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Twin Cities Campus

Forest Ecosystem Management and Conservation Minor

Forest Resources
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2016
  • Required credits in this minor: 18
The forest resources minor helps students in natural resources and other areas gain deeper understanding of the scientific foundations of forestry, the management of forest resources, and the importance of forest resources to society. Students select from an array of courses in forest assessment, forest biology and management, and forest economics and policy. Students may include a three-week, hands-on field session at the Cloquet Forestry Center as part of their minor. Students interested in the minor should contact the CFANS Student Services Office.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
The sequence of courses in the Introductory Field Session at the Cloquet Forestry Center may be used either to meet the minor courses requirement or as an elective, but they cannot be used to satisfy both requirements.
Core Courses
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
Lab/Field Experiences
Take 3 or more credits from the following:
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
Forest Policy, Management, and Planning
Take 3 or more credits from the following:
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
FNRM 3471 - Forest Planning and Management (3.0 cr)
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands [WI] (4.0 cr)
Take remaining credits to reach required total from the following two areas
Resource Assessment
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
Ecology and Management of Vegetation, Wildlife, Water and Soil Resources
FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3431 - Timber Harvesting and Road Planning (2.0 cr)
FNRM 5413 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture Lab (1.0 cr)
FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3204 - Landscape Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3205 - Productivity and Ecology of Forest Soils (3.0 cr)
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology (3.0 cr)
PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees (3.0 cr)
 
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FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02381 - FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02290
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently prereq: consent of instructor
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00362 - ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles, their application to natural resource management problems. Tools to address market failure, project analysis. Economic/financial considerations. Benefit/cost analysis. Valuation/assessment methods for property/market/non-market benefits. Planning/management problems. Managing renewable natural resources. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or MATH 1051 or MATH 1142 or MATH 1155 or MATH 1271 or ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011 or Soc 3811 or equiv
FNRM 3471 - Forest Planning and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00373
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management science as applied to forest decision-making to help develop better forest management plans. Helps students develop a basic understanding of common analytical tools from operations research and how they are applied to forestry problems to help explore many potential solutions. Also reviews traditional approaches based on simulation. Emphasizes trade-off information, interpretation of model results, and linkages between stand-level economic analysis and forest-wide planning. Reviews recent modeling efforts in Minnesota. Includes synthesis of information from multiple natural resource disciplines. Guest speakers demonstrate value of analyses in planning. Emphasizes homework assignments with some group work. An individual project requires an informal class presentation. prereq: recommended ESPM 3261 and [3218 or 3411]
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00377
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/practices of wildland recreation management. Federal recreation land management policy/organization. Recreation resource and visitor use management. Visitor-caused impacts. Management tools. Exams, applied assignments.
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 3131/5131
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02339
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sampling design, survey techniques to assess resource conditions. Applying metrics/sampling methods to forest vegetation. Calculating tree/stand volume. Modeling approaches. Case studies of modeling to project future growth. Landscape processes, characterization, modeling. prereq: [ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011], MATH 1151
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00372
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite and aerial imagery and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory statistics is recommended.
FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Selection, growth, propagation, and maintenance of trees for urban spaces. Tree selection, site preparation, plant health care management. Prevention, diagnosis, and remediation of urban tree risks such as insects, pathogens, pollution, development, and climate change.
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02342 - FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
FNRM 3431 - Timber Harvesting and Road Planning
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02340
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to forest operations. Terminology, basic engineering, equipment and harvesting system options, productivity/costs. Relationship to forest management and silviculture. Road planning, forest management guidelines, approaches for mitigating potential impacts to soil/water resources. Environmental implications of method/equipment choices. Selling timber. Sale design, layout, and administration. Two all-day field trips. prereq: FNRM 3411 or instr consent
FNRM 5413 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture Lab
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: FNRM major or minor or grad student; FNRM-FEMC track students should take FNRM 3411/5411 concurrently or instructor consent
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development of silvicultural prescriptions to achieve various landowner objectives. Timber cruise, growth/yield simulations, stand density management diagrams, thinning schedules, use of forest vegetation simulator. Field trips, computer labs, lectures. prereq: FNRM major or minor or grad student; FNRM-FEMC track students should take FNRM 3411/5411 concurrently or instructor consent
FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00307 - FNRM 3203/FNRM 5203
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecology, history, management, control of fire, wind, insect infestation, deer browsing, other disturbances in forests, including disturbance regimes of boreal, northern hardwood, savannas of North America. Influence of disturbance on wildlife habitat, urban/wildland interfaces, forest management, stand/landscape dynamics. Tree mortality in fires, successional patterns created by fires, interactions of life history traits of plants with disturbances.
FNRM 3204 - Landscape Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00795
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to landscape ecology at different scales in time/space. Development/implications of broad-scale patterns of ecological phenomena, role of disturbance in ecosystems, characteristic spatial/temporal scales of ecological events. Principles of landscape ecology as framework for landscape research, analysis, conservation, and management. prereq: Ecology course
FNRM 3205 - Productivity and Ecology of Forest Soils
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00777
Prerequisites: Soil 1125 or Soil 2125 or instructor consent
Typically offered: Every Fall
Soil-site factors affecting plant/wildlife communities. Site quality estimation, site modification/enhancement. Effects of forest management and other human-related disturbances on forest soil functions. prereq: Soil 1125 or Soil 2125 or instructor consent
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology, ecology, population management of forest/shade tree insects. Emphasizes predisposing factors/integrated management. Lecture/lab.
PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Diseases of trees in urban and forested areas. Biology, ecology and control of tree diseases. Labs provide experience identifying disease agents and learning appropriate integrated control procedures.