Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Family Education M.Ed.

Family Social Science
College of Education and Human Development
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Department of Family Social Science, 290 McNeal Hall, 1985 Buford Ave, St. Paul, MN 55108 (612-625-2705; fax: 612-625-4227)
  • Program Type: Master's
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Length of program in credits: 30
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Master of Education
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The Family Education MEd develops and strengthens professionals' competencies to work with individuals and families to enhance family life. This practitioner-based program, offered by the Department of Family Social Science (FSoS), prepares licensed teachers to further develop their knowledge and skills in the family education field, or non-licensed professionals to work with adults, youth, or children in a variety of settings. Students are prepared to be parent educators for positions in an early childhood family education (ECFE) program in Minnesota, as well as for family education positions in a variety of settings including health care, social service agencies, and religious settings in Minnesota and in other states and countries. Diversity and cultural responsiveness are integrated throughout coursework, student teaching, and observation experiences.
Program Delivery
  • completely online (all program coursework can be completed online)
  • primarily online (at least 80% of the instruction for the program is online with short, intensive periods of face-to-face coursework)
Prerequisites for Admission
A bachelor's degree from an accredited institution in family studies, child psychology, early childhood education, nutrition, or related fields. A 2.80 overall GPA in undergraduate work.
Special Application Requirements:
Application deadlines are March 1 and October 1. Apply Online at https://choose.umn.edu/apply/ For program specific application details see http://www.cehd.umn.edu/fsos/programs/masters/family-ed/how-to-apply.html International Students: Please note, this program is not offered full-time and therefore is not intended for international students needing a visa to study in the US.
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 79
    • Internet Based - Writing Score: 21
    • Internet Based - Reading Score: 19
    • Paper Based - Total Score: 550
  • IELTS
    • Total Score: 6.5
  • MELAB
    • Final score: 80
The preferred English language test is Test of English as Foreign Language.
Key to test abbreviations (TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Plan C: Plan C requires 30 major credits and 0 credits outside the major. There is no final exam.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses toward program requirements is permitted under certain conditions with adviser approval.
A minimum GPA of 2.80 is required for students to remain in good standing.
Required Coursework (15 credits)
Take the following courses:
FSOS 5937 - Parent-Child Interaction (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5942 - Diverse Family Experiences (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5944 - Curricular Design in Parent Education (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5945 - Teaching and Learning in Parent Education (3.0 cr)
FSOS 5946 - Assessment and Evaluation in Parent Education (3.0 cr)
Supporting Focus (15 credits)
Select 15 credits from the following courses, or others in consultation with the advisor, to support career goals and complete the 30-credit minimum.
Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health
CPSY 5301 - Advanced Developmental Psychology (3.0 cr)
CPSY 5518 - Prevention and Intervention in Early Childhood: Principles (3.0 cr)
CPSY 5503 - Development and Psychopathology in Early Childhood (3.0 cr)
CPSY 5513 - Early Childhood Assessment (3.0 cr)
Human Sexuality
HSEX 6001 - Foundations of Human Sexuality (3.0 cr)
HSEX 6011 - Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses (3.0 cr)
HSEX 6012 - Sexual Function and Dysfunction (3.0 cr)
HSEX 6013 - Perspectives and Practices in Sexuality Education (3.0 cr)
Addiction in Families
FSOS 5426 - Alcohol and Drugs: Families and Culture (3.0 cr)
ADDS 5011 - Foundations in Addiction Studies (2.0 cr)
ADDS 5031 - Applied Psychopharmacology (2.0 cr)
ADDS 5071 - Foundations of Co-occurring Disorders (2.0 cr)
ADDS 5081 - Multicultural Foundations of Behavioral Health (3.0 cr)
Classroom Experiece
Professionals seeking additional classroom experience are recommended to take the following course:
FSOS 5949 - Student Teaching in Parent Education (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
A sub-plan is not required for this program.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Education and Human Development

View future requirement(s):
· Spring 2020

View PDF Version:
Search.
Search Programs

Search University Catalogs
Related links.

