Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Agricultural Communication and Marketing B.S.

Applied Economics
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2023
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 73 to 85
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
This major prepares students for careers in agricultural communication, marketing, sales, training, management, leadership, business, and extension. Agribusinesses, as well as state, federal, and marketing agencies need individuals who have a broad education in the scientific (and technical) aspects of agriculture, effective work and communication skills, and quantitative and qualitative skills to solve business problems. The scientific knowledge and technical skills necessary to become an effective agribusiness marketing or media professional are provided through requirements in the basic and agricultural sciences and are strengthened by selection of one of three areas of emphasis: crops and soils, food industries, or broad overview of food, agricultural, and environmental sciences. With 21 free-standing elective credits, all majors are encouraged to pursue a CFANS or other minor.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
At least 17 upper division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus.
Introductory Courses
AECM 1001 - Introduction to Agricultural Education, Communication & Marketing (1.0 cr)
AECM 2096 - Career Exploration & Early Field Experience in Agricultural Education, Communication, and Marketing (2.0 cr)
Communication
AECM 2421W - Professional and Oral Communication for Agriculture, Food & the Environment [WI] (3.0 cr)
AECM 3431 - Communicating Food, Agriculture & Environmental Science to the Public (3.0 cr)
AECM 3444 - Layout and Design for Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (3.0 cr)
AECM 3434 - Utilizing Social Media for Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (3.0 cr)
AECM 4451W - Advanced Persuasive Writing for Agricultural and Environmental Sciences [WI] (3.0 cr)
Writing Requirement
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Technology
AECM 3452 - Digital Media Essentials for Agriculture, Food and the Environment (3.0 cr)
AECM 3462 - Podcasting for Science Literacy (3.0 cr)
AECM 4432 - Advanced Video Production for Agriculture, Food and the Environment (3.0 cr)
or AECM 4452 - Virtual Field Trip Production for Agriculture, Food & Natural Resource Science Education & Comm (3.0 cr)
Business, Marketing and Leadership
MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing (3.0 cr)
AECM 4444 - Food and Agricultural Marketing Campaigns (3.0 cr)
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting (3.0 cr)
or ACCT 2051 - Introduction to Financial Reporting (4.0 cr)
or BA 2551 - Business Statistics in R [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or ANSC 3011 - Statistics for Animal Science (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3551 - Concept Design and Value-Added Entrepreneurship in Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management (3.0 cr)
or APEC 4461 - Horticultural Marketing (3.0 cr)
or AECM 2221W - Foundations of Leadership Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
or AECM 3106 - Agricultural Policy and Issues in Minnesota (3.0 cr)
or AECM 4115 - Culturally Responsive Engagement in Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 3526 - Two to Tango: Agricultural Marketing & Communication in Argentina [GP] (3.0 cr)
or MKTG 3011 - Marketing Research (4.0 cr)
or MKTG 3041 - Buyer Behavior (4.0 cr)
or MKTG 4031 - Sales Management (4.0 cr)
Biological Sciences
AGRO 1101 - Biology of Plant Food Systems [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
Mathematical Thinking
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1051 - Precalculus I [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Social Science
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or APEC 1101H - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
Interdisciplinary Learning
Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:
· FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
Experiential Learning
AECM 3096 - Experiential Learning: Production and Business (1.0-3.0 cr)
or CFAN 2096 - Reflecting on Your Professional Experience (1.0 cr)
or CFAN 3096 - Making the Most of your Professional Experience (1.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· AECM 4451W - Advanced Persuasive Writing for Agricultural and Environmental Sciences [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
· FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
A: Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
Students must complete at least 15 credits in their area of emphasis.
Animal Science
ANSC 1101 - Introductory Animal Science (4.0 cr)
Food and Nutrition
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design (3.0 cr)
or BBE 3201 - Sustainability of Food Systems: A Life Cycle Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 3512 - Sustainable Food Chains [GP] (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 3516 - Sustainable Food Systems of Italy [ENV, GP] (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 3523 - Greek Agriculture and Gastronomy: A Taste of the Mediterranean [GP] (3.0 cr)
Natural Resources
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
or FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 3513 - The Natural History of Norway [GP, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 3514 - Machu Picchu: Biodiversity & Climate Change in Peru [ENV, GP] (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 3521 - Borneo Global Seminar: Tropical Wildlife Conservation & Climate Change [GP, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 3502 - Bahamas--Tropical Marine Biology and Shark Ecology (2.0 cr)
or CFAN 3522 - Sustainable Akumal: Turtles, tourists, cenotes and coral reefs [GP, ENV] (3.0 cr)
Plant and Soil Science
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
or HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or HORT 1003 - Organic Gardening: From Balconies to Backyards (3.0 cr)
or HORT 1014 - The Edible Landscape [TS] (3.0 cr)
or HORT 1031 - Vines and Wines: Introduction to Viticulture and Enology (3.0 cr)
or HORT 1061 - The Sustainable Lawn (3.0 cr)
or HORT 3131 - Student Organic Farm Planning, Growing, and Marketing (3.0 cr)
or ENT 3211 - Insect Pest Management (3.0 cr)
SOIL 2601 - The Social Life of Soil [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
B: Crops and Soils
Students must complete at least 21 credits in their area of emphasis.
Physical Science
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Crops and Soils
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
or HORT 2121 - Agricultural Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
PLSC 3401 - Plant Genetics and Breeding (4.0 cr)
or AGRO 4605 - Strategies for Agricultural Production and Management (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management (3.0 cr)
or FDSY 2101 - Plant Production Systems (3.0 cr)
or SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment (3.0 cr)
GCC 3017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger [GP] (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 3512 - Sustainable Food Chains [GP] (3.0 cr)
or ENT 3211 - Insect Pest Management (3.0 cr)
C: Food Industries
Students must complete at least 19 credits in their area of emphasis.
