Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Cognitive Science Minor

CLA Dean's Office
College of Liberal Arts
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Center for Cognitive Sciences, University of Minnesota, 205 Elliott Hall, 75 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-626-3570; fax: 612-626-7253)
  • Program Type: Graduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Length of program in credits (master's): 9 to 10
  • Length of program in credits (doctoral): 12 to 13
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
The cognitive science minor provides an opportunity for students to pursue integrated coursework, which emphasizes theory and methods in cognitive science.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
Special Application Requirements:
Students interested in the minor are strongly encouraged to confer with their major field advisor and director of graduate studies, and the Cognitive Science director of graduate studies regarding feasibility and requirements.
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Use of 4xxx courses toward program requirements is permitted under certain conditions with adviser approval.
The minimum cumulative GPA for coursework applied to the minor is 3.00.
Coursework
Introduction Course (3 to 4 credits)
Select one of the following courses, or a substitute course, with the approval of the Cognitive Science director of graduate studies.
CGSC 8000 - Seminar: Philosophy of the Cognitive Sciences (3.0 cr)
or CGSC 8041 - Cognitive Neuroscience (4.0 cr)
Electives (5 to 9 credits)
Master's students select at least 5 credits, and doctoral students select at least 9 credits from the following to meet minimum requirements for the minor. Approval of the Cognitive Science director of graduate studies is required.
Cognitive Science
CGSC 8410 - Perspectives in Learning, Perception, and Cognition (2.0 cr)
Cognitive Psychology
CPSY 8301 - Developmental Psychology: Cognitive Processes (4.0 cr)
EPSY 5114 - Psychology of Student Learning (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8112 - Mathematical Cognition (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8116 - Reading for Meaning: Cognitive Processes in the Comprehension of Texts (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8118 - Advanced Cognitive Psychology (3.0 cr)
PSY 5014 - Psychology of Human Learning and Memory (3.0 cr)
PSY 5015 - Cognition, Computation, and Brain (3.0 cr)
PSY 5062 - Cognitive Neuropsychology (3.0 cr)
PSY 5064 - Brain and Emotion (3.0 cr)
PSY 8010 - Advanced Topics in Learning (3.0 cr)
PSY 8031 - Seminar: Visual Perception (2.0 cr)
PSY 8036 - Topics in Computational Vision (3.0 cr)
PSY 8042 - Proseminar in Cognition, Brain, and Behavior (3.0 cr)
PSY 8055 - Seminar: Cognitive Neuroscience (3.0 cr)
PSY 8056 - Seminar: Psychology of Language (3.0 cr)
PSY 8201 - Social Cognition (3.0 cr)
Computer Science
CSCI 5115 - User Interface Design, Implementation and Evaluation (3.0 cr)
CSCI 5127W - Embodied Computing: Design & Prototyping [WI] (3.0 cr)
CSCI 5421 - Advanced Algorithms and Data Structures (3.0 cr)
CSCI 5511 - Artificial Intelligence I (3.0 cr)
CSCI 5521 - Introduction to Machine Learning (3.0 cr)
CSCI 5525 - Machine Learning (3.0 cr)
CSCI 5561 - Computer Vision (3.0 cr)
CSCI 5609 - Visualization (3.0 cr)
CSCI 5619 - Virtual Reality and 3D Interaction (3.0 cr)
CSCI 8115 - Human-Computer Interaction and User Interface Technology (3.0 cr)
CSCI 8551 - Intelligent Agents (3.0 cr)
Linguistics
LING 5001 - Introduction to Linguistics (4.0 cr)
LING 5201 - Syntactic Theory I (3.0 cr)
LING 5202 - Syntactic Theory II (3.0 cr)
LING 5205 - Semantics (3.0 cr)
LING 5206 - Linguistic Pragmatics (3.0 cr)
LING 5801 - Introduction to Computational Linguistics (3.0 cr)
LING 8200 - Topics in Syntax and Semantics (3.0 cr)
LING 8210 - Seminar in Syntax (3.0 cr)
LING 8900 - Seminar: Topics in Linguistics (3.0 cr)
LING 8921 - Seminar in Language and Cognition (3.0 cr)
Neuroscience
NSC 5202 - Theoretical Neuroscience: Systems and Information Processing (3.0 cr)
NSC 5461 - Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience (4.0 cr)
NSC 5561 - Systems Neuroscience (4.0 cr)
NSC 8217 - Systems and Computational Neuroscience (2.0 cr)
Philosophy
PHIL 4615 - Minds, Bodies, and Machines (3.0 cr)
PHIL 8131 - Epistemology Survey (3.0 cr)
PHIL 8180 - Seminar: Philosophy of Language (3.0 cr)
PHIL 8182 - Formal Semantics of Natural Language (3.0 cr)
PHIL 8620 - Seminar: Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (3.0 cr)
PHIL 8670 - Seminar: Philosophy of Science (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
Masters
Doctoral
 
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CGSC 8000 - Seminar: Philosophy of the Cognitive Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00956 - CgSc 8000/Phil 8640
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Philosophical framework for analyzing cognitive sciences. Recent developments in metaphysics and epistemology. Nature of scientific theories, methodologies of cognitive sciences, relations among cognitive sciences, relation of cognitive science to epistemology and various philosophical problems. prereq: Grad cog sci minor or instr consent
CGSC 8041 - Cognitive Neuroscience
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01636 - CgSc 8041/NSC 8041
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Relations between brain activity and cognitive function in mammals. Working memory, attention, decision processing, executive function, categorization, planning, sequence processing. Behavioral/physiological perspectives. Disruption of cognitive function following brain damage. Extracellular recording of single neuron activity in nonhuman primates. Functional neuroimaging/magnetoencephalography in humans. prereq: instr consent
CGSC 8410 - Perspectives in Learning, Perception, and Cognition
Credits: 2.0 [max 24.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Lectures/discussions in cognitive sciences by local/visiting faculty.
