Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Plant Pathology M.S.

Plant Pathology
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Department of Plant Pathology, 495 Borlaug Hall, 1991 Buford Circle, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (612-625-8200)
  • Program Type: Master's
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Length of program in credits: 30
  • This program requires summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Master of Science
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
Plant pathology focuses on the biology of plant-microbe interactions, and incorporates research involving biochemical, molecular, genetic, physiological, whole organism, population, and community levels of biological organization. Plant pathology interfaces with all plant science disciplines, and with many other fields including food sciences, veterinary medicine, biobased products, and ecology. Areas of concentration include molecular plant pathology (offered as a special emphasis), plant disease management, biological control of plant disease, forest pathology and microbial degradation of wood, microbial ecology, population biology, plant-microbe interactions, disease resistance, host-parasite coevolution, plant microbe mutualisms, and virology. Students have opportunities for laboratory and field research locally, as well as nationally and internationally. The course of study varies with the requirements for the area of concentration and interests of the student. Students who choose the emphasis in molecular plant pathology enhance their ability to design and use molecular approaches to investigate plant disease, increase basic knowledge, and develop new strategies for disease control.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.50.
Master's degree applicants must have a sound college background in the basic biological and physical sciences and mathematics.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Applicants must have completed 35 semester credits in biology with at least one course in each of the following areas: botany, zoology, genetics, plant physiology, and microbiology. Applicants must also have completed at least one course each in inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and physics. If deficiencies exist in the prerequisites, students must correct them during the first year of the graduate program. These courses cannot be counted as part of the degree program. All students accepted into the department with a BS degree are admitted into the MS program. After a minimum of two semesters, students who qualify may elect to change their degree status to the PhD program. Criteria for the change include scholastic standing, potential for success in completing a PhD, and writing competency.
Special Application Requirements:
GRE scores are required for all students and TOEFL or IELTS scores are required for international students. A clearly written statement of career interests as well as three letters of recommendation are required of all students. Students may apply at any time; however, submission of all application materials by December 10 will ensure priority consideration for fellowships and research assistantships for the next academic year. Students can be admitted any semester.
Applicants must submit their test score(s) from the following:
  • GRE
    • General Test - Verbal Reasoning: 153
    • General Test - Quantitative Reasoning: 148
    • General Test - Analytical Writing: 4.5
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 79
    • Internet Based - Writing Score: 21
    • Internet Based - Reading Score: 19
    • Paper Based - Total Score: 550
  • IELTS
    • Total Score: 6.5
The preferred English language test is Test of English as Foreign Language.
Key to test abbreviations (GRE, TOEFL, IELTS).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Plan A: Plan A requires 14 major credits, 6 credits outside the major, and 10 thesis credits. The final exam is oral.
Plan B: Plan B requires 24 major credits and 6 credits outside the major. The final exam is oral. A capstone project is required.
Capstone Project:The Plan B option requires one to three projects, determined and approved by the advisor and director of graduate studies, totaling approximately 120 hours of work.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
A minimum GPA of 2.80 is required for students to remain in good standing.
At least 2 semesters must be completed before filing a Degree Program Form.
All students: Students must enroll in a credit or non-credit teaching methods seminar or workshop, chosen in consultation with the advisor and director of graduate studies. Regular attendance at weekly plant pathology seminars is expected. Internships are encouraged as part of of the graduate experience. Financial support for international or domestic internships is available on a competitive basis. Take PLPA 5480 (3 credits), if an introductory plant pathology course has not previously been taken.
Required Coursework
Take all of the following courses. Take PLPA 8005 (S-N grade basis) for 2 credits for completing a one-semester teaching experience. Consult with the advisor and director of graduate studies regarding the additional teaching methods seminar/workshop requirement. These credits count toward the major credit requirement.