College of Education and Human Development

Graduate Admissions

Graduate School Fellowships

Graduate Assistantships

Colleges and Schools

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more
 
FSOS 5937 - Parent-Child Interaction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In Parent-Child Interaction, we will examine the dynamic, reciprocal nature of parent-child interactions across the lifespan through multidisciplinary and diverse research, theories and practices. Emphasis will be given to the bidirectional impact of parent-child interactions on the parent-child relationship and on parents' and children's development within complex family, community, cultural and other socio-ecological contexts. Students will continue to reflect and grow in their understanding of the professional role and competencies of a parent educator and learning activities will focus on practical application to both personal lives and professional work with families.
FSOS 5942 - Diverse Family Experiences
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is a research-based in-depth look at family experiences from many diverse points of view. Students will examine diverse experiences of families and their relevance to parent education and to the professional development of parent educators. Research and theoretical knowledge are woven together with observation and personal reflection to create a strength-based approach to both families and professional development.
FSOS 5944 - Curricular Design in Parent Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will develop the skills to adapt and design curricular resources and teaching strategies for effective parent education with diverse families across multiple contexts. Students will develop competence in conducting needs assessment, identifying content, discerning teaching methods, and designing lesson plans. As they develop their own philosophy of practice, students will study the history and evolution of parent education in Minnesota and across the U.S. prereq: FSoS 5937 & FSoS 5942 or instr consent
FSOS 5945 - Teaching and Learning in Parent Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will examine adult, adolescent, and parent learning and development from the perspective of their relevance for parent education. Students will select, use, and reflect on group and individual parent education teaching strategies and facilitation processes designed to meet the needs of diverse populations of adult learners. Critical reflection, ethical practices, and other parent educator competencies related to teaching methods and processes will be addressed. Personal professional development will be facilitated through challenging assumptions and examining the knowledge and competencies required for parent educators. prereq: FSoS 5937 & FSoS 5942 or instr consent
FSOS 5946 - Assessment and Evaluation in Parent Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students will be introduced to theory, terminology, issues, and approaches in assessment and evaluation. Students will apply this new material to the tasks of monitoring program performance, assessing program quality, and measuring parent learning and development. prereq: 5944 or instr consent
CPSY 5301 - Advanced Developmental Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course is an exploration of life span development through the lenses of social, cultural, cognitive, biological, and learning theories and research. A primary emphasis of the class is on gaining better conceptual understanding of different perspectives on healthy development in order to support informed practical understanding of how to help children, adolescents, and adults progress through the developmental periods and to help them with the challenges they face across their lifespan. This course is intended for graduate students. Undergraduate students should take CPSY 2301 or 3301 and not also 5301.
CPSY 5518 - Prevention and Intervention in Early Childhood: Principles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Students design prevention/intervention programs and apply evidence-based strategies in workplace/practicum settings. Readings, in-class reflective practice groups. prereq: 5501, 5503, 5506, 5508
CPSY 5503 - Development and Psychopathology in Early Childhood
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
History, theory, research, concepts, and issues in infant mental health. Typical development. Difficulties in development. Expert guest lectures. Readings, visual material. prereq: 5501 or enrolled in MA program
CPSY 5513 - Early Childhood Assessment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Summer Odd Year
The course introduces processes and evidence-based methods of early childhood assessment and diagnosis from a developmental, multi-disciplinary framework. prereq: [Baccalaureate degree in early-childhood-related field from accredited U.S. institution or documented equiv], [experience in early childhood research or practice]
HSEX 6001 - Foundations of Human Sexuality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundations of Human Sexuality covers topics in human sexuality, including biology and sexuality; sexuality across the lifespan, cultures and history; religions, epidemiology and clinical issues; and sexuality and legal/social aspects. Using readings, discussion forums, peer review, and an applied final project, students will understand the interactions between biological, social, and individual factors in producing variations in human sexuality.
HSEX 6011 - Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses offers an overview of United States and international policy related to gender and sexuality. The course will present the content and impact of such policies across human life stages, from youth reproductive health to aging LGBTQ folks; and a variety of contexts including education, military service, employment, and criminal legal systems. Using readings, multimedia sources, discussion forums, peer review, and an applied final project, students will understand the theory, process, and central actors in policy development and implementation, and the real-world effects of these processes.