CPSY 8301 - Developmental Psychology: Cognitive Processes
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Perceptual, motor, cognitive, and language development, and biological bases of each. Conceptual framework of research issues. prereq: Doctoral student, instr consent
EPSY 5114 - Psychology of Student Learning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01814
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to the theories, data, and methods of Educational Psychology most relevant to understanding student thinking and learning. The first third of the course reviews those aspects of cognitive development that are foundational for education. The second third considers how cognitive psychology informs questions of learning, memory, knowledge, and transfer. With this background in place, the final third of the course will focus on the classroom: on instruction, motivation, individual differences, and group differences. The course concludes by considering the neural correlates of classroom learning.
EPSY 8112 - Mathematical Cognition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Cognitive science research. Papers investigating how adults/children understand fundamental mathematical concepts. Papers drawn from psychology, neuroscience, education literatures. prereq: 5114 or equiv
EPSY 8116 - Reading for Meaning: Cognitive Processes in the Comprehension of Texts
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cognitive processes that take place during reading comprehension/implications of these processes for instruction/assessment.
EPSY 8118 - Advanced Cognitive Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a graduate introduction to cognitive psychology. It is "advanced" in the sense that it focuses on higher-level cognition, and also in its emphasis on theories and models in addition to empirical results. Graduate students interested in cognitive psychology are invited to register for the course, regardless of disciplinary background.
PSY 5014 - Psychology of Human Learning and Memory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Human memory encoding/retrieval. How we adaptively use memory. Brain systems that support memory. Episodic/semantic memory. Working/short-term memory. Procedural memory. Repetition priming. Prospective remembering. Autobiographical memory. prereq: 3011 or 3051 or honors or grad student
PSY 5015 - Cognition, Computation, and Brain
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Human cognitive abilities (perception, memory, attention) from different perspectives (e.g., cognitive psychological approach, cognitive neuroscience approach). prereq: [Honors or grad] or [[jr or sr], [3011 or 3031 or 3051 or 3061]] or instr consent
PSY 5062 - Cognitive Neuropsychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Consequences of different types of brain damage on human perception/cognition. Neural mechanisms of normal perceptual/cognitive functions. Vision/attention disorders, split brain, language deficits, memory disorders, central planning deficits. Emphasizes function/phenomenology. Minimal amount of brain anatomy. prereq: Grad or [[jr or sr], [3011 or 3031 or 3051 or 3061]] or instr consent
PSY 5064 - Brain and Emotion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduction to affective neuroscience. How brain promotes emotional/motivated behavior in animals/humans. Biological theories of emotion in historical/current theoretical contexts. Fundamental brain motivational systems, including fear, pleasure, attachment, stress, and regulation of motivated behavior. Implications for emotional development, vulnerability to psychiatric disorders. prereq: 3061 or 5061 or instr consent
PSY 8010 - Advanced Topics in Learning
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Contemporary topics in learning and behavior theory. prereq: 5012 or instr consent
PSY 8031 - Seminar: Visual Perception
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Cognitive, psychological, neurophysiological determinants of visual perception. Current research. prereq: 5031 or instr consent
PSY 8036 - Topics in Computational Vision
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Recent research in visual psychophysics, visual neuroscience, and computer vision. prereq: 5031 or 5036 or equiv or instr consent
PSY 8042 - Proseminar in Cognition, Brain, and Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Advanced topics in cognition, brain, and behavior. Lecture, discussion, and student-led presentations of research papers on core topics of attention, memory, emotion, categorization, thinking, and language, and intersections between these areas. prereq: Psy grad student or instr consent
PSY 8055 - Seminar: Cognitive Neuroscience
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Recent advances in analysis of neural bases of cognitive functions. prereq: 5015 or instr consent
PSY 8056 - Seminar: Psychology of Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics in psycholinguistics. prereq: Grad psych major or instr consent
PSY 8201 - Social Cognition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Social psychological theory/research on social inference and reasoning processes. Psychology of prejudice/stereotyping. prereq: Psych PhD candidate
