Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Family Social Science M.A.

Family Social Science
College of Education and Human Development
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Department of Family Social Science, 290 McNeal Hall, 1985 Buford Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (612-625-3116; fax: 612-625-4227)
  • Program Type: Master's
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2018
  • Length of program in credits: 30 to 32
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Master of Arts
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The program of study uses methods of social science to examine family systems and their interactions with various environments. The curriculum supports study in several broad theme areas: family economic well-being, families and mental health, family diversity, and relationships and development across the lifespan.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.00.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Three overall criteria guide admissions decisions: 1) evidence of strong academic preparation and the ability and desire to perform graduate level scholarship, including research; 2) fit of the applicant's professional goals with family social science (FSoS) faculty scholarship and with the overall FSoS mission, that is, enhancing the well-being of diverse families in a changing world; and 3) unique contributions applicant would make to FSoS values, including social relevance, collaboration, inclusiveness, excellence, innovation, and diversity.
Special Application Requirements:
For more information about application requirements and procedures, consult the Family Social Science web page at http://www.cehd.umn.edu/fsos/default.asp. Applicants for the master's program are reviewed only once per year. The application deadline is March 1 for admission for the following fall semester.
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 79
    • Internet Based - Writing Score: 21
    • Internet Based - Reading Score: 19
    • Paper Based - Total Score: 550
  • IELTS
    • Total Score: 6.5
  • MELAB
    • Final score: 80
Key to test abbreviations (TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Plan A: Plan A requires 14 to 19 major credits, 3 to 6 credits outside the major, and 10 thesis credits. The final exam is oral.
Plan B: Plan B requires 19 to 23 major credits and 3 to 7 credits outside the major. The final exam is oral. A capstone project is required.
Capstone Project:Students must demonstrate familiarity with the tools of research or scholarship in the field of family social science or prevention science, the ability to work independently, and the ability to present the results of their investigation effectively, by completing at least one Plan B project. The project should involve a combined total of approximately 120 hours (the equivalent of three full-time weeks) of work. The graduate faculty specifies both the nature and extent of the options available to satisfy this requirement, and whether the requirement is to be satisfied in conjunction with, or independent of, the courses in the student's program.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
A minimum GPA of 3.50 is required for students to remain in good standing.
The MA program is offered under Plan A and Plan B. The Plan A master's is recommended for students who intend to pursue a PhD degree. The Plan B master's is for students who wish to further their education so that they may hold positions of responsibility serving families. Although the instruction is based on research, the Plan B degree is not intended to provide intensive research training. The Plan B program is understood to be a terminal degree and is not recommended for students who intend to pursue the PhD degree. Consult the department for the most current information.
Plan A
Plan A requires at least 30 credits, including at least 20 course credits, of which 6 credits are outside the department in a related field, and 10 thesis credits.
FSOS 5014 - Quantitative Family Research Methods I (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5015 - Family Research Laboratory (1.0 cr)
FSOS 8001 - Conceptual Frameworks in the Family (3.0 cr)
FSOS 8013 - Qualitative Family Research Methods (3.0 cr)
FSOS 8200 - Orientation for Family Social Science (1.0 cr)
FSOS Elective
One FSOS course (3.0 cr)
or One PREV course (3.0 cr)
Statistical Methods
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II (3.0 cr)
Thesis Credits
Take 10 or more credit(s) from the following:
· FSOS 8777 - Thesis Credits: Master's (1.0-18.0 cr)
Plan B
Plan B requires at least 30 credits, including at least 26 course credits, of which 3 credits are outside the department in a related field, and at least 4 credits for a Plan B project.
FSOS 8001 - Conceptual Frameworks in the Family (3.0 cr)
FSOS 8200 - Orientation for Family Social Science (1.0 cr)
One of the following research methods course(s).
FSOS 5014 - Quantitative Family Research Methods I (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5015 - Family Research Laboratory (1.0 cr)
or FSOS 8013 - Qualitative Family Research Methods (3.0 cr)
or Evaluation research methods course (3.0 cr)
Electives
FSOS/PREV courses (12-13 cr)
FSOS Elective
or PREV Elective
Statistical Methods
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II (3.0 cr)
or EPSY 5244 - Survey Design, Sampling, and Implementation (3.0 cr)
or One course outside FSOS (3.0 cr)
Family Science Plan B Project
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
Program Sub-plans
A sub-plan is not required for this program.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
Prevention Science
This sub-plan is limited to students completing the program under Plan A or Plan B.
The fundamental assumption of the prevention science Masterís program is that future researchers and scholars will be most able to meet the challenges and changes occurring in society and in their chosen professions and disciplines if their training is comprehensive and transdisciplinary. This happens through designing and evaluating interventions, and utilizing knowledge about them more strategically to reduce the incidence of unhealthy or maladaptive behavior, and to promote health and adaptive behavior in populations across the life span. The Prevention Science Plan A master's is recommended for students who intend to pursue a PhD.
The Prevention Science Plan A requires at least 32 credits, including at least 22 course credits of which 3 credits are outside the department in a related field, and 10 thesis credits.
Plan A
FSOS 5014 - Quantitative Family Research Methods I (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5015 - Family Research Laboratory (1.0 cr)
FSOS 8001 - Conceptual Frameworks in the Family (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5701 - Prevention Science: Principles and Practices (3.0 cr)
or PREV 8001 - Prevention Science: Principles and Practices (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5702 - Prevention Science Research Methodology (3.0 cr)
or PREV 8002 - Prevention Science Research Methodology (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5703 - New Topics in Prevention: Implementation and Dissemination (3.0 cr)
or PREV 8003 - New Topics in Prevention: Implementation and Dissemination (3.0 cr)
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· FSOS 8193 - Directed Study in Family Social Science (1.0-6.0 cr)
Thesis Credits
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling exactly 10 credit(s) from the following:
· FSOS 8777 - Thesis Credits: Master's (1.0-18.0 cr)
Plan B
FSOS 5014 - Quantitative Family Research Methods I (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5015 - Family Research Laboratory (1.0 cr)
FSOS 8001 - Conceptual Frameworks in the Family (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5701 - Prevention Science: Principles and Practices (3.0 cr)
or PREV 8001 - Prevention Science: Principles and Practices (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5702 - Prevention Science Research Methodology (3.0 cr)
or PREV 8002 - Prevention Science Research Methodology (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5703 - New Topics in Prevention: Implementation and Dissemination (3.0 cr)
or PREV 8003 - New Topics in Prevention: Implementation and Dissemination (3.0 cr)
Independent Study in Prevention Science
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· FSOS 8193 - Directed Study in Family Social Science (1.0-6.0 cr)
Electives
Four additional credits of elective courses from student's area of concentration.
Plan B Project
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· FSOS 8755 - Master's Paper: Plan B Project (1.0-6.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Education and Human Development

