Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Nursing Ph.D.

School of Nursing
School of Nursing
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
School of Nursing, 5-160 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-625-7980; fax: 612-625-7727)
  • Program Type: Doctorate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2021
  • Length of program in credits: 58 to 70
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Doctor of Philosophy
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The PhD program in nursing prepares scholars as scientists, leaders, innovators, and educators in nursing and health care who: -Discover new knowledge for nursing science and health care practice through ethical, innovative, theory-based research; -Integrate knowledge to influence health care delivery and policy through collaborative, interprofessional initiatives at organizational, local, state, regional, national, and global levels; -Create and evaluate strategies to improve the health and well-being of individuals, families, communities, and populations; and -Disseminate knowledge to those in nursing, other health sciences, policy makers, and the public through scholarly publication, formal teaching, and other creative venues.
Accreditation
This program is accredited by Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.00.
Applicants must submit their test score(s) from the following:
  • GRE
    • General Test - Verbal Reasoning: 156
    • General Test - Quantitative Reasoning: 146
    • General Test - Analytical Writing: 5.0
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 95
  • MELAB
    • Final score: 85
Key to test abbreviations (GRE, TOEFL, MELAB).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
34 to 46 credits are required in the major.
24 thesis credits are required.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
A minimum GPA of 3.00 is required for students to remain in good standing.
At least 2 semesters must be completed before filing a Degree Program Form.
Core Coursework (26 credits)
All students take the following courses. Take NURS 8171 for 3 credits.
NURS 8180 - Doctoral Proseminar I: Scholarly Development (1.0 cr)
NURS 8175 - Quantitative Research Design and Methods (3.0 cr)
NURS 8172 - Theory and Theory Development for Research (3.0 cr)
NURS 8152 - Scholarship in Health Care Ethics (3.0 cr)
NURS 8171 - Qualitative Research Design and Methods (3.0-4.0 cr)
NURS 8177 - Advanced Nursing Research Practicum (1.0-2.0 cr)
NURS 8190 - Critical Review in Health Research (2.0 cr)
NURS 8121 - Health Behaviors and Illness Responses (3.0 cr)
NURS 8173 - Principles and Methods of Implementing Research (3.0 cr)
NURS 8134 - Interventions and Outcomes Research (3.0 cr)
Statistics (6 credits)
Select at least 6 statistics credits from the courses listed below, in consultation with the faculty advisor.
Biostatistics
PUBH 6450 - Biostatistics I (4.0 cr)
PUBH 6451 - Biostatistics II (4.0 cr)
or EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II (3.0 cr)
Thesis Credits
Take at least 24 doctoral thesis credits.
NURS 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral (1.0-24.0 cr)
Program Electives
The number of required elective credits is determined by nursing background and the highest degree awarded prior to Nursing PhD enrollment. Note that the Master of Nursing degree does not qualify for Post-Master's-Entry status.
Graduate Degree Prepared Nurse Electives (2 credits)
Take two or more credits from the following list, or select alternative courses, in consultation with the faculty advisor:
NURS 5115 - Interprofessional Health Care Informatics (3.0 cr)
NURS 5925 - Grant Writing and Critique (1.0 cr)
NURS 7600 - Nursing Research and Evidence Based Practice (2.0-4.0 cr)
NURS 6102 - Family Health Theory (2.0 cr)
NURS 7200 - Economics of Health Care (3.0 cr)
NURS 7300 - Program Planning and Evaluation (3.0 cr)
NURS 7900 - Scholarly Teaching and Learning in Nursing (3.0 cr)
NURS 7904 - Nursing Education Practicum (2.0 cr)
NURS 8185 - Qualitative Data Analysis for Health Care Research (3.0-4.0 cr)
HINF 5430 - Foundations of Health Informatics I (3.0 cr)
HINF 5431 - Foundations of Health Informatics II (3.0 cr)
FSOS 8105 - Family Gerontology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6904 - Nutrition and Aging (2.0 cr)
PUBH 8803 - Long-Term Care: Principles, Programs, and Policies (2.0 cr)
SW 5810 - Seminar: Special Topics (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6341 - Epidemiologic Methods I (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7250 - Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7251 - Data Analysis From Focus Groups (1.0 cr)
EPSY 5245 - Advanced Survey Data Analysis for Categorical and Rating Scale Data (1.0 cr)
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8265 - Factor Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research (3.0 cr)
NURS 6110 - Epidemiology in Nursing (2.0 cr)
NURS 7202 - Moral and Ethical Positions and Actions in Nursing (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5101 - Introduction to Integrative Healing Practices (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5303 - Pain Management and Evidence Based Complementary Health Approaches (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5513 - Living Well, Dying Well: Empowering Patient Communication at the End of Life (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5711 - Optimal Healing Environments (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5806 - Wellbeing and Resiliency for Health Professionals (1.0 cr)
CSPH 5115 - Cultural Awareness, Knowledge and Health (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5118 - Whole Person, Whole Community: The Reciprocity of Wellbeing (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5305 - Introduction to Integrative Mental Health (2.0 cr)
-OR-
Baccalaureate Prepared & Non Nurse Electives (14 credits)
Take 14 or more credits from the following list, or select alternative courses, in consultation with the faculty advisor. A minimum of 12 credits must be selected within the NURS or CSPH department.
NURS 5115 - Interprofessional Health Care Informatics (3.0 cr)
NURS 5925 - Grant Writing and Critique (1.0 cr)
NURS 7600 - Nursing Research and Evidence Based Practice (2.0-4.0 cr)
NURS 6102 - Family Health Theory (2.0 cr)
NURS 7200 - Economics of Health Care (3.0 cr)
NURS 7300 - Program Planning and Evaluation (3.0 cr)
NURS 7900 - Scholarly Teaching and Learning in Nursing (3.0 cr)
NURS 7904 - Nursing Education Practicum (2.0 cr)
NURS 8185 - Qualitative Data Analysis for Health Care Research (3.0-4.0 cr)
HINF 5430 - Foundations of Health Informatics I (3.0 cr)
HINF 5431 - Foundations of Health Informatics II (3.0 cr)
FSOS 8105 - Family Gerontology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6904 - Nutrition and Aging (2.0 cr)
PUBH 8803 - Long-Term Care: Principles, Programs, and Policies (2.0 cr)
SW 5810 - Seminar: Special Topics (1.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6341 - Epidemiologic Methods I (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7250 - Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7251 - Data Analysis From Focus Groups (1.0 cr)
EPSY 5245 - Advanced Survey Data Analysis for Categorical and Rating Scale Data (1.0 cr)
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8265 - Factor Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research (3.0 cr)
NURS 6110 - Epidemiology in Nursing (2.0 cr)
NURS 7202 - Moral and Ethical Positions and Actions in Nursing (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5101 - Introduction to Integrative Healing Practices (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5303 - Pain Management and Evidence Based Complementary Health Approaches (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5513 - Living Well, Dying Well: Empowering Patient Communication at the End of Life (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5711 - Optimal Healing Environments (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5806 - Wellbeing and Resiliency for Health Professionals (1.0 cr)
CSPH 5115 - Cultural Awareness, Knowledge and Health (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5118 - Whole Person, Whole Community: The Reciprocity of Wellbeing (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5305 - Introduction to Integrative Mental Health (2.0 cr)
 
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NURS 8180 - Doctoral Proseminar I: Scholarly Development
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Transition to doctoral study. Begins socialization process to role of nursing scholar/scientist. Career trajectories of nursing scholars who have pursued various roles. prereq: Doctoral nursing student
NURS 8175 - Quantitative Research Design and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Designs for quantitative description and quasi-experimental/experimental evaluation of scientific problems across domain of nursing. Evaluation of logic of design/attribution of causality from health and social science perspectives. prereq: [PhD student in nursing, advanced applied statistics] or instr consent
NURS 8172 - Theory and Theory Development for Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Paradigms in nursing/health, associated methods of scientific/scholarly inquiry. Inductive/deductive techniques for theory development Theory-testing using data obtained under controlled conditions. prereq: Doctoral student
NURS 8152 - Scholarship in Health Care Ethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analyze the underlying values in the concepts and discourses of health/disease. Evaluate ethical frameworks regarding their capability to address issues in health care. Analyze/discuss issues related to the responsible and ethical conduct of research. prereq: Doctoral student or instr consent
NURS 8171 - Qualitative Research Design and Methods
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Overview and comparative analysis of selected qualitative research methods and analytic strategies. Focuses on developing rigorous qualitative designs that contribute to development of nursing and health care knowledge for diverse populations. prereq: 8170 or equiv
NURS 8177 - Advanced Nursing Research Practicum
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
NURS 8177 Advanced Nursing Research Practicum is a required independent study course where students participate in designing or conducting a nursing or health-related research study under the supervision of a School of Nursing faculty investigator. prereq: PhD nursing student, instr consent, adviser consent
NURS 8190 - Critical Review in Health Research
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Skills needed to critique a body of scientific literature in focused areas of nursing research and related fields. Construction of literature reviews for planning research projects and for research utilization. prereq: Advanced statistics course, instr consent
NURS 8121 - Health Behaviors and Illness Responses
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theories of health behaviors and responses to illness are analyzed/critiqued. Multivariate research designs. Specification of testable, descriptive, dynamic models for health/illness that incorporate culture, biology, environment, and health systems for diverse individuals, families, communities, and populations. prereq: Doctoral student or instr consent
NURS 8173 - Principles and Methods of Implementing Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Nurs 8173/SAPh 8173