Physical Science
FSCN 1011 - Science of Food and Cooking [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
Food Science and Nutrition
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
FSCN 1112 - Principles of Nutrition [TS] (3.0 cr)
ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 3523 - Greek Agriculture and Gastronomy: A Taste of the Mediterranean [GP] (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 2512 - Food Customs and Culture [GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3417W - Food in History [HIS, ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
BBE 3201 - Sustainability of Food Systems: A Life Cycle Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 3528 - Exploring The New Nordic: Food Seasonality and Sustainability in Denmark and Sweden [GP] (3.0 cr)
or CSPH 3301 - Food Choices: Healing the Earth, Healing Ourselves (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 3612 - Life Cycle Nutrition (3.0 cr)
FSCN 4131 - Food Quality (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 2001 - A Food Systems Approach to Cooking for Health and the Environment (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology (4.0 cr)
or CFAN 3512 - Sustainable Food Chains [GP] (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 3516 - Sustainable Food Systems of Italy [ENV, GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences

View sample plan(s):
· A: Ag and Env Sci Sample Plan
· B: Crops and Soils Sample Plan
· C: Food Ind Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Agricultural Communication and Marketing B.S.
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AECM 1001 - Introduction to Agricultural Education, Communication & Marketing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical development of the discipline of agricultural education; orientation to career opportunities; areas and expectations of specialization; issues in the field.
AECM 2096 - Career Exploration & Early Field Experience in Agricultural Education, Communication, and Marketing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analyses of occupations, employment potential, expectations for work, and readiness for careers in agricultural education, communication, and marketing. Field placement experiences examine career options and professionals in the field. Observe schools, extension offices, and agricultural businesses to learn about the work/workplaces in agricultural education, communication, and marketing.
AECM 2421W - Professional and Oral Communication for Agriculture, Food & the Environment (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Speaking/writing about scientific/technical issues. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation. Public communication.  Lectures for this course will be online, while discussion sections will be held in-person.
AECM 3431 - Communicating Food, Agriculture & Environmental Science to the Public
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Planning/strategy for communication campaigns related to food/agriculture. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation.
AECM 3444 - Layout and Design for Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This course provides students with in-depth, integrated use of leading industry-adopted software (Adobe Illustrator and Adobe InDesign) to develop print communication pieces. The class addresses layout aspects and file preparation critical to printing a project successfully and cost-effectively. Students will learn to create graphic art designs and develop effective print layouts. Serves as a foundational course that covers a range of topics related to layout and design from principles of design, typology, color, and technical software use. Class assignments focus on developing tools for use in food, agricultural and natural resources strategic and data-driven communications programs.
AECM 3434 - Utilizing Social Media for Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
The convergence of multiple forms of media, newspaper, video, radio, and photojournalism on the internet is impacting how we communicate complicated scientific issues related to topics such as food safety, agricultural production, and good stewardship of natural resources, and social media have been found to play a critical role in shaping science literacy. Because of the increasing presence of social media in our everyday lives, agriculturists are challenged with how to best package these complex scientific topics to increase science literacy through social media networks. This course aims to provide agriculturists who possess a strong background and understanding of food, agriculture and natural resource sciences with the skills needed to communicate these complex topics to audiences across social media platforms.
AECM 4451W - Advanced Persuasive Writing for Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course, students research, write, and edit stories for agricultural, food and environmental organizations and media. Students produce a final portfolio that demonstrates their ability to create professional-level work, such as magazine articles, news stories, biographies, marketing materials, blog posts, news releases and scripts.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to technical and professional writing through various readings and assignments in which students analyze and create texts that work to communicate complex information, solve problems, and complete tasks. Students gain knowledge of workplace genres as well as to develop skills in composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing genres such as memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations. Students work in teams to develop collaborative content and to compose in a variety of modes including text, graphics, video, audio, and digital. Students also conduct both primary and secondary research and practice usability testing. The course emphasizes creating documents that are goal-driven and appropriate for a specific context and audience.
AECM 3452 - Digital Media Essentials for Agriculture, Food and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course introduces basic digital and video communication skills necessary to be successful in today's workplace specific to professions in agriculture, food, and the environment. Students will infuse learning strategies into basic audio/visual productions and basic website construction focused on informing and communicating complex science topics.
AECM 3462 - Podcasting for Science Literacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will introduce students to the art of audio storytelling and develop the professional skills used to communicate complex science topics to an intended audience. The course explores a variety of concepts used in audio storytelling and educational programming. Science topics will be researched and scripted in order to maximize acquired production skills with the intention of offering informative content to a target market.
AECM 4432 - Advanced Video Production for Agriculture, Food and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course focuses on advanced digital media production skills necessary to be successful in today's workplace specific to professions in agriculture, food and the environment. Students will infuse learning strategies into advanced documentary-style audio/visual productions. Content will be used to produce educational websites focused on informing and communicating complex science topics. prereq: AECM 3452 or Instructor Consent
AECM 4452 - Virtual Field Trip Production for Agriculture, Food & Natural Resource Science Education & Comm
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course explores the process of using digital media production skills to develop educational virtual field trips. Produced content will focus on reaching students in the K-12 classroom. Topics range from basic to complex agriscience concepts and often times will rely on the virtual setting due to limitations of biosecurity hazards, OSHA guidelines and industry regulations. Students will script and produce curriculum driven video content as well as develop supplemental media assets to be used as classroom activities for field trip participants. prereq: AECM 3452 or Instructor Consent
MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mktg 3001/Mktg 3001H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to terms, concepts, and skills for analyzing marketing problems. Factors outside the organization affecting its product, pricing, promotion, and distribution decisions. Cases from actual organizations. prereq: ECON 1101 or ECON 1165
AECM 4444 - Food and Agricultural Marketing Campaigns
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course discusses the strategy and tactical tools and techniques required to create and execute an integrated marketing communications program in the food and agricultural industries. We will cover the issues and elements of audience analysis and segmentation, advertising, brand management, product development/naming, product placement, package design and labeling, advertising and marketing avenues, and evaluation of advertising effectiveness.
