Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Agricultural Communication and Marketing B.S.

College of Food, Agri & Natural Resource Sciences
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2017
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 73 to 87
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
This major prepares students for careers in agricultural communication, journalism, marketing, sales, training, management, leadership, business, and extension. Agribusinesses, as well as state, federal, and marketing agencies need individuals who have a broad education in the scientific (and technical) aspects of agriculture, effective work and communication skills, and quantitative and qualitative skills to solve business problems. The scientific knowledge and technical skills necessary to become an effective agribusiness marketing or media professional are provided through requirements in the basic and agricultural sciences and are strengthened by selection of one of three areas of emphasis: crops and soils, food industries, or broad overview of food, agricultural, and environmental sciences. With 21 free-standing elective credits, all majors are encouraged to pursue a CFANS or other minor.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
All major requirements must be taken A-F (unless only offered S-N), and students must earn a grade of at least C-.
Quantitative Foundations
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Physical and Biological Sciences
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
AGRO 1101 - Biology of Plant Food Systems [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
Social Sciences
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
International
GCC 3017 - Grand Challenge: World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger [GP] (3.0 cr)
or AFEE 3361 - World Development Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
or Study Abroad Experience
Experiential Learning
AFEE 3096 - Experiential Learning: Production and Business (1.0-3.0 cr)
Interdisciplinary Learning
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
Writing Requirement
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
AFEE 4450W - Advanced Agricultural Journalism and Persuasive Writing for Ag, Food & Environmental Sciences [WI] (3.0 cr)
or APEC 4451W - Food Marketing Economics [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFEE 5111W - Agricultural Education: Methods of Teaching [WI] (4.0 cr)
Major Courses
AFEE 1001 - Introduction to Agricultural Education, Communication & Marketing (1.0 cr)
AFEE 2096 - Career Exploration & Early Field Experience in Agricultural Education, Communication, and Marketing (2.0 cr)
Communication and Journalism
AFEE 2421 - Professional Communication for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment (3.0 cr)
AFEE 3430 - Communicating Food, Agriculture & Environmental Science to the Public (3.0 cr)
AFEE 4450W - Advanced Agricultural Journalism and Persuasive Writing for Ag, Food & Environmental Sciences [WI] (3.0 cr)
JOUR 1001 - Introduction to Mass Communication [SOCS, TS] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 1313W - Analysis of Argument [WI] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3422 - Interviewing and Communication (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology [WI] (3.0 cr)
Leadership and Business Management
AFEE 2221W - Foundations of Leadership Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting (3.0 cr)
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales (3.0 cr)
or MKTG 4030 - Sales Management (4.0 cr)
or MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing (3.0 cr)
APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management (3.0 cr)
or MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3821 - Retail Center Management (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3551 - Entrepreneurship Fundamentals for Value-Added Rural Businesses (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing (3.0 cr)
or APEC 4451W - Food Marketing Economics [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFEE 4221 - Rural Leadership Development (3.0 cr)
or AFEE 3106 - Agricultural Policy and Issues in Minnesota (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
A: Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
Students must complete at least 20 credits in their area of emphasis.
Animal Science
ANSC 1101 - Introductory Animal Science (4.0 cr)
Natural Resources
CFAN 3513 - The Natural History of Norway [GP, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
Plant Science
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
or CFAN 3001 - Pests and Crop Protection (3.0 cr)
or ENT 4015 - Ornamentals and Turf Entomolgy (3.0 cr)
or HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or HORT 1003 - Organic Gardening: From Balconies to Backyards (3.0 cr)
or HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape [TS] (3.0 cr)
Soil Science
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Technology
AFEE 2051 - Current Technical Competencies (3.0 cr)
or UC 3201 - Web Designer Introduction (4.0 cr)
or ARTS 1701 - Introduction to Photography [AH] (4.0 cr)
Food and Nutrition
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design (3.0 cr)
or BBE 3201 - Sustainability of Food Systems: A Life Cycle Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
B: Crops and Soils
Students must complete at least 21 credits in their area of emphasis.
