Twin Cities campus

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Twin Cities Campus

Animal Sciences Ph.D.

Animal Science
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Department of Animal Science, 305 Haecker Hall, 1364 Eckles Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (612-624-3491; fax: 612-625-5789)
  • Program Type: Doctorate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Length of program in credits: 48
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Doctor of Philosophy
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The Animal Science PhD program concentrates on one of the animal sciences emphasis areas: genetics, nutrition, physiology, or production systems. Students have the option of tailoring their program to include study in more than one emphasis area and to emphasize basic or applied science.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.00.
A bachelor's degree in agriculture or a biological field with training in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics is required.
A masters degree in agriculture or a biological field is required.
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 79
    • Internet Based - Writing Score: 21
    • Internet Based - Reading Score: 19
    • Paper Based - Total Score: 550
  • IELTS
    • Total Score: 6.5
  • MELAB
    • Final score: 80
The preferred English language test is Test of English as Foreign Language.
Key to test abbreviations (TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
24 credits are required in the major.
24 thesis credits are required.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses toward program requirements is permitted under certain conditions with adviser approval.
A minimum GPA of 3.00 is required for students to remain in good standing.
At least 1 semesters must be completed before filing a Degree Program Form.
No more than 7 credits may be 4000 level courses.
Ethics Course (.5 to 3 credits)
Select 1 course from the following in consultation with the advisor:
ANSC 5091 - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans (3.0 cr)
ANSC 8134 - Ethical Conduct of Animal Research (3.0 cr)
APSC 8123 - Research Ethics in the Plant and Environmental Sciences (0.5 cr)
PLPA 8123 - Research Ethics in Plant and Environmental Sciences (0.5 cr)
SOIL 8123 - Research Ethics in the Plant and Environmental Sciences (0.5 cr)
WRS 8581 - Research and Professional Ethics in Water Resources and Environmental Science (0.5 cr)
Seminar (4 credits)
Take 1 credit of ANSC 8510 4 times.
ANSC 8510 - Graduate Seminar (1.0 cr)
Additional Coursework (17 to 20 credits)
Select from the following in consultation with the advisor. Other coursework may be applied to this requirement with advisor approval.
AGRO 5121 - Applied Experimental Design (4.0 cr)
AGRO 5321 - Ecology of Agricultural Systems (3.0 cr)
ANSC 5015 - Animal Welfare Science and Ethics (3.0 cr)
ANSC 5025 - Gut Microbiome Systems (3.0 cr)
ANSC 5035 - Animal Welfare Judging and Assessment (3.0 cr)
ANSC 5091 - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans (3.0 cr)
ANSC 5099 - Special Workshop in Animal Science (1.0-6.0 cr)
ANSC 5555 - Applied Livestock and Poultry Microbiology (2.0 cr)
ANSC 5625 - Nutritional Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
ANSC 5626 - Nutritional Physiology (3.0 cr)
ANSC 8011 - Applied Statistical Models and Analysis for Animal Science Professionals (3.0 cr)
ANSC 8134 - Ethical Conduct of Animal Research (3.0 cr)
ANSC 8211 - Animal Growth and Development (3.0 cr)
ANSC 8311 - Animal Bioenergetics (3.0 cr)
ANSC 8312 - Protein Metabolism (3.0 cr)
ANSC 8330 - Concepts and Developments in Animal Science (1.0-2.0 cr)
ANSC 8394 - Research in Animal Nutrition (1.0-3.0 cr)
ANSC 8594 - Research in Animal Science (1.0-3.0 cr)
ANSC 8990 - Curricular Practical Training (1.0 cr)
APEC 5031 - Methods of Economic Data Analysis (3.0 cr)
BIOC 6021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
BIOL 5272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
BIOL 8100 - Improvisation for Scientists (1.0 cr)
CMB 5915 - Essential Statistics for Life Sciences (3.0 cr)
CMB 8134 - Ethical Conduct of Animal Research (3.0 cr)
CMB 8560 - Research and Literature Reports (1.0 cr)
CMB 8910 - Statistical Principles of Research Design (3.0 cr)
EEB 5042 - Quantitative Genetics (3.0 cr)
FSCN 5122 - Food Fermentations and Biotechnology (2.0 cr)
FSCN 5123 - Molecular Biology for Applied Scientists (1.0 cr)
FSCN 5312 - Food Analysis (4.0 cr)
FSCN 5481 - Sensory Evaluation of Food Quality (2.0 cr)
GCD 8131 - Advanced Molecular Genetics and Genomics (3.0 cr)
GCD 8161 - Advanced Cell Biology and Development (2.0 cr)
MICE 5035 - Personal Microbiome Analysis (3.0 cr)
NR 5021 - Statistics for Agricultural and Natural Resource Professionals (3.0 cr)
NUTR 5622 - Vitamin and Mineral Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
NUTR 5625 - Nutritional Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
NUTR 5626 - Nutritional Physiology (3.0 cr)
NUTR 5627 - Nutritional and Food Toxicology (3.0 cr)
PMB 5111 - Microbial Physiology and Diversity (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6325 - Data Processing with PC-SAS (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6414 - Biostatistical Literacy (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6420 - Introduction to SAS Programming (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6450 - Biostatistics I (4.0 cr)
PUBH 6451 - Biostatistics II (4.0 cr)
PUBH 6636 - Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health Practice (2.0 cr)