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Financial accounting. Theory, concepts, principles, procedures. Preparation/understanding of the four financial statements.
ACCT 2051 - Introduction to Financial Reporting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces the topics of financial reporting and accounting. The purpose of financial accounting is to provide information to the entity owners and external parties to serve as the basis for making decisions about that entity. A student who successfully completes this class should be able to 1) understand the concepts and principles of accounting, 2) analyze, record and report the accounting treatment of business transactions, and 3) prepare, interpret, and analyze financial statements.
BA 2551 - Business Statistics in R (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 2551/SCO 2550
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The purpose of the course is to develop skills for improving data-driven decision-making using statistical techniques in the powerful statistical software environment R. As an introductory statistics course, the content will include three main areas of statistics: Descriptive Statistics, Statistical Inference, and Analysis of Relationships with Scatterplots, Correlation and Linear Regression. Developing statistical literacy is increasingly important in understanding data and engaging in the complex business world. BA 2551 focuses on statistical reasoning and how to implement statistical methods in a business context using R. Topics include (but are not limited to) descriptive statistics, statistical inference, variability, sampling, distributions, correlation analysis, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, graphical summaries of data, and introduction to linear regression. Through weekly in-class lab sessions and critical thinking assignments related to statistics in business, the course will train students to become informed consumers of numerical information and provide foundational skills in R to compute statistical procedures in future courses. We use existing packages in R as a tool to enable us to solve business problems that can leverage mathematical and statistical thinking. prereq: [Math 1031 or equiv]
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
ANSC 3011 - Statistics for Animal Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic statistical concepts. Develop statistical reasoning/critical thinking skills. Descriptive statistics, probability, sampling and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, experimental design, linear correlation, linear regression and multiple regression. How to make sound arguments/decisions based on statistics when reviewing news articles or scientific publications with statistical content. Explore/draw conclusions from data using a basic statistical software package.
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Professional selling of agricultural and food products. Students build/refine sales abilities, identify/qualify prospects, deliver sales presentations, close the sale. Principles of market research. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 3411/ApEc 5411
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic concepts related to marketing agricultural commodities. Conditions of competitive markets, historical perspectives on market institutions/policy, structural characteristics of markets, policies/regulations affecting agricultural marketing of livestock, crop, and dairy products. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3551 - Concept Design and Value-Added Entrepreneurship in Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explore the core skills required by entrepreneurs in opportunity identification and problem framing that lead to creating viable concepts that provide solutions to real consumer challenges. Students will tackle innovation challenges from an in-depth exploration of entrepreneurial and design thinking and learn how to incorporate these skills into their future professional work. Master techniques for exploring problems from a systems viewpoint through a series of hands-on projects from concept design to product mapping and consumer testing. Students get to select a project of their choosing directly from their major of study and will pitch their new product or service concept to an expert panel.
APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Strategic and operations aspects of farm management; financial analysis, budgeting, strategic management; marketing plan and control; enterprise and whole farm planning and control; investment analysis, quality, risk, and personnel management. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 4461 - Horticultural Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 4461/Hort 4461
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major areas in horticultural marketing. Difference between horticultural products and commercial commodities. Core marketing components that should be used by every small horticultural business. Approaches to consumer research.
AECM 2221W - Foundations of Leadership Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to be an effective leader in profit/non-profit agricultural settings. Roles, responsibilities, knowledge, attitudes, and skills to hire staff, set goals, coach, mentor/manage teams, and improve communication.
AECM 3106 - Agricultural Policy and Issues in Minnesota
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This course will introduce students to advocacy and policy-making that affects Minnesota’s agricultural industry, specifically at the farm level. They will experience the policy-making process from an initial idea to building support, lobbying, legislative work, implementation, and the effect policies have on Minnesota farmers. Students will get a behind-the-scenes look at the policy process in action by meeting lawmakers, lobbyists, and staff while on field trips to the Minnesota State Capitol and Minnesota Department of Agriculture. Students will also shadow a current legislator, participate in a mock senate, hear from multiple guest speakers, and research the decision-making process by following an agricultural bill through the legislative session. prereq: 30 credits or instructor approval
AECM 4115 - Culturally Responsive Engagement in Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course is broken up into five thematic and progressive modules. Module 1 will provide the opportunity for students to investigate contemporary and historical manifestations oppression and inequities within Agricultural, Food and Natural Resource Sciences (AFNR) with a special focus on community and educational spaces. Module 2 will support students to explore oppression, power, privilege, and white supremacy. Students will explore how these show in society at large, as well as how they personally embody and enact these very things. Module 3 will prompt students to consider the nature of knowledge that is legitimized and knowledge that is suppressed. We will then learn about diverse knowledge systems and decolonizing work. Module 4 will support students to explore culture, identity, intersectionality, and positionality ? their own and those of other cultural groups. We will consider how some cultures are lifted while others are marginalized in different spaces. Module 5 brings us to learning about methods of bring culturally responsive and anti-racist in AFNR work in educational and community spaces. We will employ the use of equity audits to assess various organizations and to design plans moving forward.
CFAN 3526 - Two to Tango: Agricultural Marketing & Communication in Argentina (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Agricultural marketing and farming are global industries and communicators and marketers need to be able to understand how events on other continents can impact decisions made at the firm-level; even in a different hemisphere. This course will study the farming and ranching industries in Argentina that provide the technology, production, expertise, processing, and transformation of farm products into foods that are in global demand. Additionally, this course will explore how Argentinian culture shapes marketing and communication efforts in Argentina. This course will spend two weeks in Argentina to meet with international agricultural firms and farmers to learn how Argentina continues to be a global competitor in agricultural commodities. Students will also learn about the challenges limiting South American agricultural production and how this relates to U.S. agriculture.
MKTG 3011 - Marketing Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on managing the entire marketing research process, which involves collecting and analyzing relevant, timely, and accurate information to gain customer insights and drive effective marketing decision making. Students learn fundamental techniques of data collection and analysis to solve specific marketing problems. The class offers hands-on learning-by-doing opportunities through group projects for students to practice every stage of marketing research. prereqs: 3001 and BA 2551 or SCO 2550 or equivalent statistics course
MKTG 3041 - Buyer Behavior
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mktg 3040/Mktg 3041
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of behavioral sciences to buyer behavior. Perception, attitudes, learning, persuasion, motivation, decision-making, social/cultural influences, managerial implications. prereq: 3001
MKTG 4031 - Sales Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Hiring, motivating, performance enhancement. Customer relationship management, data analysis, quantitative methods. Developing metrics to evaluate individual/group performance in attaining an organization's strategic goals. prereq: MKTG 3040 or 3041
AGRO 1101 - Biology of Plant Food Systems (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Designed for students who are not majors in a life science program, but who wish to acquire a better understanding of biological concepts especially as they relate to their lives. We examine current issues related to food, food production and the environment which provide the context to investigate fundamental concepts of biology including productivity, energy, genetic change in populations, and environmental responses to human activity. We use a problem-based learning approach to explore three contemporary issues of great importance: risks and benefits of GMOs, farming and food, and the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico. Lab, greenhouse, field, and classroom discussions.
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 1806/Math 1031
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions, with applications; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; basic probability rules, conditional probabilities, binomial probabilities. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
MATH 1051 - Precalculus I (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions with applications; zeroes of polynomials; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; coverage beyond that found in the usual 3 years of high school math. prereq: 3 yrs of high school math or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
APEC 1101H - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy. prereq: Honors student, proficiency in high school algebra
ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Microeconomic behavior of consumers, firms, and markets in domestic and world economy. Demand and supply. Competition and monopoly. Distribution of income. Economic interdependencies in the global economy. Effects of global linkages on individual decisions. prereq: knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
GCC 3017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 4103/ApEc 4103/GCC 3017
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course provides a multi-disciplinary look at problems (and some of the possible solutions) affecting food production, distribution, and requirements for the seven plus billion inhabitants of this planet. It is co-taught by a plant geneticist (Morrell) and an economist (Runge) who together have worked on international food production and policy issues for the past 40 years. Historical context, the present situation and future scenarios related to the human population and food production are examined. Presentations and discussions cover sometimes conflicting views from multiple perspectives on population growth, use of technology, as well as the ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world. The global challenge perspective is reflected in attention to issues of poverty, inequality, gender, the legacy of colonialism, and racial and ethnic prejudice. Emphasis is placed on the need for governments, international assistance agencies, international research and extension centers, as well as the private sector to assist in solving the complex problems associated with malnutrition, undernutrition, obesity, and sustainable food production. Through a better understanding of world food problems, this course enables students to reflect on the shared sense of responsibility by nations, the international community and ourselves to build and maintain a stronger sense of our roles as historical agents. Throughout the semester students are exposed to issues related to world food problems through the lenses of two instructors from different disciplinary backgrounds. The core issues of malnutrition and food production are approached simultaneously from a production perspective as well as an economic and policy perspective throughout the semester. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. GCC courses are open to all students and fulfill an honors experience for University Honors Program students.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to use of systems thinking for exploration of problems in contemporary food system from multidisciplinary perspective. System concepts. Historical evolution of food system. Analysis, management, design.
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introductory survey of environmental issues that explores the connections between environmental sciences, policy, and management. You will explore interrelationships between the environment and human society, as well as the underlying social, ethical, political and economic factors that affect those relationships. You will also examine the roles for science, technology, policy, and environmental justice in meeting environmental challenges. Asynchronous online lectures with weekly discussions in small groups.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
AECM 3096 - Experiential Learning: Production and Business
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiential learning in agricultural production and business. Planned, organized, monitored, and evaluated based on a per-experience diagnosis of learning prerequisite to higher level courses in technical agriculture and agricultural business. prereq: AgEd major, instr consent
CFAN 2096 - Reflecting on Your Professional Experience
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is designed to meet the CFANS Experiential Learning requirement which defines the importance and processes of learning through experience. Students will undertake an experience in an authentic work-place setting related to agriculture, food or natural resource settings as a prerequisite to the course. The prerequisite experience will serve as a foundation for learning professional competencies including reflection, problem solving, managing interpersonal relationships, professional communication, and goal setting. Current theories of career development will be introduced to help students construct meaning from their experiences to inform future goals and strategies. prereq: Secured internship, completion of summer module, instr consent
CFAN 3096 - Making the Most of your Professional Experience
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to meet the CFANS Experiential Learning requirement which defines the importance and processes of learning through experience. This course also is a Diversity Enriched course. Students will undertake an experience in an authentic work-place setting related to agriculture, food or natural resource settings as a prerequisite to the course. The professional/internship experience will serve as a foundation for learning professional competencies including reflection, problem solving, managing interpersonal relationships, professional communication, and goal setting. Current theories of career development and career readiness will be introduced to help students construct meaning from their experiences to inform future goals and strategies. prereq: Secured internship, instr consent
AECM 4451W - Advanced Persuasive Writing for Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course, students research, write, and edit stories for agricultural, food and environmental organizations and media. Students produce a final portfolio that demonstrates their ability to create professional-level work, such as magazine articles, news stories, biographies, marketing materials, blog posts, news releases and scripts.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to technical and professional writing through various readings and assignments in which students analyze and create texts that work to communicate complex information, solve problems, and complete tasks. Students gain knowledge of workplace genres as well as to develop skills in composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing genres such as memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations. Students work in teams to develop collaborative content and to compose in a variety of modes including text, graphics, video, audio, and digital. Students also conduct both primary and secondary research and practice usability testing. The course emphasizes creating documents that are goal-driven and appropriate for a specific context and audience.
FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition risks associated with different age, sex, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. Community needs assessment. Program planning and evaluation. Programs developed to address the needs and interests of people at different stages of the life cycle, ethnic or cultural backgrounds, and literacy levels.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
ANSC 1101 - Introductory Animal Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental concepts of animal breeding, physiology, nutrition, and management as they apply to the production of beef, dairy, horses, poultry, sheep, swine, and other livestock. Fall term class open only to ANSC majors. Spring term class open to all majors.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the compositional variation, processing, selection, storage, cookery, palatability, nutritional value, and safety of red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products. Meets CFANS interdisciplinary requirement.
APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to use of systems thinking for exploration of problems in contemporary food system from multidisciplinary perspective. System concepts. Historical evolution of food system. Analysis, management, design.
BBE 3201 - Sustainability of Food Systems: A Life Cycle Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Consequences of global food system. Diversity in food systems. Current topics in food sustainability.
CFAN 3512 - Sustainable Food Chains (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Concentrated study in agriculture/agribusiness. Horticulture. Viticulture/wine making. Rural tourism. Gastronomy. prereq: instr consent
CFAN 3516 - Sustainable Food Systems of Italy (ENV, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
This course examines the concepts of sustainability in relation to food production and culture in a country and place where food is a fundamental component of the regional and national culture. The course incorporates intercultural development concepts to introduce students to past and present Italian culture through the cultural importance of food systems, the ethics of food consumption and production and the concepts of sustainability.
CFAN 3523 - Greek Agriculture and Gastronomy: A Taste of the Mediterranean (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
This embedded course will be based in Thessaloniki, Greece and will examine Greek agriculture, food, and culture. Students will have hands-on experiences learning about the impact that Greek cuisine has on the rural development of the country, and how Greeks work to conserve many of their cultural traditions.
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introductory survey of environmental issues that explores the connections between environmental sciences, policy, and management. You will explore interrelationships between the environment and human society, as well as the underlying social, ethical, political and economic factors that affect those relationships. You will also examine the roles for science, technology, policy, and environmental justice in meeting environmental challenges. Asynchronous online lectures with weekly discussions in small groups.
ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
CFAN 3513 - The Natural History of Norway (GP, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring & Summer Odd Year
The program will be based in the Nord Tröndelag region of central Norway where students will learn about Norway's physical geography, ecology, and management of natural resources, including its flora, fauna, and agricultural systems. Students will also gain an understanding of the region's rich culture, history, and close ties to Minnesota. prereq: instructor consent
CFAN 3514 - Machu Picchu: Biodiversity & Climate Change in Peru (ENV, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Southeastern Peruvian Andes. Inca civilizations. Biodiversity assessment in headwaters of Amazon. What it means to be World Heritage Site. Experience the magic of the Andes. Watch the sunrise over the mountains surrounding Machu Picchu. Climb steep trails deep in the forest to check cameras capturing Peccaries, Jaguars and Jagarundis. Eat dinner with Macaws. Ask a question about the ecology of the forest ? and answer it. Have a unique experience in South America, and share a story about that experience back at home. Posing your own question about biodiversity, landscapes, specific plants or animals, or culture is an intensely rewarding experience. Learning about the ecology of a subset of the Amazon, framing questions and collecting information to address those questions helps us refine our creative and analytical abilities.
CFAN 3521 - Borneo Global Seminar: Tropical Wildlife Conservation & Climate Change (GP, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Summer Odd Year
This seminar explores tropical conservation by focusing on three main themes in Borneo: climate change, rehabilitation and release of charismatic rare and endangered species, and remote camera surveys for environmental education. Each theme is supported with in-country lectures, exploration activities, and a student product. We explore and learn about marine, montane, and tropical forest ecosystems. Threats to ecosystem health in Borneo are multi-faceted. Habitat loss and fragmentation, due to logging a few decades ago and primarily now oil-palm agriculture, mean that wildlife populations are smaller and increasingly isolated. This class engages students in global issues of climate change and habitat loss, helping them explore and analyze their observations critically. It also brings students face-to-face with rehabilitation and reintroduction of the species that suffer most as forests are felled for logging followed by oil palm agriculture. Species we investigate most closely are orangutans and sun bears. We explore riparian habitat, discuss issues of fragmentation, and pressures on protected areas at the Danau Girang Field Centre (DGFC). DGFC is located in high-quality riparian habitat in the Kinabatangan Reserve, in patches of forest nestled in a matrix of oil-palm agriculture. This area is host to a truly incredible suite of wild species. The Kinabatangan River is home to clouded leopards, sun bears, orangutans, otters, proboscis monkeys, and crocodiles. At the field station, wild orangutans forage in the canopy overhead. If you follow the noise of rustling leaves, you will likely observe troops of long-tailed macaques moving in the canopy and hornbills feeding on forest fruits. Students learn wildlife monitoring techniques and design their own environmental education lesson. Students also connect issues of climate change and conservation in a range of ecosystems in Sabah, Borneo, and design enrichment projects for captive sun bears and orangutans.
CFAN 3502 - Bahamas--Tropical Marine Biology and Shark Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Ecology of sharks and natural history of South Bimini Island. Marine ecosystems. Local flora and fauna. Local culture and development policy on the ecosystems. prereq: instr consent
CFAN 3522 - Sustainable Akumal: Turtles, tourists, cenotes and coral reefs (GP, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
This Global Campus Partner seminar addresses coastal and marine ecology as affected by tourism and development and how these affect local communities. We will explore these issues in Akumal (Mayan: place of the turtle), Mexico on the Riviera Maya. Tourism and associated development have expanded exponentially in the past decade with subsequent effects on waste management and water quality in the local cenotes, groundwater, lagoons and reefs. In addition to the water quality effects, increased use by tourist is also directly affecting sea grass, turtles and coral reefs. We will explore the ecology of these systems, methods to assess their status and impacts, and strategies to reduce or mitigate the effects in a sustainable manner that involves local populations. Prereq: CFAN 3422
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles and techniques of propagating plants by seeds, cuttings, grafts, buds, layers, and division. Lectures on principles; labs on practice of various propagating techniques.
HORT 1003 - Organic Gardening: From Balconies to Backyards
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This fully online course focuses on the principles and practices of growing fruits, vegetables, and herbs with an ecological approach. You'll explore basic botany, soils and compost, species and variety selection, planning and design, container gardening, pest management, season extension, and more so you can approach your gardening projects with confidence. This introductory course focuses on the principles and practices of growing fruits, vegetables, and herbs with an ecological approach. You?ll explore basic botany, soils and compost, species and variety selection, planning and design, container gardening, pest management, season extension, and more so you can approach your gardening projects with confidence. We will begin by taking a look at the fundamentals of organic gardening, then move on to an overview of basic plant science principles. Following this introduction, course content will focus on how these principles can be applied practically in the planning and management of an organic garden, whether that be in your yard, on your patio, or at a school or community site. This course isn?t so much about memorizing facts as it is about you becoming a well-informed gardener who can make educated decisions and seek out reliable answers to questions or problems that might come up. The course is presented entirely online and makes extensive use of discussions, interactive activities, worksheets, and multimedia projects that get you immersed in a host of gardening topics. Short video segments in each module highlight key topics and provide information to guide you as you work through the readings, activities, and assignments.
HORT 1014 - The Edible Landscape (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Tracing our relationship with edible landscapes traces to our hunting-gathering origins. Technological/social changes that have distanced us from our food. Integrating food plants into pleasing, sustainable, and edible landscapes in yards, neighborhoods, and cities.
HORT 1031 - Vines and Wines: Introduction to Viticulture and Enology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to the principles of growing grapes (viticulture), making wine (enology), and an appreciation of the historical, geographical, and sensory diversity of wine. The course is taught in part with 20-50 minute online lectures; usually 2 or 3 of these are covered each week. The class also meets once a week for a combination lecture and wine tasting/sensory session. Guest lecturers will be involved to explore certain aspects of the course including grape vine biology, morphology, genetics and breeding, as well as sensory evaluation and wine components, and the subject of soils and so-call ?terroir? or regional identity, including the relation between grape cultivar, soil, climate, and cultural practices. Prerequisite: Enrollees must be 21 yrs of age by date of 1st class meeting Enrollment Restrictions: Open enrollment to undergraduate students ONLY; graduate students, masters students, and others will need instructor permission.
HORT 1061 - The Sustainable Lawn
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Common turfgrasses. How to manage home lawn in sustainable way. Maintaining quality turf areas with reduced inputs.
HORT 3131 - Student Organic Farm Planning, Growing, and Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HORT 3131 / HORT 5131
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organic fruit and vegetable production has been one of the fastest growing segments of the US economy for almost two decades, stimulating an overwhelming number of biological and ecological innovations to produce food using organic approaches. This course aims to increase student's knowledge of ecological concepts as applied to managing organic systems, with an emphasis on soil nutrient cycles and plant-soil-microbe interactions that serve as the cornerstone of organic systems. Students in this course will learn tools needed to manage an organic diversified vegetable operation. The course consists of two components. The lecture session is designed to help students think about concepts and principles that are useful in planning and managing production strategies on organic farms. We spend a significant amount of our time reviewing soil nutrient cycling and its critical importance for organic farms, including how to effectively use soil and organic nutrient inputs such as cover crops, manure and fertilizers, to provide vegetable crops with the nutrients they need to grow. We also learn about successful marketing strategies for organic produce. Finally, near the end of the semester we will discuss pest management, including both weeds and disease/insect pests, and compare different tillage options available to organic producers. What we learn is then applied to planning next year's season of the UMN student organic farm. Throughout, we will use case studies, guest speakers, games, and active learning discussion approaches to move these classroom sessions "beyond the lecture" and allow students to engage with the material in a meaningful way. The lab is designed to allow a space to put into action some of the concepts students learn in lecture, including soil organic matter analysis, microgreen propagation, calculation of organic fertilizer rates, and operation of driven and walk-behind tractors.
ENT 3211 - Insect Pest Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ent 3211/Ent 5211
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Management of Insect Pests is designed for upper division undergraduates in any major or minor. The course will emphasize principles of insect pest management and draw from examples related to agricultural, horticultural and landscape and urban systems. Conventional (nonorganic) and organic approaches, the use of social media and modern technology, and economic, environmental and social consequences of diverse tactics (chemical, cultural, biological, genetic, etc.) will be covered by the Instructor and, on occasion, by guest lecturers. Student debates on pesticide-pollinator and genetic engineering issues will provide real-world context and insights on complexities of insect pest prevention and management.
SOIL 2601 - The Social Life of Soil (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Soil microorganisms can either promote plant health or wage chemical warfare. And alliances can turn on a dime. Learn about this fascinating dog-eat-dog world and how we can support a rich soil ecosystem that benefits plants and humans.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving. prereq: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, high school physics recommended; Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
HORT 2121 - Agricultural Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Chemical/biochemical foundation for agricultural disciplines. Concepts in organic, analytical, and biological chemistry. Chemistry, metabolism, and development of plants. Prerequisites: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or [CHEM 1061, CHEM 1065] *Note for those students considering graduate school - We highly recommend you consult your academic advisor for appropriate chemistry coursework.
