Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Park and Protected Area Management Minor

Forest Resources
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2018
  • Required credits in this minor: 18 to 20
This minor prepares students for positions related to parks and trails management and nature-based tourism. Students will learn about theory and practice in parks and trails planning, recreation management, nature-based tourism, environmental interpretation, and visitor behavior monitoring and management.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Core Courses
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands [WI] (4.0 cr)
FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism (3.0 cr)
FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4811 - Environmental Interpretation (3.0 cr)
Park and Protected Area Management Minor Options
Park and Protected Area Management Option
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3206 - Park and Protected Area Management Field Studies (2.0 cr)
-OR-
Resource Based Tourism Option
FNRM 3201 - Introduction to Travel and Tourism (3.0 cr)
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
FNRM 3206 - Park and Protected Area Management Field Studies (2.0 cr)
ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development [GP] (3.0 cr)
APEC 4311 - Tourism Development: Principles, Processes, Policies (3.0 cr)
GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism [CIV] (3.0 cr)
CFAN 3501 - Costa Rica--Sustainable Development [GP] (3.0 cr)
CFAN 3502 - Bahamas--Tropical Marine Biology and Shark Ecology (2.0 cr)
CFAN 3503 - Switzerland--Mountain Agriculture [GP] (3.0 cr)
CFAN 3504 - Vertebrate Research Design and Field Survey Techniques [GP] (3.0 cr)
CFAN 3506 - Iceland: Landscapes, Natural Resources, and Environmental Management (3.0 cr)
CFAN 3507 - Exploring Ecuador: People, Land, and Water from the Amazon to the Galapagos [ENV, GP] (3.0 cr)
CFAN 3510 - From Rainforest to Reef: Wildlife Medicine and Conservation in Belize (3.0 cr)
CFAN 3512 - Sustainable Food Chains [GP] (3.0 cr)
CFAN 3513 - The Natural History of Norway [GP, ENV] (3.0 cr)
CFAN 3514 - Machu Picchu: Biodiversity & Climate Change in Peru [ENV] (3.0 cr)
CFAN 3516 - Sustainable Food Systems of Italy [ENV, GP] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 3980 - Topics in Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5990 - Topics in Archaeology (3.0 cr)
-OR-
International Tourism Option
Six credits international tourism coursework at UMN/or partner institute selected in consultation with and approved by minor adviser.
 
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FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00377
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/practices of wildland recreation management. Federal recreation land management policy/organization. Recreation resource and visitor use management. Visitor-caused impacts. Management tools. Exams, applied assignments.
FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00410 - FNRM 3101/FNRM 5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Tourism is a significant industry locally, nationally, and internationally. Park and protected area attractions are among the most visited but also the most vulnerable attractions. This course is designed to familiarize you with the basic concept of park and protected area tourism, including cultural and ecotourism, and then develop your expertise to plan and evaluate sustainable tourism development and operations. Accordingly, you will complete assignments that apply the knowledge gained to planning and evaluation activities. This course is offered partially on-line. COURSE OBJECTIVES By the end of the class you will be able to: 1.Differentiate and appreciate the complexities involved with defining and developing nature, eco, heritage, geo-, park and protected, cultural and "sustainable tourism." 2.Identify specific social, economic, and environmental impacts associated with park and protected area tourism, how to measure them, and methods to minimize the negative and maximize the positive impacts. 3.Analyze domestic and international case studies of park and protected area tourism. 4.Critically evaluate park and protected area tourism services and effective management and planning. 5. Create elements of a business plan for park and protected area tourism operations that emphasize sustainability.
FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Recreation, leisure, and tourism are significant parts of the world, national, and state economies. Understanding visitor behavior is important and has significant implications for organizations, agencies, and businesses related to parks, tourism destinations, and museums. In this class, you will learn to apply both social science theory and methods to understand consumers, with an emphasis on visitors to parks and protected areas. You will immediately apply your learning of survey development, interviewing, observation and content analysis to real-word situations in class projects. This is an online course.
ESPM 4811 - Environmental Interpretation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02374
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories of interpretation. Nonformal teaching pedagogy. Interpretive talks, walks, and programs. Camp leadership, oral presentation. Newsletter development, Website design. Development of self-guided trail guides, brochures, and exhibits. Planning, evaluation. Interpretive work in private, state, or federal agencies. First-hand experience.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00379 - ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02381 - FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00361 - ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
FNRM 3206 - Park and Protected Area Management Field Studies
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02284
Prerequisites: Sophomore status or higher
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Directed field study of park/protected areas. Recreation planning/visitor management, cultural/natural resource management, nature-based tourism management, resource interpretation. Communication across local, state, federal, tribal park, protected areas in northern Minnesota. prereq: Sophomore status or higher
FNRM 3201 - Introduction to Travel and Tourism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02445 - FNRM 3201/FNRM 5201
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Travel and tourism is called one of the largest industries in the world today. This course introduces students to the nature, structure, and complexity of the travel and tourism system. Specific focus is placed on understanding the tourism system and its impact globally on economies, environments, and people. Using a lens of sustainability, students will examine the functions and interconnectedness of the various sectors within the tourism system and the role of diverse and sometimes competing priorities of stakeholders in the creation, delivery, and integration of tourism. The course uses readings, case studies, discussion, and applied projects to develop students’ understanding of tourism and how communities, businesses, and government can maximize benefits associated with the demand for tourism while protecting the natural and human resources upon which it depends.