PLPA 5480 - Principles of Plant Pathology (3.0 cr)
PLPA 8123 - Research Ethics in Plant and Environmental Sciences (0.5 cr)
PLPA 8200 - Plant Pathology Seminar (1.0 cr)
PLPA 8005 - Supervised Classroom or Extension Teaching Experience (1.0-2.0 cr)
PLPA 8104 - Plant Virology (2.0 cr)
PLPA 8105 - Plant Bacteriology (3.0 cr)
Plant Pathology Electives
Select at least 5 credits from the following course list in consultation with the director of graduate studies, advisor, and graduate advisory committee.
Take 5 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PLPA 5003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 5202 - Field Plant Pathology (2.0 cr)
· PLPA 5203 - Introduction to Fungal Biology (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 5300 - Current Topics in Molecular Plant Pathology (1.0 cr)
· PLPA 5301 - Large Scale Omic Data in Plant Biology (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 5444 - Ecology, Epidemiology, and Evolutionary Biology of Plant-Microbe Interactions (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 5660 - Plant Disease Resistance and Applications (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 8103 - Plant-Microbe Interactions (3.0 cr)
Outside Coursework
Take at least 6 credits outside the major. Select courses in consultation with the advisor, director of graduate studies, and advisory committee. Suggested courses include the following:
AGRO 8241 - Chromosomal and Molecular Genetics of Plant Improvement (3.0 cr)
EEB 5221 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
GCD 5036 - Molecular Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
BIOC 5361 - Microbial Genomics and Bioinformatics (3.0 cr)
Thesis Credits or Capstone Project Credits
Plan A students must take 10 credits of PLPA 8777. Plan B students must take 10 credits of PLPA 8300.
Thesis Credits
Plan A students take 10 credits of PLPA 8777.
Take 10 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PLPA 8777 - Thesis Credits: Master's (1.0-18.0 cr)
or Plan B students take 10 credits of PLPA 8300.
Take 10 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PLPA 8300 - Plant Pathology Project (1.0-6.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
A sub-plan is not required for this program.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
Molecular Plant Pathology
This sub-plan is limited to students completing the program under Plan A.
Students in the molecular plant pathology track complete specialized coursework that emphasizes molecular approaches to investigating plant diseases, increase their knowledge of basic science, and explore emerging strategies for disease control. Students in the molecular plant pathology track will learn about topics such as pathogen effectomics, plant phenomics, molecular plant/microbe interactions, and an ever-evolving array of molecular research techniques, strategies, and analytical approaches. At the same time, students will garner a comprehensive understanding of plant interactions with pathogenic and non-pathogenic microbes from a systems level, building a firm knowledge base of classical and contemporary plant pathology concepts. Students completing the molecular plant pathology track will be well positioned for research careers in molecular plant pathology in academia, industry, and government.
Take all of the following courses. Take PLPA 8005 (S-N grade basis) for 2 credits for completing a one-semester teaching experience. Consult with the advisor and director of graduate studies regarding the additional teaching methods seminar/workshop requirement. These credits count toward the major credit requirement.
Molecular Plant Pathology
Take 14 - 20 credit(s) from the following:
Required Coursework
Minimum of 14 credits in plant pathology required.
· PLPA 5480 - Principles of Plant Pathology (3.0 cr)
PLPA 5300 - Current Topics in Molecular Plant Pathology (1.0 cr)
PLPA 8103 - Plant-Microbe Interactions (3.0 cr)
PLPA 8200 - Plant Pathology Seminar (1.0 cr)
PLPA 8123 - Research Ethics in Plant and Environmental Sciences (0.5 cr)
PLPA 8005 - Supervised Classroom or Extension Teaching Experience (1.0-2.0 cr)
· Outside Courswork
Take at least 6 course credits outside the major. Select courses in consultation with advisor, director of graduate studies, and advisory committee. Suggested courses include the following:
· AGRO 8241 - Chromosomal and Molecular Genetics of Plant Improvement (3.0 cr)
BIOC 5361 - Microbial Genomics and Bioinformatics (3.0 cr)
EEB 5221 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
GCD 5036 - Molecular Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
Plant Pathology Electives
Take elective credits from the following list, chosen in consultation with your advisor, director of graduate studies, and advisory committee to meet the 14-credit (Plan A) minimum major requirement.