Crops and Soils
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
or HORT 2100 - Agricultural Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
ANSC 3011 - Statistics for Animal Science (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 4605 - Strategies for Agricultural Production and Management (3.0 cr)
CFAN 3001 - Pests and Crop Protection (3.0 cr)
or HORT 3005W - Introduction to Plant Physiology [WI] (4.0 cr)
or Or take the following course pair:
BIOL 3002 - Plant Biology: Function (2.0 cr)
BIOL 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
C: Food Industries
Students must complete at least 20 credits in their area of emphasis.
Food Industries
FSCN 1011 - Science of Food and Cooking [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
FSCN 1112 - Principles of Nutrition [TS] (3.0 cr)
FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology (4.0 cr)
ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers (3.0 cr)
FSCN 3615 - Sociocultural Aspects of Food, Nutrition, and Health [GP] (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 3612 - Life Cycle Nutrition (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 3614 - Nutrition Education and Counseling (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 3732 - Food Service Operations Management (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences

View sample plan(s):
· A: Ag and Env Sci Sample Plan
· B: Crops and Soils Sample Plan
· C: Food Ind Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Agricultural Communication and Marketing B.S.
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MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02451 - CI 1806/Math 1031
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions, with applications; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; basic probability rules, conditional probabilities, binomial probabilities. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01088 - Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Prerequisites: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, Internet access; high school physics recommended; CHEM 1015 is a 3-credit, lecture-only course, with the lectures delivered online via Moodle, and exams taken in person on campus. Internet access is required. Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lectures online, exams on campus. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
AGRO 1101 - Biology of Plant Food Systems (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Designed for students who are not majors in a life science program, but who wish to acquire a better understanding of biological concepts especially as they relate to their lives. We examine current issues related to food, food production and the environment which provide the context to investigate fundamental concepts of biology including productivity, energy, genetic change in populations, and environmental responses to human activity. We use a problem-based learning approach to explore three contemporary issues of great importance: risks and benefits of GMOs, farming and food, and the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico. Lab, greenhouse, field, and classroom discussions.
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01640
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Biological diversity from genetic variation to diversity of species/ecosystems. Genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes governing biological diversity. Genetic, evolutionary, and ecological perspectives on issues concerning human diversity, human population growth, health, agriculture, and conservation. Lab.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525 - Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major concepts of modern biology. Molecular structure of living things, energy recruitment/utilization, flow of genetic information through organisms/populations. Principles of inheritance, ecology, and evolution. Includes lab. prereq: high school chemistry
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00019 - Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
GCC 3017 - Grand Challenge: World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00136
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course provides a multi-disciplinary look at problems (and some of the possible solutions) affecting food production, distribution and requirements for the seven plus billion inhabitants of this planet. It is co-taught by an agronomist (Porter) and an economist (Runge) who together have worked on international food production and policy issues for the past 40 years. Historical context, the present situation and future scenarios related to the human population and food production are examined. Presentations and discussions cover sometimes conflicting views from multiple perspectives on population growth, use of technology, as well as the ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world. The global challenge perspective is reflected in attention to issues of poverty, inequality, gender, the legacy of colonialism, and racial and ethnic prejudice. Emphasis is placed on the need for governments, international assistance agencies, international research and extension centers, as well as the private sector to assist in solving the complex problems associated with malnutrition, undernutrition, obesity and sustainable food production. Through a better understanding of world food problems, this course enables students to reflect on the shared sense of responsibility by nations, the international community and ourselves to build and maintain a stronger sense of our roles as historical agents. Throughout the semester students are exposed to issues related to world food problems through the lenses of two instructors from different disciplinary backgrounds. The core issues of malnutrition and food production are approached simultaneously from a production perspective as well as an economic and policy perspective throughout the semester.
AFEE 3361 - World Development Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01778 - AFEE 3361/AFEE 5361
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development problems throughout the world. Development in Third World countries. First World development problems. Population, health and disease, education, agriculture, industry, finance, politics, and human rights.