FNRM 3206 - Park and Protected Area Management Field Studies
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02284
Prerequisites: Sophomore status or higher
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Directed field study of park/protected areas. Recreation planning/visitor management, cultural/natural resource management, nature-based tourism management, resource interpretation. Communication across local, state, federal, tribal park, protected areas in northern Minnesota. prereq: Sophomore status or higher
ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3251/5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use and sustainable development. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Global case studies. Impact of consumption in developed countries on sustainable development in lesser developed countries.
APEC 4311 - Tourism Development: Principles, Processes, Policies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evolution of tourism industry; economic, environmental, and sociocultural impacts of tourism development; influence of government policies and organizations; models and tools needed for successful development; consequences of development activities and ways to involve stakeholders in decisions. prereq: 1101, 1102 or Econ 1101, 1102
GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global flows of tourism from perspective of debates about consumption, development, identity, and the environment. Close reading, field trips, discussion of films, research paper.
CFAN 3501 - Costa Rica--Sustainable Development (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Costa Rica's development strategy. Agriculture, tourism, energy, and urbanization show synergies and tension between economic, social, and environmental impacts. Sustainability and how organizations maximize benefits associated with sustainable development. prereq: instr consent
CFAN 3502 - Bahamas--Tropical Marine Biology and Shark Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Ecology of sharks and natural history of South Bimini Island. Marine ecosystems. Local flora and fauna. Local culture and development policy on the ecosystems. prereq: instr consent
CFAN 3503 - Switzerland--Mountain Agriculture (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Spring-time agriculture in a mountain ecosystem; management of farm enterprises to be productive in the context of Europe; how Switzerland has developed agro-tourism; interact with farmers, researchers, professionals and government officials who share expertise and interest in agricultural issues. prereq: instr consent
CFAN 3504 - Vertebrate Research Design and Field Survey Techniques (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Thai culture and conservation challenges. Two-day barge trip learning culture before traveling to Thailand's premier conservation research site. Camera-trapping techniques, prey assessment methods, and radio telemetry approaches to the study of large mammals. prereq: instr consent
CFAN 3506 - Iceland: Landscapes, Natural Resources, and Environmental Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Landscapes and natural resources shape ways countries view and manage environmental resources. We will study landscapes and natural resources of Iceland, including Thingvellir (= ÿingvellir) National Park, the historical seat of Icelandic Parliament (or Alþingi). We will learn how the national park and other natural resources are sustainably managed, and their significance as environmental and cultural shrines. Students will compile a journal with daily entries, including photographs or digital images, and participate in field exercise and cultural/social activities providing insight into Icelandic landscapes and society. prereq: But must be at least end-of-year freshmen in good academic standing with a minimum GPA of 2.5 or instr consent
CFAN 3507 - Exploring Ecuador: People, Land, and Water from the Amazon to the Galapagos (ENV, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course we will explore the abundant flora and fauna and water resources of the majestic mountains, rich valley farmlands, and lush tropical forests. We will also explore sustainability and restoration projects and visit urban Quito, rural villages, Amazon basin, and island hop through the Galapagos. This interdisciplinary course offers students of all disciplines an opportunity to explore water resource management and Indigenous (Quichua) culture – A great opportunity for scientifically and culturally oriented students to interact with each other and the people of Ecuador.
CFAN 3510 - From Rainforest to Reef: Wildlife Medicine and Conservation in Belize
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to key topics in wildlife medicine. Students will learn medical issues and approaches, the role of the veterinarian in wildlife conservation, zoo medicine, and wildlife rescue & rehabilitation. This program is held at the Belize Wildlife & Referral Clinicâ¿¿s (BWRC) teaching facility with BWRCâ¿¿s founder and wildlife veterinarian, Dr. Isabelle Paquet-Durand. Labs include distance immobilization, suture, spay & neuter, necropsy, comparative anatomy, radiography, parasitology and blood analysis. Field visits are conducted with Dr. Isabelle to the Belize Zoo and to avian, reptile, primate, and manatee centers. Students are introduced to preventative medicine and common diseases for many of these species. A spay & neuter lab reviews theory and suture practice, this is followed by a spay & neuter clinic organized in the field or at BWRC. Students also have the opportunity to observe, and when possible, assist the BWRC veterinary staff during their daily operations.
CFAN 3512 - Sustainable Food Chains (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Concentrated study in agriculture/agribusiness. Horticulture. Viticulture/wine making. Rural tourism. Gastronomy. prereq: instr consent
CFAN 3513 - The Natural History of Norway (GP, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring & Summer Odd Year
The program will be based in the Nord Tröndelag region of central Norway where students will learn about Norway's physical geography, ecology, and management of natural resources, including its flora, fauna, and agricultural systems. Students will also gain an understanding of the region's rich culture, history, and close ties to Minnesota. prereq: instructor consent
CFAN 3514 - Machu Picchu: Biodiversity & Climate Change in Peru (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Southeastern Peruvian Andes. Inca civilizations. Biodiversity assessment in headwaters of Amazon. What it means to be World Heritage Site.
CFAN 3516 - Sustainable Food Systems of Italy (ENV, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
This course examines the concepts of sustainability in relation to food production and culture in a country and place where food is a fundamental component of the regional and national culture. The course incorporates intercultural development concepts to introduce students to past and present Italian culture through the cultural importance of food systems, the ethics of food consumption and production and the concepts of sustainability.
ANTH 3980 - Topics in Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANTH 5990 - Topics in Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent