considered preparatory for becoming a professional health coach and does not meet educational hour requirements toward eligibility for the National Board of Health and Wellness Coaching exam, or for Continuing Education hours for NBHWC recertification. Prereq: Admitted to the Doctor of Nursing Practice-Integrative Health and Healing specialty; Admitted to other Doctor of Nursing Practice specialties; Graduate or professional students in health sciences programs; Practicing health professionals; or instructor consent.
CSPH 5805 - Wellbeing in the Workplace
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Work and experiences in the workplace have a profound impact on many dimensions of individual and collective wellbeing, including a sense of purpose and meaning, financial and emotional security, quality of relationships and community, physical and emotional health, and the local and global environments. In this course, students will learn multi-disciplinary perspectives on key challenges in creating workplaces that contribute to greater wellbeing. Students will also reflect on their own personal experiences with wellbeing in their current and past work environments and examine strategies for enhancing wellbeing based on interdisciplinary theory and research. Specific topics include the importance of purpose and meaning at work, challenges in achieving work-life integration, the impact of technology on work expectations, and organizational change. This course is based on a whole-life, integrative model of wellbeing and draws from research and theory across the social, behavior, and health sciences. Prereq jr or sr or grad, or instructor consent
CSPH 5806 - Wellbeing and Resiliency for Health Professionals
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will teach health professional students and health professionals self-care strategies that will improve their individual wellbeing and reduce the stress and burnout often experienced in these professions. Improving individual wellbeing will also contribute to greater wellbeing in the teams and systems in which these professionals work Prereq jr or sr or grad, or instructor consent
CSPH 5807 - Mindfulness in the Workplace: Pause, Practice, Perform
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Mindfulness in the Workplace is an experiential course designed to teach core mindfulness skills while also exploring specific applications to the workplace setting. The course explores key mindfulness traits and how they relate to essential workplace skills, such as resilience, task execution, critical analysis, intra/interpersonal growth, leadership, and other related topics. In addition, the course explores how corporate culture can be a barrier or a catalyst for adoption of mindfulness principles. By exploring the above topics from the perspective of the workplace and academic literature, students will gain an understanding of how to apply evidence-informed techniques to help them on the job. Prereq jr or sr or grad, or instructor consent
CSPH 5905 - Food Matters: Cook Like Your Life Depends On It
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Food Matters is an experiential-learning, applied nutrition & culinary skills course for health professional students. The course addresses the role of food in specific health conditions and its function in health promotion and disease prevention. The course guides future health professionals in the procurement, preparation, and consumption of sustainably raised whole foods for self care and how this translates to patient care. Prereq: Graduate student in a health professions field, or instructor consent
EPSY 5114 - Psychology of Student Learning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3301/EPsy 5114
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to the theories, data, and methods of Educational Psychology most relevant to understanding student thinking and learning. The first third of the course reviews those aspects of cognitive development that are foundational for education. The second third considers how cognitive psychology informs questions of learning, memory, knowledge, and transfer. With this background in place, the final third of the course will focus on the classroom: on instruction, motivation, individual differences, and group differences. The course concludes by considering the neural correlates of classroom learning.
EPSY 5244 - Survey Design, Sampling, and Implementation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey methods, including mail, phone, and Web-based/e-mail surveys. Principles of measurement, constructing questions/forms, pilot testing, sampling, data analysis, reporting. Students develop a survey proposal and a draft survey, pilot the survey, and develop sampling/data analysis plans. prereq: [5221 or 5231 or 5261 or equiv], [CEHD grad student or MEd student]
EPSY 5247 - Qualitative Methods in Educational Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to qualitative methods of inquiry. Contrasting different research traditions (e.g., case study, phenomenology, ethnography, social interactionism, critical theory). Practice with field notes, observations, and interviewing. Use of NVIVO to track/code data. prereq: Graduate student or Applied Psychology in Educational and Community Settings Minor
EPSY 5609 - Infants and Toddlers with Delays/Disabilities: Family-Centered Approaches to Early Intervention
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course was designed to provide pre-service and current teachers as well as related service providers with the knowledge and skills needed to understand the dynamic ecosystems of families with a child with disabilities. Students will be introduced to the major methods, philosophies, and current research that emphasize effective family-professional collaboration in planning and service delivery for infants and young children with disabilities. The focus is on a family-centered approach to assess and design educational plans and interventions, with a specific emphasis on relationship building and understanding the diverse perspectives on family life and developmental expectations.
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8251/EPsy 8261
Prerequisites: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Statistical Methods in Education I is the first course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course covers estimation and hypothesis testing with a particular focus on ANOVA and an introduction to multiple linear regression. Prepares students for EPSY 8252/8262. prereq: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
General linear model used as context for regression. Matrix algebra, multiple regression, path analysis, polynomial regression, standardized regression, stepwise solutions, analysis of variance, weighted least squares, logistic regression. prereq: [8252 or equiv], regression/ANOVA course, familiarity with statistical analysis package
EPSY 8282 - Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Traditional/modern approaches to analyzing longitudinal data. Dependent t-test, repeated measures ANOVA/MANOVA. Linear mixed models, multilevel models, generalized models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
FSCN 4612W - Advanced Human Nutrition (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study of digestion/absorption of nutrients. Research techniques in nutrition, including human/epidemiological studies. Health promotion, disease prevention theories. Non-Enforced Prerequisites: FSCN 1112, CHEM 1062 and CHEM 1066 Enforced Prerequisites (students cannot register without the following): BioC 3021 or PHSL 3051 or ANSC 3301 or BIOL 3211 or Instructor Consent
FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition risks associated with different age, sex, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. Community needs assessment. Program planning and evaluation. Programs developed to address the needs and interests of people at different stages of the life cycle, ethnic or cultural backgrounds, and literacy levels.
FSCN 4621 - Nutrition and Metabolism
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Carbohydrate, lipid, protein metabolism. Uses systems/holistic approach to emphasize how metabolic pathways interrelate. Prequisite courses: FSCN 4612, BIOC 3021, ANSC 3301
FSCN 4622 - Nutritional Toxicology, the basic science of diet-related toxicants
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSCN 4622/Nutr 5627
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of toxicology. Molecular mechanism behind dietary chemical-induced toxicities. Impact/risk of dietary chemicals for human health. prereq: BIOC 3021; designed for students majoring in [nutrition or food science or toxicology ]
FSCN 4665 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nutrition care process, with a focus on nutrition assessment and support, and on pathophysiology, management, and nutrition care of disease and injury, e.g. gastrointestinal (GI), pancreatic, hepatic, and pulmonary disorders; surgery/trauma/burns; and cancer. prereq: BIOC: 3021, PHYS 3051, FSCN 4612
FSCN 4666 - Medical Nutrition Therapy II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition care process, with a focus on pathophysiology, management, and nutrition care of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, renal disorders, and obesity.
FSCN 4732 - Food and Nutrition Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Financial and human resource management applied to a variety of business and institutional settings. Field trips may be required. prereq: 3732
FSCN 5131 - Food Quality for Graduate Credit
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management systems, statistical procedures, regulatory requirements involved with producing quality food/ingredients. Risk assessment/management, good manufacturing practices, hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP), statistical methods for process control, total quality management, food/drug laws. Prereq: Food Science Grad Student Student may select grading basis if instructor approves. A-F registration is required for class to count toward degree.
FSCN 5312 - Food Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical tools needed for investigation in Food Science/Technology, whether by food industry, governmental agencies, or universities. Application of quantitative/ qualitative physical, chemical/instrumental methods used for analysis/examination of food constituents. Sensory evaluation techniques, evaluation of methods/interpretation of results. prereq: 4112, STAT 3011
FSCN 5601 - Management of Eating Disorders
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Etiology, occurrence, course, treatment, prevention of eating disorders from multidisciplinary perspective. Roles and responsibilities of eating disorder treatment team members of varying types across various treatment milieus. Prereq: Junior, senior or graduate student in nutrition or health related program or instructor consent.
FSOS 5014 - Quantitative Family Research Methods I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Family research methods, issues associated with multiple levels of analysis. Conducting family-focused data analyses using basic/intermediate methods (through ANOVA and multiple regression), including power analysis. Ethical issues involved in family research such as IRB/HIPAA regulations. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FSOS 5015 - Family Research Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Application of basic family research methods into experiential learning using statistical software. Analyses that correspond with problem situations in 5014 and that involve secondary data analyses. Using statistical software for basic family research. Preparation to work with quantitative family data sets. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FSOS 5111 - Introduction to Family Therapy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is designed as an introduction to the field of marriage/couple and family therapy. Students who successfully complete the course should be well versed in the basics of both the foundational and contemporary theories of the discipline. Further, students will be exposed to a number of clinical vignettes and case scenarios that demonstrate the application of the theories in pre-recorded family therapy sessions. Through class assignments and discussions, students will be able to make a more informed decision as to whether or not family therapy is a field that holds potential for them in their own professional pursuits. Other mental health disciplines attend to family variables but having a background in family systems theory and family therapy theories will provide a solid knowledge base for someone embarking on a career in relationship-oriented clinical work. Family systems theory guides the majority of what will be discussed in class.
FSOS 5701 - Prevention Science: Principles and Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 5701/PREV 8001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Theoretical, empirical, and practical foundations for strategic interventions to prevent behavioral problems and promote healthy development. Multidisciplinary roots of prevention science. Trends/directions and best practices.
FSOS 5937 - Parent-Child Interaction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In Parent-Child Interaction, we will examine the dynamic, reciprocal nature of parent-child interactions across the lifespan through multidisciplinary and diverse research, theories and practices. Emphasis will be given to the bidirectional impact of parent-child interactions on the parent-child relationship and on parents' and children's development within complex family, community, cultural and other socio-ecological contexts. Students will continue to reflect and grow in their understanding of the professional role and competencies of a parent educator and learning activities will focus on practical application to both personal lives and professional work with families.
FSOS 5942 - Diverse Family Experiences
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is a research-based in-depth look at family experiences from many diverse points of view. Students will examine diverse experiences of families and their relevance to parent education and to the professional development of parent educators. Research and theoretical knowledge are woven together with observation and personal reflection to create a strength-based approach to both families and professional development.
FSOS 5944 - Curricular Design in Parent Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will develop the skills to adapt and design curricular resources and teaching strategies for effective parent education with diverse families across multiple contexts. Students will develop competence in conducting needs assessment, identifying content, discerning teaching methods, and designing lesson plans. As they develop their own philosophy of practice, students will study the history and evolution of parent education in Minnesota and across the U.S. prereq: FSoS 5937 & FSoS 5942 or instr consent
FSOS 5945 - Teaching and Learning in Parent Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will examine adult, adolescent, and parent learning and development from the perspective of their relevance for parent education. Students will select, use, and reflect on group and individual parent education teaching strategies and facilitation processes designed to meet the needs of diverse populations of adult learners. Critical reflection, ethical practices, and other parent educator competencies related to teaching methods and processes will be addressed. Personal professional development will be facilitated through challenging assumptions and examining the knowledge and competencies required for parent educators. prereq: FSoS 5937 & FSoS 5942 or instr consent
FSOS 5946 - Assessment and Evaluation in Parent Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students will be introduced to theory, terminology, issues, and approaches in assessment and evaluation. Students will apply this new material to the tasks of monitoring program performance, assessing program quality, and measuring parent learning and development. prereq: 5944 or instr consent
FSOS 8001 - Conceptual Frameworks in the Family
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major theoretical models about families, emphasizing sociohistorical context.
FSOS 8002 - Advanced Family Conceptual Frameworks
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Builds on FSoS 8001 by focusing specifically on family level research questions. Family development/critical theoretical perspectives that can be used to understand/study family processes/contemporary ecological issues. prereq: 8001 or instr consent
FSOS 8014 - Quantitative Family Research Methods II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Quantitative research process, from developing research question to putting findings to use. Major course project basis for class discussion. Family research. Applying research knowledge to study of families. prereq: [5014 or equiv], [8001 or equiv], [two stat courses or instr consent]
FSOS 8036 - Couple/Marriage and Family Therapy Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Historic/contemporary approaches to C/MFT research with emphasis on prevention, intervention, dissemination from variety of perspectives. prereq: FSOS doctoral student enrolled in Couple Family Therapy (CFT) or instr consent
FSOS 8101 - Family Stress, Coping, and Adaptation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Helping families become more resilient to stress by decreasing vulnerability to crises and traumatic stress disorders. Students develop research or intervention proposal on family stress, coping, adaptation, crisis, trauma, or resilience. prereq: 8001 or equiv, research methods course
HINF 5430 - Foundations of Health Informatics I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introductory survey of health informatics, focusing on foundational concepts. Topics covered include: conceptualizations of data, information, and knowledge; current terminologies, coding, and classification systems for medical information; ethics, privacy, and security; systems analysis, process and data modeling; human-computer interaction and data visualization. Lectures, readings, and exercises highlight the intersections of these topics with electronic health record systems and other health information technology. prereq: Junior, senior, grad student, professional student, or instr consent
HINF 5431 - Foundations of Health Informatics II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introductory survey of health informatics, focusing on applications of informatics concepts and technologies. Topics covered include: health informatics research, literature, and evaluation; precision medicine; decision models; computerized decision support systems; data mining, natural language processing, social media, rule-based system, and other emerging technologies for supporting 'Big Data' applications; security for health care information handling. Lectures, readings, and exercises highlight the intersections of these topics with current information technology for clinical care and research. prereq: Junior, senior, grad student, professional student, or instr consent
HINF 5440 - Foundations of Translational Bioinformatics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Translational bioinformatics deals with the assaying, computational analysis and knowledge-based interpretation of complex molecular data to better understand, prevent, diagnose and treat disease. This course emphasizes deep DNA sequencing methods that have persistent impact on research related to disease diagnosis and treatment. The course covers sequence analysis, applications to genome sequences, and sequence-function analysis, analysis of modern genomic data, sequence analysis for gene expression/functional genomics analysis, and gene mapping/applied population genetics. Prerequisites: MS, PhD, or MD/PhD student interested in translational bioinformatics
HINF 5450 - Foundations of Precision Medicine Informatics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The course will provide an introduction into the fundamental concepts of Precision Medicine with a focus on informatics-focused applications for clinical data representation, acquisition, decision making and outcomes evaluation. The student will gain an appreciation of fundamental biomedical data representation and its application to genomic, clinical, and population problems.