CSCI 5115 - User Interface Design, Implementation and Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory, design, programming, and evaluation of interactive application interfaces. Human capabilities and limitations, interface design and engineering, prototyping and interface construction, interface evaluation, and topics such as data visualization and World Wide Web. Course is built around a group project. prereq: 4041 or instr consent
CSCI 5127W - Embodied Computing: Design & Prototyping (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
In this course, you will learn and apply the principles of embodied computing to human-centered challenges. Through a semester-long team project, you will learn and demonstrate mastery of human-centered embodied computing through two phases: (1) investigating human needs and current embodied practices and (2) rapidly prototyping and iterating embodied computing solutions. One of the ways you will demonstrate this mastery is through the collaborative creation of a written document and project capstone video describing your process and prototype. prereq: CSci 4041, upper division or graduate student, or instructor permission; CSci 5115 or equivalent recommended.
CSCI 5421 - Advanced Algorithms and Data Structures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental paradigms of algorithm and data structure design. Divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy method, graph algorithms, amortization, priority queues and variants, search structures, disjoint-set structures. Theoretical underpinnings. Examples from various problem domains. prereq: 4041 or instr consent
CSCI 5511 - Artificial Intelligence I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01666
Prerequisites: [2041 or #], grad student
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to AI. Problem solving, search, inference techniques. Logic/theorem proving. Knowledge representation, rules, frames, semantic networks. Planning/scheduling. Lisp programming language. prereq: [2041 or instr consent], grad student
CSCI 5521 - Introduction to Machine Learning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Problems of pattern recognition, feature selection, measurement techniques. Statistical decision theory, nonstatistical techniques. Automatic feature selection/data clustering. Syntactic pattern recognition. Mathematical pattern recognition/artificial intelligence. prereq: [[2031 or 2033], STAT 3021] or instr consent
CSCI 5525 - Machine Learning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Models of learning. Supervised algorithms such as perceptrons, logistic regression, and large margin methods (SVMs, boosting). Hypothesis evaluation. Learning theory. Online algorithms such as winnow and weighted majority. Unsupervised algorithms, dimensionality reduction, spectral methods. Graphical models. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
CSCI 5561 - Computer Vision
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Issues in perspective transformations, edge detection, image filtering, image segmentation, and feature tracking. Complex problems in shape recovery, stereo, active vision, autonomous navigation, shadows, and physics-based vision. Applications. prereq: 5511 or instr consent
CSCI 5609 - Visualization
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Fundamental theory/practice in data visualization. Programming applications. Perceptual issues in effective data representation, multivariate visualization, information visualization, vector field/volume visualization. prereq: [1913, 4041] or equiv or instr consent
CSCI 5619 - Virtual Reality and 3D Interaction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduction to software, technology/applications in virtual/augmented reality, 3D user interaction. Overview of current research. Hands-on projects. prereq: 4611 or 5607 or 5115 or equiv or instr consent
CSCI 8115 - Human-Computer Interaction and User Interface Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Current research issues in human-computer interaction, user interface toolkits and frameworks, and related areas. Research techniques, model-based development, gesture-based interfaces, constraint-based programming, event processing models, innovative systems, HCI in multimedia systems. prereq: 5115 or instr consent
CSCI 8551 - Intelligent Agents
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of intelligent agents. Agent architectures; knowledge representation, communication, cooperation, and negotiation among multiple agents; planning and learning; issues in designing agents with a physical body; dealing with sensors and actuators; world modeling. prereq: 5511 or instr consent
LING 5001 - Introduction to Linguistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00099 - Ling 3001/3001H/5001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of human language. Methods, questions, findings, and perspectives of modern linguistics. Components of the language system (phonetics/phonology, syntax, semantics/pragmatics); language acquisition; language and social variables; language and cognition; language change; language processing; language and public policy; language and cognition.