Take at most 8 credit(s) from the following:
· PLPA 5003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 5444 - Ecology, Epidemiology, and Evolutionary Biology of Plant-Microbe Interactions (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 5660 - Plant Disease Resistance and Applications (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 5202 - Field Plant Pathology (2.0 cr)
· PLPA 5203 - Introduction to Fungal Biology (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 5301 - Large Scale Omic Data in Plant Biology (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 8104 - Plant Virology (2.0 cr)
· PLPA 8105 - Plant Bacteriology (3.0 cr)
 
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· College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences

View future requirement(s):
· Fall 2022
· Fall 2021
· Spring 2021
· Fall 2020

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PLPA 5480 - Principles of Plant Pathology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is intended for graduate students and undergraduate students in their third or fourth year that are interested in learning about principles of plant pathology, diseases that affect plants, microbiology and microbial and plant interactions. In this course students will learn principles of plant pathology through lectures and demonstrations and exercises in laboratory. Students will gain knowledge of mycology and select diseases caused by fungi within Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and the fungal-like Oomycota. Diseases caused by bacteria, nematodes, viruses, parasitic plants and abiotic damage are also examined. Lectures will include information concerning the history and importance of plant pathology, mycology, bacteriology, nematology, virology, infection process, genetics of host and microorganism interactions, epidemiology of diseases and disease control strategies. In the hands-on laboratory period the student will learn laboratory skills, gain experience using the microscope, work with microorganisms, learn diagnostic skills, and be able to recognize 30 plant diseases. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
PLPA 8123 - Research Ethics in Plant and Environmental Sciences
Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Course Equivalencies: APSc/PBio/PlPa/Soil 8123
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
History/values relating to research/scholarship. Social responsibility, reporting misconduct. Authorship. Plagiarism. Peer review. Copyright, intellectual property. Conflicts of interest. Research data management. Fiscal responsibility/management. Environmental health/safety. Research involving humans/animals. Mentorship. Presentations by faculty, invited speakers. Meets during first seven weeks of spring semester. prereq: Enrolled in a plant/environmental grad research program
PLPA 8200 - Plant Pathology Seminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Students enrolled in PlPa 8200 will gain experience and expertise in the area of oral scientific communication. Through participation in a regular departmental seminar series, students will be exposed to a variety of seminar preparation and presentation techniques. Working one-on-one with a Seminar Advisor and the course Instructor, students will select and appropriately define a seminar topic, identify pertinent literature, prepare an effective abstract, and prepare and present a public seminar on the selected topic. Students will further interact with classmates and other participants in the departmental seminar series through public question and answer periods and by moderating individual seminar sessions. PlPA 8200 will be conducted in hybrid format, providing opportunities for in person and online (Zoom) participation in a synchronous manner.
PLPA 8005 - Supervised Classroom or Extension Teaching Experience
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Teaching experience in Plant Pathology. Discussions about effective teaching to strengthen skills and develop a personal teaching philosophy. prereq: instr consent
PLPA 8104 - Plant Virology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Characteristics, biology, epidemiology, and control of plant diseases caused by viruses. prereq: 5480
PLPA 8105 - Plant Bacteriology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bacteria interact with plants in various ways depending upon environmental conditions, nutrient status, and host plant genotypes. The outcome of these interactions can result in the plant associated bacteria being pathogens, or mutualists. In the Plant Bacteriology course, we will examine several bacterial diseases in-depth to understand the disease cycles, epidemiology, mechanisms of pathogenesis, beneficial microbes, and means of disease control. The laboratory section will focus on techniques used to identify bacteria, for inoculating plants, isolating bacteria from plant material, and methods to understand the plant-bacterial interactions. The first hour of most class sessions will consist primarily of lectures by the instructor followed by group discussion of assigned readings. Laboratory sessions will occur for 90 minutes and are designed to illustrate concepts presented during the lecture/discussion sessions. prereq: 5480
PLPA 5003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides an overview of tree diseases in urban and forested areas. It covers diseases that have had a significant impact on society such as Dutch Elm disease; oak wilt, chestnut blight, white pine blister rust, sudden oak death and many others. It also provides an overview of important cankers, leaf diseases, wilts, rusts, root rots and other tree problems. Laboratory sessions enable students to get hands-on experience identifying disease agents, examining symptoms and learning appropriate control procedures. Emphasis will also be placed on ecological processes, biological and cultural control, and host-parasite interactions. This course should be of value to anyone interested in biological sciences, natural resources or ecology. It is a must or individuals that will have a career in natural resources but should also be useful to those interested in maintaining healthy trees at home, in urban areas or woodlands. Alumni of the University working with trees or woody ornamentals indicate this is one of the most important courses you can take as a student.