AFEE 3096 - Experiential Learning: Production and Business
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiential learning in agricultural production and business. Planned, organized, monitored, and evaluated based on a per-experience diagnosis of learning prerequisite to higher level courses in technical agriculture and agricultural business. prereq: AgEd major, instr consent
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235 - Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Written/oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing/practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. prereq: [Jr or sr or instr consent], [1301 or 1401 or equiv]
AFEE 4450W - Advanced Agricultural Journalism and Persuasive Writing for Ag, Food & Environmental Sciences (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course, students research, write, and edit stories for agricultural, food and environmental organizations and media. Students produce a final portfolio that demonstrates their ability to create professional-level work such as magazine articles, news stories, biographies, marketing materials, blog posts, news releases and scripts.
APEC 4451W - Food Marketing Economics (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00385 - ApEc 4451W/ApEc 5451
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economics of food marketing in the United States. Food consumption trends, consumer food behavior, marketing strategies, consumer survey methodology, food distribution/retailing system. Policy issues related to food marketing. Individual/group projects. prereq: [[1101 or Econ 1101], [1101H or Econ 1101H], SCO 2550 or STAT 3011 or equiv, 60 cr] or instr consent
AFEE 5111W - Agricultural Education: Methods of Teaching (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Use of teaching resources; principles of teaching and learning; problem-solving techniques, lesson plan construction for large group, small group and individual investigations; student management; and assessment.
AFEE 1001 - Introduction to Agricultural Education, Communication & Marketing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical development of the discipline of agricultural education; orientation to career opportunities; areas and expectations of specialization; issues in the field.
AFEE 2096 - Career Exploration & Early Field Experience in Agricultural Education, Communication, and Marketing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analyses of occupations, employment potential, expectations for work, and readiness for careers in agricultural education, communication, and marketing. Field placement experiences examine career options and professionals in the field. Observe schools, extension offices, and agricultural businesses to learn about the work/workplaces in agricultural education, communication, and marketing.
AFEE 2421 - Professional Communication for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Speaking/writing about scientific/technical issues. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation. Public communication.
AFEE 3430 - Communicating Food, Agriculture & Environmental Science to the Public
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Planning/strategy for communication campaigns related to food/agriculture. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation. prereq: Sophomore standing or 30 cr
AFEE 4450W - Advanced Agricultural Journalism and Persuasive Writing for Ag, Food & Environmental Sciences (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course, students research, write, and edit stories for agricultural, food and environmental organizations and media. Students produce a final portfolio that demonstrates their ability to create professional-level work such as magazine articles, news stories, biographies, marketing materials, blog posts, news releases and scripts.
JOUR 1001 - Introduction to Mass Communication (SOCS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01664 - Jour 1001/Jour 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Function of mass communication messages/industries. News, advertising, public relations, books, music, film, TV, video games. Technologies of media production. Delivery systems. Political, legal, ethical, social, global aspects of mass communication.
COMM 1313W - Analysis of Argument (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Strategies for analyzing, evaluating, generating arguments. Problems in listening/responding to argument.
COMM 3422 - Interviewing and Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Application of communication concepts in information interview. Planning, conducting, and evaluating informational, journalistic/elite, helping, persuasive, appraisal, and employment interviews. Class training, field experience.
WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01353
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practice writing for various professional purposes/audiences, using appropriate styles, tones, and organizational elements. Potential genres include proposals, reports, web content, email, executive summaries, job search portfolios. Attention to workplace collaboration and broader issues of professional literacy.
WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Read books/articles, discuss, and write about major issues in science/technology. Possible topics: DNA and human genome. Animal/human interaction. Global warming; Alternative energies; Animal/human cloning and stem-cell research. Vaccines from Smallpox to AIDS. Why civilizations collapse.
AFEE 2221W - Foundations of Leadership Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to be an effective leader in profit/non-profit agricultural settings. Roles, responsibilities, knowledge, attitudes, and skills to hire staff, set goals, coach, mentor/manage teams, and improve communication.
