Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Sociology Ph.D.

Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Department of Sociology, 909 Social Sciences Building, 267 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-624-4300; fax: 612-624-7020)
Email: soc@umn.edu
  • Program Type: Doctorate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Length of program in credits: 65
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Doctor of Philosophy
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
Through the exploration of social and individual dynamics, students are prepared to enrich social scientific understandings of the complex problems societies face today. Research specialties include: 1. Demography, family, and life course 2. Global, transnational, and comparative sociology 3. Inequalities and culture 4. Law, crime, punishment, and human rights Methodological training is available in historical and comparative research, survey research, network analysis, advanced statistical analysis, and qualitative research. The doctoral program is for students planning to do research or teach.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.50.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
An earned graduate or professional degree is not required for admission. It is recommended that applicants have a background in basic sociology, usually consisting of the equivalent of 18 credits in undergraduate work (including 9 credits of social science statistical methods), or an MA degree in sociology or a closely related field. Individuals without sociology coursework are generally required to complete background coursework in theory and statistics during their first year of residence; such coursework cannot be applied to doctoral credit requirements.
Special Application Requirements:
Applicants are evaluated on their academic potential, commitment to the field, creativity, and potential for contribution to the field. In addition to the University application form, and its required documents, applicants must submit the following: GRE scores; a sample of written work, usually a term paper, written in English; three letters of recommendation; and a personal statement of professional objectives. Non-native English speakers are required to take the TOEFL test, this includes students who have studied in the U.S. The department accepts new students for fall admission only. The application deadline is December 15.
Applicants must submit their test score(s) from the following:
  • GRE
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 95
    • Internet Based - Listening Score: 22
    • Internet Based - Writing Score: 24
    • Internet Based - Reading Score: 22
    • Internet Based - Speaking Score: 27
The preferred English language test is Test of English as Foreign Language.
Key to test abbreviations (GRE, TOEFL).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
29 credits are required in the major.
12 credits are required outside the major.
24 thesis credits are required.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
A minimum GPA of 3.00 is required for students to remain in good standing.
At least 3 semesters must be completed before filing a Degree Program Form.
Coursework offered on both the A-F and S/N grade basis must be taken A-F, with a minimum grade of B earned for each course.
Core Courses (14 Credits)
Take the following courses. Take SOC 8001 twice for a total of 2 credits.
SOC 8001 - Sociology as a Profession (1.0 cr)
SOC 8701 - Sociological Theory (4.0 cr)
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics (4.0 cr)
Advanced Qualitative Research Methods (3 credits)
Take one of the following courses.
SOC 8851 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: In-Depth Interviewing (3.0 cr)
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum (3.0 cr)
SOC 8853 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Historical & Comparative Sociology (3.0 cr)
Sociology Electives (12 Credits)
Select elective coursework in consultation with the advisor.
SOC 5090 - Topics in Sociology (1.0-3.0 cr)
SOC 5104 - Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
SOC 5246 {Inactive} [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
SOC 5411 - Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations (3.0 cr)
SOC 5446 - Comparing Healthcare Systems [GP] (3.0 cr)
SOC 5455 - Sociology of Education (3.0 cr)
SOC 5511 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
SOC 8090 - Topics in Sociology (1.5-3.0 cr)
SOC 8093 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
SOC 8094 - Directed Research (1.0-4.0 cr)
SOC 8101 - Sociology of Law (3.0 cr)
SOC 8111 - Criminology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8171 - Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives in Human Rights (3.0 cr)
SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance (3.0 cr)
SOC 8211 - The Sociology of Race & Racialization (3.0 cr)
SOC 8221 - Sociology of Gender (3.0 cr)
SOC 8290 - Topics in Race, Class, Gender and other forms of Durable Inequality (3.0 cr)
SOC 8311 - Political Sociology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8390 - Topics in Political Sociology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
SOC 8490 - Advanced Topics in Social Organization (3.0 cr)
SOC 8501 - Sociology of the Family (3.0 cr)
SOC 8540 - Topics in Family Sociology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8551 - Life Course Inequality & Health (3.0 cr)
SOC 8590 - Topics in Life Course Sociology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8607 - Migration & Migrants in Demographic Perspective (3.0 cr)
SOC 8701 - Sociological Theory (4.0 cr)
SOC 8721 - Social Psychology: Micro-Sociological Approaches to Inequalities and Identities (3.0 cr)
SOC 8731 - Sociology of Knowledge (3.0 cr)
SOC 8735 - Sociology of Culture (3.0 cr)
SOC 8790 - Advanced Topics in Sociological Theory (3.0 cr)
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics (4.0 cr)
SOC 8851 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: In-Depth Interviewing (3.0 cr)
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum (3.0 cr)
SOC 8853 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Historical & Comparative Sociology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8890 - Advanced Topics in Research Methods (2.0-3.0 cr)
Outside Coursework (12 credits)
Select 12 credits outside the major in consultation with the advisor.
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race (3.0 cr)
AMST 8920 - Topics in American Studies (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5041 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
DSSC 8112 - Scholarship and Public Responsibility (1.0 cr)
DSSC 8211 - Doctoral Research Workshop in Development Studies and Social Change (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8282 - Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data (3.0 cr)
GEOG 8230 - Theoretical Geography (3.0 cr)
GEOG 8292 - Seminar in GIS: Spatial Analysis and Modeling (3.0 cr)
GEOG 8294 - Spatiotemporal Modeling and Simulation (3.0 cr)
GEOG 8970 - Directed Readings (1.0-5.0 cr)
GEOG 8980 - Topics: Geography (1.0-3.0 cr)
GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy (3.0 cr)
GLOS 5900 - Topics in Global Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
GRAD 8401 - Dissertation Proposal Development Seminar (3.0 cr)
GWSS 5104 - Transnational Feminist Theory (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8108 - Genealogies of Feminist Theory (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8109 - Feminist Knowledge Production (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8250 - Seminar: Nation, State, and Citizenship (1.0-3.0 cr)
GWSS 8260 - Seminar: Race, Representation and Resistance (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8270 - Seminar: Theories of Body (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8995 - Directed Research (1.0-8.0 cr)
HIST 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History (3.0 cr)
HIST 5902 - Latin America Proseminar: Modern (3.0 cr)
HIST 5910 - Topics in U.S. History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8900 - Topics in European/Medieval History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8910 - Topics in U.S. History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8920 - Topics in African History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8960 - Topics in History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8970 - Advanced Research in Quantitative History (3.0 cr)
HIST 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-16.0 cr)
JOUR 8503 - Advanced Qualitative Methods in Mass Communication Research (3.0 cr)
KIN 5126 - Social Psychology of Sport & Physical Activity (3.0 cr)
LAW 6846 - Philosophy of Punishment (3.0 cr)
LAW 6889 - Laws of War (3.0 cr)
LING 5900 - Topics in Linguistics (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5103 - Comparative Education (3.0 cr)
OLPD 8095 - Problems: Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (1.0-3.0 cr)
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance (3.0 cr)
PA 5204 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
PA 5281 - Immigrants, Urban Planning and Policymaking in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
PA 5301 - Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South (3.0 cr)
PA 5401 - Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5451 - Immigration, Health and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5490 - Topics in Social Policy (1.0-4.0 cr)
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5823 - Human Rights and Humanitarian Crises: Policy Challenges (3.0 cr)
PA 8151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance (3.0 cr)
PA 8312 - Analysis of Discrimination (4.0 cr)
PA 8331 - Economic Demography (3.0 cr)
PA 8390 - Advanced Topics in Advanced Policy Analysis Methods (1.0-3.0 cr)
PA 8461 - Global and U.S. Perspectives on Health and Mortality (3.0 cr)
PA 8690 - Advanced Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy (1.0-3.0 cr)
PHIL 8310 - Seminar: Moral Philosophy (3.0 cr)
POL 8160 - Topics in Models and Methods (3.0 cr)
POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory (3.0 cr)
POL 8660 - Topics in Comparative Politics (3.0 cr)
PSY 8204 - Social Psychology of Prejudice and Intergroup Relations (3.0 cr)
PSY 8205 - Principles of Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
PSY 8208 - Social Psychology: The Self (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6000 - Topics: Community Health Promotion (0.5-4.0 cr)
PUBH 6370 - Social Epidemiology (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6845 - Using Demographic Data for Policy Analysis (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6855 - Medical Sociology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7250 - Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7461 - Exploring and Visualizing Data in R (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7462 - Advanced Programming and Data Analysis in R (2.0 cr)
PUBH 8341 - Advanced Epidemiologic Methods: Concepts (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar (3.0 cr)
Thesis Credits
Take 24 doctoral thesis credits.
SOC 8888 - Thesis Credits: Doctoral (1.0-24.0 cr)
 
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SOC 8001 - Sociology as a Profession
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This 1 credit class fosters adaptation to the Graduate Program in Sociology and preparation for a sociological career. In the Fall, we explore professional careers in this field. We discuss the wide range of opportunities in sociology and help students further explore the next steps to becoming a scholar, educator, and member of various professional, intellectual, and social communities. We share practical information about being a student in sociology and about sociological careers, discuss presentations in department workshop seminars, and provide a safe place to discuss issues of student concerns. Students are encouraged to bring to the class their thoughts and reactions to experiences during their first semester in the PhD program. The Spring 8001 class is oriented to particular milestones in the Sociology Graduate Program and important student activities (for example, preparing reading lists for the preliminary exam and then writing the preliminary exam, preparing a dissertation prospectus, writing grant proposals, preparing an article for publication, etc.). Pre-req: Soc PhD students
SOC 8701 - Sociological Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Traditions of social theory basic to sociological knowledge, their reflection and expansion in contemporary theory, their applications in selected areas of empirical research. Sample topics: social inequality, social organization and politics, family organization and social reproduction, social order and change, sociology of knowledge and religion.
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Multiple objectives of social research and how they inform research design. Conceptualization and measurement of complex concepts. Broad issues in research design and quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and management. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
SOC 8851 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: In-Depth Interviewing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Interviewers have opened up other worlds to the sociological imagination and taught us much about the way people think, feel, and make sense of the world as well as of their own identities. We will conduct interviews; transcribe, code, and analyze interview data; and write up interview- based research. We will also consider a range of epistemological, practical, and ethical issues related to interviewing as a research method, reading materials drawn from a broad range of substantive sociological subfields as well as from geography. This course is best suited to graduate students who have an interview-based project in mind and want to acquire the skills for carrying out their research, and students who are considering using interviews in their dissertation research and want to try their hand at interviewing before making a decision. Because this is a hands-on, fieldwork-based course, no auditors are permitted.
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Ethnographic practice involves two core activities: engaging people in their own space and time, and separating yourself enough from the fieldwork site to write about observations and experiences with some degree of analytical distance and theoretical sophistication. Ethnographers are always both participant and observer, although some of them -- often those who start off as insiders at a site from the beginning -- will be more practically or emotionally enmeshed in a fieldwork site than others. This seminar emphasizes both these core activities: students develop the practice of shuttling constantly between fieldwork site and writing field notes and analysis. Complementing the field work will be reading and discussion of classic and contemporary ethnographies. Each student will undertake his or her own fieldwork project, learning how to generate field notes that include rich description and coherent, flexible analysis. These projects should generate a useful body of qualitative data, as well as an intensive, hands-on experience of the design, research process, and analysis of ethnography. Prerequisites: graduate student, and completion of SOC 8801, or instructor consent.
SOC 8853 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Historical & Comparative Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is designed to teach graduate students to design and carry out theoretically informed and methodologically sophisticated historical research projects. In the first section of the course, we will explore the meaning of historical sociology, the disciplinary reflexes of sociologists and historians, conceptions of time in historical sociology, the uses of narrative in explanation, the use of case studies and comparisons in historical analysis, and varieties of explanation. The following section will examine the problems and potentials involved in different types of sources used by historically-oriented social scientists and the politics of historical memory. The final section will survey research by sociologists, historians, and political scientists that attempts to develop historically informed theories of various phenomena, such as race relations, nation and state formation, colonialism and imperialism, democratization and citizenship, gender and sexuality, and contentious politics. This course fulfills an advanced qualitative methods requirement for Sociology graduate students.
SOC 5090 - Topics in Sociology
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: Undergrad soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 5104 - Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4104/GloS 4104H/Soc 4104/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: at least one 3xxx SOC course recommended
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
SOC 5411 - Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 4411/Soc 4411H/Soc 5411
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theories/evidence about origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. Efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by use of law enforcement, security, and military forces. Terror involves using violent actions to achieve political, religious, or social goals. This course examines theories and evidence about the origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. It analyzes efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by counterterror organizations, including law enforcement, security, and military forces. Graduate and honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Prereq: Sociology Major/Minors must register A-F
SOC 5446 - Comparing Healthcare Systems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3446/Soc 5446
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of national health systems from an international comparative perspective, emphasizing social, organizational, political, economic, cultural, and ethical dimensions of healthcare policies and programs to deliver services and their impacts on the health of population groups. The comparative approach will enable students to acquire a better understanding of the problems and potential for reforming and improving U.S. health care delivery. Students enrolled in Soc 5446 (graduate level) are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 5455 - Sociology of Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: OLPD 5041/Soc 5455
Typically offered: Every Fall
Structures and processes within educational institutions. Links between educational organizations and their social contexts, particularly as these relate to educational change. prereq: 1001 or equiv or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 8090 - Topics in Sociology
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
SOC 8093 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study in sociology. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
SOC 8094 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
May be used to fulfill sociology graduate requirement for advanced methodological training.
SOC 8101 - Sociology of Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Sociological analysis of law and society. In-depth review of research on why people obey the law, of social forces involved in creation of law (both civil and criminal), procedures of enforcement, and impact of law on social change.
SOC 8111 - Criminology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Overview of theoretical developments and empirical research. Underlying assumptions, empirical generalizations, and current controversies in criminological research.
SOC 8171 - Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives in Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This seminar will approach human rights issues from a variety of "disciplinary" perspectives, including history, the arts, law, the social sciences, and praxis. Empirical work in the social sciences will receive somewhat greater emphasis. One key focus will be the unique advantages (and disadvantages) of the different perspectives and fruitful ways to combine them to strengthen action that improves human rights situations in countries around the world, including the United States. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced topics in law, crime, and deviance. Social underpinnings of legal/illegal behavior and of legal systems.
SOC 8211 - The Sociology of Race & Racialization
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major theoretical debates. Classic and contemporary theoretical approaches to studying U.S. race relations; contemporary and historical experiences of specific racial and ethnic groups.
SOC 8221 - Sociology of Gender
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 8221/WoSt 8202
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Organization, culture, and dynamics of gender relations and gendered social structures. Sample topics: gender, race, and class inequalities in the workplace; women.s movement; social welfare and politics of gender inequality; theoretical and methodological debates in gender studies; sexuality; science; sociology of emotions.
SOC 8290 - Topics in Race, Class, Gender and other forms of Durable Inequality
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Comparative perspectives on racial inequality; race, class, and gender; quantitative research on gender stratification; stratification in post-communist societies; institutional change and stratification systems; industrialization and stratification. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SOC 8311 - Political Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social dimensions of political behavior and social origins of different forms of the state. How various theoretical traditions--Marxist, Weberian, and feminist--address key issues in political sociology, including citizenship, revolution, state formation, origins of democracy, welfare state, and fascism.
SOC 8390 - Topics in Political Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics with common focus on social underpinnings of political behavior/change. Topics specified in Class Schedule. Sample topics: democracy and development, international legal and political systems, power and protest in advanced capitalist states, xenophobia and international migration, and civil society and democracy.
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to theoretical/methodological foundations of social network analysis. Concepts/principles, measurements, computer techniques. Applications to friendships, communities, workteams, intra-/inter-organizational relations, international systems. Focuses on network visualizations.
SOC 8490 - Advanced Topics in Social Organization
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Content varies with instructor. Sample topics: gender and organizations, interorganizational relations, comparative study of organizations, nonprofit organizations, consumer behavior, industry and technology, social networks, conflict, coercion, and social exchange. Topics specified in [Class Schedule]. prereq: instr consent
SOC 8501 - Sociology of the Family
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical and empirical works from contemporary family sociology. Content varies with instructor. Sample topics: definitions of the family, family roles, family interactions, marriage and divorce, childbearing, parenthood, and cultural variations in families.
SOC 8540 - Topics in Family Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Families and mental health; families, work, and the labor market; historical/comparative research on the family. Topics specified in [Class Schedule].
SOC 8551 - Life Course Inequality & Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Seminar examines the changing life course in its social and historical context, including theoretical principles, methodologies, and policy implications. Focus on key societal institutions that offer unequal opportunities and constraints, depending on social class, race/ethnicity, and gender. Unequal access to age-graded social roles and resources shape the course of development, and in doing so, they have profound impacts on health. We will consider how inequality in the family, education, work, the military, and in the health care & criminal justice systems influence health behaviors and outcomes at different ages and life stages. prereq: grad student or instr consent
SOC 8590 - Topics in Life Course Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Sociology of aging, sociology of youth, and mental health and adjustment in early life course. Topics specified in [Class Schedule].
SOC 8607 - Migration & Migrants in Demographic Perspective
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
With fertility and mortality, migration is one of three core population processes. This course provides a graduate-level treatment of major theoretical and empirical debates in demographic/population research on migration and migrants. It examines topics like why and how people migrate, who migrates and who does not, and the effects of migration in migrant-receiving and migrant-sending areas. Along the way, it links to a number of related topics, including the impacts of migration on migrants themselves, the role of the state and policies governing migration and incorporation, and transnationalism. A common thread throughout is connecting these topics to issues of population size, composition, and change. While this course contains ?demographic? in the title and fulfills requirements for graduate trainees and the population studies minor in the Minnesota Population Center, it is necessarily interdisciplinary in scope and draws from research in economics, demography/population studies, human geography, history, political science, population health, public policy, and sociology. Credit will not be granted if the student has already completed a Soc 8090 topics course with the same title.
SOC 8701 - Sociological Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Traditions of social theory basic to sociological knowledge, their reflection and expansion in contemporary theory, their applications in selected areas of empirical research. Sample topics: social inequality, social organization and politics, family organization and social reproduction, social order and change, sociology of knowledge and religion.
SOC 8721 - Social Psychology: Micro-Sociological Approaches to Inequalities and Identities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Social psychology is basic to an understanding of contemporary social life. This subfield of sociology focuses on social phenomena at the micro-level. Small group dynamics, social interactions, and individual experiences are importantly structured by the macro-structural context, e.g., by socioeconomic status, race, gender, sexuality, and other dimensions of social inequality. At the same time, these and other micro-sociological processes reflect individual-level identities, perceptions, motivations and cognitions. This seminar examines a wide range of social psychological phenomena linked to inequality (e.g., the effects of class, minority status, and gender on disparities in identity, self-concept, and health; the development of status hierarchies in small group interaction; intergroup relations, prejudice, and discrimination). We begin with a consideration of ?personal structure,? emphasizing the cultural and structural variability of self-conceptions and identities, cognitive processes, and motivation, as well as the biosocial bases of action. These may be considered individual-level ?building blocks? of social psychological theories (along with emotions, attitudes, values, and ideologies). We then address prominent theoretical perspectives in social psychology that illuminate the linkages between micro-social contexts of inequality and identity, including symbolic interactionism, exchange theory, structural social psychology (?social structure and personality?) and the social psychology of the life course. Social psychological theory and research are foundational to many specialty fields in sociology, including the sociology of the family, education, health, deviance, work, social mobility, social movements, emotions, and the sociology of childhood, youth, and aging. Social psychology is also central to prominent theoretical debates in sociology surrounding the relationship between social structure and agency; individual-level identities, perceptions, motivations, goals, and strategies are both structured by the social context and affect the capacity of individuals to act agentically and to achieve their goals.
SOC 8731 - Sociology of Knowledge
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Knowledge and related terms (ideology, stereotype, prejudice, belief, truth). Variation of knowledge across social groups/categories (e.g., gender, race, class, generation, nationality); institutions (e.g., politics, law, science); and societies across time and space. Power, rituals, institution, networks, and knowledge. Genealogy of theories.
SOC 8735 - Sociology of Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Definition/importance of culture as dimension of social life. Structural/Durkheimian approaches, cultural Marxism, practice theory. Cultural creation/reception. Identities as cultural formations. Culture/social inequality. Culture and race. Cultural construction of social problems. Culture and globalization.
SOC 8790 - Advanced Topics in Sociological Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Sample topics: theories of conflict, theories of purposive action, Marxist theory, and structure-agency debate.
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Multiple objectives of social research and how they inform research design. Conceptualization and measurement of complex concepts. Broad issues in research design and quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and management. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
SOC 8851 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: In-Depth Interviewing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Interviewers have opened up other worlds to the sociological imagination and taught us much about the way people think, feel, and make sense of the world as well as of their own identities. We will conduct interviews; transcribe, code, and analyze interview data; and write up interview- based research. We will also consider a range of epistemological, practical, and ethical issues related to interviewing as a research method, reading materials drawn from a broad range of substantive sociological subfields as well as from geography. This course is best suited to graduate students who have an interview-based project in mind and want to acquire the skills for carrying out their research, and students who are considering using interviews in their dissertation research and want to try their hand at interviewing before making a decision. Because this is a hands-on, fieldwork-based course, no auditors are permitted.
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Ethnographic practice involves two core activities: engaging people in their own space and time, and separating yourself enough from the fieldwork site to write about observations and experiences with some degree of analytical distance and theoretical sophistication. Ethnographers are always both participant and observer, although some of them -- often those who start off as insiders at a site from the beginning -- will be more practically or emotionally enmeshed in a fieldwork site than others. This seminar emphasizes both these core activities: students develop the practice of shuttling constantly between fieldwork site and writing field notes and analysis. Complementing the field work will be reading and discussion of classic and contemporary ethnographies. Each student will undertake his or her own fieldwork project, learning how to generate field notes that include rich description and coherent, flexible analysis. These projects should generate a useful body of qualitative data, as well as an intensive, hands-on experience of the design, research process, and analysis of ethnography. Prerequisites: graduate student, and completion of SOC 8801, or instructor consent.
SOC 8853 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Historical & Comparative Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is designed to teach graduate students to design and carry out theoretically informed and methodologically sophisticated historical research projects. In the first section of the course, we will explore the meaning of historical sociology, the disciplinary reflexes of sociologists and historians, conceptions of time in historical sociology, the uses of narrative in explanation, the use of case studies and comparisons in historical analysis, and varieties of explanation. The following section will examine the problems and potentials involved in different types of sources used by historically-oriented social scientists and the politics of historical memory. The final section will survey research by sociologists, historians, and political scientists that attempts to develop historically informed theories of various phenomena, such as race relations, nation and state formation, colonialism and imperialism, democratization and citizenship, gender and sexuality, and contentious politics. This course fulfills an advanced qualitative methods requirement for Sociology graduate students.
SOC 8890 - Advanced Topics in Research Methods
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced Research Methods (e.g., multilevel models), historical/comparative, field, survey research. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 8801, 8811, or instr consent. Cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
At its heart, the 8202 seminar is about dialogue, interrogating scholarship on race, intellectual history, and knowledge production. We will be in deep conversation with one another as we negotiate meaning around the intellectual history of race. Dialogue, indeed, is at the heart of this graduate seminar experience. Given the multidisciplinary composition of the students and content in 8202, we build together to form a learning whole in a remote format. Central to our work is excavating the 500 year legacy of race thought and making into the contemporary period.
AMST 8920 - Topics in American Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Classic and current issues in research methodology, including positivist, interpretivist, feminist, and postmodernist frameworks. Methodology, in the broadest sense of the concept, is evaluated. Students conduct three research exercises and set up an ethnographic research project. prereq: Grad anth major or instr consent
DSSC 8112 - Scholarship and Public Responsibility
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Seminar. Concerns/themes relevant to public engagement in academic work. Diverse practices of reading, writing, and pedagogy. Privileged locations of knowledge. Tactics of civil society organizing. Politics of collaborative work. prereq: Grad DSSC minor or instr consent
DSSC 8211 - Doctoral Research Workshop in Development Studies and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interdisciplinary workshop to assist doctoral students in writing successful research and grant proposals to support their dissertation research on themes related to global social change. Enables students to develop interdisciplinary peer review and feedback skills and consider ethical and practical issues global south research. prereq: Grad DSSC minor or instr consent
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual framework of hierarchical linear models for nested data, their application in educational research. Nature/effects of nested data, logic of hierarchical models, mixed-effects models. Estimation/hypothesis testing in these models, model-checking, nonlinear models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
EPSY 8282 - Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Traditional/modern approaches to analyzing longitudinal data. Dependent t-test, repeated measures ANOVA/MANOVA. Linear mixed models, multilevel models, generalized models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
GEOG 8230 - Theoretical Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced topics. Topics vary with interests of faculty offering course. Contemporary theoretical/philosophical themes transcending subdisciplines of human/physical geography. prereq: instr consent
GEOG 8292 - Seminar in GIS: Spatial Analysis and Modeling
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Overview of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis/modeling of human/environmental systems. Spatial statistics, modeling spatiotemporal processes, simulation techniques, visualization, complex systems/complexity. Guidance in thesis/dissertation research. prereq: 3511 [or equiv statistics course], [3561 or 5561 or equiv intro GIS course] or instr consent
GEOG 8294 - Spatiotemporal Modeling and Simulation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Many geographic, societal, and environmental phenomena as well as biological and ecological systems involve dynamic processes that are changing in space and time. Examples include hurricanes, animal migrations, spread of diseases, human mobility and population dynamics. Movement is a key to understanding the underlying mechanisms of these dynamic processes. Today, the availability of an unprecedented amount of movement observations at ne spatial and temporal granularities has resulted in substantial advances in GISciences approaches for the analysis, modeling, and simulation of movement and its patterns. Spatiotemporal models and simulation techniques are often used to analyze and better understand the patterns of spatiotemporal processes, and to assess their behavioral responses in varying environmental conditions. This seminar introduces students to the concepts of spatiotemporal processes and patterns. We review existing methods for modeling and simulation of spatiotemporal phenomena, especially movement. Students will develop computational skills to model a phenomena of their choice and create simulations.
GEOG 8970 - Directed Readings
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
tbd prereq: dept consent
GEOG 8980 - Topics: Geography
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 30.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar offered by visiting or regular faculty. Topics vary with interests of faculty. prereq: instr consent
GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 5403/Law 6058
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
GLOS 5900 - Topics in Global Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Proseminar. Selected issues in global studies. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
GRAD 8401 - Dissertation Proposal Development Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This seminar is the culminating component of intensive work on dissertation proposal development. The program involves a five-day spring workshop, independent summer research, a five-day fall workshop, and opportunities for on-going interactions with the cohort and with faculty instructors. The work is designed to help participants develop cogent and fundable dissertation research proposals. The main goal of the spring workshop is to help clarify students? research questions and scope as well as to better prepare them for a productive predissertation summer research experience. The fall workshop is intended to help students build on their spring workshop efforts and summer research experiences to prepare full dissertation research proposals. These proposals are intended to serve as the foundation for department prospectus requirements and for internal and external dissertation research and completion grants. All components of the program are required though registration is only for the fall seminar. Admission will be based on application in the prior year and requires a commitment to participate in all components of the program. A grade of Satisfactory will be based on attendance at and satisfactory performance in all of the spring and fall workshops, demonstrated completion of independent research over the summer, and the submission of a dissertation research proposal as part of the fall workshop. Students must be enrolled in a doctoral degree program, must be pre-ABD (may not have passed the prelim oral exam), and have advisor approval. prereq: PhD student who has not passed prelim oral exams
GWSS 5104 - Transnational Feminist Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Third World and transnational feminisms. Interrogating the categories of "women," "feminism," and "Third World." Varieties of power/oppression that women have endured/resisted, including colonization, nationalism, globalization, and capitalism. Concentrates on postcolonial context.
GWSS 8108 - Genealogies of Feminist Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Two-semester seminar. First term: debates in gender theory; intersections of gender theory with critical race theory, post-colonial theory, sexuality theory, social class analysis. Second term: inter-/multi-disciplinary feminist research methodologies from humanities/social sciences. prereq: Feminist studies PhD or grad minor student or instr consent
GWSS 8109 - Feminist Knowledge Production
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Two-semester interdisciplinary seminar. First term: debates in gender theory; gender theory, critical race theory, post-colonial theory, sexuality theory, social class analysis. Second term: inter-/multi-disciplinary feminist research methods from humanities/social sciences. prereq: Feminist studies PhD or grad minor student or instr consent
GWSS 8250 - Seminar: Nation, State, and Citizenship
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics related to nation, state, citizenship.
GWSS 8260 - Seminar: Race, Representation and Resistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Race, racialization, racial justice as related to representation/struggles for social/economic justice. Intersectional analysis of power, politics, ideology/identity. Queer of color critique, women of color feminisms, critical sex/body positive approaches. prereq: Grad student
GWSS 8270 - Seminar: Theories of Body
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How body is configured in many social arenas. Legal decisions, public policy, medical research, cultural customs. Examine how attitudes toward male/female bodies influence social myths/discourses about social policy/change.
GWSS 8995 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 36.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
TBD
HIST 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5890/Hist 5890
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will read recently published scholarship in American Indian and Indigenous history that takes up pressing research questions, promises to push inquiry in new directions, and that theorizes important interventions in our thinking to understand where the field is situated and moving. Reflecting the instinctively interdisciplinary nature of American Indian and Indigenous history, readings will be drawn not just from the discipline of history but across other disciplines such as Anthropology, American Studies, Geography, Literature, Political Science, and Legal Studies. As well, readings will include scholarship that reaches out to embrace the Global Indigenous studies turn. prereq: Advanced undergrad with instr consent or grad student
HIST 5902 - Latin America Proseminar: Modern
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduces beginning graduate and advanced undergraduate students to major historical writings on various Latin American themes. prereq: instr consent
HIST 5910 - Topics in U.S. History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
HIST 8900 - Topics in European/Medieval History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8910 - Topics in U.S. History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8920 - Topics in African History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8960 - Topics in History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8970 - Advanced Research in Quantitative History
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students carry out publishable-quality research on quantitative history topic. prereq: Grad student
HIST 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students work on tutorial basis. Guided individual reading or study. prereq: Grad student, instr consent
JOUR 8503 - Advanced Qualitative Methods in Mass Communication Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced qualitative research principles/techniques applied to mass communication research, including ethnography, interviews, focus groups, case study, qualitative content analysis, historical research.   prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
KIN 5126 - Social Psychology of Sport & Physical Activity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory/research on social influences, individual differences, motivational processes. How sport/physical activity contribute to psycho-social development. Social psychological factors influencing physical activity beliefs/behaviors. prereq: 3126W or equiv or grad student or instr consent
LAW 6846 - Philosophy of Punishment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar concerns normative justifications for the substantive criminal law and for state systems of punishment for crime. It examines literatures in the philosophy of punishment from the early 19th century (e.g., Kant, Hegel, Bentham) onwards, in contemporary criminal law and punishment theory (many writers), and in social theory (e.g., Durkheim, Weber, Marx, Foucault, Wacquant), concerning justifications for punishing at all, and whom, and how much, and functional questions about the larger social purposes that punishment serves. A focus is on the usefulness of existing paradigms for understanding and justifying such recent developments as restorative justice, community justice, therapeutic jurisprudence, and specialized drug and domestic violence courts.
LAW 6889 - Laws of War
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course focuses on two interrelated bodies of law: rules pertaining to the use of force in international law (known as the jus ad bellum) and rules regulating the conduct of hostilities under the laws of international and non-international armed conflict (known as international humanitarian law, the laws of armed conflict, or the jus in bello). The course will cover such issues as the “Just War” theory, its history and its relevance in the modern world; the general prohibition on the use of force under Article 2(4) of the UN Charter; use of force by the UN: collective security and law enforcement actions; individual and collective self-defense; humanitarian intervention; and nuclear weapons in international law. The course will also consider regulation of the means and methods of warfare focusing on the Geneva and Hague laws: the four Geneva conventions protecting the wounded, sick, and shipwrecked, prisoners of war, and civilians; the means and methods of war, including lawful and unlawful weapons and targets; the law of internal armed conflicts; and asymmetric warfare.
LING 5900 - Topics in Linguistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics vary. See Class Schedule.
OLPD 5103 - Comparative Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examination of systems and philosophies of education globally with emphasis upon African, Asian, European, and North American nations. Foundations of comparative study with selected case studies.
OLPD 8095 - Problems: Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 24.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Independent study on issues of educational policy/administration. Arranged with instructor.
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organizational analysis of international development and humanitarian assistance, including perspectives from sociology, political science, psychology, public administration, and management. Examines efforts of multiple organizational players, including NGOs, governments, bi-lateral and multi-lateral organizations, corporations, foundations, and international organizations. Critical analysis of aid organizations, especially regarding ways in which they reflect and create power and privilege, the manner in which individuals’ needs and desires interact with, support, or challenge the needs of the organization, and how all of this is influenced by forces outside the boundary of the organization. Students practice developing actionable recommendations to improve the effectiveness of international aid organizations in the context of multiple (and often contested) understandings of global development needs and conflicting stakeholder demands. Readings, class discussions, mini-lectures, simulations, case analyses, group projects, oral presentations, memo writing, opinion writing.
PA 5281 - Immigrants, Urban Planning and Policymaking in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social, political, economic experiences of contemporary U.S. immigrants. Draws from sociology, economics, demography, political science, public affairs. Local government policies/plans. Cities/suburbs as contexts for immigrants. Interactions between immigrant communities/urban planners/policymakers. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5301 - Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5301/Soc 5511
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic demographic measures/methodology. Demographic transition, mortality, fertility. Perspectives on nonmarital fertility, marriage, divorce, cohabitation. Cultural differences in family structure, aging, migration, refugee movements, population policies. Discussion of readings. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5401 - Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/extent of poverty/inequality in the United States, causes/consequences, impact of government programs/policies. Extent/causes of poverty/inequality in other developed/developing countries. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5451 - Immigration, Health and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5451/PubH 5281
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How to access demographic, health, and background information on US immigrants. Characteristics and health needs of immigrants. Designing culturally competent health programs. How to advocate for needed policy changes to promote immigrant health and wellbeing. Community visits required. Online course.
PA 5490 - Topics in Social Policy
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5823 - Human Rights and Humanitarian Crises: Policy Challenges
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines response of governments, international organizations, NGOs, and others to global humanitarian and human rights challenges posed by civil conflict and other complex emergencies in places such as Syria, Ukraine, South Sudan, Somalia, Burma, and elsewhere. Course will also consider and assess UN and other institutions established to address these issues (like UNOCHA and UNHCR). In addition, course will examine US policy toward humanitarian issues and refugees (including US refugee admissions).
PA 8151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organizational analysis of international development and humanitarian assistance, including perspectives from sociology, political science, psychology, public administration, and management. Examines efforts of multiple organizational players, including NGOs, governments, bi-lateral and multi-lateral organizations, corporations, foundations, and international organizations. Critical analysis of aid organizations, especially regarding ways in which they reflect and create power and privilege, the manner in which individuals' needs and desires interact with, support, or challenge the needs of the organization, and how all of this is influenced by forces outside the boundary of the organization. Students increase analytical capabilities in understanding international aid organizations in the context of multiple (and often contested) perspectives on global development and stakeholder demands. Class time involves class discussions, mini-lectures, simulations, and case analyses. Main graded work is a research prospectus or longer research paper.
PA 8312 - Analysis of Discrimination
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Policy analysis/other applied social sciences as tools for measuring/detecting discrimination in market/nonmarket contexts. Application of modern tools of labor econometrics/race relations research to specific problems of market/nonmarket discrimination.
PA 8331 - Economic Demography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Classical theory, advanced econometric methods, recent empirical work, and available datasets for research in economic demography. Topics include the economics of mortality, fertility, migration, marriage, women's labor supply, intra-family bargaining, and age structure. Students develop critical analysis and academic discourse skills through in-depth discussions and replications of papers, presentations, referee-style writing assignments, and a term paper. prereq: Grad-level economic theory (PA 5021 or equiv) and econometrics (PA 5033 or equiv) and instructor permission
PA 8390 - Advanced Topics in Advanced Policy Analysis Methods
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
PA 8461 - Global and U.S. Perspectives on Health and Mortality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The health of populations in developing and developed countries is very different. Within countries, great health disparities exist between more advantaged and more disadvantaged populations. When crafting policies that aim to improve population health, it is crucial to know how to measure health and how to think about the health needs of the specific population in question. This course will provide an overview to the factors driving health, mortality, and aging across different populations. In addition, students will learn the best sources of data and measures to use to describe the health status of a population. They will also be able to assess policy options that address the health of their population.
PA 8690 - Advanced Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
PHIL 8310 - Seminar: Moral Philosophy
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts/problems relating to ethical discourse. prereq: 4310 or 4320 or 4330 or instr consent
POL 8160 - Topics in Models and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminars on selected topics, as specified in Class Schedule.
POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings and research in special topics or problems.
POL 8660 - Topics in Comparative Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings in advanced topics or problems. Supervised research/training. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
PSY 8204 - Social Psychology of Prejudice and Intergroup Relations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Approaches, findings, and controversies in research on social psychology of prejudice, racial attitudes, and intergroup relations. Focuses on approaches based in social psychology and on related work from political science and sociology.
PSY 8205 - Principles of Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contemporary theoretical positions and related research. prereq: Psy PhD student
PSY 8208 - Social Psychology: The Self
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Social psychological theory and research concerning the self and social behavior. prereq: Psych background especially in personality and soc psych
PUBH 6000 - Topics: Community Health Promotion
Credits: 0.5 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
New course offerings or topics of interest in Community Health Promotion.
PUBH 6370 - Social Epidemiology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
How a society's social interactions, past and present, yield differential exposures and differences in health outcomes between persons who make up populations. New disease-specific risk factors. How well-known exposures emerge and are maintained by social system.
PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory/application of survey research in data collection. Sampling, item development, instrument design/administration to conduct survey or be aware of issues related to design/implementation. Identification of sources of error in survey research.
PUBH 6845 - Using Demographic Data for Policy Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
How to pose researchable policy questions, locate existing data, turn data into a usable format, understand data documentation, analyze data, communicate findings according to standards of the professional policy community. Quantitative issues. prereq: [Grad level research methods course, basic statistics course] or instr consent
PUBH 6855 - Medical Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to common theoretical/empirical approaches used by sociologists to study health/illness. How content reflects social inequalities in health/illness. Social processes that shape experience of health/illness. prereq: [[Grad or professional school] student, previous experience with statistical software] or instr consent
PUBH 7250 - Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Interactive, intensive overview of focus group procedures for public/non-profit environments. Practical approaches to determining appropriate use of focus groups. Design options, developing questions, recruiting participants, moderating. Analyzing/reporting results.
PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated data arise in many situations, particularly when observations are made over time and space or on individuals who share certain underlying characteristics. This course covers techniques for exploring and describing correlated data, along with statistical methods for estimating population parameters (mostly means) from these data. The focus will be primarily on generalized linear models (both with and without random effects) for normally and non-normally distributed data. Wherever possible, techniques will be illustrated using real-world examples. Computing will be done using R and SAS. prereq: Regression at the level of PubH 6451 or PubH 7405 or Stat 5302. Familiarity with basic matrix notation and operations (multiplication, inverse, transpose). Working knowledge of SAS or R (PubH 6420).
PUBH 7461 - Exploring and Visualizing Data in R
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is intended for students, both within and outside the School of Public Health, who want to learn how to manipulate data, perform simple statistical analyses, and prepare basic visualizations using the statistical software R. While the tools and techniques taught will be generic, many of the examples will be drawn from biomedicine and public health.
PUBH 7462 - Advanced Programming and Data Analysis in R
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is intended for students who are relatively proficient with R, and are looking to improve their coding and data analysis skills. The emphasis will be on learning tools and techniques which are useful to students who will be doing non-trivial programming and/or data analysis in either a research or production environment.
PUBH 8341 - Advanced Epidemiologic Methods: Concepts
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual foundations of fundamental issues in epidemiologic methodology. How/why a given method, design, or approach might help explain population health. Strengths, limits, and potential alternatives for a given approach.
PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Understand/competently use advanced quantitative methods in applied social science, policy, demographic research. Methods considered largely within or related to framework of regression analysis. Effort will be made to reflect interests of class. prereq: This is an advanced, doctoral-level course. Students are expected to have completed a full year of doctoral-level introductory statistical and/or econometric classes in their respective field prior to enrolling in this course (e.g., PubH 7401-2, ApEc8211-2, SOC 8801-8811). Exceptions may be granted with instr consent.
SOC 8888 - Thesis Credits: Doctoral
Credits: 1.0 -24.0 [max 100.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
(No description) prereq: [Completion of four semesters and all required credits completed], 24 cr required