HSEX 6012 - Sexual Function and Dysfunction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course covers various aspects of sexual function and dysfunction as well as an in-depth overview of sexual health as it pertains to the general public. Using readings, discussion forums, peer review, and an applied final project, students will understand the range of normal and abnormal sexual response, diagnostic categories of sexual dysfunction, and the range of therapies available.
HSEX 6013 - Perspectives and Practices in Sexuality Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course covers the history of sexuality education, primarily in the US with international comparison, as well as current and emerging issues in sexual education. Using readings, discussion forums, peer review, and an applied final project, students will understand the temporal changes in sexual health education in the US and abroad and the empirical, theoretical, and educational foundations of sexual health education.
FSOS 5426 - Alcohol and Drugs: Families and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 3426/5426
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Overview of psychology/sociology of drug use/abuse. Life-span, epidemiological, familial, cultural data regarding use. Fundamentals of licit/illicit drug use behavior. Gender, ethnicity, social class, sexuality, sexual orientation, disability.
ADDS 5011 - Foundations in Addiction Studies
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01942 - AddS 5001/AddS 5011
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theoretical perspectives/concepts related to etiology of alcohol/drug dependency/abuse. Emphasizes bio-psycho-social models of addiction/disease: psychodynamics, social learning, contingency, family systems. Connection of theory to empirical research.
ADDS 5031 - Applied Psychopharmacology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01938
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
This course provides a comprehensive survey of the basic concepts of psychopharmacology and psychiatric conditions for which psychoactive medication presents an appropriate intervention strategy. It is intended to be an introduction into the field and is designed to provide a working knowledge base to enable students to more competently address the experiences of their clients taking prescribed psychotropic medications.
ADDS 5071 - Foundations of Co-occurring Disorders
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01940
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Understanding mentally ill/chemically abusive or dependent client. Intervention, advocacy, education, support for client/those part of his/her environment. Social, environmental, multicultural factors that contribute resources for these clients.
ADDS 5081 - Multicultural Foundations of Behavioral Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
What is culture? How might culture, cultural practices, and history be significant in the use/abuse of substances? How is culture relevant to the attitudes/practices in the prevention/treatment of substance use/abuse? Multicultural counseling and cultural competence in addiction counseling. People as individuals. Clinician's own cultural worldview/ other cultural worldviews.
FSOS 5949 - Student Teaching in Parent Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students will participate in mentored and supervised parent education practice designed to meet individual student needs and interests in parent education. The student teaching assignment is supplemented with online discussions and chats intended to provide students an opportunity to engage in discussion, reflection, and cooperative learning with regard to the practice of parent education. prereq: Application for student teaching; FSoS 5937, 5942, 5944 and 5945 or instr consent
FSOS 5937 - Parent-Child Interaction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In Parent-Child Interaction, we will examine the dynamic, reciprocal nature of parent-child interactions across the lifespan through multidisciplinary and diverse research, theories and practices. Emphasis will be given to the bidirectional impact of parent-child interactions on the parent-child relationship and on parents' and children's development within complex family, community, cultural and other socio-ecological contexts. Students will continue to reflect and grow in their understanding of the professional role and competencies of a parent educator and learning activities will focus on practical application to both personal lives and professional work with families.
FSOS 5942 - Diverse Family Experiences
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is a research-based in-depth look at family experiences from many diverse points of view. Students will examine diverse experiences of families and their relevance to parent education and to the professional development of parent educators. Research and theoretical knowledge are woven together with observation and personal reflection to create a strength-based approach to both families and professional development.
FSOS 5944 - Curricular Design in Parent Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will develop the skills to adapt and design curricular resources and teaching strategies for effective parent education with diverse families across multiple contexts. Students will develop competence in conducting needs assessment, identifying content, discerning teaching methods, and designing lesson plans. As they develop their own philosophy of practice, students will study the history and evolution of parent education in Minnesota and across the U.S. prereq: FSoS 5937 & FSoS 5942 or instr consent