HINF 5502 - Python Programming Essentials for the Health Sciences
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Computer programming essentials for health sciences/health care applications using Python 3. Intended for students with limited programming background, or students wishing to obtain proficiency in Python programming language. prereq: Junior or senior or grad student or professional student or instr consent
HINF 5510 - Applied Health Care Databases: Database Principles and Data Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of database theory, modeling, design, and manipulation of databases will be introduced, taught with a healthcare applications emphasis. Students will gain experience using a relational database management system (RDBMS), and database manipulation will be explored using Structured Query Language (SQL) to compose and execute queries. Students will be able to critically evaluate database query methods and results, and understand their implications for health care. prereq: Junior or senior or grad student or professional student or instr consent
HINF 5520 - Informatics Methods for Health Care Quality, Outcomes, and Patient Safety
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Application/operation of clinical information systems, electronic health records, decision support/application in health care system. Use of clinical information systems/association with health care delivery, payment, quality, outcomes. prereq: Junior or senior or grad student or professional student or instr consent
HINF 5531 - Health Data Analytics and Data Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Data science methods and techniques for the extraction, preparation, and use of health data in decision making. prereq: Junior or senior or professional student or grad student or instr consent
HINF 5610 - Foundations of Biomedical Natural Language Processing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The course will provide a systematic introduction to basic knowledge and methods used in natural language processing (NLP) research. It will introduce biomedical NLP tasks and methods as well as their resources and applications in the biomedical domain. The course will also provide hands-on experience with existing NLP tools and systems. Students will gain basic knowledge and skills in handling with main biomedical NLP tasks. Prerequisites graduate student or instructor consent; Experience with at least one programming language (Python or Perl preferred) Recommended: basic understanding of data mining concepts, basic knowledge of computational linguistics
HINF 5620 - Data Visualization for the Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
An advanced health informatics course, focusing on theoretical and practical aspects of data and information visualization for health care and the health sciences. Topics include classic and novel visualization types; models of human visual perception and cognition; color, text and typography; maps and diagrams; evaluation and testing; and the aesthetic and cultural aspects of visualization. Examples emphasize health sciences applications for clinicians, patients, researchers, and analysts. Modern programming and commercial tools are discussed, including D3, ggplot2, and Tableau. Students will report on and discuss visualization methods, published studies and books, culminating in a final visualization project of the student's choosing.
HINF 5630 - Clinical Data Mining
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This is a hands-on introductory data mining course specifically focusing on health care applications. Analogously to the relationship between biostatistics and statistics, the data and computational challenges, the experiment design and the model performance requirements towards data mining in the clinical domain differ from those in general applications. This course aims to teach the students the most common data mining techniques and elaborate on the differences between general and clinical data mining. Specifically, the course will focus on (i) clinical data challenges and preprocessing; (ii) survey of the most common techniques in the clinical domain; (iii) clinical application touching up on experimental design and collaborations with physicians. The class will meet twice a week, one day dedicated to lectures and one day to a hands-on lab component, where students are expected to apply the techniques to health-related data. Some of the models will be evaluated with the involvement of a physician collaborator. Prerequisites: Basic linear algebra (matrix notation), basic optimization (gradient descent) Graduate level introductory statistics (e.g. STAT 5101-5102) or equivalent or instructor consent
HSEX 6001 - Foundations of Human Sexuality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundations of Human Sexuality covers topics in human sexuality, including biology and sexuality; sexuality across the lifespan, cultures and history; religions, epidemiology and clinical issues; and sexuality and legal/social aspects. Using readings, discussion forums, peer review, and an applied final project, students will understand the interactions between biological, social, and individual factors in producing variations in human sexuality.
HSEX 6011 - Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses offers an overview of United States and international policy related to gender and sexuality. The course will present the content and impact of such policies across human life stages, from youth reproductive health to aging LGBTQ folks; and a variety of contexts including education, military service, employment, and criminal legal systems. Using readings, multimedia sources, discussion forums, peer review, and an applied final project, students will understand the theory, process, and central actors in policy development and implementation, and the real-world effects of these processes.
HSEX 6211 - Dimensions of Sexual Functioning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course covers various aspects of sexual function and dysfunction as well as an in-depth overview of sexual health as it pertains to the general public. Using readings, discussion forums, peer review, and an applied final project, students will understand the range of sexual responses people may experience, diagnostic categories of sexual functioning, and the range of therapies available.
HSEX 6013 - Perspectives and Practices in Sexual Health Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course covers the history of sexuality education, primarily in the US with international comparison, as well as current and emerging issues in sexual health education. Using readings, discussion forums, peer review, and an applied final project, students will understand the temporal changes in sexual health education in the US and abroad and the empirical, theoretical, and educational foundations of sexual health education.
LAW 6036 - Reproductive Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The age-old debate on the rights of individuals to sexual determination and reproductive autonomy rages on. It grows more contentious as new technology and heated political confrontations alter the playing field. This course, using cases, statutes, and ancient and contemporary critical writings, examines the legal foundations and social implications of regulating contraception, abortion, pregnancy, childbirth, and assisted reproduction. It addresses access, funding, the rights of men, women, minors, fetuses, and government. It also explores ethical considerations and international perspectives.
LAW 6046 - Human Trafficking
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Seminar will examine the breadth and depth of efforts to combat and raise awareness about human trafficking, a form of modern-day slavery in which people are compelled through force, fraud, coercion, or other means to engage in commercial sexual exploitation or forced labor.
LAW 6058 - Human Rights Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 5900/Law 6058
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will study the histories, philosophies and activities of human rights activists and organizations. The course examines the theoretical basis of the human rights movement, the principles underlying key organizations in the human rights field, as well as their strategies, tactics, and programs. The class will use case studies and other active methods to understand and to evaluate the work of human rights activists. Topics to be considered include fact-finding and documentation, campaigns on human rights issues, cultural relativism, economic rights, and corporate responsibility for human rights. Students will consider the basic organizational structure and fundraising needs of NGOs. Students will design and present a research project based on their selection of in-class topics. Readings include material on the history of NGOs; roots and development of the human rights movement; analysis of key NGOs; advocacy within international institutions; and reports and publications from NGOs working in the field.
LAW 6621 - Rights in Conflict: Citizenship and Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores an emerging, interdisciplinary field of inquiry that focuses on the relationships between Civil Rights Law in the United States and International Human Rights Law in the global context. Although the two areas represent distinct bodies of law, they also share many important features, objectives, and impediments. By examining the historical emergence of (1) Civil Rights Law in the United States, and (2) International Human Rights Law in the global context, students will gain a better understanding of the critical relationships and intersections between these two important areas of public law. Through an examination of the seminal cases and controversies in these areas, this course will explore the differences between various categories of rights; America’s “exceptionalism” why the United States pursues a strong human rights agenda abroad that is rarely applied in the domestic context; the gains (and losses) that the domestic civil rights movement has experienced in recent decades, among other topics.
LAW 6718 - Immigration and Criminal Law: Immigration Consequences of Crimes and Criminalizing Migration
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In the last decade, there has been an increased emphasis on using the criminal justice system to help determine who is and who is not suitable to live and work in the United States. This phenomenon has had some increasingly interesting effects as the immigration apparatus has been for most of the history of the United States a civil and agency system. The increased reliance on the criminal justice system has caused some overlap of criminal justice norms- including concepts of right to counsel, detention and detainers and warrants. At the same time, the prosecution of federal migration crimes has skyrocketed in the same period to the point where the majority of all federal prisoners are imprisoned because of migration crimes.
LAW 6827 - Women's International Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar addresses the history and legal context of women’s human rights; the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and its impact; gender and human rights in the international system; specific topics such as property and other economic rights, reproductive rights, and violence against women; and the role of nongovernmental organizations in making CEDAW work for women.
LAW 6862 - Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Few areas of law have changed as quickly or as dramatically as those regulating the rights of members of the LGBTQ community. This is true in Minnesota, nationally, in foreign jurisdictions, and at the international level. These evolving debates span numerous areas of law, including criminal, asylum, family, employment, civil rights, and human rights. This course will critically review the history and broader context of these legal developments to ask: where should we go from here? Through the lens of paradigmatic cases and events, we will examine local, national, and international advocacy approaches to a wide range of human rights issues affecting LGBTQ people: criminalization, violence, stigma, forced migration, marriage, family, housing, health, employment, and freedom of speech and association. The course will analyze how factors like race and class have shaped the LGBTQ rights movement in the US and beyond, with an emphasis on how laws and policies that appear neutral on their face can nevertheless have a disparate impact on members of the LGBTQ community. Students will study primary and scholarly sources, supplemented by narrative and other artistic material. Through focused interactions with guest speakers, students will have the opportunity to learn from practitioners working on litigation, advocacy, and mobilization in Minnesota, the US, and abroad. Coursework consists of independent research projects informed by students? interests. Students will finish the seminar with a better understanding of the relevant law and the choices and challenges faced by human rights advocates in a rapidly changing field.
NURS 5029 - Introduction to Nursing Interventions
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to evidence-based interventions for safe, inclusive, and ethical nursing practice. Active learning activities in laboratory, simulation, are used to build skills to support nursing process.
NURS 5031 - Human Response to Health and Illness: Adults and Elders
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Focus on individual responses to health and illness in the context of families and environments. The clinical component will emphasize the application of the nursing process in adult and older adult populations.
NURS 5032 - Human Response to Health and Illness: Children and Childbearing Families
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Focus is on family responses to health and illness. Application of the nursing process in children and childbearing families is emphasized. The family as the unit of care is the focus of a seminar.
NURS 5115 - Interprofessional Health Care Informatics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Implications of informatics for practice, including nursing, public health, and health care in general. Electronic health record issues. Ethical, legislative, political, and global/future informatics issues.
NURS 5116 - Consumer Health Informatics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course examines issues from the consumer?s perspective in the acquisition, understanding, or use of health information. Mobile health, telehealth, sensor technology, and internet sources for improving health are examined. The impact on consumer-provider communication and relationships as well as ethical and legal issues are explored. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
NURS 5117 - Consumer Health Informatics Practicum
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students apply consumer health informatics principles, theories, and research to consumer health informatics topics and how technology is used to engage patients, clinicians, and family members in their health care. Specific topics include electronic health literacy, digital/mobile health technologies (health apps), and sensor/remote monitoring. prereq: Graduate student, [Nurs 5116 or &Nurs 5116] or instructor consent
NURS 5190 - Essentials of Holistic Health Assessment and Foundational Clinical
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to health and physical assessment for safe, culturally sensitive, inclusive, and ethical nursing practice across the life span. Active learning, simulation, and clinical settings are used to develop a holistic approach to nursing process: assessment, diagnosis, outcome, planning, implementation, and evaluation. prereq: Admission to MN Program
NURS 5284 - Supporting Physiologic Labor and Childbirth for Nurses
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Techniques to provide labor support, discussion about doula role and overlap with nursing support. Emphasizing continuous physical and emotional labor support plus information to enhance physiologic birth. Experience providing labor support to women at a clinical facility included.
NURS 5505 - Assessment and Support of Individuals in Labor
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Self-directed study with goal of working with experienced labor nurses/learning knowledge/skills required to perform labor. Clinical experience. Completion of selected online modules related to nursing care of women in labor. prereq: Admission to DNP Program
NURS 6110 - Epidemiology in Nursing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
For nurses in advanced practice and leadership positions to utilize basic epidemiological principles in assessing determinants of health and their outcomes in populations. Application of epidemiological concepts to nursing.
NURS 6213 - Reproductive Healthcare for Patients with Complex Conditions
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The course provides an evidence based, theoretical and epidemiologic basis for advanced practice nursing care of patients with complex reproductive health problems requiring multidisciplinary interventions. Selected high-risk gynecologic and perinatal conditions are examined. prereqs: (NM and WHNP) 6305/6306, 6501, 6925; (NM only) 6308, 6210/6211; (WHNP only) 6502, 6926, 6927/6928
NURS 6305 - Reproductive and Sexual Health Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of theory and evidence to holistic practice in reproductive and sexual health care. Emphasis is placed on theoretical knowledge and skills related to caring for persons with common reproductive health needs throughout the life cycle. The sociopolitical context of women's lives and those seeking reproductive and sexual health care is integrated throughout. prereq: DNP student, 5200, 5222, 5228, 5229
NURS 6600 - Health Systems and Care Models
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current/emerging care delivery systems and nursing models are analyzed as to how they meet dynamic, social, economic, technological, political trends. Impact of disruptive technologies, business models, value networks, designing better models.
NURS 6895 - Adult Acute Care Holistic Health Assessment and Wellness
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Provides nurse anesthesia students and other interested APRN students with the cognitive and psychomotor skills necessary to perform an advanced health assessment for acute care adult patients and/or those in need of a preoperative assessment. prereq: Nurse anesthesia DNP student or instr consent
NURS 6924 - Assessment and Interventions for Children and Youth With Special Health Care Needs
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Children and youth with special health care needs. Growth and development, pathophysiology, and specific conditions within a holistic, family-centered, community based, culturally competent, coordinated approach to assessment and intervention. prereq: instr consent
NURS 7100 - Quality Improvement and Implementation Science in Health Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study of improvement and implementation science with emphasis on integration of organizational change theory, quality improvement models, guidelines, and strategies to drive evidence-based change and improve patient outcomes in the context of healthcare systems.