VMED 5410 - Scientific Writing and Speaking (2.0 cr)
VMED 5915 - Essential Statistics for Life Sciences (3.0 cr)
VMED 8192 - Dairy Health Management: Critical Thinking (1.0 cr)
Thesis Credits
Take 24 doctoral thesis credits
ANSC 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral (1.0-24.0 cr)
 
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ANSC 5091 - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
You have a great research idea, now what? How do you turn your idea into a proposal? It has been said paraphrasing Edison, that innovation is one percent inspiration, ninety-nice percent perspiration. In this course, we will start with and inspiring idea and sweat our way to develop a research proposal. The students will go through a step-by-step process that starts choosing and defining a research idea, then proceeding to do literature reviews and to the development of hypothesis, aims, objectives and a research strategy. The aim of this course is to provide students with tools to understand the structure of scientific reports and proposals, literature searches and basic data interpretation. The student will learn about different research approaches and how to achieve consistency in their research projects. We will guide students in how to begin and develop a written research proposal that will satisfy the requirements of their advisers, institution and funding organizations. prereq: There are no prerequisites, however, having taken ANSC 3011 Statistics for Animal Science is desirable.
ANSC 8134 - Ethical Conduct of Animal Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 8134/CMB 8134/VMed 8134
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ethical considerations in use of animal subjects in agricultural, veterinary, and biomedical research. Federal, state, and University guidelines relating to proper conduct for acquisition/use of animals for laboratory, observational, epidemiological, and clinical research. Regulatory requirements, bases for what is deemed proper conduct. Societal impact on scientific investigations utilizing animal subjects. prereq: Grad student or prof school student or instr consent
APSC 8123 - Research Ethics in the Plant and Environmental Sciences
Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Course Equivalencies: APSc/PBio/PlPa/Soil 8123
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ethics training to graduate students enrolled in plant/environmental graduate research programs and fulfill requirement for training in responsible conduct of research.
PLPA 8123 - Research Ethics in Plant and Environmental Sciences
Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Course Equivalencies: APSc/PBio/PlPa/Soil 8123
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ethics training to graduate students enrolled in plant/environmental graduate research programs and fulfill requirement for training in responsible conduct of research. prereq: Enrolled in a plant/environmental grad research program
SOIL 8123 - Research Ethics in the Plant and Environmental Sciences
Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Course Equivalencies: APSc/PBio/PlPa/Soil 8123
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ethics training to graduate students enrolled in plant/environmental graduate research programs and fulfill requirement for training in responsible conduct of research.
WRS 8581 - Research and Professional Ethics in Water Resources and Environmental Science
Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Course Equivalencies: CE 8581/WRS 8581
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ethics of water resources science and environmental engineering research/practice. Societal responsibility, plagiarism, recording-keeping, authorship, confidentiality, conflicts of interest, professional relationships, fraud, reporting misconduct. Meets during first eight weeks of spring semester. prereq: [Environmental engineering or water resources science] grad student or instr consent
ANSC 8510 - Graduate Seminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Students attend seminars and lead a seminar, giving oral presentation of scientific data. Public speaking skills. Preparing visuals for scientific presentations. Audience critiques of presentations. prereq: instr consent
AGRO 5121 - Applied Experimental Design
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 5121/Ent 5121
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of sampling methodologies, experimental design, and statistical analyses. Methods/procedures in generating scientific hypotheses. Organizing, initiating, conducting, and analyzing scientific experiments using experimental designs and statistical procedures. prereq: Stat 5021 or equiv or instr consent
AGRO 5321 - Ecology of Agricultural Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/Ent 5321
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological approach to problems in agricultural systems. Formal methodologies of systems inquiry are developed/applied. prereq: [3xxx or above] course in [Agro or AnSc or Ent or Hort or PlPa or Soil] or instr consent
ANSC 5015 - Animal Welfare Science and Ethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 2015/AnSc5015
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This multidisciplinary course helps students develop an intellectual framework for understanding and interpreting issues involving animal welfare and ethics of animal use in agriculture, science and society.