Typically offered: Every Spring
Integrates scientific, statistical, and practical aspects of research. Inter-relationships among design, sample selections, subject access, human subjects requirements, instrument selection and evaluation, data management, analyses plans, grant writing, and research career issues. Field experiences required. prereq: 8114 or other 8xxx grad research methods course, 2 grad stat courses;
NURS 8134 - Interventions and Outcomes Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Design/evaluation of intervention/outcomes research. Use of advanced experimental design and multivariate statistical approaches to evaluate theory-based interventions with longitudinal outcomes in context. prereq: 8121, PhD student, instr consent
PUBH 6450 - Biostatistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Descriptive statistics. Gaussian probability models, point/interval estimation for means/proportions. Hypothesis testing, including t, chi-square, and nonparametric tests. Simple regression/correlation. ANOVA. Health science applications using output from statistical packages. prereq: [College-level algebra, health sciences grad student] or instr consent
PUBH 6451 - Biostatistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Two-way ANOVA, interactions, repeated measures, general linear models. Logistic regression for cohort and case-control studies. Loglinear models, contingency tables, Poisson regression, survival data, Kaplan-Meier methods, proportional hazards models. prereq: [PubH 6450 with grade of at least B, health sciences grad student] or instr consent
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8251/EPsy 8261
Prerequisites: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Statistical Methods in Education I is the first course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course covers estimation and hypothesis testing with a particular focus on ANOVA and an introduction to multiple linear regression. Prepares students for EPSY 8252/8262. prereq: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8252/EPsy 8262
Prerequisites: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical Methods in Education II is the second course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course focuses on multiple linear regression and provides an introduction to linear mixed models. prereq: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
NURS 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral
Credits: 1.0 -24.0 [max 100.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required
NURS 5115 - Interprofessional Health Care Informatics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Implications of informatics for practice, including nursing, public health, and health care in general. Electronic health record issues. Ethical, legislative, political, and global/future informatics issues.
NURS 5925 - Grant Writing and Critique
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Self-paced course. Online modular format. How to write/critique grants. Students select a research or program grant to critique, applying knowledge obtained through learning modules. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
NURS 7600 - Nursing Research and Evidence Based Practice
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examination of evidence based nursing including types and levels of evidence, research process, critique, and synthesis of research studies, and the science of implementation. prereq: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in a 3 credit inferential statistics course
NURS 6102 - Family Health Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Emerging theory in family nursing science, related theories. Research on family systems for structuring systemic framework to examine clinical problems related to family health care. Applies family health theories to selected phenomena of interest to health care. prereq: 6200 or instr consent
NURS 7200 - Economics of Health Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Economic theories of health care in relation to health disparities and global health. Financing strategies, payment systems, and their effect on doctor/nursing practice. prereq: Admission to DNP program
NURS 7300 - Program Planning and Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A critical analysis of methods for practical program planning and evaluation for advanced nursing professionals in leadership roles; includes evaluation of approach and design, intervention processes including stakeholder issues, measurement issues, and strategies to evaluate outcomes achievement. prereq: Admission to DNP program or instr consent
NURS 7900 - Scholarly Teaching and Learning in Nursing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Critical analysis of teaching-learning theories and evidence about elements that comprise effective teaching in diverse populations in order to design and evaluate the quality of plans for educational experiences that facilitate achievement of desired learner outcomes in nursing.
NURS 7904 - Nursing Education Practicum
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Design, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based, scholarly teaching and learning in various nursing education contexts. Analysis of select nursing program in relation to meeting standards for accreditation and various other expected outcomes of nursing programs. prereq: Graduate student in nursing or Nurs 7900 or equivalent.