PLPA 5202 - Field Plant Pathology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Characteristics of a variety of plant diseases. Field trips to observe symptoms and effects of diseases, and to learn about prevention and control of diseases in field, forest, golf course, greenhouse, nursery, orchard, and urban environments.
PLPA 5203 - Introduction to Fungal Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Fungi are a critical component of the diversity and function of terrestrial ecosystems, affecting decomposition, plant nutrient uptake, and agricultural practices. Key components of fungal biology, including ecology, genetics, life cycles and diversity. Labs provide hands on experience with a diverse range of organisms. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
PLPA 5300 - Current Topics in Molecular Plant Pathology
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current Topics in Molecular Plant Pathology is a highly interactive class in which students read, discuss, and critique pivotal publications in the field of molecular plant pathology. Specific topics will change from year to year, but will generally include subjects such as plant-microbe communication, diversity and evolution of plant-microbe associations, genomic analysis of pathogens (symbionts) and plant host responses, and mechanisms of pathogenicity. prereq: Introductory courses in plant pathology or microbiology; genetics; molecular biology or genomics; or consent of instructor
PLPA 5301 - Large Scale Omic Data in Plant Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to large scale data in plant biology. Emphasizes model plants and important agricultural crops focusing on new approaches and technologies in the field. Fundamentals, acquisition, and analysis of high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing, high-throughput plant phenotyping, functional and comparative genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and microbiomics. prereq: Intro course in genetics or instr consent
PLPA 5444 - Ecology, Epidemiology, and Evolutionary Biology of Plant-Microbe Interactions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts and recent research in the ecology, epidemiology, and evolutionary/coevolutionary biology of plant-microbe interactions spanning the range from parasitic to mutualistic in agricultural and natural habitats. prereq: Intro plant pathology or advanced biology coursework recommended
PLPA 5660 - Plant Disease Resistance and Applications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamentals of disease resistance in plants and the genetics of host-parasite interactions as they relate to the sustainable control of plant diseases. Examples explored at the Mendelian, populational, and molecular level of organization. prereq: 2001, BIOL 4003
PLPA 8103 - Plant-Microbe Interactions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Genetics, physiology, and molecular biology of plant-microbe interactions. Communication between plants/microbes. Signal transduction, control of gene expression, symbiosis/parasitism, plant host response mechanisms, plant disease physiology. prereq: Intro course in plant pathology or molecular biology or equiv
AGRO 8241 - Chromosomal and Molecular Genetics of Plant Improvement
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Mixture of classic/current info in molecular plant genetics, biotech, and genomics. Students devise experiments in breeding, genetics, genomics, physiology, cellular/molecular biology, and other areas. prereq: Introductory Genetics course
GCD 5036 - Molecular Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis of dynamic cellular activities at the molecular level in cell biological fields that are experiencing new research advances not yet reflected in textbooks. Significant emphasis is placed on understanding the experimental basis of our current knowledge of cellular processes through analysis of scientific papers. Project and presentation-based assessments of learning outcomes. prereq: BIOL 4004 or GCD 4005W or grad
BIOC 5361 - Microbial Genomics and Bioinformatics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to genomics. Emphasizes microbial genomics. Sequencing methods, sequence analysis, genomics databases, genome mapping, prokaryotic horizontal gene transfer, genomics in biotechnology, intellectual property issues. Hands-on introduction to UNIX shell scripting, genomic data analysis using R and Excel in a computer lab setting. prereq: College-level courses in [organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology]
PLPA 8777 - Thesis Credits: Master's
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 50.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required [Plan A only]
PLPA 8300 - Plant Pathology Project
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 24.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Laboratory or library projects for Plan B master's students in plant pathology.