ANSC 5025 - Gut Microbiome Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is primarily focused on providing conceptual and methodological tools to understand how diet and the gut microbiome converge to impact the physiological landscape of animals and humans, considering diet, host and microbiome as one highly integrated system. To that end, the course relies on concepts of data analysis, gastrointestinal microbiology, the breadth of scientific literature produced up to date and hands on experiences to immerse attendants in the ever-growing microbiome field and open them to consider a microbiome lens to address different research questions in their respective fields. The course emphasizes three main conceptual areas: 1. Compositional and functional organization of microbial communities in the mammalian gut: From cells to functional communities. 2. Dietary drivers of the mammalian gut microbiome: Nutritional Ecology in the mammalian gut 3. Host-microbiome interactions: Physiological impact of the mammalian gut microbiome Rather than memorizing these concepts, the course emphasizes the need to apply them to real life issues in animal and human nutrition and health. As such, recognizing these conceptual areas in context, and using them for problem solving in their respective research areas is the ultimate goal of the course. Undergraduate level course in microbiology and physiology are suggested to enroll in this course. Also, previous completion of statistics courses and familiarity with the R statistical interface and command line are recommended.
ANSC 5035 - Animal Welfare Judging and Assessment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced application of animal welfare science toward the assessment of real-life scenarios in agriculture, companion, and exotic animals. Top students will compete on the UMN team at the Intercollegiate Animal Welfare Judging and Assessment Competition held in November each year.
ANSC 5091 - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
You have a great research idea, now what? How do you turn your idea into a proposal? It has been said paraphrasing Edison, that innovation is one percent inspiration, ninety-nice percent perspiration. In this course, we will start with and inspiring idea and sweat our way to develop a research proposal. The students will go through a step-by-step process that starts choosing and defining a research idea, then proceeding to do literature reviews and to the development of hypothesis, aims, objectives and a research strategy. The aim of this course is to provide students with tools to understand the structure of scientific reports and proposals, literature searches and basic data interpretation. The student will learn about different research approaches and how to achieve consistency in their research projects. We will guide students in how to begin and develop a written research proposal that will satisfy the requirements of their advisers, institution and funding organizations. prereq: There are no prerequisites, however, having taken ANSC 3011 Statistics for Animal Science is desirable.
ANSC 5099 - Special Workshop in Animal Science
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Topics vary. See Class Schedule or department. Topics may use guest lectures/experts. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 5555 - Applied Livestock and Poultry Microbiology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This applied microbiology course is intended to provide theoretical basis and hands-on experience to students on major pathogenic bacteria colonizing livestock and domestic poultry. This course will provide skills to the students who seriously consider farm animal and poultry microbiology research and/or teaching in their careers. Pathogenic bacteria in livestock and poultry such as Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157: H7, and Salmonella, fungal microorganisms (Aspergillus), and beneficial microorganisms such as Lactobacillus, will be discussed. In addition, the course will introduce feed testing methods (Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) methodology), common antibacterials/antibiotics used for decontamination and disinfection, and the emerging alternatives to antibiotics with a perspective on bacterial antibiotic resistance. In a flipped class room format, the students will gather necessary information provided by the instructor, listen to short lectures on the methods and mechanisms, participate in demonstrations, and apply it in a typical BSL2 laboratory set up under supervision. All students should undergo BSL2 training prior to enrollment. Online training counts to approximately 5-6 hours. Not more than 4 students will be allowed for each session due to BSL2 pathogenic microbiology space restriction, access to RAR facilities, and some non-conventional microbiological methods. Special health conditions, pregnancy, and immunocompromised situations must be consulted with the instructor prior to enrollment. The students must obtain clearance from ROHC for their tetanus vaccination status.
ANSC 5625 - Nutritional Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Overview of biochemical molecules and pathways important in nutritional events. prereq: BIOC 3021 or instr consent
ANSC 5626 - Nutritional Physiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Whole body macronutrient metabolism as it relates to etiology of metabolic diseases. Signaling between tissues to control homeostasis. How dysregulation of crosstalk can lead to metabolic diseases. How diet, exercise, or starvation impact metabolism. Regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Designing/analyzing/interpreting research data.