NURS 8185 - Qualitative Data Analysis for Health Care Research
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Techniques for descriptive, interpretive, and analytic data. Data preparation, management, and analysis. Transforming data from multiple texts to theoretical conceptualizations. Writing, dissemination of findings. prereq: 8171 or grad course in qualitative research methods
HINF 5430 - Foundations of Health Informatics I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introductory survey of health informatics, focusing on foundational concepts. Topics covered include: conceptualizations of data, information, and knowledge; current terminologies, coding, and classification systems for medical information; ethics, privacy, and security; systems analysis, process and data modeling; human-computer interaction and data visualization. Lectures, readings, and exercises highlight the intersections of these topics with electronic health record systems and other health information technology. prereq: Junior, senior, grad student, professional student, or instr consent
HINF 5431 - Foundations of Health Informatics II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introductory survey of health informatics, focusing on applications of informatics concepts and technologies. Topics covered include: health informatics research, literature, and evaluation; precision medicine; decision models; computerized decision support systems; data mining, natural language processing, social media, rule-based system, and other emerging technologies for supporting 'Big Data' applications; security for health care information handling. Lectures, readings, and exercises highlight the intersections of these topics with current information technology for clinical care and research. prereq: Junior, senior, grad student, professional student, or instr consent
FSOS 8105 - Family Gerontology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Integrates gerontology and family studies; new lines of inquiry, qualitative and quantitative, into aging families. Family gerontological research, family relationships, family and long-term care institutions, theoretical frameworks and research methods, and research and interventions. prereq: 4154 or equiv or instr consent
PUBH 6904 - Nutrition and Aging
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Current literature on nutrition needs/factors affecting nutritional status of adults and the elderly. Relevant community resources. prereq: Grad student or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 8803 - Long-Term Care: Principles, Programs, and Policies
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Long-term care policy for functionally impaired persons, particularly the elderly. Team taught from healthcare and social services perspective; grounded in research literature on evidence of program effects. Innovative programs addressing current fragmentation of services. prereq: Grad-level health-care policy course or instr consent
SW 5810 - Seminar: Special Topics
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course provides an understanding of basic methods and tools used by epidemiologists to study the health of populations.
PUBH 6341 - Epidemiologic Methods I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6320PubH /6341
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to epidemiologic concepts and methods: (1) Study design (randomized trials and observational studies); (2) Measures of exposure-disease association; (3) Casual inference and bias; (4) Confounding and effect modification.
PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory/application of survey research in data collection. Sampling, item development, instrument design/administration to conduct survey or be aware of issues related to design/implementation. Identification of sources of error in survey research.
PUBH 7250 - Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Interactive, intensive overview of focus group procedures for public/non-profit environments. Practical approaches to determining appropriate use of focus groups. Design options, developing questions, recruiting participants, moderating. Analyzing/reporting results.
PUBH 7251 - Data Analysis From Focus Groups
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Alternatives for capturing data in focus groups. Making sense out of data. Alternative analytic strategies. Emphasizes analysis that is systematic/verifiable.
EPSY 5245 - Advanced Survey Data Analysis for Categorical and Rating Scale Data
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Practical course. Specific nature of survey data (typically categorical or ordinal). Appropriate data analytic methods. prereq: 5244, 5261
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
General linear model used as context for regression. Matrix algebra, multiple regression, path analysis, polynomial regression, standardized regression, stepwise solutions, analysis of variance, weighted least squares, logistic regression. prereq: [8252 or equiv], regression/ANOVA course, familiarity with statistical analysis package
EPSY 8265 - Factor Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [8252 or equiv or #]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Factor analytic techniques/applications. Component, common factor, confirmatory analysis. Factor extraction, estimating number of dimensions. Rotation, factor scores, hierarchical factor analysis. prereq: [8252 or equiv or instr consent]
EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Quantitative techniques using manifest/latent variable approaches for analysis of educational/social science data. Introduction to structural equation modeling approaches to multiple regression, factor analysis, path modeling. Developing, estimating, interpreting structural equation models. prereq: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual framework of hierarchical linear models for nested data, their application in educational research. Nature/effects of nested data, logic of hierarchical models, mixed-effects models. Estimation/hypothesis testing in these models, model-checking, nonlinear models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
NURS 6110 - Epidemiology in Nursing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
For nurses in advanced practice and leadership positions to utilize basic epidemiological principles in assessing determinants of health and their outcomes in populations. Application of epidemiological concepts to nursing.
NURS 7202 - Moral and Ethical Positions and Actions in Nursing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative ethics and theoretical underpinnings for positions taken. Implications for subsequent action. Morally defensible positions on health-related issues, corresponding actions from perspective of nursing.