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00458 - Acct 2050/ApEc 1251
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Financial accounting. Theory, concepts, principles, procedures. Preparation/understanding of the four financial statements.
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Professional selling of agricultural and food products. Students build/refine sales abilities, identify/qualify prospects, deliver sales presentations, close the sale. Principles of market research. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
MKTG 4030 - Sales Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Hiring, motivating, performance enhancement. Customer relationship management, data analysis, quantitative methods. Developing metrics to evaluate individual/group performance in attaining an organization's strategic goals. prereq: 3001, 3010, 3040
MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to terms, concepts, and skills for analyzing marketing problems. Factors outside the organization affecting its product, pricing, promotion, and distribution decisions. Cases from actual organizations. prereq: ECON 1101
APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Strategic and operations aspects of farm management; financial analysis, budgeting, strategic management; marketing plan and control; enterprise and whole farm planning and control; investment analysis, quality, risk, and personnel management. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Aspects/characteristics of organizations, their members. Why people/groups feel/behave as they do. Processes/methods that improve behavior/attitudes/effectiveness of members. Member/manager skills. Guest speakers, group presentations, films.
APEC 3821 - Retail Center Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Management of garden centers, grocery stores, and other retail units selling perishable agricultural products. prereq: [1101 or Econ 1101], [1251 or Acct 2050]
APEC 3551 - Entrepreneurship Fundamentals for Value-Added Rural Businesses
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Process of starting a new business or organization. Creating a new value proposition in which people are willing to pay for this new product or service according to its perceived value. Students identify market niches and develop plans to exploit them. Student-run businesses may be created as well as self-standing independent businesses.
APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02506 - ApEc 3411/ApEc 5411
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic concepts related to marketing agricultural commodities. Conditions of competitive markets, historical perspectives on market institutions/policy, structural characteristics of markets, policies/regulations affecting agricultural marketing of livestock, crop, and dairy products. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 4451W - Food Marketing Economics (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00385 - ApEc 4451W/ApEc 5451
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economics of food marketing in the United States. Food consumption trends, consumer food behavior, marketing strategies, consumer survey methodology, food distribution/retailing system. Policy issues related to food marketing. Individual/group projects. prereq: [[1101 or Econ 1101], [1101H or Econ 1101H], SCO 2550 or STAT 3011 or equiv, 60 cr] or instr consent
AFEE 4221 - Rural Leadership Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Understanding the role, function, and features of leadership in rural communities; importance of personal involvement, personal leadership qualities, and vision for individuals and rural community organizations.
AFEE 3106 - Agricultural Policy and Issues in Minnesota
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This course will introduce students to advocacy and policy-making that affects Minnesota’s agricultural industry, specifically at the farm level. They will experience the policy-making process from an initial idea to building support, lobbying, legislative work, implementation, and the effect policies have on Minnesota farmers. Students will get a behind-the-scenes look at the policy process in action by meeting lawmakers, lobbyists, and staff while on field trips to the Minnesota State Capitol and Minnesota Department of Agriculture. Students will also shadow a current legislator, participate in a mock senate, hear from multiple guest speakers, and research the decision-making process by following an agricultural bill through the legislative session. prereq: 30 credits or instructor approval
ANSC 1101 - Introductory Animal Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental concepts of animal breeding, physiology, nutrition, and management as they apply to the production of beef, dairy, horses, poultry, sheep, swine, and other livestock. Fall term class open only to ANSC majors. Spring term class open to all majors.
CFAN 3513 - The Natural History of Norway (GP, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring & Summer Odd Year
The program will be based in the Nord Tröndelag region of central Norway where students will learn about Norway's physical geography, ecology, and management of natural resources, including its flora, fauna, and agricultural systems. Students will also gain an understanding of the region's rich culture, history, and close ties to Minnesota. prereq: instructor consent
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary survey of environmental issues. Interrelationships between environment and human society. Roles of science, technology, and policy in meeting environmental challenges. Lecture, discussion. Students evaluate social, ethical, political, and economic factors.
ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00671 - ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00671 - ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
CFAN 3001 - Pests and Crop Protection
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to biology/identification of insects, weeds, and diseases that affect agricultural crops. Management of these organisms based on principles of integrated pest management. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv or instr consent
ENT 4015 - Ornamentals and Turf Entomolgy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Diagnosis and management of insect pests in landscape plants. Emphasis on the principles of biological control, biorational pesticides, and integrated pest management. prereq: 1xxx course in biol or hort or forest resources
HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles and techniques of propagating plants by seeds, cuttings, grafts, buds, layers, and division. Lectures on principles; labs on practice of various propagating techniques.
HORT 1003 - Organic Gardening: From Balconies to Backyards
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This fully online course focuses on the principles and practices of growing fruits, vegetables, and herbs with an ecological approach. You'll explore basic botany, soils and compost, species and variety selection, planning and design, container gardening, pest management, season extension, and more so you can approach your gardening projects with confidence.
HORT 1014 - Edible Landscape (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Tracing our relationship with edible landscapes traces to our hunting-gathering origins. Technological/social changes that have distanced us from our food. Integrating food plants into pleasing, sustainable, and edible landscapes in yards, neighborhoods, and cities.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
AFEE 2051 - Current Technical Competencies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Prepares agricultural education teachers and other agricultural professionals to use technology. Develop basic skills and knowledge to plan, implement, operate, and maintain agricultural structural and mechanical systems. Experiential learning principles and applied problem solving.
UC 3201 - Web Designer Introduction
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Web design process: plan, design, launch, and publish using industry standard Web design software. Adobe Photoshop and Dreamweaver are used to build and publish a personal Web site using HTML5 and CSS. Design principles, business practices, site analysis, Bootstrap, jQuery and Animate are also covered. Lectures, exercises, lab. No previous experience necessary.
ARTS 1701 - Introduction to Photography (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Presents conceptual, technical, historical aspects of photography within fine arts context. Emphasis on creative process through hands-on experience in use of camera, digital, black/white, darkroom processes.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to use of systems thinking for exploration of problems in contemporary food system from multidisciplinary perspective. System concepts. Historical evolution of food system. Analysis, management, design.
BBE 3201 - Sustainability of Food Systems: A Life Cycle Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Consequences of global food system. Diversity in food systems. Current topics in food sustainability.
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
HORT 2100 - Agricultural Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: CHEM 1015/1017 or CHEM 1061 #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Chemical/biochemical foundation for agricultural disciplines. Concepts in organic, analytical and biological chemistry. Chemistry, metabolism, and development of plants. prereq: CHEM 1015/1017 or CHEM 1061 instr consent
ANSC 3011 - Statistics for Animal Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00258 - AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic statistical concepts. Develop statistical reasoning/critical thinking skills. Descriptive statistics, probability, sampling and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, experimental design, linear correlation, linear regression and multiple regression. How to make sound arguments/decisions based on statistics when reviewing news articles or scientific publications with statistical content. Explore/draw conclusions from data using a basic statistical software package.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00258 - AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Ecology/biology of invasive plant species (weeds). Principles of invasive plant management in agricultural/horticultural, urban, wetland, aquatic, and other non-cropland landscape systems, utilizing biological, cultural, and chemical means. Management strategies to design systems that optimize invasive plant management in terms of economic, environmental, and social impacts. prereq: 4005, [Bio 3002 or equiv], Soil 2125, [Agro 2501 or Hort 1011]
ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to provide a local and global historical perspective of soil erosion (causes and consequences); develop a scientific understanding of soil erosion processes; and relates various soil conservation and land-use management strategies to real-world situations. Basics of soil erosion processes and prediction methods will be the fundamental building blocks of this course. From this understanding, we will discuss policies and socioeconomic aspects of soil erosion. Lastly, we will focus on effective land-use management using natural resource assessment tools. Case studies and real-world and current events examples will be used throughout the course to relate course material to experiences. prereq: SOIL 2125 or instr consent
AGRO 4605 - Strategies for Agricultural Production and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Information/tools necessary to make informed land management decisions in ever-evolving economic, policy, climate environments. Evaluate hows, whats, whys of crop management by solving real-world problems that agricultural professionals face. State-of-the-art production/management practices for major agricultural crops in Minnesota. Lectures feature agricultural professionals/experts. Lab component provides hands-on experience with modern equipment/data interpretation. prereq: 1101 or equivalent, [CHEM1015/17 or equivalent], SOIL1125 or equivalent], [jr or sr or grad student or instr consent]
CFAN 3001 - Pests and Crop Protection
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to biology/identification of insects, weeds, and diseases that affect agricultural crops. Management of these organisms based on principles of integrated pest management. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv or instr consent
HORT 3005W - Introduction to Plant Physiology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to physiological basis for effects of environment on plant growth/development. How to produce optimal plant growth. Experimental technique, data analysis, scientific writing. Lecture, readings, lab.