ANSC 8011 - Applied Statistical Models and Analysis for Animal Science Professionals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed for graduate students in the applied agricultural, animal science, and related programs that require an understanding of applied statistical analysis and interpretation of research data. Students will learn central principles in sampling, experimental design, and statistical analysis. The course will have an intense focus on data analysis of research data with SAS software. By the end of the semester, students should be able to generate testable hypotheses, organize a work plan to collect research data, and analyze results using appropriate statistical procedures and SAS software. Prerequisites: STAT 3021 or 5021: Statistical Analysis or equivalent, or consent of instructors
ANSC 8134 - Ethical Conduct of Animal Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 8134/CMB 8134/VMed 8134
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ethical considerations in use of animal subjects in agricultural, veterinary, and biomedical research. Federal, state, and University guidelines relating to proper conduct for acquisition/use of animals for laboratory, observational, epidemiological, and clinical research. Regulatory requirements, bases for what is deemed proper conduct. Societal impact on scientific investigations utilizing animal subjects. prereq: Grad student or prof school student or instr consent
ANSC 8211 - Animal Growth and Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Whole body growth of animals, bone, and adipose tissue; structure, function, differentiation, and development of tissues; mode of action of hormones, growth factors, and growth promoters. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 8311 - Animal Bioenergetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Integrated systems approach to energy metabolism of animals. Application of classical techniques of calorimetry and comparative slaughter. Development of systems for expressing energy content of feeds, and techniques for measuring whole body and organ metabolism of specific nutrients. prereq: instr consent; BIOC 4331 recommended
ANSC 8312 - Protein Metabolism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Basic and applied concepts of protein metabolism in farm animals. prereq: BioC 4331
ANSC 8330 - Concepts and Developments in Animal Science
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review, critical evaluation of recent research reports. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 8394 - Research in Animal Nutrition
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Research in selected areas: topics and animal species determined by consultation. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 8594 - Research in Animal Science
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Research including experimental studies in disciplines associated with animal production and research, with emphasis on interdisciplinary studies. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 8990 - Curricular Practical Training
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Industrial work assignment involving animal science. Review/approval by faculty member and director of graduate studies. Final report covering work assignment. prereq: AnSc grad student, dept consent
APEC 5031 - Methods of Economic Data Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The course introduces linear statistical economic (econometric) models with and without independent errors. It also introduces econometric models for analyzing discrete response variables, censored response variables, and non-random data samples. It shows how these econometric models can be used to evaluate and quantify theoretical relationships and forecast counterfactual economic outcomes. prereq: APEC 3001, Math 1142 or Math 1272, Stat 3001 or Sco 2550 or grad student or instructor consent
BIOC 6021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates. Metabolism, regulation of metabolism. Quantitative treatments of chemical equilibria, enzyme catalysis, and bioenergetics. Chemical basis of genetic information flow. prereq: general biology, organic chemistry, instr consent; intended for MBS students
BIOL 5272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended.
BIOL 8100 - Improvisation for Scientists
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This is a 7-week course designed to practice a wide array of strategies in order to gain awareness and control over your personal expression. Students will develop more effective ways to expand their ability to navigate the stress generally associated with delivering content in front of others. By learning how to manage their personal expression more effectively, students will be able to use specific tools in order to adapt their expression to various settings (large audiences, small groups, or one on one interviews/counseling). Adapting exercises from techniques such as improvisation and storytelling, this class will provide a comfortable and safe environment for students who want to expand their confidence when presenting for others.
CMB 5915 - Essential Statistics for Life Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a broad overview of the principles and methods of statistical analysis used in life sciences research, including biological, veterinary, and translational research, and provides the background a new researcher needs to understand and apply commonly used statistical methods and the preparation needed for more advanced coursework. Classes will include general instruction and background information, detailed examples of how to perform the analyses, with actual data sets, and discussion on how the topic has been applied in biological research, including reading and assessing papers in the field. Computing will be performed using the R software environment, though students may use alternate software with permission. Topics will include: Descriptive statistics and exploratory graphics Understanding statistical inference and interpreting P-values and confidence intervals. One and two sample inference, including t-tests, proportion tests, and non-parametric alternatives Linear regression, including the effects of confounders ANOVA methods, including pairwise comparisons and multiple comparisons
CMB 8134 - Ethical Conduct of Animal Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 8134/CMB 8134/VMed 8134
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ethical considerations in the use of animal subjects in agricultural, veterinary, and biomedical research. Federal, state, and University guidelines relating to proper conduct for acquisition and use of animals for laboratory, observational, epidemiological, and clinical research. Regulatory requirements. Bases for proper conduct. Societal impact on scientific investigations utilizing animal subjects.