CSPH 5101 - Introduction to Integrative Healing Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Cultural contexts of healing traditions. Integrative therapies presented by practitioners, including traditional Chinese medicine, meditation, mind-body healing, spiritual practices, energy healing, naturopathy, herbalism, movement therapies, homeopathy, manual therapies, nutrition. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student; or instructor consent
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cultural contexts explored through field-trip immersion experiences. Aspects of different health care systems. Indigenous North American, Vedic, traditional Chinese, biomedicine. Writing assignment. prereq: [Jr, Sr, or grad student standing], instr consent
CSPH 5303 - Pain Management and Evidence Based Complementary Health Approaches
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will cover the evidence regarding effectiveness and safety of CIH practices, and the relationship of CIH to contemporary views of pain, health, and healing. There is a growing evidence base to support some complementary and integrative healing (CIH) approaches for pain management including yoga, mindfulness meditation, chiropractic, and others. In the US, chronic pain impacts over one third of the population and affects more individuals than heart disease, diabetes, and cancer combined. While there is a wide range of conventional medical treatments available to manage pain, many are only marginally effective and are associated with troublesome side effects. Of growing concerns is the endemic problem of opioids associated with misuse, addiction, and fatal overdose. Pain sufferers and health providers need effective and safe options for pain management. Some complementary and integrative healing (CIH) approaches have a growing evidence base to support their use, particularly for pain management. This course will introduce students to the theories, mechanisms, use, effectiveness, and safety of commonly used complementary and integrative healing practices. The relationship of CIH approaches to contemporary views and research regarding pain, health and healing, and placebo effects will also be explored. Through reading, reflection, discussion, and critical appraisal, students will develop the necessary skills to synthesize different forms of information, including research, to reach evidence-informed and balanced conclusions regarding CIH for managing pain, restoring function, and enhancing overall health and wellbeing. CIH approaches covered will include: whole systems (Traditional Chinese Medicine, osteopathy, chiropractic, Ayurvedic Medicine, etc.); mind-body practices (contemplative and meditative practices; yoga, tai chi, Qigong, etc.); manipulative and body-based approaches (massage therapy, acupuncture, manipulation); and energy-based approaches (energy medicine, Reiki, therapeutic touch, healing touch). Upon completion of the course, students will have a foundational knowledge of CIH for pain management and the skills to critically appraise and determine the trustworthiness of different information sources. Prerequisite: Graduate or Professional program student.
CSPH 5513 - Living Well, Dying Well: Empowering Patient Communication at the End of Life
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will learn how to provide compassionate and effective care at the end of life, including appropriate communication with patients, families, and healthcare providers at crucial points of care. Students will also explore their own perspectives about end of life and learn the importance of self-care. The course will help students reframe end-of-life care from a focus on medical death to an emphasis on humane dying through reflection on values, hopes, and plans. Students will learn to support individuals through personal connection and the sharing of narratives and wisdom.
CSPH 5711 - Optimal Healing Environments
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development/implementation of optimal healing environments. Evidence base supporting structural, architectural, human, and care processes. Emphasizes identifying models of optimal healing environments and leadership strategies that support diffusion of innovation. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
CSPH 5806 - Wellbeing and Resiliency for Health Professionals
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will teach health professional students and health professionals self-care strategies that will improve their individual wellbeing and reduce the stress and burnout often experienced in these professions. Improving individual wellbeing will also contribute to greater wellbeing in the teams and systems in which these professionals work.
CSPH 5115 - Cultural Awareness, Knowledge and Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How knowledge can become resource for individual, family, community health. Interactive glimpse of wisdom of cultural communities. Develop capacity to see culture within professional education/practice. Cultural constructs underpinning medical system, role of culture in interaction between practitioner/patient, role of reconnection to cultural heritage in healing. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
CSPH 5118 - Whole Person, Whole Community: The Reciprocity of Wellbeing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores the symbiotic and reciprocal relationship between individual and community health and wellbeing, as well as the many factors/forces which influence that relationship. Drawing upon recent studies in the area of reciprocal/symbiotic effects between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing, this course will include the following core topics: definitions of community and related dimensions of wellbeing, importance of Individual/Community reciprocity (Social Justice, Equity, Safety, and Trust), historical trauma and healing, and individual action and personal empowerment in community transformation. Utilizing elements of the Center for Spirituality & Healing's Wellbeing model and modes of contemplative practice, this course will ultimately assist learners through phases of individual reflection and mindfulness for the purpose of creating more open and reciprocal relationships with entities they describe as their communities. An extension of recent studies in the area of the reciprocal (or rippling) effect between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing this course will guide individuals in identifying the various communities in which they live or participate, the roles they "play" within those communities and why/ how this knowledge can help prepare them for action and leadership. Main themes of the course will include: - Mindfulness, Reflection and Healing: Historical Trauma and Marginalization. - Roles and Reciprocity: Justice, Equity, Security and Trust between individuals and their communities. - Transformation: Individual Action/Leadership as Bridge between Personal and Community Wellbeing.