BIOL 3002 - Plant Biology: Function
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How plants make/use food. Mineral function/uptake. Water relations. Transport processes. Growth/development. prereq: [1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv], [CHEM 1011 or one semester chemistry with some organic content]
BIOL 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Various plant processes at subcellular, organ, whole plant levels. Lab, recitation. prereq: Concurrent enrollment 3002
FSCN 1011 - Science of Food and Cooking (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Souffles, custards, sauces, coffee brewing, candy making used to examine physics/chemistry of heat transfer, foams, gels, emulsions, extractions, crystallization.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
FSCN 1112 - Principles of Nutrition (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course explores fundamental concepts of nutrition, nutrient functions, human nutritional requirements, and food sources. We will learn about evaluating nutrition information and food safety, and investigate the role of nutrition in chronic disease, public policy, and the environment. Nutrition is both a science and social science. This class involves social aspects, but mainly concerns the biochemistry and physiology of how food is processed in the body. The chapters on carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and metabolism especially built on biology and physiology. Course topics include: 1. essential nutrients (macro-and-micro-nutrients) needed from the diet; 2. major functions of nutrients and physiological changes with deficiency or excess; 3. digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients; 4. weight management; 5. scientific method and nutrition; 6. life cycle issues; 7. food safety issues 8. nutrition for sports Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry
FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: BIOL 1009, CHEM 1015
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How microbes impact our world in deadly/life-saving ways. Roles of bacteria, fungi, and viruses as agents of human diseases; in food spoilage/food borne diseases; and in food preservation/health promotion. Preventing plant diseases, food/drug production, cleaning up oil spills. Genetic engineering.
ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the compositional variation, processing, selection, storage, cookery, palatability, nutritional value, and safety of red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products.
FSCN 3615 - Sociocultural Aspects of Food, Nutrition, and Health (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sociocultural aspects of regional/cultural diversity in food preferences and food behavior, food habits, demographics, lifestyles, food consumption, and expenditures. Effect of socioeconomic status, religious beliefs, age, and cultural meaning of foods on food choices.
FSCN 3612 - Life Cycle Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: CHEM 1061/1065
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nutritional changes throughout lifecycle. Pregnancy, lactation, childhood, adulthood, aging. Topics relevant to lifecycle changes (e.g., body composition, immunity, sports nutrition). prereq: CHEM 1061/1065
FSCN 3614 - Nutrition Education and Counseling
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Effective communication skills are essential for all food and nutrition professionals whether working in clinical, community, management, or food service settings. This course is divided into two components: nutrition education and counseling. These two components will first teach the necessary knowledge and skills required of entry level dietitians such as educational theory and techniques, counseling theory and methods, interviewing techniques, and health literacy. You will also develop and practice these skills through application verbally in breakout sessions as well as written. The written component for the education section will include an interview paper; several informal activities in class all which will help develop and practice skills to complete the final project of developing a nutrition education lesson plan. The syllabus will focus on the nutrition education component. prereq: 1112
FSCN 3732 - Food Service Operations Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Planning, preparing, delivering, serving, managing foods served away from home.