CMB 8560 - Research and Literature Reports
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Current developments in cellular and molecular mechanisms of animal health and disease.
CMB 8910 - Statistical Principles of Research Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is a broad overview of the principles and techniques of research design and methods used in veterinary and translational research, and provides the background a new researcher needs to understand the literature and make good decisions about what is appropriate for their research. prereq: intro grad level stats course or it's equivalent
EEB 5042 - Quantitative Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamentals of quantitative genetics. Genetic/environmental influences on expression of quantitative traits. Approaches to characterizing genetic basis of trait variation. Processes that lead to change in quantitative traits. Applied/evolutionary aspects of quantitative genetic variation. prereq: [BIOL 4003 or GCD 3022] or instr consent; a course in statistics is recommended
FSCN 5122 - Food Fermentations and Biotechnology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major food fermentations important for today's food industry, with particular focus on microbiological components. Fermentations cover all major commodity food groups of dairy, cereal, meat, vegetables, fruits. prereq: MICB 3301, BIOL 4003
FSCN 5123 - Molecular Biology for Applied Scientists
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Half semester course. Two hours per week for 8 weeks. Basics of molecular biology/how it has been used for biotechnological applications. Origins of molecular biology from discovery of DNA as inheritance material within cells to advent of gene cloning/sequencing technologies. prereq: MicB 3301 or FScN 2021 or instr consent
FSCN 5312 - Food Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical tools needed for investigation in Food Science/Technology, whether by food industry, governmental agencies, or universities. Application of quantitative/ qualitative physical, chemical/instrumental methods used for analysis/examination of food constituents. Sensory evaluation techniques, evaluation of methods/interpretation of results. prereq: 4112, STAT 3011
FSCN 5481 - Sensory Evaluation of Food Quality
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Fundamentals of sensory perception. Test designs and methods in studying sensory qualities of foods. Issues in sensory evaluation. Group research project. prereq: 3102, STAT 3011
GCD 8131 - Advanced Molecular Genetics and Genomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Literature-based course in modern molecular genetic and genomic analysis. Students will gain a deep understanding of the fundamental molecular mechanisms controlling inheritance in biological systems. Students will gain a facility in thinking critically and creatively about how genes work at cellular, organismal, and transgenerational levels. Course instruction emphasizes active-learning approaches, student presentations, and group projects. prereq: [3022 or BIOL 4003], [BIOC 3021 or BIOC 4331] or instr consent
GCD 8161 - Advanced Cell Biology and Development
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The advanced cell and developmental biology of embryos, taught through in-depth, comparative analysis of historical and current primary research articles that illustrate developmental mechanisms and experimental approaches in key invertebrate and vertebrate model organisms. prereq:[BMBB or MCDBG grad student] or [GCD 4161, [GCD 8131 or Biol 4003], Biol 4004, and GCD 4034] or instr consent
MICE 5035 - Personal Microbiome Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Personal Microbiome Analysis, an introduction to the computational exploration and analysis of your inner microbial community, also known as your microbiome. In this course, you will have the opportunity to explore your own microbiome using visualization and analysis tools. Sequencing your own microbiome is encouraged but not required for the course. Introductory biology or genetics is recommended: BIOL 1009, GCD 3022 or BIOL 4003.
NR 5021 - Statistics for Agricultural and Natural Resource Professionals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/NR 5021/St
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed for graduate students in the agricultural, environmental, natural resources, and other related programs that require an understanding of statistics and applied quantitative research. Course content focuses on data analysis approaches using common statistical methods, e.g., probability and distributions, simple linear, multiple, and logistic regression, linear models, and analysis of variance. This course is completely online and asynchronous. prereq: College algebra or instructor consent
NUTR 5622 - Vitamin and Mineral Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutritional, biochemical, and physiological aspects of vitamins and essential minerals in human and experimental-animal models. prereq: BioC 3021, Phsl 3051, FSCN 4612
NUTR 5625 - Nutritional Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Overview of biochemical molecules and pathways important in nutritional events. prereq: BIOC 3021 or instr consent
NUTR 5626 - Nutritional Physiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Whole body macronutrient metabolism as it relates to etiology of metabolic diseases. Signaling between tissues to control homeostasis. How dysregulation of crosstalk can lead to metabolic diseases. How diet, exercise, or starvation impact metabolism. Regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Designing/analyzing/interpreting research data. prereq: NUTR 5625
NUTR 5627 - Nutritional and Food Toxicology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FScN 4622/Nutr 5627
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Toxic agents, organisms, and toxic effects that are important in the toxic events, with a focus on food toxicants and nutrient-toxicant interaction. prereq: BIOC 3021; designed for students majoring in [nutrition or food science or toxicology]
PMB 5111 - Microbial Physiology and Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4111/PMB 5111
Typically offered: Every Fall
Structural/functional organization of bacteria/archaea. Energy metabolism utilizing light, inorganic/organic chemicals. Cell morphologies, roles/assembly of surface structures. Growth/survival mechanisms in various extreme environments. Adaptation to changing conditions by development of specialized cells/structures, altering metabolic patterns.