FSOS 5945 - Teaching and Learning in Parent Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will examine adult, adolescent, and parent learning and development from the perspective of their relevance for parent education. Students will select, use, and reflect on group and individual parent education teaching strategies and facilitation processes designed to meet the needs of diverse populations of adult learners. Critical reflection, ethical practices, and other parent educator competencies related to teaching methods and processes will be addressed. Personal professional development will be facilitated through challenging assumptions and examining the knowledge and competencies required for parent educators. prereq: FSoS 5937 & FSoS 5942 or instr consent
FSOS 5946 - Assessment and Evaluation in Parent Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students will be introduced to theory, terminology, issues, and approaches in assessment and evaluation. Students will apply this new material to the tasks of monitoring program performance, assessing program quality, and measuring parent learning and development. prereq: 5944 or instr consent
FSOS 5949 - Student Teaching in Parent Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students will participate in mentored and supervised parent education practice designed to meet individual student needs and interests in parent education. The student teaching assignment is supplemented with online discussions and chats intended to provide students an opportunity to engage in discussion, reflection, and cooperative learning with regard to the practice of parent education. prereq: Application for student teaching; FSoS 5937, 5942, 5944 and 5945 or instr consent
CPSY 5301 - Advanced Developmental Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course is an exploration of life span development through the lenses of social, cultural, cognitive, biological, and learning theories and research. A primary emphasis of the class is on gaining better conceptual understanding of different perspectives on healthy development in order to support informed practical understanding of how to help children, adolescents, and adults progress through the developmental periods and to help them with the challenges they face across their lifespan. This course is intended for graduate students. Undergraduate students should take CPSY 2301 or 3301 and not also 5301.
EPSY 5135 - Human Relations Workshop
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Experiential course addressing issues of prejudice and discrimination in terms of history, power, and social perception. Includes knowledge and skills acquisition in cooperative learning, multicultural education, group dynamics, social influence, effective leadership, judgment and decision-making, prejudice reduction, conflict resolution.
CPSY 5261 - Early Learning in Infancy and Toddlerhood
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
This course provides an understanding of infant and toddler development. It offers multiple perspectives and current research related to the timetable of infant and toddler development, as well as the role of caregivers, environment, and culture in development. Special attention will be given to policies/programming that concern infants, toddlers, and their families. Students will be expected to understand the nuanced and varied ways in which development unfolds, including areas of exceptionalities, as well as explore the roles of professionals and community members in supporting infant and toddler development.
OLPD 5201 - Strategies for Teaching Adults
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Psychological theories of adult learning; learning styles and personality types; teaching styles; group and team learning; moderating and study circles; teaching technologies and distance learning; gender, race, and cultural communication. Applications of strategies. prereq: Grad student only
CSPH 5118 - Whole Person, Whole Community: The Reciprocity of Wellbeing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores the symbiotic and reciprocal relationship between individual and community health and wellbeing, as well as the many factors/forces which influence that relationship. Drawing upon recent studies in the area of reciprocal/symbiotic effects between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing, this course will include the following core topics: definitions of community and related dimensions of wellbeing, importance of Individual/Community reciprocity (Social Justice, Equity, Safety, and Trust), historical trauma and healing, and individual action and personal empowerment in community transformation. Utilizing elements of the Center for Spirituality & Healing's Wellbeing model and modes of contemplative practice, this course will ultimately assist learners through phases of individual reflection and mindfulness for the purpose of creating more open and reciprocal relationships with entities they describe as their communities. An extension of recent studies in the area of the reciprocal (or rippling) effect between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing this course will guide individuals in identifying the various communities in which they live or participate, the roles they "play" within those communities and why/ how this knowledge can help prepare them for action and leadership. Main themes of the course will include: - Mindfulness, Reflection and Healing: Historical Trauma and Marginalization. - Roles and Reciprocity: Justice, Equity, Security and Trust between individuals and their communities. - Transformation: Individual Action/Leadership as Bridge between Personal and Community Wellbeing.
EPSY 5101 - Intelligence and Creativity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01874
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Contemporary theories of intelligence and intellectual development and contemporary theories of creativity and their implications for educational practices and psychological research.
CI 5351 - Technology Tools for Educators
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Develop skills in using technology applications to support teaching and learning. Internet applications, presentation software, Web 2.0 technologies, and Web site development.