NURS 7108 - Population Health Informatics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Standards, interoperability, and integration of information systems for population health are examined. Population health use cases are analyzed for potential benefits, legal, ethical, and practical issues related to the development of population health information systems. prereq: [5115 or [HINF 5430, HINF 5431]] or instr consent
NURS 7209 - Integrative Nursing I
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This is a foundational course for advanced nursing practice with a focus on the scholarship, research, and theory underlying integrative nursing. prereq: NURS 5101, NURS 5200, NURS 5222, NURS 7000, taken concurrent with CSpH 5226
NURS 7300 - Program Planning and Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A critical analysis of methods for practical program planning and evaluation for advanced nursing professionals in leadership roles; includes evaluation of approach and design, intervention processes including stakeholder issues, measurement issues, and strategies to evaluate outcomes achievement. prereq: Admission to DNP program or instr consent
NURS 8134 - Interventions and Outcomes Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Design/evaluation of intervention/outcomes research. Use of advanced experimental design and multivariate statistical approaches to evaluate theory-based interventions with longitudinal outcomes in context. prereq: 8121, PhD student, instr consent
NURS 8171 - Qualitative Research Design and Methods
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Overview and comparative analysis of selected qualitative research methods and analytic strategies. Focuses on developing rigorous qualitative designs that contribute to development of nursing and health care knowledge for diverse populations. prereq: 8170 or equiv
NURS 8185 - Qualitative Data Analysis for Health Care Research
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Qualitative analysis techniques for descriptive, interpretive, and analytic data including data preparation, management and analysis are presented. Transforming data from multiple texts to theoretical conceptualizations, writing skills and dissemination of qualitative research findings suitable to each method are stressed. prereq: 8171 or grad course in qualitative research methods
NUTR 5624 - Nutrition and Genetics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Overview of gene-diet interactions and relevant technologies used to study such interactions. Nutrigenomics, epigenetics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics. Examples of gene-diet interactions, implications. Current issues. Prerequisites: Courses in Nutritional Biochemistry (e.g., NUTR 5625), and Vitamin and Mineral Biochemistry (e.g., NUTR 5622), or consent of instructor
NUTR 5626 - Nutritional Physiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Whole body macronutrient metabolism as it relates to etiology of metabolic diseases. Signaling between tissues to control homeostasis. How dysregulation of crosstalk can lead to metabolic diseases. How diet, exercise, or starvation impact metabolism. Regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Designing/analyzing/interpreting research data. prereq: NUTR 5625
NUTR 5627 - Nutritional and Food Toxicology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSCN 4622/Nutr 5627
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Toxic agents, organisms, and toxic effects that are important in the toxic events, with a focus on food toxicants and nutrient-toxicant interaction. prereq: BIOC 3021; designed for students majoring in [nutrition or food science or toxicology]
NUTR 8620 - Advances in Nutrition
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Recent research or special topics (e.g., obesity, vitamin biochemistry, nutrition education).
OLPD 5011 - Leading Organizational Change: Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How theory is incorporated, affects the change process, and can improve schools/institutions of higher education. Characteristics that impact change processes/outcomes. Leadership/policy effects.
OLPD 5095 - Problems: Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 24.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Course or independent study on specific topic within department program emphasis.
OLPD 5096 - Internship: Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development
Credits: 1.0 -9.0 [max 24.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Internship in elementary, secondary, general, postsecondary administration, or other approved field related setting.
OLPD 5103 - Comparative Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examination of systems and philosophies of education globally with emphasis upon African, Asian, European, and North American nations. Foundations of comparative study with selected case studies.
OLPD 5104 - Strategies for International Development of Education Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course provides a critical analysis of strategies used to improve educational outcomes worldwide. This course examines contemporary trends in educational policy, development, and practice, focusing on how?s and why?s of educational change. Empirical studies, organizational reports, and student experiences all inform class discussion. prereq: Grad student
OLPD 5107 - Gender, Education, and International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of gender/gender relations in international development/education. Interdisciplinary body of literature from development studies, political science, economics, anthropology, cultural studies, gender/women's studies.
OLPD 5124 - Critical Issues in International Education and Educational Exchange
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of comprehensive policy-oriented frameworks for international education; practices of U.S. and other universities; conceptual development of international education and its practical application to programs, to employment choices, and to pedagogy.
OLPD 5132 - Intercultural Education and Training: Theory and Application
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to the field of intercultural education and related field of multicultural education; analyzes the field through a critical lens; examines diverse meanings of education, including cultural knowledge.
OLPD 5201 - Strategies for Teaching Adults
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Psychological theories of adult learning; learning styles and personality types; teaching styles; group and team learning; moderating and study circles; teaching technologies and distance learning; gender, race, and cultural communication. Applications of strategies. prereq: Grad student only
OLPD 5202 - Perspectives of Adult Learning and Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Emphasis on major adult development theorists, theories, and current applications. Transformative learning, self-directed learning, experiential learning, and cooperative learning provide theoretical framework for exploring physiological, psychological, sociological, and cultural aspects of adult development through the life span.
OLPD 5346 - Politics of Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Political dimensions of policy formulation/implementation in education. Use of power/influence in shaping educational policies and in resolving conflicts over educational issues. Analysis of consequences/cross-impacts. prereq: postbac, MEd, or grad student
OLPD 5501 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: OLPD 5501/EPsy 5243
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to program evaluation. Planning an evaluation study, collecting and analyzing information, reporting results; evaluation strategies; overview of the field of program evaluation.
OLPD 5502 - Comparative evaluation theory for practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This class will give students the foundation in evaluation theory necessary for high-quality and ethical practice in evaluation, consulting, or other forms of organizational change Recommend 5501 or equivalent (can be taken concurrently)
OLPD 5607 - Organization Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to major concepts, skills, and techniques for organization development/change. prereq: Grad student only
OLPD 5611 - Facilitation and Meeting Skills
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to the disciplines of planning and running effective meetings. Tools and methods for meeting management and evaluation are presented within the context of organization development.
OLPD 5619 - Planning and Decision-Making Skills
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to the disciplines of planning and decision making typically used in process improvement interventions. Tools and methods for facilitating group decisions and problem solving.
OLPD 5819 - Evaluating and Using Research in Organizations and Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Role of educational research in professional practice. Problems of practice for research. Alternative modes of research. Synthesis/application of results of research. prereq: Grad student
OLPD 8502 - Advanced Evaluation Theory and Theory crafting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This advanced course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of major evaluation theories, systems for organizing evaluation theories, and propose ways of expanding current theory. prereq: Doctoral standing OR instructor?s permission (enforced) Recommend OLPD 5502 (can be taken concurrently)
PA 5002 - Introduction to Policy Analysis
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
PA 5003 - Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Finance/accounting concepts/tools in public/nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting. Balance sheet/income statement analysis. Cash flow analysis. Public/nonprofit sector budgeting processes. Lectures, discussions. Cases. prereq: Public policy major/minor or major in development practice, public affairs or liberal studies or grad nonprofit mgmt cert or instr consent
PA 5004 - Introduction to Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
History/institutional development of urban planning as profession. Intellectual foundations, planning theory. Roles of urban planners in U.S./international settings. Scope, legitimacy, limitations of planning/planning process. Issues in planning ethics/settings of diverse populations/stakeholders. prereq: Major/minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
PA 5011 - Management of Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Challenges facing higher-level managers in public and nonprofit organizations in mixed economy and democratic republic. Distinctive features of public and nonprofit management, skills necessary for effective management, manager's role as creator of public value. Lectures, case discussions.
PA 5012 - The Politics of Public Affairs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Politics is how we make collective decisions about matters of shared consequence. This course examines politics and introduces students to key concepts and skills needed for effective political analysis. The central themes of the course focus on power; institutions and organizations; discourse; and citizenship.
PA 5013 - Law and Urban Land Use
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of law in regulating/shaping urban development, land use, environmental quality, local/regional governmental services. Interface between public/private sector. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
PA 5021 - Microeconomics for Policy Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
PA 5022 - Applications of Economics for Policy Analysis
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Application of economic reasoning to a wide range of contemporary public policy issues. The following topically-focused courses also fulfill the MPP economics requirement: PA 5431: Public Policies on Work and Pay, PA 5503: Economics of Development, PA 5521: Development Planning and Policy Analysis, PA 5722: Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy, and PA 5805: Global Economics. prereq: 5021 or equiv
PA 5031 - Statistics for Public Affairs
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
PA 5032 - Applied Regression
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis, assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met.
PA 5033 - Multivariate Techniques
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use of bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches for analyzing and evaluating public affairs issues and the assumptions behind the analytical approaches. Designed to help students read, understand, interpret, use, and evaluate empirical work used in social sciences by policy analysts and policy makers. prereq: [5032 or 5044 or equiv] or instr consent. May fulfill stats requirements in other programs.
PA 5041 - Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
PA 5042 - Urban and Regional Economics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evaluation of city existence/growth using economics. Economic forces in development of cities. Economic analysis of urban areas/land market. Economic analysis of planning issues in land use, transportation, housing, environment. prereq: [Major or minor in urban and regional planning, microeconomics course] or instr consent
PA 5043 - Economic and Demographic Data Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Economic/demographic data analysis techniques for planning. Exposure to most important data sources. Conceptual understanding of range of methods/hands-on experience in applying these methods. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
PA 5044 - Applied Regression, Accelerated
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bivariate/multivariate models used in regression analysis, including assumptions behind them/problems that arise when assumptions are not met. Course covers similar topics as PA 5032 but delves deeper into theory/application of methods. prereq: 5031 or equiv, or instr consent
PA 5051 - Leadership Foundations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Leadership concepts, tools, and strategies in a personal, community, and organizational context for mid-career students. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5051-5052 must be taken in same academic yr
PA 5053 - Policy Analysis in Public Affairs
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Process of public policy and program analysis, including problem formulation, program design and implementation. Opportunity to draw upon published research and conduct field-based research to understand implementation conditions. Professional communications, including writing of memos, requests for proposals, and implementation briefs, are stressed. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5053-5054 must be taken in same academic yr
PA 5054 - Program Design and Implementation Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continues 5053. Process of public policy and program analysis, including problem formulation, program design and implementation. Opportunity to draw upon published research and conduct field-based research to understand implementation conditions. Professional communications, including writing of memos, requests for proposals, and implementation briefs, are stressed. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5053-5054 must be taken in same academic yr
PA 5055 - Qualitative Research Methods and Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Problem-based learning of analytical reasoning through social science research methods. Systematic review and literature review. Qualitative research including interviews, focus groups, and analysis. Research proposal. prereq: Major in public affairs or public affairs certificate, [5055-5056 must be taken in same academic yr]
PA 5056 - Quantitative Research Methods and Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problem-based learning to analytical reasoning through social science research methods. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability, statistical inference. Hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation, analysis of variance, correlation. Simple regression analysis. prereq: Major in public affairs or public affairs certificate, [5055-5056 must be taken in same academic yr]
PA 5081 - Understanding Power and Teamwork in Public Affairs Education
Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Power and teamwork in public affairs education.
PA 5101 - Management and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories, concepts, and real world examples of managerial challenges. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of funding environments, management of multiple constituencies. Types of nonprofits using economic/behavioral approaches. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5103 - Leadership and Change
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Models of change/leadership. How leaders can promote personal, organizational, and societal change. Case studies, action research. Framework for leadership and change.
PA 5104 - Strategic Human Resource Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory/practice of developing, utilizing, and aligning human resources to improve culture/outcomes of nonprofit/public organizations. HR strategy, individual diversity, leadership, selection, training, compensation, classification, performance appraisal, future HR practices. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5105 - Integrative Leadership: Leading Across Sectors to Address Grand Challenges
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 6623/Mgmt 6402/OLPD 6402/P
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Are you interested in working across government, business, and the non-profit sector for public good? Are you wondering how you can create sustainable shared leadership on challenges that can best be addressed together? This course explores multi-sector leadership and related governance and management challenges from a variety of perspectives and provides an opportunity for students to work together to apply what they are learning individually and in teams through in-class exercises and a final team project. The course is taught by a team of interdisciplinary faculty and considers different contexts, forms, and specific examples of multisector leadership that can enable transformative action to tackle a significant societal issue and achieve lasting change. Credit will be not be granted if credit has been received for GCC 5023, OLPD 6402, PUBH 6702, MGMT 6402, PA 5130, LAW 6623.
PA 5113 - State and Local Public Finance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory/practice of financing. Providing public services at state/local level of government. Emphasizes integrating theory/practice, applying materials to specific policy areas, and documenting wide range of institutional arrangements across/within the 50 states. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5114 - Budget Analysis in Public and Nonprofit Orgs
Credits: 1.5 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5111/PA 5114
Prerequisites: PA 5003
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques, terminology, concepts and skills for developing and analyzing operating and capital budgets in public and nonprofit organizations. Budget analysis using case studies, problem sets, and spreadsheets. Time value of money, cost-benefit analysis, break-even analysis, sensitivity analysis, and fiscal analysis. prereq: PA 5003
PA 5116 - Financing Public and Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Prerequisites: PA 5003; credit will not be granted if credit already received for: PA 5111
Typically offered: Every Spring
Financial resource management for public and nonprofit organizations. Short-term and long-term debt management, retirement financing, and endowment investing. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques applied to real-world problems. Financial management in context of national and regional economies. prereq: PA 5003; credit will not be granted if credit already received for: PA 5111
PA 5122 - Law and Public Affairs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Overview of evolution of American legal system. Role of courts, legislatures, and political actors in changing law. How law is used to change public policy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5123 - Philanthropy in America: History, Practice, and Trends
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory/practice of philanthropy. Foundation/corporate/ individual giving. History/economic structure/dynamics. Models of philanthropy, components of grant making/seeking. Current debates, career options.