View PDF Version:
Search.
Search Programs

Search University Catalogs
Related links.

College of Education and Human Development

Graduate Admissions

Graduate School Fellowships

Graduate Assistantships

Colleges and Schools

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more
 
FSOS 5014 - Quantitative Family Research Methods I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Family research methods, issues associated with multiple levels of analysis. Conducting family-focused data analyses using basic/intermediate methods (through ANOVA and multiple regression), including power analysis. Ethical issues involved in family research such as IRB/HIPAA regulations. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FSOS 5015 - Family Research Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of basic family research methods into experiential learning using statistical software. Analyses that correspond with problem situations in 5014 and that involve secondary data analyses. Using statistical software for basic family research. Preparation to work with quantitative family data sets. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FSOS 8001 - Conceptual Frameworks in the Family
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major theoretical models about families, emphasizing sociohistorical context.
FSOS 8013 - Qualitative Family Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Approaches to qualitative family research evaluation. Phenomenological, feminist, grounded theory, content analytic, ethnomethodological, ethnographic, program evaluation. Theory, research examples, student projects.
FSOS 8200 - Orientation for Family Social Science
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
TBD
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02313
Prerequisites: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Statistical Methods in Education I is the first course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course covers estimation and hypothesis testing with a particular focus on ANOVA and an introduction to multiple linear regression. Prepares students for EPSY 8252/8262. prereq: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02314
Prerequisites: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical Methods in Education II is the second course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course focuses on multiple linear regression and provides an introduction to linear mixed models. prereq: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
FSOS 8777 - Thesis Credits: Master's
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 50.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required [Plan A only]
FSOS 8001 - Conceptual Frameworks in the Family
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major theoretical models about families, emphasizing sociohistorical context.
FSOS 8200 - Orientation for Family Social Science
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
TBD
FSOS 5014 - Quantitative Family Research Methods I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Family research methods, issues associated with multiple levels of analysis. Conducting family-focused data analyses using basic/intermediate methods (through ANOVA and multiple regression), including power analysis. Ethical issues involved in family research such as IRB/HIPAA regulations. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FSOS 5015 - Family Research Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of basic family research methods into experiential learning using statistical software. Analyses that correspond with problem situations in 5014 and that involve secondary data analyses. Using statistical software for basic family research. Preparation to work with quantitative family data sets. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FSOS 8013 - Qualitative Family Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Approaches to qualitative family research evaluation. Phenomenological, feminist, grounded theory, content analytic, ethnomethodological, ethnographic, program evaluation. Theory, research examples, student projects.
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02313
Prerequisites: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Statistical Methods in Education I is the first course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course covers estimation and hypothesis testing with a particular focus on ANOVA and an introduction to multiple linear regression. Prepares students for EPSY 8252/8262. prereq: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02314
Prerequisites: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical Methods in Education II is the second course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course focuses on multiple linear regression and provides an introduction to linear mixed models. prereq: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
EPSY 5244 - Survey Design, Sampling, and Implementation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey methods, including mail, phone, and Web-based/e-mail surveys. Principles of measurement, constructing questions/forms, pilot testing, sampling, data analysis, reporting. Students develop a survey proposal and a draft survey, pilot the survey, and develop sampling/data analysis plans. prereq: [5221 or 5231 or 5261 or equiv], [CEHD grad student or MEd student]
FSOS 5014 - Quantitative Family Research Methods I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Family research methods, issues associated with multiple levels of analysis. Conducting family-focused data analyses using basic/intermediate methods (through ANOVA and multiple regression), including power analysis. Ethical issues involved in family research such as IRB/HIPAA regulations. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FSOS 5015 - Family Research Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of basic family research methods into experiential learning using statistical software. Analyses that correspond with problem situations in 5014 and that involve secondary data analyses. Using statistical software for basic family research. Preparation to work with quantitative family data sets. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FSOS 8001 - Conceptual Frameworks in the Family