LING 5201 - Syntactic Theory I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01958 - Ling 4201/Ling 5201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/issues in current syntactic theory. prereq: 5001 or honors student or instr consent
LING 5202 - Syntactic Theory II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01961 - Ling 4202/Ling 5202
Typically offered: Every Spring
Modern syntactic theory. Syntactic phenomena in various languages. Syntactic argumentation, development of constraints on grammar formalisms. prereq: 5201 or instructor consent. LING 5201 is directed towards honors students and graduate students.
LING 5205 - Semantics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of sentence meaning. Semantic properties. Relations such as analyticity, entailment, quantification, and genericity. Philosophical background, formal techniques of semantic analysis, how sentence meaning depends on word meaning, syntax, and context. The role of semantics in grammatical theory. prereq: [4201 or 5201] or instr consent
LING 5206 - Linguistic Pragmatics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of linguistic phenomena in relation to beliefs and intentions of language users; speech act theory, conversational implicature, presupposition, information structure, relevance theory, discourse coherence. prereq: [4201 or 5201] or instr consent
LING 5801 - Introduction to Computational Linguistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Methods/issues in computer understanding of natural language. Programming languages, their linguistic applications. Lab projects. prereq: [4201 or 5201] or programming experience or instr consent
LING 8200 - Topics in Syntax and Semantics
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Syntax and semantics of natural language, with particular emphasis on the interface between the two. prereq: 5202, 5205 or instr consent
LING 8210 - Seminar in Syntax
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Current issues in syntactic theory. Topics vary. prereq: 5202, 5205 or instr consent
LING 8900 - Seminar: Topics in Linguistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics vary. See Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
LING 8921 - Seminar in Language and Cognition
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Language-related issues in cognitive science from a linguistic perspective. Serves as elective for cognitive science minor, but only for linguistics nonmajors. prereq: instr consent
NSC 5202 - Theoretical Neuroscience: Systems and Information Processing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSc 5202/Phsl 5202
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of computational/theoretical neuroscience. Distributed representations and information theory. Methods for single-cell modeling, including compartmental/integrate-and-fire models. Learning rules, including supervised, unsupervised, and reinforcement learning models. Specific systems models from current theoretical neuroscience literature. Lecture/discussion. Readings from current scientific literature. prereq: [3101, 3102W] recommended
NSC 5461 - Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Lectures by team of faculty, problem sets in important physiological concepts, discussion of original research papers. prereq: NSc grad student or instr consent
NSC 5561 - Systems Neuroscience
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of organization of neural systems forming the basis for sensation/movement. Sensory-motor/neural-endocrine integration. Relationships between structure and function in nervous system. Team taught. Lecture, laboratory. prereq: NSc grad student or instr consent
NSC 8217 - Systems and Computational Neuroscience
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced seminar. prereq: 5561 or instr consent
PHIL 4615 - Minds, Bodies, and Machines
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02814
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Mind-body problem. Philosophical relevance of cybernetics, artificial intelligence, computer simulation. Mental phenomena present the philosopher with a number of deep but inescapable puzzles and challenges. We tend to suppose that we know what it is to have a mind, to have beliefs, desires, etc., and we think that we know how to explain our own behavior and that of others -- and all of this without any formal training in the relevant science. All of this is surely amazing; indeed it verges on the outrageous. We admit to not knowing the makeup of the simplest structures, to not knowing how to explain the behavior of the simplest organisms -- we, OF COURSE, leave such issues to scientific investigation. Yet, at the same time, we think we know how to explain the behavior of this most complex of systems; we know how to do it, and we know what we are talking about when we explain behavior by citing the relevant beliefs, desires, etc. And, to repeat, we know all of this with no formal training. Strange indeed. Not only is this initial confidence puzzling, but attempts to articulate the mental story and to integrate it into the larger scientific picture have all proven problematical. We start our investigation with a very brief glance at a mid-century proposal that initiated a very different way of thinking about mind: the proposal by Turing -- one of the great minds of the 20th Century--that machines of a certain kind could exhibit intelligence. A story told in part in the recent movie, The Imitation Game. We then turn to some more traditional approaches to mind: Cartesianism, Behaviorism and Materialism. prereq: one course in philosophy or instr consent
PHIL 8131 - Epistemology Survey
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Survey, against background of traditional issues, of contemporary developments in theory of knowledge.
PHIL 8180 - Seminar: Philosophy of Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Topics vary by offering. prereq: 4231 or instr consent
PHIL 8182 - Formal Semantics of Natural Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 8221/Phil 8182
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Truth-conditional model-theoretic semantics applied to treatment of opacity, intensionality, quantification, and related phenomena in natural language. prereq: Phil 5201 or instr consent
PHIL 8620 - Seminar: Philosophy of the Biological Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Topics vary by offering.
PHIL 8670 - Seminar: Philosophy of Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics vary by offering. prereq: instr consent