PA 5135 - Managing Conflict: Negotiation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course teaches the theory and the practice of negotiation strategies with an emphasis on applied, personal skill building constructed on a foundation of research and practice in the field. Students will apply their negotiation skills across interpersonal, public dispute, government, and private sector settings. The course focuses on developing students? personal theory of practice for decision-making, effective communication and impactful leadership through practice of distributive bargaining, value creation, consensus building, facilitation, and mediation exercises and discussions.
PA 5136 - Group Process Facilitation for Organizational and Public/Community Engagement
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Group process facilitation components, theories, tools, techniques. Facilitator’s role in group goals and processes. Facilitation in public policy. Cross-cultural challenges. Topics may include meeting management, group decision-making, conflict, participatory leadership, and other tools.
PA 5137 - Project Management in the Public Arena
Credits: 1.5 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Project management and leadership strategies for implementing public policy, including new or revised government programs, public works, and regulations. Use of project management concepts, principles, and tools, including project definition, scoping, planning, scheduling (using the critical path method), budgeting, monitoring, staffing, and managing project teams. Application of "agile" and "extreme" project management in situations of complexity and uncertainty, including those due to the scrutiny and expectations of elected officials, the media, citizens, and other stakeholders.
PA 5145 - Civic Participation in Public Affairs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Critique/learn various approaches to civic participation in defining/addressing public issues. Readings, cases, classroom discussion, facilitating/experiencing engagement techniques. Examine work of practitioner, design engagement process.
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organizational analysis of international development and humanitarian assistance, including perspectives from sociology, political science, psychology, public administration, and management. Examines efforts of multiple organizational players, including NGOs, governments, bi-lateral and multi-lateral organizations, corporations, foundations, and international organizations. Critical analysis of aid organizations, especially regarding ways in which they reflect and create power and privilege, the manner in which individuals’ needs and desires interact with, support, or challenge the needs of the organization, and how all of this is influenced by forces outside the boundary of the organization. Students practice developing actionable recommendations to improve the effectiveness of international aid organizations in the context of multiple (and often contested) understandings of global development needs and conflicting stakeholder demands. Readings, class discussions, mini-lectures, simulations, case analyses, group projects, oral presentations, memo writing, opinion writing.
PA 5209 - Urban Planning and Health Equity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This interdisciplinary course examines the causes and consequences of place-based health disparities in cities, explores how health disparities can be mitigated and exacerbated by urban planning decisions, and introduces best practices in urban planning for achieving community health equity. The course will involve extensive readings, guest lectures, field-based assignments, data-collection activities, and local community involvement. Twin Cities has one of the largest disparities in health outcomes in the nation and local practitioners are pioneering new urban planning solutions to reduce place-based health disparities. The course will utilize this location advantage and use the region as an immersive learning environment. Students are expected to apply knowledge and skills learned in the class locally in the Twin Cities region. At the end of the course, students will be able to: Understand the historical foundations, current trends and challenges, and international perspectives in connecting urban planning to health equity issues; investigate how various planning sectors and urban environment dimensions, including land use, transportation, open space, housing, food systems, and community social capital, interact to affect health disparities in cities; critically evaluate how existing planning processes and decisions respond to the needs of vulnerable populations and contribute to health equity; and develop skills to engage communities and identifying community-sensitive solutions for reducing place-based health disparities. Fulfills a requirement for graduate Health Equity Minor (http://www.sph.umn.edu/academics/minor/health-equity/).
PA 5211 - Land Use Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Physical/spatial basis for land use planning at community/regional level. Role of public sector in guiding private development. Land use regulations, comprehensive planning, growth management, innovative land use planning/policies. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
PA 5212 - Managing Urban Growth and Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Theory/practice of planning, promoting, and controlling economic growth/change in urban areas. Economic development tools available to state/local policymakers, historic context of their use in the United States. legal, social, and economic implementation constraints. Interactions among economic, social, and demographic trends. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5213 - Introduction to Site Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analyzing/preparing graphic plans for development or redevelopment of property. Site planning issues, process, opportunities, details, and techniques. Hands-on preparation of a site plan. Site visits, lectures, research, presentations, exam, in-class exercises. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5231 - Transit Planning and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CEGE 5213/PA 5231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles/techniques related to implementing transit systems. Historical perspective, characteristics of travel demand, demand management. Evaluating/benchmarking system performance. Transit-oriented development. Analyzing alternative transit modes. System design/finance. Case studies, field projects. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5234 - Urban Transportation Planning and Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CEGE 8202/PA 8202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will integrate key theories and practices, traditional and emerging policy instruments, and techniques for urban and transportation planning. The goal is to introduce students to essential concepts, influential thinkers, and important debates associated with the land use-transportation connection as a foundation for both professional and academic work. By the end of the course, students will be able to comprehend urban transportation planning process and demand forecasting; the theories and empirical evidence on land use and transportation interactions; land use and transportation policy instruments and their effectiveness; and land use and transportation planning in developing countries.
PA 5242 - Environmental Planning, Policy, and Decision Making
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory and practice. Ethical, legal, and institutional frameworks relative to a range of environmental issues. Innovative environmental decision making informed by collaboration, conflict resolution, adaptive management, and resilience thinking. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory and practice of strategic planning and management for public and nonprofit organizations and networks. Strategic planning process, management systems; stakeholder analyses. Tools and techniques such as purpose expansions, SWOT analyses, oval mapping, portfolio analyses, and logic models.
PA 5261 - Housing Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hsg 5463/PA 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Institutional/environmental setting for housing policy in the United States. Competing views of solving housing problems through public intervention in the market. Federal/local public sector responses to housing problems. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5262 - Neighborhood Revitalization Theories and Strategies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5262/PA 8203
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policymaking/politics of planning in housing, community development, social policy. Connecting policy to local/regional politics. Role of institutional decision-making structures on policy outcomes. Importance of citizens, social movements, interest groups in policymaking process.
PA 5281 - Immigrants, Urban Planning and Policymaking in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social, political, economic experiences of contemporary U.S. immigrants. Draws from sociology, economics, demography, political science, public affairs. Local government policies/plans. Cities/suburbs as contexts for immigrants. Interactions between immigrant communities/urban planners/policymakers. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5301 - Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5301/Soc 5511
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic demographic measures/methodology. Demographic transition, mortality, fertility. Perspectives on nonmarital fertility, marriage, divorce, cohabitation. Cultural differences in family structure, aging, migration, refugee movements, population policies. Discussion of readings. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5311 - Program Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course covers the core principals, methods, and implementation of evaluation research. Students will learn through an applied partnership with a nonprofit or state/local government clients. The course is designed for both students interested in a potential career in evaluation and those that want to be better consumers of research. Past programmatic/policy areas included health and human services, education, environment science, economic development, transportation, and evidence-based policymaking.
PA 5401 - Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/extent of poverty/inequality in the United States, causes/consequences, impact of government programs/policies. Extent/causes of poverty/inequality in other developed/developing countries. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory, tools, and practice of the implementation of public policy, particularly in areas involving public, private, and nonprofit organizations. Analytical approach focuses on multiple levels in policy fields to pinpoint and assess implementation challenges and levers for improvement.
PA 5413 - Early Childhood and Public Policy
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CPsy 5413/PA 5413
Typically offered: Every Fall
State/federal/int'l policies/legislation touching first 5 years of child's life. Family, community, institutional roles in promoting children's social/cognitive/emotional development. Health, mental health, poverty, special needs, economic/social justice. Part of Early Childhood Pol cert. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5415 - Effective Policies for Children in the First Decade
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Policies to improve the wellbeing of children through the first decade of life are examined using examples from economics and other disciplines. The course focuses on the role of government in helping to promote early childhood development. Readings and projects focus on policies or programs that affect child outcomes from the prenatal period to third grade. Students will become familiar with the importance of rigorous impact evaluations and the use of cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis as a tool for efficient resource allocation. Some familiarity with regression analysis would be helpful.
PA 5421 - Racial Inequality and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical roots of racial inequality in American society. Contemporary economic consequences. Public policy responses to racial inequality. Emphasizes thinking/analysis that is critical of strategies offered for reducing racism and racial economic inequality. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5426 - Community-Engaged Research and Policy with Marginalized Groups
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Marginalized populations tend to be viewed as objects of social policy, passive victims, or a cause of social problems. Processes of marginalization we will explore in this class include: structural racism, colonization, economic exclusion and exploitation, gender bias, and more. Policy and research are typically driven by mainstream/dominant society members with little direct knowledge about the real lives of people on the margins. This can lead to misguided actions, misunderstandings, paternalism, unintended negative consequences, and further marginalization and/or stigmatization. In this course, we will learn about community-engaged research methodologies such as participatory action research (PAR) and community-based participatory research (CPBR). We will use case studies of sex trafficking, housing, and youth work to explore the challenges, rewards, and ethical implications of these community-engaged approaches to research and policy-making. Instructors and students in the course will work together on a real-world research and policy challenge so that students contribute to ongoing work in the field in real-time.
PA 5431 - Public Policies on Work and Pay
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HRIR 5655/PA 5431
Typically offered: Every Fall
Public policies affecting employment, hours of work, and institutions in labor markets. Public programs impacting wages, unemployment, training, collective bargaining, job security, and workplace governance. Policy implications of the changing nature of work. prereq: [[PA 5031 or equiv], grad student] or instr consent
PA 5451 - Immigration, Health and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5451/PubH 5281
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How to access demographic, health, and background information on US immigrants. Characteristics and health needs of immigrants. Designing culturally competent health programs. How to advocate for needed policy changes to promote immigrant health and wellbeing. Community visits required. Online course.
PA 5521 - Development Planning and Policy Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques of development planning/policy analysis at national, regional, and project levels. Effects of external shocks and government interventions on national/regional economies. Macroeconomic modeling, input-output analysis, social accounting matrices/multipliers, project evaluation. prereq: 5031 or equiv recommended or instr consent
PA 5561 - Gender and International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Women and men are affected differently by development and participate differently in policy formulation and implementation. Gender-sensitive perspective. Historical, political context. Global South. Policy, practice, and experience (theory and measurement; international, national, local stakeholders; effects of policy and practice on development). prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the key concepts and tools necessary for gender policy analysis. Survey of the major findings in the field of gender and public policy in policy areas such as poverty alleviation, health, international security, environment and work-family reconciliation. Scope includes local, national, and global policy arenas as well as exploration of gender and the politics of policy formulation.
PA 5711 - Science, Technology & Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interplay of science, technology, the environment, and society. Approaches from across the social sciences will cover how science and technology can create new environmental pressures as well as policy challenges in a range of spheres from climate change to systems of intellectual property and international development.
PA 5721 - Energy Systems and Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Impact of energy production/consumption choices on environmental quality, sustainable development, and other economic/social goals. Emphasizes public policy choices for energy/environment, linkages between them.
PA 5723 - Water Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5723/WRS 5101
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sociocultural, legal, economic, and environmental forces affecting supply/use of water by individuals, sectors, and governance institutions. Historical trends; water laws in United States and internationally. Institutional structures for managing water at federal, state, and local levels. Current water-related issues/policies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5724 - Climate Change Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Existing and proposed approaches to mitigate and adapt to climate change through policies that cross scales of governance (from local to global) and impact a wide range of sectors. Exploration of climate change policy from a variety of disciplinary approaches and perspectives, emphasizing economic logic, ethical principles, and institutional feasibility. How policy can be shaped in the face of a variety of competing interests to achieve commonly desired outcomes. Students develop a deep knowledge of climate change in particular countries through a team final project. prereq: Intro microecon (such as Econ 1101 or equiv)
PA 5741 - Risk, Resilience and Decision Making
Credits: 1.5 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interplay between risk analysis, decision making, and policy in the context of new and emerging technologies, environmental and human well-being, risk and resilience. Assessment methods; risk management processes, issues and methods; role/treatment of uncertainty; factors in decision making; risk-based rule making; public values; risk communication and perception. Scientific, technical, social, political, and ethical issues. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5805 - Global Economics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [5021 or equivalent] or #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Global trade, exchange rates, finance, international business, and migration in context of theories and evidence that inform the policies pursued at national level. Operation of main international organizations dealing with these issues will also be examined. prereq: [5021 or equivalent] or instr consent
PA 5813 - US Foreign Policy: Issues and Institutions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Taught by the Humphrey School diplomat in residence, this course helps students develop a deep understanding of how US foreign policy institutions function, how that is being challenged, and the broader global implications of those changes. Through readings, class discussions, and guest lectures, we look at the institutions and processes involved in developing and managing US foreign policy, and use case studies to advance students? knowledge, including of how the Department of State works, and the expanding role of the Department of Defense, the National Security Council, and intelligence agencies. We examine how economic instruments like sanctions are used to advance policy; and how American citizens, lobbyists, and foreign governments influence policy. We incorporate discussions of current events into each class. Students develop writing and presentation skills critical to foreign policy careers.
PA 5814 - Global Diplomacy in a Time of Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Taught by the Humphrey School?s diplomat in residence, this course examines the changing world of twenty-first century global diplomacy and how state and nonstate actors are challenging the status quo. We look at the dynamics behind major international developments?with case studies including BREXIT, the Iran Agreement, climate negotiations, and China?s global initiatives?placed in the context of an examination of how states operate in the international diplomatic sphere and how multilateral organizations enhance or challenge the concept of state sovereignty. Students gain knowledge about the complexities of diplomacy and negotiation through readings, classroom discussions, and guest speakers and develop professional skills through writing and presentation assignments.