PLSC 3401 - Plant Genetics and Breeding
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 4401/Hort 4401/PLSC 3401
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of plant genetics and environmental variation. Applications of genetics to crop evolution and breeding of self-pollinated, cross-pollinated, and asexually propagated crops. Investigation of hybridization, variation, and selection. Course is offered with two alternating instructors: Spring Odd its with Eric Watkins. Spring Even is with Aaron Lorenz. Prerequisites: BIOL 1009 or 1009H
AGRO 4605 - Strategies for Agricultural Production and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Information/tools necessary to make informed land management decisions in ever-evolving economic, policy, climate environments. Evaluate hows, whats, whys of crop management by solving real-world problems that agricultural professionals face. State-of-the-art production/management practices for major agricultural crops in Minnesota. Lectures feature agricultural professionals/experts. Lab component provides hands-on experience with modern equipment/data interpretation. prereq: 1101 or equivalent, [CHEM1015/17 or equivalent], SOIL1125 or equivalent], [jr or sr or grad student or instr consent]
ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to provide a local and global historical perspective of soil erosion (causes and consequences); develop a scientific understanding of soil erosion processes; and relates various soil conservation and land-use management strategies to real-world situations. Basics of soil erosion processes and prediction methods will be the fundamental building blocks of this course. From this understanding, we will discuss policies and socioeconomic aspects of soil erosion. Lastly, we will focus on effective land-use management using natural resource assessment tools. Case studies and real-world and current events examples will be used throughout the course to relate course material to experiences. prereq: SOIL 2125 or instr consent
FDSY 2101 - Plant Production Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: College level general biology course or Hort 1001 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
How food production systems fit within overall food system. Fundamentals of soils, plant nutrition, plant production metabolites as they affect food production systems. Decisions that differentiate among conventional sustainable/organic systems. prereq: College level general biology course or Hort 1001 or instr consent
SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation, interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient problems. prereq: SOIL 2125
GCC 3017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 4103/ApEc 4103/GCC 3017
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course provides a multi-disciplinary look at problems (and some of the possible solutions) affecting food production, distribution, and requirements for the seven plus billion inhabitants of this planet. It is co-taught by a plant geneticist (Morrell) and an economist (Runge) who together have worked on international food production and policy issues for the past 40 years. Historical context, the present situation and future scenarios related to the human population and food production are examined. Presentations and discussions cover sometimes conflicting views from multiple perspectives on population growth, use of technology, as well as the ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world. The global challenge perspective is reflected in attention to issues of poverty, inequality, gender, the legacy of colonialism, and racial and ethnic prejudice. Emphasis is placed on the need for governments, international assistance agencies, international research and extension centers, as well as the private sector to assist in solving the complex problems associated with malnutrition, undernutrition, obesity, and sustainable food production. Through a better understanding of world food problems, this course enables students to reflect on the shared sense of responsibility by nations, the international community and ourselves to build and maintain a stronger sense of our roles as historical agents. Throughout the semester students are exposed to issues related to world food problems through the lenses of two instructors from different disciplinary backgrounds. The core issues of malnutrition and food production are approached simultaneously from a production perspective as well as an economic and policy perspective throughout the semester. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. GCC courses are open to all students and fulfill an honors experience for University Honors Program students.
CFAN 3512 - Sustainable Food Chains (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Concentrated study in agriculture/agribusiness. Horticulture. Viticulture/wine making. Rural tourism. Gastronomy. prereq: instr consent
ENT 3211 - Insect Pest Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ent 3211/Ent 5211
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Management of Insect Pests is designed for upper division undergraduates in any major or minor. The course will emphasize principles of insect pest management and draw from examples related to agricultural, horticultural and landscape and urban systems. Conventional (nonorganic) and organic approaches, the use of social media and modern technology, and economic, environmental and social consequences of diverse tactics (chemical, cultural, biological, genetic, etc.) will be covered by the Instructor and, on occasion, by guest lecturers. Student debates on pesticide-pollinator and genetic engineering issues will provide real-world context and insights on complexities of insect pest prevention and management.
FSCN 1011 - Science of Food and Cooking (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Souffles, custards, sauces, coffee brewing, candy making used to examine physics/chemistry of heat transfer, foams, gels, emulsions, extractions, crystallization.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
FSCN 1112 - Principles of Nutrition (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course explores fundamental concepts of nutrition, nutrient functions, human nutritional requirements, and food sources. We will learn about evaluating nutrition information and food safety, and investigate the role of nutrition in chronic disease, public policy, and the environment. Nutrition is both a science and social science. This class involves social aspects, but mainly concerns the biochemistry and physiology of how food is processed in the body. The chapters on carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and metabolism especially built on biology and physiology. Course topics include: 1. essential nutrients (macro-and-micro-nutrients) needed from the diet; 2. major functions of nutrients and physiological changes with deficiency or excess; 3. digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients; 4. weight management; 5. scientific method and nutrition; 6. life cycle issues; 7. food safety issues 8. nutrition for sports Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry
ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the compositional variation, processing, selection, storage, cookery, palatability, nutritional value, and safety of red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products. Meets CFANS interdisciplinary requirement.
CFAN 3523 - Greek Agriculture and Gastronomy: A Taste of the Mediterranean (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
This embedded course will be based in Thessaloniki, Greece and will examine Greek agriculture, food, and culture. Students will have hands-on experiences learning about the impact that Greek cuisine has on the rural development of the country, and how Greeks work to conserve many of their cultural traditions.