PLPA 5480 - Principles of Plant Pathology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is intended for graduate students and undergraduate students in their third or fourth year that are interested in learning about principles of plant pathology, diseases that affect plants, microbiology and microbial and plant interactions. In this course students will learn principles of plant pathology through lectures and demonstrations and exercises in laboratory. Students will gain knowledge of mycology and select diseases caused by fungi within Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and the fungal-like Oomycota. Diseases caused by bacteria, nematodes, viruses, parasitic plants and abiotic damage are also examined. Lectures will include information concerning the history and importance of plant pathology, mycology, bacteriology, nematology, virology, infection process, genetics of host and microorganism interactions, epidemiology of diseases and disease control strategies. In the hands-on laboratory period the student will learn laboratory skills, gain experience using the microscope, work with microorganisms, learn diagnostic skills, and be able to recognize 30 plant diseases. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
PLPA 5300 - Current Topics in Molecular Plant Pathology
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current Topics in Molecular Plant Pathology is a highly interactive class in which students read, discuss, and critique pivotal publications in the field of molecular plant pathology. Specific topics will change from year to year, but will generally include subjects such as plant-microbe communication, diversity and evolution of plant-microbe associations, genomic analysis of pathogens (symbionts) and plant host responses, and mechanisms of pathogenicity. prereq: Introductory courses in plant pathology or microbiology; genetics; molecular biology or genomics; or consent of instructor
PLPA 8103 - Plant-Microbe Interactions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Genetics, physiology, and molecular biology of plant-microbe interactions. Communication between plants/microbes. Signal transduction, control of gene expression, symbiosis/parasitism, plant host response mechanisms, plant disease physiology. prereq: Intro course in plant pathology or molecular biology or equiv
PLPA 8200 - Plant Pathology Seminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Students enrolled in PlPa 8200 will gain experience and expertise in the area of oral scientific communication. Through participation in a regular departmental seminar series, students will be exposed to a variety of seminar preparation and presentation techniques. Working one-on-one with a Seminar Advisor and the course Instructor, students will select and appropriately define a seminar topic, identify pertinent literature, prepare an effective abstract, and prepare and present a public seminar on the selected topic. Students will further interact with classmates and other participants in the departmental seminar series through public question and answer periods and by moderating individual seminar sessions. PlPA 8200 will be conducted in hybrid format, providing opportunities for in person and online (Zoom) participation in a synchronous manner.