PA 5823 - Human Rights and Humanitarian Crises: Policy Challenges
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines response of governments, international organizations, NGOs, and others to global humanitarian and human rights challenges posed by civil conflict and other complex emergencies in places such as Syria, Ukraine, South Sudan, Somalia, Burma, and elsewhere. Course will also consider and assess UN and other institutions established to address these issues (like UNOCHA and UNHCR). In addition, course will examine US policy toward humanitarian issues and refugees (including US refugee admissions).
PA 5825 - Crisis Management in Foreign Affairs
Credits: 1.5 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Crisis decision making in foreign policy. Examination of the organization and structure of crisis decision-making within U.S. national security apparatus. Analysis of in-depth four foreign policy crises (Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam – Tet, Iraq, and a current crisis). Crisis simulation with students in the role of national security leaders.
PA 5826 - National Security Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5826/PA 8821
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will analyze U.S. national security policy and process from the viewpoint of the National Security Council staff. Students will examine the organization and structure of the U.S. national security apparatus and the national security decision-making process, including individual and political factors; assess central threats to U.S. and international security and develop and discuss policy options to deal with those threats; undertake a major policy review on a specific national security challenge facing the United States, including analysis and recommendations; produce products, both written and oral, crucial to national security policy making (e.g., concise information and action memorandum), and put themselves in the position of national security leaders as part of a policy simulation. Grades will be based on oral participation, papers, and class reports.
PA 5885 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Politics of human rights issue emergence; relevant international, regional, and domestic norms; correlates of state repression; measurement of human rights abuse and remedies; human rights promotion by states, political parties, international organizations, NGOs, social movements, faith-based organizations, and providers of international development assistance.
PA 5927 - Effective Grantwriting for Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Grantwriting skills, processes, problem,s and resources for nonprofit organizations. Researching and seeking grants. Communication with potential funders and generating financial support. Collaborating effectively with the organization and clients to create substantive, fundable proposals.
PA 5928 - Data Management and Visualization with R
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to R Studio software. Use of R Studio to carry out R file and related database management functions. Tools and techniques for data analysis and statistical programming in quantitative research or related applied areas. Topics include data selection, data manipulation, and data and spatial visualization (including charts, plots, histograms, maps, and other graphs). Prerequisite knowledge: Introductory statistics; ability to create bar graphs, line graphs, and scatter plots in MS Excel; and familiarity with principles of data visualization.
PA 5929 - Data Visualization: Telling Stories with Numbers
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Tools for communicating quantitative information in an intelligent, effective and persuasive way. Topics covered include 1) writing and speaking about data; 2) data management in Excel in order to prepare data for charting; 3) understanding and ability to deploy core concepts in of design, layout, typography and color to maximize the impact of their data visualizations 4) determining which types of statistical measures are most effective for each type of data and message; 5) determining which types of design to use for communicating quantitative information; and 6) designing graphs and tables that are intelligent and compelling for communicating quantitative information.
PA 5933 - Survey Methods: Designing Effective Questionnaires
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Applied (hands-on) introduction to survey questionnaire design. Student teams design a questionnaire for a real or imaginary client, typically a non-profit/NGO or governmental agency. For example, students may draft and revise questions about respondents? demographics and employment; life histories; knowledge, use, and opinions about services; and anxiety and well-being. The class will spend two weeks on each module, actively engaging in class about draft questions, and through that practice, learning how to improve them. Survey questions will be entered into SurveyToGo, an app used offline on Windows devices to collect data, and questionnaire will be tested on a small number of volunteers. Students will learn: - The process of questionnaire design in a team - Basic pitfalls of survey design ? names, definitions, examples. - How to use Excel to track questions, coded responses, and prompts for interviewers - How to use interviewing software SurveyToGo This class is not a substitute for a comprehensive survey research class or a statistical course on sampling and weighting.
PUBH 5231 - Emergency Preparedness: A Public Health Perspective
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Public health emergency preparedness, response, recovery. Introduction to field's core competencies. Various components of course, including online modules, intended to stimulate interactions among learners. Purpose, history, organization, functions, tools, activities used in field. prereq: Upper-level undergraduate students and grad/professional students in academic health sciences and fields related to public health emergency preparedness, response, and recovery. Credit will be not granted if student has completed the PubH 5230 topic course with same title.
PUBH 6004 - Global Health Capstone
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to facilitate learners’ synthesis of the skills, knowledge, and attitudes learned throughout the Global Health Certificate courses and practiced during field experience. Each student will be guided through the creation of a portfolio of carefully selected assignments, reflections, and experiences completed during the Certificate program, along with a resume and a final reflection. Each student will then present a portfolio at the end of the course.
PUBH 6011 - Public Health Approaches to HIV/AIDS
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 3011/6011
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of public health approaches to AIDS epidemic. Epidemiological/clinical features of HIV infection. Impact of AIDS on certain communities/populations. Behavior change principles as they apply to AIDS interventions. prereq: Grad student or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 6020 - Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Three major approaches to social sciences in public health: psychosocial, community approaches, economic and policy interventions. Covers theories of behavior change, program and policy development, community engagement, and policy implementation and advocacy. Not open to students in Community Health Promotion or Public Health Nutrition MPH programs.
PUBH 6034 - Evaluation I: Concepts
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6034/PubH 6852
Typically offered: Every Spring
Developing useful program evaluations. Emphasizes skills for program administrators, planners. Needs assessments. Assessment of program design, implementation, impact. Cost-effectiveness analysis. Quantitative and qualitative data collection methods. Ethical considerations.
PUBH 6035 - Evaluation II: Applications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6035/PubH 6806
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course teaches basic research skills needed to plan, conduct, and analyze data from a quantitative research project. Skills include developing research questions;performing literature searches; performing literature searches;developing questionnaires; implementing a study; coding, entering and analyzing data using STATA software; and writing reports.
PUBH 6045 - Skills for Policy Development
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Skills relevant to policy development and implementation for public health-related issues.
PUBH 6049 - Legislative Advocacy Skills for Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
State legislature as arena for public health practice. Skills necessary to operate in that arena. Analyzing emergence, development, and resolution of legislative issues of public health importance.
PUBH 6050 - Community Health Promotion I: Integrating Theory, Evidence, and Context
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course examines personal, social, and environmental factors that influence health-related behaviors, as well as the role of individuals, groups, institutions, societal structures, and policy in encouraging and discouraging healthy behaviors. The course focuses on behavior change theories and application of these theories to health promotion.
PUBH 6051 - Community Health Promotion II: Developing, Implementing, and Justifying Interventions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6051/Pubh 6673
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Skill development for developing community health interventions, budgets, implementation plans, and grant proposals. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for PubH 6673.
PUBH 6055 - Social Inequalities in Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Extent and causes of social inequalities in health. Degree to which understanding of these inequalities is hampered by methodological limitations in health research. Focuses on individual, community, and policy approaches to reducing social inequalities in health.
PUBH 6060 - Motivational Interviewing: Strategies to Effect Behavior Change
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction of the theoretical basis of motivational interviewing (MI) style. Using MI style in diverse contexts (clinical, community program, research) and relative to diverse behavioral issues (addictions, healthy lifestyle behaviors, chronic disease adherence).
PUBH 6066 - Building Communities, Increasing Health: Preparing for Community Health Work
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Taught with Powderhorn-Phillips Cultural Wellness Center. Introduction to community building/organizing. Using culture as a resource for health, reducing barriers, identifying community assets, planning organizing strategy, understanding the impact of history. Emphasizes self-reflection and skill-building for authentic, grassroots community work.
PUBH 6074 - Mass Communication and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Jour 5541/PubH 6074
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an overview of theory and research that lies at the intersection of mass communication and public health. We examine the potential for media exposure to influence public health outcomes, both as a product of people's everyday interactions with media and the strategic use of media messages to accomplish public health goals. To this end, we will explore large-scale public health campaigns in the context of tobacco, obesity, and cancer screening. We also will explore news media coverage of controversial health issues, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, and health information in entertainment media, such as smoking in movies. This course seeks to understand whether media messages have had intended and/or unintended effects on public attitudes and behavior. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal, medical, and digital media sources will be considered as well.
PUBH 6078 - Public Health Policy as a Prevention Strategy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Philosophical, ethical, economic, political, efficacy rationale for policy approach to prevention. Historical/current application of prevention policy to public health problems. prereq: 2nd yr MPH or public health MS student or [Epi, Biostats, Env Hlth, HSRPconcurrent registration is required (or allowed) in A PhD student] or instr consent
PUBH 6081 - Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a graduate-level class for students preparing for careers in public health research and practice where sex, sexuality, and sexual health are key components. It is a highly applied, highly interactive course focused on developing skills needed in sex research and sexual health practice. The teaching pedagogical approach is a "flipped classroom" where students are expected to learn the content from the assigned audiotaped lectures, movies and readings, and to come to class ready to participate in exercises, discuss case studies, complete assignments and immerse themselves in public health practice and research focused on sex, sexuality, and sexual health. The purpose of this graduate level course is to prepare health professionals for a professional career addressing community and population sexual health concerns by deepening their knowledge of and exposure to research practice in the field, increasing comfort familiarity and ability to speak on sexual health topics, and by practicing their skills. The assignments focus on hot topics in sex and sexual health, and are designed to increase knowledge of the field of sexual health, while developing skills in conceptualization, measurement, intervention design, and evaluation. Please note this course addresses the greatest challenges in sexual health facing our world, including such hot topics as the zika virus and HIV prevention, clergy sexual abuse, campus sexual climate, sexual harassment, LGBT health disparities, contraception, abortion, women's rights, teen sex, and unplanned pregnancy.
PUBH 6094 - Interventions to Address Weight-Related Health and Eating Disorders
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine obesity epidemic, eating disorders, prevention and treatment approaches at multiple levels (individual, social, environmental, policy), links between obesity and eating disorders.
PUBH 6102 - Issues in Environmental Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Current issues, principles, and methods of environmental/occupational health practice. prereq: Public health [MPH or MHA or certificate] student or health journalism MA major or nursing MS student or instr consent
PUBH 6107 - Excel Skills for Data Management in Public Health Settings
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on course on computer skills to learn a wide range of methods to manipulate public health data. Students will be given ?raw? datasets and practice computer methods to clean, filter, recode, combine, tabulate and report data within the Excel and Access environments. The course is ideal for students who may not pursue more advanced quantitative training but still want to feel comfortable using these widely available programs to produce quality datasets for further analysis, and to generate summary results or reports in their work as public health practitioners.
PUBH 6108 - Foundations of Global Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an introduction to key principles and topics in global health including measures of global burden of disease, identification of key health problems around the world and the main determinants, health systems and international public health organizations. In addition, we will discuss cross-cutting and timely issues in health promotion, disease control programs, and operational research in international settings. Class exercises and discussions will focus on challenging global health problems, and strategies to address them. This course is required for those students enrolled in the School of Public Health Global Health Certificate program, and is also open to other qualified students (see Course Prerequisites). Examples of diseases and illustrations of global health problems in this class will include both infectious and non-infectious diseases and should be of interest to students in various programs.
PUBH 6116 - Environmental Law
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Questions when pollution protection law conflicts with policy encouraging the use of natural resources. Conflicts when government restricts use of property without compensating its owner. Increasing authority of government to audit businesses.
PUBH 6120 - Injury Prevention in the Workplace, Community, and Home
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Injury epidemiology: analyses of major injury problems affecting the public in the workplace, community, and home using epidemiologic model and conceptual framework; emphasis on strategies/program development for prevention and control.
PUBH 6123 - Violence Prevention and Control: Theory, Research, and Application
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis/critique of major theories and of epidemiological research pertinent to violence, including characteristics of violence and relevant risk factors, reporting/treatment protocols, and current/potential intervention efforts and prevention initiatives. Emphasizes interdisciplinary contributions to violence prevention/control.
PUBH 6130 - Occupational Medicine: Principles and Practice
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Pathogenesis of diseases caused by occupational hazards. Evaluating work-related illnesses. Overall regulatory framework governing occupational health/safety. prereq: Environmental health major; toxicology course recommended or instr consent
PUBH 6131 - Working in Global Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to key issues in global health. Global burden of disease. Cultural issues/health. Nutrition. Infectious diseases. Environmental problems. Women/children. Prereq Grad student.
PUBH 6132 - Air, Water, and Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Issues related to providing adequate levels of clean air/water. Local water quantity/quality, air quality in developed/developing world, global air/water quality, policies meant to protect these resources.
PUBH 6134 - Sustainable Development and Global Public Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Effects of globalization on social/sustainable development. Population, war, economics, urbanization, environment, water/sanitation, communicable/non-communicable conditions. New infectious/chronic diseases, food security/environmental health. prereq: Credit will not be granted if received for 6100 or 6365
PUBH 6135 - Job Search Strategies and Career Professional Development
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is intended for students who are interested in learning how to develop a meaningful career in Public Health and related fields. Students will learn skills that they can apply to finding an Applied Practice Experience or internship, and to finding employment. The skills include the following: assessing self-awareness/strengths, researching job/internships and employers, relationship-building (networking), interviewing, self-marketing (e.g. resumes, cover letters), identification of professional goals, and professionalism in the workplace. The focus is primarily non-academic careers but some class content and work may also apply to academic job searches and careers.
PUBH 6140 - Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/concepts in identifying health effects in workplace. Strategies for identifying excess risk, evaluating strengths/weaknesses of research techniques, assessing bias/confounding. prereq: Coursework in epidemiology, biostatistics
PUBH 6150 - Interdisciplinary Evaluation of Occupational Health and Safety Field Problems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Guided evaluation of potential health/safety problems at work site, recommendations and design criteria for correction/evaluation of occupational health/safety programs.