FSCN 2512 - Food Customs and Culture (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Account of traditional and contemporary food customs and culture. Practice of food choice, preparation, and preservation in the context of worldview, perspectives on diet and health, and belief systems of communities and societies around the world. Major emphasis on US cultures including Native American, Hispanic American, European American, African American, and Asian American. Development of cultural self-understanding and intercultural awareness via food and food habits-related experiences and reflections.
HIST 3417W - Food in History (HIS, ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Significance of food in society, from earliest times to present. Why we eat what we eat. How foods have been "globalized." Dietary effects of industrial modernity. Material culture, social beliefs. Examples from around world.
BBE 3201 - Sustainability of Food Systems: A Life Cycle Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Consequences of global food system. Diversity in food systems. Current topics in food sustainability.
CFAN 3528 - Exploring The New Nordic: Food Seasonality and Sustainability in Denmark and Sweden (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This embedded study abroad course will explore aspects of agriculture, food, and culture in Scandinavia in comparison to each student?s experience in the United States. This course will first meet on-campus, before our departure for a two-week experience in May. In English usage, Scandinavia can refer to Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, and sometimes used more broadly to include the Aland Islands, the Faroe Islands, Finland, and Iceland. The use of the term Nordic can also include the aforementioned countries along with Finland and Greenland. Throughout this course, we will embark on an experience through hands-on learning in Denmark and Sweden. Students will learn about, and reflect on, available food resources in Scandinavia, including how Scandinavian cuisine is intertwined with Scandinavian culture. CFANS has partnered with DIS for this course. DIS is a non-profit study abroad foundation established in Denmark in 1959, with locations in Copenhagen and Stockholm. DIS provides semester, academic year, and summer programs taught in English, and offers high-impact learning experiences for upper-division undergraduate students from distinguished North American colleges and universities. The intellectually challenging curriculum is broad, cutting edge, and enriched by experiential learning components, including faculty-led study tours across Europe. It provides students with opportunities for meaningful cultural engagement and personal growth, which is further enriched through housing and extracurricular offerings. Activities and learning will take place at numerous locations throughout Scandinavia. Students will attend lectures and presentations taught by faculty who are experts in the field, and will have the opportunity to learn about the culture and cuisine in Scandinavia. In their exploration of Scandinavia, students will be exposed to a breadth of diverse cultural experiences in which they will be challenged to reflect on their emotional responses and active participation within Scandinavian culture and integrate these into their personal and professional worldview. Students will also visit important archaeological, sacred, and natural sites throughout Scandinavia to better understand the history of the region and the culture of its people. Students will be encouraged early on to identify a particular interest they want to learn more about in Scandinavia (e.g. precision agriculture, dairy production, sustainability, agro-tourism, etc.) and find opportunities to integrate this interest into the questions they ask in their blog posts, their final project, and at site visits.
CSPH 3301 - Food Choices: Healing the Earth, Healing Ourselves
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSPH 3301/FScN 3301
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Food production in our current industrial system feeds the world, but at a cost to the environment. In nutrition, we often talk about a healthy diet, but only occasionally do we link our food and diet choices to agricultural practices and the health of the planet. This class will link the concepts of human health and planetary health in terms of food. Starting with the framework of complexity theory and gentle action, we will cover human food/nutrition needs and food security, how food is produced from farm to fork, labor, equity and race issues within agriculture and the food system, food choices and the earth?s bio-diversity, land and water use, climate change, organic and sustainable agriculture, marketing, processing and distribution, fair trade, and economic policies. Prereq junior or senior undergraduates (60+ credits) or instructor consent
FSCN 3612 - Life Cycle Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
FSCN 3612 focuses on nutritional requirements and common issues during different stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, childhood, adulthood, and aging. There are no required courses for this class; however, it is best to take a basic nutrition class beforehand, such as FSCN 1112 Principles of Nutrition or an equivalent.
FSCN 4131 - Food Quality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is designed to give students an overview of the management systems, statistical procedures, and regulatory requirements involved with producing quality food and ingredients. The course material includes risk assessment and management, good manufacturing practices, hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP), statistical methods for process control, total quality management, and food and drug laws. The course is intended primarily for upper division undergraduates majoring in food science. prereq: jr
FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition risks associated with different age, sex, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. Community needs assessment. Program planning and evaluation. Programs developed to address the needs and interests of people at different stages of the life cycle, ethnic or cultural backgrounds, and literacy levels.
FSCN 2001 - A Food Systems Approach to Cooking for Health and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This is a fun, hands-on cooking class. It is also an Experiential Learning (EL) course which meets the EL requirement for all CFANS students. This lecture /lab format course will give students the confidence to cook healthful whole foods as they learn about the food system. Subject matter will be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective. Concepts covered include fundamental concepts of nutrition, food sources, food safety, the food system; skills/resources for food choices based on nutritional, environmental, local and global societal implications. We will examine the ethical and civic themes that guide food choices. We will discuss and write about how environmental, cultural, social, and health issues impact personal food choices. prereq: [soph, jr, sr] or instructor consent
FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: BIOL 1009, CHEM 1015
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How microbes impact our world in deadly/life-saving ways. Roles of bacteria, fungi, and viruses as agents of human diseases; in food spoilage/food borne diseases; and in food preservation/health promotion. Preventing plant diseases, food/drug production, cleaning up oil spills. Genetic engineering.
CFAN 3512 - Sustainable Food Chains (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Concentrated study in agriculture/agribusiness. Horticulture. Viticulture/wine making. Rural tourism. Gastronomy. prereq: instr consent
CFAN 3516 - Sustainable Food Systems of Italy (ENV, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
This course examines the concepts of sustainability in relation to food production and culture in a country and place where food is a fundamental component of the regional and national culture. The course incorporates intercultural development concepts to introduce students to past and present Italian culture through the cultural importance of food systems, the ethics of food consumption and production and the concepts of sustainability.
SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F