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major theoretical models about families, emphasizing sociohistorical context.
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02313
Prerequisites: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Statistical Methods in Education I is the first course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course covers estimation and hypothesis testing with a particular focus on ANOVA and an introduction to multiple linear regression. Prepares students for EPSY 8252/8262. prereq: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
FSOS 5701 - Prevention Science: Principles and Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02405
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical, empirical, and practical foundations for strategic interventions to prevent behavioral problems and promote healthy development. Multidisciplinary roots of prevention science. Trends/directions and best practices.
PREV 8001 - Prevention Science: Principles and Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical, empirical, and practical foundations for strategic interventions to prevent behavioral problems and promote healthy development. Multidisciplinary roots of prevention science. Trends/directions. best practices.
FSOS 5702 - Prevention Science Research Methodology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is intended to provide students with broad exposure to topics in research methodology within the field of prevention science. Prevention science as a discipline focuses on the etiology and prevention of social, physical and mental health problems and the translation of that information to promote health and well-being. This course will emphasize research methodology as it pertains to preventive interventions in youth and family contexts. The course is intended to serve as a survey of a wide range of topics within these areas, with research design, measurement issues, and analytic methods representing the major foci. Topics will be covered with attention to the community contexts within which prevention research often occurs as well as the ethical and human subjects issues that may arise. Students who successfully complete the course are expected to be able to interpret and critically evaluate prevention research methodology as well as identify appropriate methodical strategies to address research questions within prevention science.
PREV 8002 - Prevention Science Research Methodology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is intended to provide students with broad exposure to topics in research methodology within the field of prevention science. Prevention science as a discipline focuses on the etiology and prevention of social, physical and mental health problems and the translation of that information to promote health and well-being. This course will emphasize research methodology as it pertains to preventive interventions in youth and family contexts. The course is intended to serve as a survey of a wide range of topics within these areas, with research design, measurement issues, and analytic methods representing the major foci. Topics will be covered with attention to the community contexts within which prevention research often occurs as well as the ethical and human subjects issues that may arise. Students who successfully complete the course are expected to be able to interpret and critically evaluate prevention research methodology as well as identify appropriate methodical strategies to address research questions within prevention science
FSOS 5703 - New Topics in Prevention: Implementation and Dissemination
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This is an interdisciplinary course focused on the new science of implementation and dissemination of evidence-based/empirically-supported family-focused psychosocial prevention programs. Course content will include an overview of conceptual and theoretical foundations of implementation research, key research questions, methods for evaluating implementation and dissemination efforts, and case examples from the empirical literature. The course will take an ecological perspective to the implementation of family-based prevention programs, addressing questions such as how widespread efforts to install programs in communities can ensure that programs create change in children and families.
PREV 8003 - New Topics in Prevention: Implementation and Dissemination
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This is an interdisciplinary course focused on the new science of implementation and dissemination of evidence-based/empirically-supported family-focused psychosocial prevention programs. Course content will include an overview of conceptual and theoretical foundations of implementation research, key research questions, methods for evaluating implementation and dissemination efforts, and case examples from the empirical literature. The course will take an ecological perspective to the implementation of family-based prevention programs, addressing questions such as how widespread efforts to install programs in communities can ensure that programs create change in children and families
FSOS 8193 - Directed Study in Family Social Science
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 12.0]
Prerequisites: Doctoral student in FSoS or related field
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study. prereq: Doctoral student in FSoS or related field
FSOS 8777 - Thesis Credits: Master's
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 50.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required [Plan A only]