PLPA 8123 - Research Ethics in Plant and Environmental Sciences
Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Course Equivalencies: APSc/PBio/PlPa/Soil 8123
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
History/values relating to research/scholarship. Social responsibility, reporting misconduct. Authorship. Plagiarism. Peer review. Copyright, intellectual property. Conflicts of interest. Research data management. Fiscal responsibility/management. Environmental health/safety. Research involving humans/animals. Mentorship. Presentations by faculty, invited speakers. Meets during first seven weeks of spring semester. prereq: Enrolled in a plant/environmental grad research program
PLPA 8005 - Supervised Classroom or Extension Teaching Experience
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Teaching experience in Plant Pathology. Discussions about effective teaching to strengthen skills and develop a personal teaching philosophy. prereq: instr consent
AGRO 8241 - Chromosomal and Molecular Genetics of Plant Improvement
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Mixture of classic/current info in molecular plant genetics, biotech, and genomics. Students devise experiments in breeding, genetics, genomics, physiology, cellular/molecular biology, and other areas. prereq: Introductory Genetics course
BIOC 5361 - Microbial Genomics and Bioinformatics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to genomics. Emphasizes microbial genomics. Sequencing methods, sequence analysis, genomics databases, genome mapping, prokaryotic horizontal gene transfer, genomics in biotechnology, intellectual property issues. Hands-on introduction to UNIX shell scripting, genomic data analysis using R and Excel in a computer lab setting. prereq: College-level courses in [organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology]
GCD 5036 - Molecular Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis of dynamic cellular activities at the molecular level in cell biological fields that are experiencing new research advances not yet reflected in textbooks. Significant emphasis is placed on understanding the experimental basis of our current knowledge of cellular processes through analysis of scientific papers. Project and presentation-based assessments of learning outcomes. prereq: BIOL 4004 or GCD 4005W or grad
PLPA 5003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides an overview of tree diseases in urban and forested areas. It covers diseases that have had a significant impact on society such as Dutch Elm disease; oak wilt, chestnut blight, white pine blister rust, sudden oak death and many others. It also provides an overview of important cankers, leaf diseases, wilts, rusts, root rots and other tree problems. Laboratory sessions enable students to get hands-on experience identifying disease agents, examining symptoms and learning appropriate control procedures. Emphasis will also be placed on ecological processes, biological and cultural control, and host-parasite interactions. This course should be of value to anyone interested in biological sciences, natural resources or ecology. It is a must or individuals that will have a career in natural resources but should also be useful to those interested in maintaining healthy trees at home, in urban areas or woodlands. Alumni of the University working with trees or woody ornamentals indicate this is one of the most important courses you can take as a student.
PLPA 5444 - Ecology, Epidemiology, and Evolutionary Biology of Plant-Microbe Interactions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts and recent research in the ecology, epidemiology, and evolutionary/coevolutionary biology of plant-microbe interactions spanning the range from parasitic to mutualistic in agricultural and natural habitats. prereq: Intro plant pathology or advanced biology coursework recommended
PLPA 5660 - Plant Disease Resistance and Applications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamentals of disease resistance in plants and the genetics of host-parasite interactions as they relate to the sustainable control of plant diseases. Examples explored at the Mendelian, populational, and molecular level of organization. prereq: 2001, BIOL 4003
PLPA 5202 - Field Plant Pathology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Characteristics of a variety of plant diseases. Field trips to observe symptoms and effects of diseases, and to learn about prevention and control of diseases in field, forest, golf course, greenhouse, nursery, orchard, and urban environments.
PLPA 5203 - Introduction to Fungal Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Fungi are a critical component of the diversity and function of terrestrial ecosystems, affecting decomposition, plant nutrient uptake, and agricultural practices. Key components of fungal biology, including ecology, genetics, life cycles and diversity. Labs provide hands on experience with a diverse range of organisms. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
PLPA 5301 - Large Scale Omic Data in Plant Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to large scale data in plant biology. Emphasizes model plants and important agricultural crops focusing on new approaches and technologies in the field. Fundamentals, acquisition, and analysis of high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing, high-throughput plant phenotyping, functional and comparative genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and microbiomics. prereq: Intro course in genetics or instr consent
PLPA 8104 - Plant Virology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Characteristics, biology, epidemiology, and control of plant diseases caused by viruses. prereq: 5480
PLPA 8105 - Plant Bacteriology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bacteria interact with plants in various ways depending upon environmental conditions, nutrient status, and host plant genotypes. The outcome of these interactions can result in the plant associated bacteria being pathogens, or mutualists. In the Plant Bacteriology course, we will examine several bacterial diseases in-depth to understand the disease cycles, epidemiology, mechanisms of pathogenesis, beneficial microbes, and means of disease control. The laboratory section will focus on techniques used to identify bacteria, for inoculating plants, isolating bacteria from plant material, and methods to understand the plant-bacterial interactions. The first hour of most class sessions will consist primarily of lectures by the instructor followed by group discussion of assigned readings. Laboratory sessions will occur for 90 minutes and are designed to illustrate concepts presented during the lecture/discussion sessions. prereq: 5480