CSPH 5305 - Introduction to Integrative Mental Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Prerequisite: Graduate or Professional student. This course focuses on introducing students to the concept of integrative mental health (IMH). Definitions of IMH, the history and background of the concept, and how it relates to psychiatric care and health care in general will be explored. Students will explore and practice risk-benefit profiles of different modalities in the context of evidence-based mental health care. An emphasis will be placed on the connection between physical and mental health and how that can be approached from an integrative perspective. Topics such as mindfulness and mental health, nutrition and mental health, herbs and supplements in psychiatric care, and the role of functional medicine in IMH will be covered, as well as how psychotherapy and psychotropic medications fit in the IMH framework. Students will review the current diagnostic system for mental health disorders and that can both help and hinder an integrative approach to mental health care. Integrative approaches for assessing mental health concerns will be reviewed, and how to use these approaches alongside a traditional medical approach for maximum benefit will be explored. Students will further review specific modalities for mental health and wellbeing that are less focused on specific systems and more focused on holism and the interplay of systems. Students will also identity and explore different ways of viewing mental health and wellbeing based on cultural and geographical issues, and how these may impact the approaches.
NURS 5115 - Interprofessional Health Care Informatics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Implications of informatics for practice, including nursing, public health, and health care in general. Electronic health record issues. Ethical, legislative, political, and global/future informatics issues.
NURS 5925 - Grant Writing and Critique
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Self-paced course. Online modular format. How to write/critique grants. Students select a research or program grant to critique, applying knowledge obtained through learning modules. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
NURS 7600 - Nursing Research and Evidence Based Practice
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examination of evidence based nursing including types and levels of evidence, research process, critique, and synthesis of research studies, and the science of implementation. prereq: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in a 3 credit inferential statistics course
NURS 6102 - Family Health Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Emerging theory in family nursing science, related theories. Research on family systems for structuring systemic framework to examine clinical problems related to family health care. Applies family health theories to selected phenomena of interest to health care. prereq: 6200 or instr consent
NURS 7200 - Economics of Health Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Economic theories of health care in relation to health disparities and global health. Financing strategies, payment systems, and their effect on doctor/nursing practice. prereq: Admission to DNP program
NURS 7300 - Program Planning and Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A critical analysis of methods for practical program planning and evaluation for advanced nursing professionals in leadership roles; includes evaluation of approach and design, intervention processes including stakeholder issues, measurement issues, and strategies to evaluate outcomes achievement. prereq: Admission to DNP program or instr consent
NURS 7900 - Scholarly Teaching and Learning in Nursing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Critical analysis of teaching-learning theories and evidence about elements that comprise effective teaching in diverse populations in order to design and evaluate the quality of plans for educational experiences that facilitate achievement of desired learner outcomes in nursing.
NURS 7904 - Nursing Education Practicum
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Design, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based, scholarly teaching and learning in various nursing education contexts. Analysis of select nursing program in relation to meeting standards for accreditation and various other expected outcomes of nursing programs. prereq: Graduate student in nursing or Nurs 7900 or equivalent.
NURS 8185 - Qualitative Data Analysis for Health Care Research
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Techniques for descriptive, interpretive, and analytic data. Data preparation, management, and analysis. Transforming data from multiple texts to theoretical conceptualizations. Writing, dissemination of findings. prereq: 8171 or grad course in qualitative research methods
HINF 5430 - Foundations of Health Informatics I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introductory survey of health informatics, focusing on foundational concepts. Topics covered include: conceptualizations of data, information, and knowledge; current terminologies, coding, and classification systems for medical information; ethics, privacy, and security; systems analysis, process and data modeling; human-computer interaction and data visualization. Lectures, readings, and exercises highlight the intersections of these topics with electronic health record systems and other health information technology. prereq: Junior, senior, grad student, professional student, or instr consent
HINF 5431 - Foundations of Health Informatics II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introductory survey of health informatics, focusing on applications of informatics concepts and technologies. Topics covered include: health informatics research, literature, and evaluation; precision medicine; decision models; computerized decision support systems; data mining, natural language processing, social media, rule-based system, and other emerging technologies for supporting 'Big Data' applications; security for health care information handling. Lectures, readings, and exercises highlight the intersections of these topics with current information technology for clinical care and research. prereq: Junior, senior, grad student, professional student, or instr consent
FSOS 8105 - Family Gerontology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Integrates gerontology and family studies; new lines of inquiry, qualitative and quantitative, into aging families. Family gerontological research, family relationships, family and long-term care institutions, theoretical frameworks and research methods, and research and interventions. prereq: 4154 or equiv or instr consent
PUBH 6904 - Nutrition and Aging
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Current literature on nutrition needs/factors affecting nutritional status of adults and the elderly. Relevant community resources. prereq: Grad student or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 8803 - Long-Term Care: Principles, Programs, and Policies
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Long-term care policy for functionally impaired persons, particularly the elderly. Team taught from healthcare and social services perspective; grounded in research literature on evidence of program effects. Innovative programs addressing current fragmentation of services. prereq: Grad-level health-care policy course or instr consent
SW 5810 - Seminar: Special Topics
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course provides an understanding of basic methods and tools used by epidemiologists to study the health of populations.