PUBH 6154 - Climate Change and Global Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interconnected relationships between global climate change/human health. Develop computer models to predict climate change from natural/anthropogenic forces, predict human health outcomes as result of changing climate. prereq: Students must have elementary computer skills.
PUBH 6159 - Principles of Toxicology I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This is the first of two courses that covers fundamental principles of exposure, uptake and metabolism. This course focuses on identifying the mechanisms and effects of chemical, biological, and physical agents on human health. Discussions will focus on the action of environmental agents and how they interact with humans to cause disease. Emphasis is on understanding the principles of toxicology as they apply to understanding toxicant-human interactions.
PUBH 6161 - Regulatory Toxicology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
In-depth introduction to laws (and associated regulations) of U.S. federal regulatory agencies, such as CPSC, EPA, FDA, OSHA, and DOT, that require/use toxicological data/information in their mission of protecting human/environmental health. prereq: Background in toxicology or pharmacology or related field is recommended
PUBH 6170 - Introduction to Occupational Health and Safety
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Nurs/PubH 5170
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Concepts/issues in occupational health/safety. Application of public health principles/decision-making process in preventing injury/disease, promoting health of adults, protecting worker populations from environmental hazards. Observational visit to manufacturing facility. prereq: Environmental health major or instr consent
PUBH 6173 - Exposure to Physical Agents
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Nature, health effects, monitoring, and control of physical agents in working/living environments. Ionizing/non-ionizing radiations (including lasers, ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light). Noise/vibration, heat/cold stress. Dose, response, and engineering interventions.
PUBH 6175 - Environmental Measurements Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Measuring exposures to potentially hazardous agents in air or water. Sampling the agent. Preparing sample for analysis. Conducting analysis. Interpreting results. prereq: EH or instr consent
PUBH 6177 - Nanotechnology Health and Safety
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
As defined by ASTM, nanotechnology is the emerging field of "technologies that measure, manipulate, or incorporate materials and/or features with at least one dimension between approximately 1 and 100 nm". Toxicology studies have indicated that exposures to nanomaterials present unique health risks not encountered with their parent materials. After completing this course, students will understand how the fundamental concepts and methods of occupational hygiene are applied specifically to nanomaterials. Students will learn to use aerosol science, toxicology, product lifecycle assessment, exposure assessment, and occupational hygiene data interpretation methods comprehensively to evaluate workers' disease risks from nanomaterial exposures and to guide intervention efforts. Emphasis will be placed on control measures appropriate for nanomaterials, and control banding approaches when data are lacking. Participants will study the handling of waste products and potential impacts of released nanoparticles on the public and the ambient environment. The course is aimed at graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in the health and basic sciences, engineering, public health, and industrial hygiene.
PUBH 6181 - Surveillance of Foodborne Diseases and Food Safety Hazards
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 5181/VMed 5165
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles/methods for surveillance of foodborne diseases. Investigation of outbreaks, assessment of food safety hazards. Focuses on integration of epidemiologic/lab methods.
PUBH 6182 - Emerging Infectious Disease: Current Issues, Policies, and Controversies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Issues/controversies surrounding emerging infectious diseases. Framework for considering realistic/innovative policies. Bioterrorism, public health preparedness. Pandemic influenza preparedness, smallpox vaccination, antibiotic resistance. prereq: AHC student, instr consent
PUBH 6183 - Theory and Practice in Foodborne Disease Outbreak Detection, Investigation and Control
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course focuses on the practical basis for developing and implementing methods for foodborne disease outbreak detection, investigation and control; using recent outbreaks to highlight underlying principles. The course will review biological characteristics of major foodborne disease pathogens, clinical features of the illnesses they cause and epidemiologic presentations of foodborne outbreaks. The implications of these characteristics will be discussed in a problem solving, seminar format that examines theory and practice in the context of recent outbreaks. Strategies to promote timely decision-making will be emphasized.
PUBH 6184 - Field and laboratory methods in public health entomology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Pathogens transmitted by arthropods, particularly mosquitoes and ticks, inflict human disease all over the world. These pathogens represent a broad diversity of persistent foes as well as emerging challengers. PubH 6184: Field and laboratory methods in public health entomology will provide students with the tools and experiences that they will need to be conversant on the topic with both the general public and public health entomology experts. This course is intended to prepare MPH, Veterinary, and other graduate and undergraduate student to work alongside these experts and be able to contribute intelligently to entomological problems they might encounter during their future careers. To this end, rather than having a heavy emphasis on lectures and textbooks, the course has many field trips to professional entomology facilities, field work, and laboratory projects.
PUBH 6192 - Measurement and Properties of Air Contaminants
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Gaseous/particulate air contaminants, their occurrence in workplaces. Factors governing generation/dispersal. Criteria, rationales, and standards for measurement in workplace. Industrial hygiene measurement. Aerosol-related ill-health. prereq: Good grasp of [elementary physics, chemistry, mathematics including calculus]
PUBH 6193 - Advanced Topics in Human Exposure Science
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Designing exposure studies for epidemiologic investigations and health risk assessments. Techniques to measure/estimate human exposures to hazardous agents in non-occupational and occupational environments. prereq: 6192 or instr consent
PUBH 6241 - American Indian Public Health and Wellness, Health Policy, Law, Health Services Administration
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
As sovereign nations, American Indian Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their members along with the land and environment of their respective tribe. Tribes are becoming increasingly involved in more public health activities and regulations, and deliver public health services through various funding sources, grants, and contracts, alone or in collaboration with other tribes and local governments, county and state health departments. This course provides a general basis for understanding American Indian public health and wellness. Central to this area of study, is an appreciation to understand the unique governmental relationship based on how the federal government relates to tribal nations as distinct sovereign political entities, not as a racial classification. The trust responsibility is a government to government relationship as established in the U.S. Constitution. In this course students will learn about the legal responsibility of the United States to the 574 federally recognized tribes, to provide health services to American Indians. Students will examine the public health issues facing American Indian communities; review historical implications, analyze legislation, apply specific financing requirements, and gain an understanding of the unique American Indian public health system and the complex set of services, activities, collaborations, and stakeholders that varies by tribe and region. This is a required course for those seeking a certificate or minor. It is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with tribes and American Indian communities, to understand the basis of health services and implications of specific tribal (local and federal) law to help improve the devastating health issues currently experienced by American Indians. While this course focuses on American Indian Public Health and Wellness, Health Policy, Law, Health Services Administration, there are many parallels that can be made by students related to other governance structures from around the world. The lessons can help fortify the knowledge of all students regardless of race, and culture, that can be utilized in individual professional endeavors.
PUBH 6242 - Cultural Humility with American Indian Populations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course will present evidence that cultural humility is a lifelong quest toward achieving positive outcomes in work with American Indian Tribes and American Indian communities. It is essential that health care and health service providers learn the respective cultures of the American Indian population they are serving. Equally important is the fact that every federally recognized tribe, of which there are 573, has their own unique traditional customs, history with other tribes, and often subpopulations within the governance of a single tribal government. The realization of understanding how populations have been driven by their respective cultures to their overall health and well-being is necessary to promote achievement of positive outcomes for stakeholders and communities. The course will target methods to help health professionals to ensure that health services take into account individual understanding of the professional?s knowledge and how this knowledge should be respectful of individual cultural preferences. A systematic process will be provided to assist in how to learn community policies, learning processes, and traditions; as well as learning about various structures by which the culture of governments, organizations and individuals develop and support the attitudes, behaviors, practices and systems that are needed for effective cross-cultural interactions between health professionals and community members. Students will learn that ultimately, cultural humility effectiveness is determined by the individual who is receiving the services. The course is grounded in the understanding that cultural humility can effectively be used to strive for continuous improvement, to effectively utilize assets and address the health needs of individual American Indian communities.
PUBH 6243 - American Indian Research, Evaluation and Collaborations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
As sovereign nations, American Indian Federally Recognized Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their populations, as well as controlling research and evaluation activities; and development of formal collaborations. A duly elected Tribal government is responsible for all functions and activities of the Tribe. Tribes have an inherent and legal responsibility to protect Tribal affairs, businesses, and traditional values and customs. Included in Tribal responsibilities is the ability to develop and maintain policies to protect the integrity of operations and guard against predatory and harmful use of data against the population they serve. This is an absolute and non-negotiable function of a Tribe to ensure present and continued viability of all future generations. This course will provide specific examples of data sharing agreements, Memorandums of Agreement or Understanding, legal basis for confidentially, discuss community readiness, and community evaluations. It is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with Tribes and American Indian communities, and to understand the basis of research, evaluation, and collaboration. This course focuses on stakeholder driven: participation, issue identification, data sharing, and benefit to community. To help ensure ethical and cultural values are protected an increasing number of Tribes are forming their own Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) under 45 CFR 46. The course will offer examples of Tribal IRBs and specific IRB components for American Indian populations. Tribal governments represent communities with distinctive social, cultural, and spiritual qualities that embody a unique context for the review and conduct of research. This course will provide numerous examples of Tribally developed research and review mechanisms that are tailored to specific community needs and interests.
PUBH 6250 - Foundations of Public Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this course we will examine values, contexts, principles, and frameworks of public health. We will provide an introduction to public health, consider the history of public health, social/political determinants, impact of health disparities on race, class and gender, moral and legal foundations, public health structures, historical trauma and cultural competence, health and human rights, advocacy and health equity, communication and financing, and the future of public health in the 21st century. Grounded in theory and concepts, we will incorporate core competencies and skills for public health professionals and will focus on developing problem solving and decision-making skills through critical analysis, reflection, case studies, readings, and paper assignments.
PUBH 6261 - Human Centered Design for Public Health Leadership, Practice and Innovation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Design has always played a significant role in public health, including the birth of Public Health, where John Snow discovered that a poorly designed water pump placement (sanitary system design) was the root cause of an 1854 cholera outbreak in London. Today, while the challenges facing public health leaders, researchers and practitioners have changed, the need for Human Centered Design (HCD) competencies such as systems thinking, interdisciplinary collaboration and creativity, has only become more apparent. 21st Century public health problems are what designers refer to as ?wicked problems? or those problems that are difficult or impossible to solve in the traditional sense because they are complex, long-term and constantly evolving, requiring a new set of tools and approaches well suited for HCD. HCD in public health is an applied research and innovation framework that: 1) prioritizes understanding the lived experiences of those individuals and populations most familiar with, and impacted by, a challenge; 2) recognizes the role of power and privilege in designing public health systems; 3) involves an inclusive and collaborative approach throughout the design process, and; 4) promotes iterative prototyping of assumptions and ideas to learn quickly and safely into unknowns. Those looking to address complex public health challenges such as obesity, mental illness, poverty or health disparities, will need to learn how to master a variety of practices that support cross-sectored collaboration, systems thinking, creativity, experimentation and equity: Human Centered Design is an effective compliment, convener and enhancer to other core public health, public policy and health system management policies and practices. This course is an introduction to Human Centered Design for 21st century public health leadership, practice and research and is a prerequisite for PUBH 6262 Human Centered Design for Public Health Studio I: Applying HCD for Community Health Innovations.
PUBH 6301 - Fundamentals of Clinical Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6301/PubH 6305
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts of clinical research design/implementation/analysis. Students will learn skills needed for research in humans.
PUBH 6303 - Clinical Research Project Seminar
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students will present their thesis and give and receive feedback. Students must have their project underway.
PUBH 6310 - Clinical Epidemiology 1
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Clinical epidemiology is the science of using population methods to answer individual patient questions. This course in clinical epidemiology I will cover the design of epidemiological studies and the analysis and interpretation of epidemiological data in order to answer clinical questions. A variety of study designs methods including cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional study designs will be taught. The design and analysis of clinical trials is covered in-depth by other courses (e.g. PubH 7420 and 7415) and hence is not covered here. This course is intended for MS students majoring in clinical research. Others including medical students, students in various MS programs, and MPH programs in the School of Public Health and other interested students are welcome to enroll as long as they meet the course requirements. PhD students in the School of Public Health will be better served by Clinical Epidemiology II, (see below). If you have already studied advanced methods in epidemiology or biostatistics or completed Epi Methods II (PubH 6342) or more advanced Epidemiology courses, please do not take this 1-credit course since there will be redundant material. You may be interested instead in Clinical Epidemiology II which focuses on more clinical aspects including prognosis, diagnosis, treatment and prevention.
PUBH 6311 - Clinical Epidemiology II
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Clinical epidemiology is the science of using population methods to answer individual patient questions. This course in clinical epidemiology will cover the design of epidemiological studies and the analysis and interpretation of epidemiological data in order to answer clinical questions. Clinical Epidemiology II will cover concepts related to prognosis, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. programs, MPH and PhD programs in the School of Public Health and other interested students are welcome to enroll as long as they meet the course requirements.
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course provides an understanding of basic methods and tools used by epidemiologists to study the health of populations.
PUBH 6325 - Data Processing with PC-SAS
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to methods for transferring/processing existing data sources. Emphasizes hands-on approach to pre-statistical data processing and analysis with PC-SAS statistical software with a Microsoft Windows operating system.
PUBH 6333 - Principles of Human Behavior I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Theoretical perspective on etiology/modification of health behavior in individuals/communities. prereq: Epi PhD student or instr consent
PUBH 6341 - Epidemiologic Methods I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6320PubH /6341
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to epidemiologic concepts and methods: (1) Study design (randomized trials and observational studies); (2) Measures of exposure-disease association; (3) Casual inference and bias; (4) Confounding and effect modification.
PUBH 6342 - Epidemiologic Methods II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods and techniques for designing, implementing, analyzing, and interpreting observational epidemiologic studies, including cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies.
PUBH 6344 - Completing the Integrated Learning Experience: Secondary Data Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The goal of PubH 6344 is to provide guidance and hands-on experience for developing and completing the Integrated Learning Experience (ILE) research project involving secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional, case-control, or cohort study. The course will help meet research project milestones and complete the project in a timely manner.