FSOS 5014 - Quantitative Family Research Methods I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Family research methods, issues associated with multiple levels of analysis. Conducting family-focused data analyses using basic/intermediate methods (through ANOVA and multiple regression), including power analysis. Ethical issues involved in family research such as IRB/HIPAA regulations. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FSOS 5015 - Family Research Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of basic family research methods into experiential learning using statistical software. Analyses that correspond with problem situations in 5014 and that involve secondary data analyses. Using statistical software for basic family research. Preparation to work with quantitative family data sets. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FSOS 8001 - Conceptual Frameworks in the Family
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major theoretical models about families, emphasizing sociohistorical context.
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02313
Prerequisites: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Statistical Methods in Education I is the first course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course covers estimation and hypothesis testing with a particular focus on ANOVA and an introduction to multiple linear regression. Prepares students for EPSY 8252/8262. prereq: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
FSOS 5701 - Prevention Science: Principles and Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02405
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical, empirical, and practical foundations for strategic interventions to prevent behavioral problems and promote healthy development. Multidisciplinary roots of prevention science. Trends/directions and best practices.
PREV 8001 - Prevention Science: Principles and Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical, empirical, and practical foundations for strategic interventions to prevent behavioral problems and promote healthy development. Multidisciplinary roots of prevention science. Trends/directions. best practices.
FSOS 5702 - Prevention Science Research Methodology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is intended to provide students with broad exposure to topics in research methodology within the field of prevention science. Prevention science as a discipline focuses on the etiology and prevention of social, physical and mental health problems and the translation of that information to promote health and well-being. This course will emphasize research methodology as it pertains to preventive interventions in youth and family contexts. The course is intended to serve as a survey of a wide range of topics within these areas, with research design, measurement issues, and analytic methods representing the major foci. Topics will be covered with attention to the community contexts within which prevention research often occurs as well as the ethical and human subjects issues that may arise. Students who successfully complete the course are expected to be able to interpret and critically evaluate prevention research methodology as well as identify appropriate methodical strategies to address research questions within prevention science.
PREV 8002 - Prevention Science Research Methodology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is intended to provide students with broad exposure to topics in research methodology within the field of prevention science. Prevention science as a discipline focuses on the etiology and prevention of social, physical and mental health problems and the translation of that information to promote health and well-being. This course will emphasize research methodology as it pertains to preventive interventions in youth and family contexts. The course is intended to serve as a survey of a wide range of topics within these areas, with research design, measurement issues, and analytic methods representing the major foci. Topics will be covered with attention to the community contexts within which prevention research often occurs as well as the ethical and human subjects issues that may arise. Students who successfully complete the course are expected to be able to interpret and critically evaluate prevention research methodology as well as identify appropriate methodical strategies to address research questions within prevention science
FSOS 5703 - New Topics in Prevention: Implementation and Dissemination
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This is an interdisciplinary course focused on the new science of implementation and dissemination of evidence-based/empirically-supported family-focused psychosocial prevention programs. Course content will include an overview of conceptual and theoretical foundations of implementation research, key research questions, methods for evaluating implementation and dissemination efforts, and case examples from the empirical literature. The course will take an ecological perspective to the implementation of family-based prevention programs, addressing questions such as how widespread efforts to install programs in communities can ensure that programs create change in children and families.
PREV 8003 - New Topics in Prevention: Implementation and Dissemination
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This is an interdisciplinary course focused on the new science of implementation and dissemination of evidence-based/empirically-supported family-focused psychosocial prevention programs. Course content will include an overview of conceptual and theoretical foundations of implementation research, key research questions, methods for evaluating implementation and dissemination efforts, and case examples from the empirical literature. The course will take an ecological perspective to the implementation of family-based prevention programs, addressing questions such as how widespread efforts to install programs in communities can ensure that programs create change in children and families
FSOS 8193 - Directed Study in Family Social Science
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 12.0]
Prerequisites: Doctoral student in FSoS or related field
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study. prereq: Doctoral student in FSoS or related field
FSOS 8755 - Master's Paper: Plan B Project
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graduate faculty work with students on research for Plan B paper. prereq: FSoS MA student