PUBH 6341 - Epidemiologic Methods I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6320PubH /6341
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to epidemiologic concepts and methods: (1) Study design (randomized trials and observational studies); (2) Measures of exposure-disease association; (3) Casual inference and bias; (4) Confounding and effect modification.
PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory/application of survey research in data collection. Sampling, item development, instrument design/administration to conduct survey or be aware of issues related to design/implementation. Identification of sources of error in survey research.
PUBH 7250 - Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Interactive, intensive overview of focus group procedures for public/non-profit environments. Practical approaches to determining appropriate use of focus groups. Design options, developing questions, recruiting participants, moderating. Analyzing/reporting results.
PUBH 7251 - Data Analysis From Focus Groups
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Alternatives for capturing data in focus groups. Making sense out of data. Alternative analytic strategies. Emphasizes analysis that is systematic/verifiable.
EPSY 5245 - Advanced Survey Data Analysis for Categorical and Rating Scale Data
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Practical course. Specific nature of survey data (typically categorical or ordinal). Appropriate data analytic methods. prereq: 5244, 5261
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
General linear model used as context for regression. Matrix algebra, multiple regression, path analysis, polynomial regression, standardized regression, stepwise solutions, analysis of variance, weighted least squares, logistic regression. prereq: [8252 or equiv], regression/ANOVA course, familiarity with statistical analysis package
EPSY 8265 - Factor Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [8252 or equiv or #]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Factor analytic techniques/applications. Component, common factor, confirmatory analysis. Factor extraction, estimating number of dimensions. Rotation, factor scores, hierarchical factor analysis. prereq: [8252 or equiv or instr consent]
EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Quantitative techniques using manifest/latent variable approaches for analysis of educational/social science data. Introduction to structural equation modeling approaches to multiple regression, factor analysis, path modeling. Developing, estimating, interpreting structural equation models. prereq: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual framework of hierarchical linear models for nested data, their application in educational research. Nature/effects of nested data, logic of hierarchical models, mixed-effects models. Estimation/hypothesis testing in these models, model-checking, nonlinear models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
NURS 6110 - Epidemiology in Nursing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
For nurses in advanced practice and leadership positions to utilize basic epidemiological principles in assessing determinants of health and their outcomes in populations. Application of epidemiological concepts to nursing.
NURS 7202 - Moral and Ethical Positions and Actions in Nursing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative ethics and theoretical underpinnings for positions taken. Implications for subsequent action. Morally defensible positions on health-related issues, corresponding actions from perspective of nursing.
CSPH 5101 - Introduction to Integrative Healing Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Cultural contexts of healing traditions. Integrative therapies presented by practitioners, including traditional Chinese medicine, meditation, mind-body healing, spiritual practices, energy healing, naturopathy, herbalism, movement therapies, homeopathy, manual therapies, nutrition. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student; or instructor consent
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cultural contexts explored through field-trip immersion experiences. Aspects of different health care systems. Indigenous North American, Vedic, traditional Chinese, biomedicine. Writing assignment. prereq: [Jr, Sr, or grad student standing], instr consent
CSPH 5303 - Pain Management and Evidence Based Complementary Health Approaches
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will cover the evidence regarding effectiveness and safety of CIH practices, and the relationship of CIH to contemporary views of pain, health, and healing. There is a growing evidence base to support some complementary and integrative healing (CIH) approaches for pain management including yoga, mindfulness meditation, chiropractic, and others. In the US, chronic pain impacts over one third of the population and affects more individuals than heart disease, diabetes, and cancer combined. While there is a wide range of conventional medical treatments available to manage pain, many are only marginally effective and are associated with troublesome side effects. Of growing concerns is the endemic problem of opioids associated with misuse, addiction, and fatal overdose. Pain sufferers and health providers need effective and safe options for pain management. Some complementary and integrative healing (CIH) approaches have a growing evidence base to support their use, particularly for pain management. This course will introduce students to the theories, mechanisms, use, effectiveness, and safety of commonly used complementary and integrative healing practices. The relationship of CIH approaches to contemporary views and research regarding pain, health and healing, and placebo effects will also be explored. Through reading, reflection, discussion, and critical appraisal, students will develop the necessary skills to synthesize different forms of information, including research, to reach evidence-informed and balanced conclusions regarding CIH for managing pain, restoring function, and enhancing overall health and wellbeing. CIH approaches covered will include: whole systems (Traditional Chinese Medicine, osteopathy, chiropractic, Ayurvedic Medicine, etc.); mind-body practices (contemplative and meditative practices; yoga, tai chi, Qigong, etc.); manipulative and body-based approaches (massage therapy, acupuncture, manipulation); and energy-based approaches (energy medicine, Reiki, therapeutic touch, healing touch). Upon completion of the course, students will have a foundational knowledge of CIH for pain management and the skills to critically appraise and determine the trustworthiness of different information sources. Prerequisite: Graduate or Professional program student.