PUBH 6350 - Epidemiologic Methods III: Lab
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Skills-based course in which students get hands-on experience in analysis of a variety of epidemiologic datasets using SAS programming to apply epidemiologic methods presented in PubH 6343, examine crude data for outliers, data errors and distributional assumptions, debug code when programs do not run correctly, and prepare a scientific presentation with appropriate content for introduction/background, methods, results and discussion.
PUBH 6355 - Pathophysiology of Human Disease
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Compendium of human diseases relevant to public health professionals. Focuses on cardiovascular disease, cancer, and infectious disease. Presented from epidemiologic perspective. Significance of diseases in terms of prevalence, incidence, morbidity, and mortality. Risk factors, prevention strategies. prereq: Epidemiology major or public health nutrition major or instr consent
PUBH 6365 - Global Challenges in Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will focus on the considerable burden due to infectious diseases within middle and low-income countries, as well as the underlying risk factors that lead to their emergence and spread. Students will learn about and review different measures of disease burden and health status. Different diseases of international public health significance will be reviewed, with a focus on epidemiologic research and methods used describe and analyze disease determinants. The course will also expose students to different interventions (prevention and control strategies) that have been used in both emergency situation, and to reduce the burden of more endemic diseases that significantly impact the health of populations. The scientific literature concerning specific diseases of interest will be examined and discussed in order to illustrate these principles. We recognize that it is impossible to cover all subjects in global health. Using a case-study approach, the course will instead select a variety of infectious diseases of international importance. We will focus instead on approaches to dealing with these different problems, and some of the methodologies used to study them. This course will allow students to gain both skills and a greater understanding of public health research and practice as it applies to international health. prereq: [6320 or 6341, instr consent] master's or doctoral level student in School of Public Health
PUBH 6381 - Genetics in Public Health in the Age of Precision Medicine
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Our understanding of human genomic variation and its relationship to health is expanding rapidly. This knowledge is now being translated primarily through the field of ?precision medicine? (finding the right drug for the right person at the right time). Public health, in contrast, seeks to abate the social and environmental factors that lead to disease and health disparities. This course will provide an introduction to the field of public health genomics at this interesting point in its history. Approximately one-half of the course is devoted to Genetic Epidemiology, or the science of detecting genetic risk factors for human disease. The other half of the course will cover public health genomics, including ?precision public health?, genetic screening programs, and the possibilities and pitfalls of direct to consumer marketing of genetic tests. How genomics relates to health equity will be a recurring theme of this course. This is a graduate course designed primarily for Epidemiology MPH and PhD students, and fulfills the ?Epi Of? requirement for the MPH in Epidemiology. Graduate students from other programs are very welcome.
PUBH 6386 - Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course will provide an introduction to cardiovascular disease (CVD) epidemiology. It is intended to provide a detailed perspective on the well-established risk factors for CVD, as well as an introduction to emerging risk factors. Both observational studies and clinical trials will be discussed. The class will include a main focus on prevention of cardiovascular disease, and national recommendations for treatment and prevention. Several classes will incorporate discussions of new directions and current controversies in CVD. Additionally, the class will introduce students to the CVD research in the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health.
PUBH 6387 - Cancer Epidemiology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Epidemiologic aspects of cancer. Theories of carcinogenesis, patterns of incidence and mortality, site-specific risk factors. Issues of cancer control and prevention.
PUBH 6389 - Nutritional Epidemiology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Nutrition/disease relationships through application of epidemiologic methods. Characterization of various exposures to food/nutrient intakes, biological basis for nutrition/disease relationships. Studies of specific chronic diseases and nutritional intake. Design/interpretation of studies using nutritional measures. prereq: [[6320 or 6330 or 6341], [Epidemiology MPH or Public Health Nutrition MPH or Epidemiology PhD student]] or instr consent
PUBH 6396 - Applied Practice Experience Global Health
Credits: 0.5 -8.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students are required to complete a supervised Applied Practice Experience (AP). Students must address three Global Health competencies. prereq: Global Health Certificate Instructor Consent
PUBH 6414 - Biostatistical Literacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Develop ability to read/interpret statistical results in primary literature. Minimal calculation. No formal training in any statistical programming software. Biostatistical Literacy will cover the fundamental concepts of study design, descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, odds ratios, relative risks, adjusted models in multiple linear, logistic and Poisson regression, and survival analysis. The focus will be when to use a given method and how to interpret the results, not the actual computation or computer programming to obtain results from raw data. prereq: MPH or certificate student or environmental health or instr consent
PUBH 6420 - Introduction to SAS Programming
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
Use of SAS for analysis of biomedical data. Data manipulation/description. Basic statistical analyses (t-tests, chi-square, simple regression).
PUBH 6432 - Biostatistical Methods in Translational and Clinical Research
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
This short course on translational and clinical research will focus on the topics of diagnostic medicine and designing clinical research methods, application of regression models and early phase clinical trials. prereq: Students will benefit from having taken one or two semester courses in biostatistics or applied statistics covering up to and including multiple regression and introductory logistic regression.
PUBH 6450 - Biostatistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will cover the fundamental concepts of exploratory data analysis and statistical inference for univariate and bivariate data, including: ? study design and sampling methods, ? descriptive and graphical summaries, ? random variables and their distributions, ? interval estimation, ? hypothesis testing, ? relevant nonparametric methods, ? simple regression/correlation, and ? introduction to multiple regression. There will be a focus on analyzing data using statistical programming software and on communicating the results in short reports. Health science examples from the research literature will be used throughout the course. prereq: [College-level algebra, health sciences grad student] or instr consent
PUBH 6451 - Biostatistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will cover more advanced aspects of statistical analysis methods with a focus on statistical modeling, including: ? two-way ANOVA, ? multiple linear regression, ? logistic regression, ? Poisson regression, ? log binomial and ordinal regression, ? survival analysis methods, including Kaplan-Meier analysis and proportional hazards (Cox) regression, ? power and sample size, and ? survey sampling and analysis. There will be a focus on analyzing data using statistical programming software and on communicating the results in short reports. Health science examples from the research literature will be used throughout the course. prereq: [PubH 6450 with grade of at least B, health sciences grad student] or instr consent
PUBH 6525 - Introduction to Population Health: A Health System
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Population health is the field of practice and research concerned with the health of groups of individuals and the equitable distribution of health within these groups. Populations may be defined by geographic area, by social and economic characteristics such as gender, socio-economic status, and race/ethnicity, by disease states such as persons with mental illness or diabetes, or by enrollment in a health care plan or utilization of a specific health care organization. Population health takes an upstream approach, focusing on the social determinants of health and fundamental issues of health equity. While improving population health requires the involvement of multiple sectors such as public health agencies, health departments, education, housing, faith-based organizations and criminal justice, here we focus on how population heath can be addressed from within the health system through partnerships with other sectors. Using case studies, we will explore how population health innovations are applied by health systems.
PUBH 6535 - Managerial Accounting for Health Services
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential, absorption, activity-based costing. Budgeting, variance analysis. Financial accounting, including transaction data and accrual accounting. Developing financial statements. Ration analysis. prereq: MHA student or instr consent
PUBH 6541 - Statistics for Health Management Decision Making
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Variation. Frequency distribution, measurement, probability, graphing. Significance tests, estimation, trends; data handling. Modeling, odds ratios. Prevalence, incidence and vital statistics. Research applications. Statistical approach to rational administrative decision making. Inductive teaching, lectures, computer/lab exercises. prereq: Health care admin student or instr consent
PUBH 6542 - Management of Health Care Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Role of hospital in health services delivery. Relationships with other systems and the community. Emphasizes governance, medical staff, and role of administrator. Lectures, on-site visits to health services organizations. prereq: MHA student or permission of instructor
PUBH 6544 - Principles of Problem Solving in Health Services Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problem-solving theory/technique. Solving a management problem within a health services organization. Presenting a report. Lectures, seminars, demonstrations. prereq: 6541, completed 30 hours of MHA coursework, health care administration student
PUBH 6553 - Health Care Management Ethics
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ethical issues faced by health care managers as leaders of an organization, members of a profession, and coodinators of clinical processes. Perspectives of managerial, organizational, professional, and clinical ethics. prereq: Public health MPH or MHA or certificate student or instr consent
PUBH 6554 - Healthcare Strategy and Marketing
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Managing the marketing function, marketing planning, strategy, management concepts. Identifying marketing problems/opportunities. Constructing, evaluating, and managing a marketing plan. prereq: MHA student or permission of instructor
PUBH 6555 - Health Economics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
General principles of health economics applied to issues in health. Implications for health policy.
PUBH 6556 - Health and Health Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
U.S. health care system and health policy process, including current challenges in the areas of health care delivery, financing, and policy.
PUBH 6558 - Health Finance II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of corporate/not-for-profit finance and insurance concepts integrated/applied to health care. Capital/operating budgets. Medicare's payment systems for hospitals/physicians, risk-adjusted capitation payment systems. Population-based health care finance, managed care. Financing aspects of public health policy and health care reform. prereq: MHA student, familiarity with computerized spread-sheets]] or permission of instructor
PUBH 6560 - Operations Research and Quality in Health Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Grad-level statistics/management coursework
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Using a systems perspective to develop models to analyze/improve health care operations. Identifying data needs/sources to model structures, processes, and outcomes of care. Applying quality improvement, management sciences/operations research techniques to real world health care problems. prereq: Grad-level statistics/management coursework
PUBH 6562 - Information Technology in Health Care
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Managing information as a strategic resource within health care organizations. Designing information technology systems to capture, combine, and transform information to measure processes/outcomes of care, support collaborative clinical decision making, support management decisions, empower patients, and improve health care operations. Prereq: MHA student or instructor consent.
PUBH 6564 - Private Purchasers of Health Care: Roles of Employers and Health Plans in U.S. Health Care System
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development and organization of HMOs and PPOs: risk sharing, provider contracts, utilization management, quality improvement, marketing, and new product development; employer relations; Medicare and Medicaid contracting; budget processing; financial performance; pricing; government regulations. prereq: MHA or MBA or HSRP or PHA student or instr consent
PUBH 6565 - Innovation of Healthcare Services
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Designing/creating new care delivery services/experiences. Exploiting opportunities for innovation. Overcoming obstacles. Capturing value. prereq: MHA student only
PUBH 6570 - Healthcare Administration
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Selected readings in healthcare administration. Discussion based on readings. prereq: dept consent
PUBH 6571 - Quality, Patient Safety, and Performance Improvement
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to concepts of performance improvement in health care institutions. prereq: MHA or MPH or certificate student or instr consent
PUBH 6576 - Understanding Clinical Quality Using Administrative Data
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This is an introductory course designed for students interested in learning how to effectively use administrative data (e.g., billing or claims data, clinical registries, enrollment records) to inform program development, program or policy evaluation and mandatory reporting. During the course, students will learn about quality frameworks; payment systems and how they translate into available administrative data; common coding and billing systems; structure of administrative data; common data available from each source; approaches for linking data across sources; reporting considerations; strategies for risk adjustment and applications to current local and national quality improvement programs. The course will provide practical, hands-on training for individuals to lead teams who analyze and report outcomes using administrative data-- - without the need to analyze the data themselves.
PUBH 6577 - Advanced Problem Solving in Health Services Administration
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Capstone course. Students integrate/synthesize knowledge, attitudes, and skills acquired in curriculum and apply them to resolve management problem. prereq: MHA student
PUBH 6578 - Negotiation Strategies
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: MHA student or instructor permission
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The central issues of this course deal with understanding the behavior of individuals, groups and organizations on the context of competitive situations. prereq: MHA student or instructor permission
PUBH 6596 - Legal Considerations in Health Services Organizations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Laws affecting administration of hospitals and other healthcare organizations. Administrative law, corporate/business law, labor law, civil liability, tax-related issues. Legal issues relevant to administration, decision making, and planning. prereq: Health care admin student
PUBH 6601 - Born a Girl: Global Women's Health
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Women's health conditions, programs, services, and policies in developed/developing countries. Social, economic, environmental, behavioral, and political factors affecting health behaviors, reproductive health, chronic and acute diseases, premature mortality and longevity. prereq: Grad level student
PUBH 6605 - Sexual, Reproductive, and Perinatal Public Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Overview of perinatal, sexual, and reproductive health surveillance, programs, services, and policies in the U.S., with an emphasis on vulnerable populations and methods to assess and interpret perinatal, sexual, and reproductive health data. prereq: Public health student or grad student or instr consent
PUBH 6606 - Children's Health: Life Course and Equity Perspectives
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is focused on 1) major causes of illness at each phase of fetal, infant, and child development, 2) how the social determinants of health interact with underlying biology in early life to shape health over the life course, and 3) evidence-based child public health programs and interventions.
PUBH 6607 - Adolescent Health: Issues, Programs, and Policies
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This two-credit course focuses on the major public health issues of adolescents and the programs and policies that impact the health and well-being of this population. Course readings and discussion focus primarily on adolescents in the United States, although international contexts are also considered. The course is designed to examine the prevalence and etiology of health and wellness indicators for youth, including mental health; sexual and reproductive health; physical activity and nutrition; and prevention of tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use, violence involvement, and injury. In addition, the course analyzes contemporary social movements and issues that impact adolescents through a public health lens (e.g., Black Lives Matter, DACA and the DREAM Act, achievement gap, inequitable distribution of wealth and economic opportunities, gender equity, civic engagement). The course is designed for graduate public health students with professional interests in preventive interventions to reduce health inequities. Students in other related health professions (e.g., medicine, nursing) or human services professions (e.g., public affairs, social work) with an interest in health issues are also welcome. The course meets the requirement for the Health Equity Minor in the School of Public Health.