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course provides an understanding of basic methods and tools used by epidemiologists to study the health of populations.
PUBH 6325 - Data Processing with PC-SAS
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to methods for transferring/processing existing data sources. Emphasizes hands-on approach to pre-statistical data processing and analysis with PC-SAS statistical software with a Microsoft Windows operating system.
PUBH 6414 - Biostatistical Literacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Develop ability to read/interpret statistical results in primary literature. Minimal calculation. No formal training in any statistical programming software. Biostatistical Literacy will cover the fundamental concepts of study design, descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, odds ratios, relative risks, adjusted models in multiple linear, logistic and Poisson regression, and survival analysis. The focus will be when to use a given method and how to interpret the results, not the actual computation or computer programming to obtain results from raw data. prereq: MPH or certificate student or environmental health or instr consent
PUBH 6420 - Introduction to SAS Programming
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
Use of SAS for analysis of biomedical data. Data manipulation/description. Basic statistical analyses (t-tests, chi-square, simple regression).
PUBH 6450 - Biostatistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will cover the fundamental concepts of exploratory data analysis and statistical inference for univariate and bivariate data, including: ? study design and sampling methods, ? descriptive and graphical summaries, ? random variables and their distributions, ? interval estimation, ? hypothesis testing, ? relevant nonparametric methods, ? simple regression/correlation, and ? introduction to multiple regression. There will be a focus on analyzing data using statistical programming software and on communicating the results in short reports. Health science examples from the research literature will be used throughout the course. prereq: [College-level algebra, health sciences grad student] or instr consent
PUBH 6451 - Biostatistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will cover more advanced aspects of statistical analysis methods with a focus on statistical modeling, including: ? two-way ANOVA, ? multiple linear regression, ? logistic regression, ? Poisson regression, ? log binomial and ordinal regression, ? survival analysis methods, including Kaplan-Meier analysis and proportional hazards (Cox) regression, ? power and sample size, and ? survey sampling and analysis. There will be a focus on analyzing data using statistical programming software and on communicating the results in short reports. Health science examples from the research literature will be used throughout the course. prereq: [PubH 6450 with grade of at least B, health sciences grad student] or instr consent
PUBH 6636 - Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health Practice
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Qualitative inquiry, selected data collection, management, analysis methods for qualitative research in public health. Current approaches to assess strength of evidence of qualitative studies in public health. Provision of practical skills that can be applied in public health settings.
VMED 5410 - Scientific Writing and Speaking
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Techniques of writing/publishing papers/theses. Manuscript preparation. Submission/review process. Proofreading. Publishing processes. Grant Writing. Oral/poster presentations at sceintific meetings. prereq: Grad student in health sciences
VMED 5915 - Essential Statistics for Life Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a broad overview of the principles and methods of statistical analysis used in life sciences research, including biological, veterinary, and translational research, and provides the background a new researcher needs to understand and apply commonly used statistical methods and the preparation needed for more advanced coursework. Classes will include general instruction and background information, detailed examples of how to perform the analyses, with actual data sets, and discussion on how the topic has been applied in biological research, including reading and assessing papers in the field. Computing will be performed using the R software environment, though students may use alternate software with permission. Topics will include: Descriptive statistics and exploratory graphics Understanding statistical inference and interpreting P-values and confidence intervals. One and two sample inference, including t-tests, proportion tests, and non-parametric alternatives Linear regression, including the effects of confounders ANOVA methods, including pairwise comparisons and multiple comparisons
VMED 8192 - Dairy Health Management: Critical Thinking
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Group discussions surrounding critical evaluations of scientific journal articles and dairy-related scientific presentations. Facilitated by both students and faculty.
ANSC 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral
Credits: 1.0 -24.0 [max 100.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required