CSPH 5513 - Living Well, Dying Well: Empowering Patient Communication at the End of Life
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will learn how to provide compassionate and effective care at the end of life, including appropriate communication with patients, families, and healthcare providers at crucial points of care. Students will also explore their own perspectives about end of life and learn the importance of self-care. The course will help students reframe end-of-life care from a focus on medical death to an emphasis on humane dying through reflection on values, hopes, and plans. Students will learn to support individuals through personal connection and the sharing of narratives and wisdom.
CSPH 5711 - Optimal Healing Environments
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development/implementation of optimal healing environments. Evidence base supporting structural, architectural, human, and care processes. Emphasizes identifying models of optimal healing environments and leadership strategies that support diffusion of innovation. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
CSPH 5806 - Wellbeing and Resiliency for Health Professionals
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will teach health professional students and health professionals self-care strategies that will improve their individual wellbeing and reduce the stress and burnout often experienced in these professions. Improving individual wellbeing will also contribute to greater wellbeing in the teams and systems in which these professionals work.
CSPH 5115 - Cultural Awareness, Knowledge and Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How knowledge can become resource for individual, family, community health. Interactive glimpse of wisdom of cultural communities. Develop capacity to see culture within professional education/practice. Cultural constructs underpinning medical system, role of culture in interaction between practitioner/patient, role of reconnection to cultural heritage in healing. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
CSPH 5118 - Whole Person, Whole Community: The Reciprocity of Wellbeing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores the symbiotic and reciprocal relationship between individual and community health and wellbeing, as well as the many factors/forces which influence that relationship. Drawing upon recent studies in the area of reciprocal/symbiotic effects between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing, this course will include the following core topics: definitions of community and related dimensions of wellbeing, importance of Individual/Community reciprocity (Social Justice, Equity, Safety, and Trust), historical trauma and healing, and individual action and personal empowerment in community transformation. Utilizing elements of the Center for Spirituality & Healing's Wellbeing model and modes of contemplative practice, this course will ultimately assist learners through phases of individual reflection and mindfulness for the purpose of creating more open and reciprocal relationships with entities they describe as their communities. An extension of recent studies in the area of the reciprocal (or rippling) effect between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing this course will guide individuals in identifying the various communities in which they live or participate, the roles they "play" within those communities and why/ how this knowledge can help prepare them for action and leadership. Main themes of the course will include: - Mindfulness, Reflection and Healing: Historical Trauma and Marginalization. - Roles and Reciprocity: Justice, Equity, Security and Trust between individuals and their communities. - Transformation: Individual Action/Leadership as Bridge between Personal and Community Wellbeing.
CSPH 5305 - Introduction to Integrative Mental Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Prerequisite: Graduate or Professional student. This course focuses on introducing students to the concept of integrative mental health (IMH). Definitions of IMH, the history and background of the concept, and how it relates to psychiatric care and health care in general will be explored. Students will explore and practice risk-benefit profiles of different modalities in the context of evidence-based mental health care. An emphasis will be placed on the connection between physical and mental health and how that can be approached from an integrative perspective. Topics such as mindfulness and mental health, nutrition and mental health, herbs and supplements in psychiatric care, and the role of functional medicine in IMH will be covered, as well as how psychotherapy and psychotropic medications fit in the IMH framework. Students will review the current diagnostic system for mental health disorders and that can both help and hinder an integrative approach to mental health care. Integrative approaches for assessing mental health concerns will be reviewed, and how to use these approaches alongside a traditional medical approach for maximum benefit will be explored. Students will further review specific modalities for mental health and wellbeing that are less focused on specific systems and more focused on holism and the interplay of systems. Students will also identity and explore different ways of viewing mental health and wellbeing based on cultural and geographical issues, and how these may impact the approaches.