PUBH 6613 - Children and Youth With Special Health Care Needs
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles, programs, policies, and practices for identifying/meeting needs of children/youth with special health care needs in the United States. Epidemiology, historic/current legislation, organization/delivery. Readings, online discussions, written assignments. prereq: Graduate-level student in [AHC programs or education or social work or psychology]
PUBH 6627 - Sexuality Education: Criteria, Curricula, and Controversy
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Issues and controversies affecting K-12 sexuality education. Current research and guidelines for effective, responsible education and curricula selection. Various curricula being used in the United States. Challenges in teaching sensitive issues inherent in sexuality education.
PUBH 6630 - Foundations of Maternal and Child Health Leadership
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6630/PubH 6655
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical/current principles, programs, policies, and practices related to women, children, adolescents, and families. Articulating a personal leadership style/plan for development of leadership competencies. Leadership principles, skills, and models applied to improving health of MCH populations. prereq: Public Health MCH major or instr consent
PUBH 6636 - Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health Practice
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Qualitative inquiry, selected data collection, management, analysis methods for qualitative research in public health. Current approaches to assess strength of evidence of qualitative studies in public health. Provision of practical skills that can be applied in public health settings.
PUBH 6673 - Grant Writing for Public Health
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6051/Pubh 6673
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on workshop. Identifying successful elements of a grant application. Grant review process. Critiquing a grant. Writing an application.
PUBH 6675 - Women's Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Programs, services, and policies that affect women's health in the United States. Methodological issues in research. Emphasizes social, economic, environmental, behavioral, and political factors. Measurement/interpretation of factors, how they translate into interventions, programs, and policies.
PUBH 6711 - Public Health Law
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Basic concepts of law, legislative process, and legal bases for existence/administration of public health programs. Legal aspects of current public health issues/controversies, regulatory role of government in health services system. prereq: Grad student or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 6717 - Decision Analysis for Health Care
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to methods/range of applications of decision analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis in health care technology assessment, medical decision making, and health resource allocation.
PUBH 6724 - The Health Care System and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Overview of health care delivery, finance systems within public health context. Components of health care system: financing, role of employers/public programs, health care delivery system, managed care. Collaborative interventions between managed care, public health. prereq: Public health or grad student or instr consent
PUBH 6727 - Health Leadership and Effecting Change
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Analysis of leadership models and competencies, particularly as applied to organizational change. Applications to individual self-development and to health care organizations. prereq: Public hlth MPH or MHA or certificate student or [health services research, policy/admin] MS student or instr consent
PUBH 6730 - International Comparative Health Systems
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
History and development of health systems from a socio-political perspective. Overview of relative importance and meaning of health outcomes data. Role of WHO. Students use OECD health database.
PUBH 6735 - Principles of Health Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6735/PubH 6835.
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the policy environment that influences and shapes public health and the provision of health care services, to enhance understanding of the historical and political context of health policy, to develop strategies for analysis of health policy issues, and to communicate effectively in the policy environment. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for PubH 6835.
PUBH 6737 - Structural Racism and Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course offers an examination of U.S. health inequities from a historical lens and discussion of present-day issues. Through the readings, discussions, and assignments in this class, students will better understand historical policies, events, and movements that have led to health inequities and connect those to contemporary issues in the United States and within the field of public health. The course takes an intersectional perspective (to race, ethnicity, gender, and class) to examine health inequities, with a specific focus on inequities related to race and racism.
PUBH 6741 - Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to ethical issues in public health practice/policy. Ethical analysis, recognizing/analyzing moral issues. prereq: Public health [MPH or MHA or certificate] student or environmental health [MS or PhD] major or instr consent
PUBH 6742 - Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to ethical issues in public health research/policy. Ethical analysis. Recognizing/analyzing moral issues.
PUBH 6744 - State Health Policy and Politics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Half semester. Federal health reform debate and debate over reinstating the MN General Assistance Medical Care program. Intergovernmental relationship between the federal and state governments in health policy and finance; role of state and local policy makers and policy advocates. Political context for state health policy development.
PUBH 6745 - Rural Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will cover some of the broad issues related to rural context, social determinants of health, health care, and health disparities, with the purpose to provide an introduction to the field of rural health. The focus of the course will primarily be on the U.S., although it will touch on the global context and students are welcome to explore rural health issues in other countries in some of their assignments.
PUBH 6751 - Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Understanding of and improvement in the competencies of managers in organizations, particularly as applied to health services and public health organizations. prereq: [Public hlth MPH or MHA or certificate] student or [environmental health MS or PhD] student or dentistry MS student or instr consent
PUBH 6755 - Planning and Budgeting for Public Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Principles of budgeting, planning, forecasting, and analyzing in nonprofit/government organizations applied to health care administration and public health. prereq: Academic Hlth Ctr grad student or instr consent
PUBH 6765 - Continuous Quality Improvement: Methods and Techniques
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory/practical applications of concepts, tools, techniques of continuous quality improvement (QI) in public health/health care.
PUBH 6772 - Health Disparities Capstone Seminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Readings and discussion-based seminar. Readings emphasize practice and policy solutions to health disparities. prereq: CSPH 5115 OR PubH 6066 OR PUBH 6055 OR PUBH 6855, 2d yr MPH student completing SPH health disparities interdisciplinary concentration] or instr consent
PUBH 6780 - Topics in Public Health Administration and Policy
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 60.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
New courses or topics of interest in public health administration/policy.
PUBH 6803 - Conducting a Systematic Literature Review
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Project-based class to develop systematic review skills for evidence-based practice. Draws from AHRQ and Cochrane systematic review methodology; supported by examples from the Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center. Use for master?s thesis, dissertation, or to support research proposals. Prereq: research study design or epidemiology.
PUBH 6805 - Introduction to Project Management for Health Professionals
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Core concepts/skills for managing projects effectively, making sure they are completed on time, within budget, meeting performance objectives. prereq: Matriculation in master's program in School of Public Health, or instr consent
PUBH 6806 - Principles of Public Health Research
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Evaluation of public health research literature and planning for independent research projects. Formulation of research question, research design, sampling techniques, use of research concepts, and data analysis. Data collection techniques, including questionnaires, interviews, and data analysis. prereq: Pub hlth or grad or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 6809 - Advanced Methods in Health Decision Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods applicable to issues of medical decision making. Analyses of environmental/safety decisions. How to apply methods at cutting-edge of clinical decision science. prereq: [6717 or intro course in decision analysis], some facility with mathematical notation/reasoning
PUBH 6813 - Managing Electronic Health Information
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Managing health information is a central function of health care organizations. Information is used for managing population health, profiling providers, and measuring quality. This course describes relational data theory, normalization, and Structured Query Language (SQL) will be used to create and query databases. Students will be introduced to the basic programming skills necessary to manage data in research projects. Programming aspects of the course will use SQL procedure in the SAS language. prereq: Admission to a University of Minnesota Masters program or Permission of instructor.
PUBH 6815 - Community-based Participatory Research
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This introductory course is intended for junior faculty, post-docs, graduate students and community practitioners interested in adding CBPR to their repertoire of effective approaches to understanding and addressing social and health disparities. Topics will explore the purpose and applications of CBPR; partnership formation and maintenance; issues of power, trust, race, class, and social justice; conflict resolution; ethical issues; CBPR's relationship to cultural knowledge systems, and funding CBPR projects. This is NOT a methodology course. CBPR is an approach to conducting research that is amenable to a variety of research designs and methodologies and will NOT cover topics such as survey design, quantitative methods, qualitative methods, focus groups, community needs assessment procedures, etc.
PUBH 6832 - Economics of the Health Care System
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines applications of microeconomic principles to the U.S. health care system. Topics include demand for medical care, insurance theory and selection issues, provider payment, competition in health care markets, the health care workforce, pharmaceutical prices and innovation, health care spending growth, quality of care, externalities, the relationship between income and health, and the economics of the opioid epidemic. Prerequisite: an introductory economics or microeconomic theory course ? or permission of the instructor.
PUBH 6845 - Using Demographic Data for Policy Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
How to pose researchable policy questions, locate existing data, turn data into a usable format, understand data documentation, analyze data, communicate findings according to standards of the professional policy community. Quantitative issues. prereq: [Grad level research methods course, basic statistics course] or instr consent
PUBH 6852 - Program Evaluation in Health and Mental Health Settings
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6034/PubH 6852
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Understanding an evaluation study. Program evaluation. Applications to health and mental health settings. emphasizes public health.
PUBH 6864 - Conducting Health Outcomes Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major concepts/principles in conducting health outcomes research that evaluates medical care. Developing study designs matched to research questions. Frequently used study designs. Evaluating health outcomes. Analytical approaches. prereq: Introductory course in epidemiology or health services research methods or instr consent
PUBH 6901 - Foundations of Public Health Nutrition Leadership
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of public health nutrition. Roles/function of public health nutritionists. Programs/delivery mechanisms for promoting nutritional status of populations. Students explore their beliefs/competencies in relation to principles/philosophy of public health nutrition. This course has a strong focus on policy, systems and environmental changes to improves access to health foods for individuals and communities.
PUBH 6904 - Nutrition and Aging
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Current literature on nutrition needs/factors affecting nutritional status of adults and the elderly. Relevant community resources. prereq: Grad student or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 6906 - Global Nutrition
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nature/scope of chief nutritional issues and problems in the world. Emphasizes developing countries. Nutrient deficiencies, nutrition-related aspects of infectious/chronic disease. prereq: Grad student
PUBH 6907 - Maternal, Infant, Child and Adolescent Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6902/PubH 6903/PubH 6907
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course provides an overview of nutrition issues affecting pregnant and postpartum women, females of reproductive age, infants, children and adolescents. The course integrates public health practice and policy recommendations with evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to provide a comprehensive view of maternal and child health (MCH) nutrition issues seen by practitioners in community settings. The course addresses nutrition education, community/ population nutrition intervention strategies, and programs and policies to promote healthy eating and physical activity and to reduce obesity and chronic disease risk among MCH populations. The course also provides an opportunity for students to develop social marketing and media communication skills and messages appropriate for maternal and child health (MCH) populations as well as to evaluate child nutrition assistance programs and policies.
PUBH 6914 - Community Nutrition Intervention
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Tools for developing community nutrition interventions. Using behavioral therapy, conducting needs assessments, writing program objectives, developing intervention strategies, evaluating program implementation and effectiveness, planning a budget, writing grant proposals.
PUBH 6915 - Nutrition Assessment
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: Public health nutrition major or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Common nutritional assessment using dietary, biochemical, and anthropometric approaches. Applications of methods, interpretation of results. Hands-on experience, training in common anthropometric methods. prereq: Public health nutrition major or instr consent
PUBH 6933 - Nutrition and Chronic Diseases
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Issues in nutrition and public health. How nutrition research is translated into dietary recommendations for public health. Relation of nutrition to obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer.
PUBH 6954 - Personal, Social and Environmental Influences on the Weight-Related Health of Pediatric Populations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Overview of public health strategies for the prevention of pediatric obesity. Includes overview of epidemiology of child and adolescent obesity with a focus on social-ecological risk factors. Discusses implications for developing interventions and programs. prereq: completed one of the following: a) basic intro to nutrition course, b) PubH 6094, or c) 1 year work experience in the field of obesity and/or public health or instructor consent.
PUBH 6955 - Using Policy to Address the Weight-Related Health of Child and Adolescent Populations
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 3955/PubH 6955
Typically offered: Every Spring
Overview of federal, state, local policy approaches. National initiatives for prevention of child and adolescent obesity. Specific policies will be discussed at local, state, federal levels. Extensive discussion on evidence of impact of policies on child and adolescent weight.
PUBH 6995 - Community Nutrition Practicum
Credits: 7.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Didactic/experiential learning opportunities in community nutrition program delivery/management. Students complete at least 40 hours each week for ten weeks guided by on-site preceptor and course instructor. prereq: Public health nutrition MPH degree student, instr consent
PUBH 6996 - Clinical Nutrition Practicum
Credits: 7.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Didactic/experiential learning in clinical nutrition. Application of nutrition care process/model to medical conditions. Students complete at least 40 hours each week for ten weeks guided by on-site preceptor and course instructor. prereq: Public health nutrition MPH degree student, instr consent
PUBH 7091 - Independent Study: Community Health Promotion
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Independent study supervised by community health promotion faculty member. prereq: CHP major, instr consent
PUBH 7193 - Directed Study: Environmental Health
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study in a topic agreed upon by student and faculty member. prereq: instr consent
PUBH 7200 - Topics: Public Health Practice
Credits: 0.5 -4.0 [max 80.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
New course offerings or topics of interest in public health practice.
PUBH 7210 - Topics: Global Food Systems
Credits: 0.5 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Food systems related to specific food products, including inputs, processes, and outputs from production sites to consumers. Context for food safety policy. Concept of food system biosecurity as prerequisites for a safe, abundant, affordable, and diverse food supply. Case studies of food-borne disease outbreaks illustrate critical controls in food production.
PUBH 7214 - Principles of Risk Communication
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Key concepts of risk communication theory and their practical application to collection/sharing of information in support of individual and community decision-making about public health issues. Application of risk communication principles to routine, ongoing public health issues and those that arise out of emergency/crisis.
PUBH 7221 - Planning for Urgent Threats
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Role of public health in disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. How public health agencies plan for managing the crisis. Providing surge capacity to maintain public health and health care functions. Assisting a community's recovery from a disaster.
PUBH 7230 - Topics in Infectious Disease
Credits: 0.5 -4.0 [max 80.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Topics in emerging/re-emerging infectious diseases. Biology, epidemiology, diagnosis, economics, risk analysis, methods for prevention/control. Global implications.
PUBH 7231 - Surveillance of Foodborne Diseases in Humans
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud