Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Sociology Minor

Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Department of Sociology, 909 Social Sciences Building, 267 19th Ave S, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-624-4300; fax: 612-624-7020)
Email: soc@umn.edu
  • Program Type: Graduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2022
  • Length of program in credits (master's): 6
  • Length of program in credits (doctoral): 12
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
Through the exploration of social and individual dynamics, we prepare our students to enrich social scientific understandings of the complex problems societies face today. Research specialties include: 1. Demography, family, and life course 2. Global, transnational, and comparative sociology 3. Inequalities and culture 4. Law, crime, punishment, and human rights Methodological training is available in historical and comparative research, survey research, network analysis, advanced statistical analysis, and qualitative research.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
Special Application Requirements:
Students interested in the minor are strongly encouraged to confer with their major field advisor and director of graduate studies, and the Sociology director of graduate studies regarding feasibility and requirements.
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
Courses applied to the minor must be approved by the Sociology director of graduate studies. Courses applied to the minor that are offered on both the A-F and S/N grade basis must be taken A-F, with a minimum grade of B earned for each. The minimum cumulative GPA for minor field coursework is 3.00.
Coursework (6 to 12 credits)
Master's students select 6 credits, and doctoral students select 12 credits from the following in consultation with the Sociology director of graduate studies:
SOC 5090 - Topics in Sociology (1.0-3.0 cr)
SOC 5104 - Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
SOC 5246 {Inactive} [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
SOC 5411 - Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations (3.0 cr)
SOC 5446 - Comparing Healthcare Systems [GP] (3.0 cr)
SOC 5455 - Sociology of Education (3.0 cr)
SOC 5511 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
SOC 8090 - Topics in Sociology (1.5-3.0 cr)
SOC 8093 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
SOC 8094 - Directed Research (1.0-4.0 cr)
SOC 8101 - Sociology of Law (3.0 cr)
SOC 8111 - Criminology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8171 - Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives in Human Rights (3.0 cr)
SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance (3.0 cr)
SOC 8211 - The Sociology of Race & Racialization (3.0 cr)
SOC 8221 - Sociology of Gender (3.0 cr)
SOC 8290 - Topics in Race, Class, Gender and other forms of Durable Inequality (3.0 cr)
SOC 8311 - Political Sociology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8390 - Topics in Political Sociology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
SOC 8490 - Advanced Topics in Social Organization (3.0 cr)
SOC 8501 - Sociology of the Family (3.0 cr)
SOC 8540 - Topics in Family Sociology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8551 - Life Course Inequality & Health (3.0 cr)
SOC 8590 - Topics in Life Course Sociology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8607 - Migration & Migrants in Demographic Perspective (3.0 cr)
SOC 8701 - Sociological Theory (4.0 cr)
SOC 8721 - Social Psychology: Micro-Sociological Approaches to Inequalities and Identities (3.0 cr)
SOC 8731 - Sociology of Knowledge (3.0 cr)
SOC 8735 - Sociology of Culture (3.0 cr)
SOC 8790 - Advanced Topics in Sociological Theory (3.0 cr)
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics (4.0 cr)
SOC 8851 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: In-Depth Interviewing (3.0 cr)
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum (3.0 cr)
SOC 8853 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Historical & Comparative Sociology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8890 - Advanced Topics in Research Methods (2.0-3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
Masters
Doctoral
 
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SOC 5090 - Topics in Sociology
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: Undergrad soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 5104 - Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4104/GloS 4104H/Soc 4104/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: at least one 3xxx SOC course recommended
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
SOC 5411 - Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 4411/Soc 4411H/Soc 5411
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theories/evidence about origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. Efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by use of law enforcement, security, and military forces. Terror involves using violent actions to achieve political, religious, or social goals. This course examines theories and evidence about the origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. It analyzes efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by counterterror organizations, including law enforcement, security, and military forces. Graduate and honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Prereq: Sociology Major/Minors must register A-F
SOC 5446 - Comparing Healthcare Systems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3446/Soc 5446
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of national health systems from an international comparative perspective, emphasizing social, organizational, political, economic, cultural, and ethical dimensions of healthcare policies and programs to deliver services and their impacts on the health of population groups. The comparative approach will enable students to acquire a better understanding of the problems and potential for reforming and improving U.S. health care delivery. Students enrolled in Soc 5446 (graduate level) are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 5455 - Sociology of Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: OLPD 5041/Soc 5455
Typically offered: Every Fall
Structures and processes within educational institutions. Links between educational organizations and their social contexts, particularly as these relate to educational change. prereq: 1001 or equiv or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 8090 - Topics in Sociology
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
SOC 8093 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study in sociology. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
SOC 8094 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
May be used to fulfill sociology graduate requirement for advanced methodological training.
SOC 8101 - Sociology of Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Sociological analysis of law and society. In-depth review of research on why people obey the law, of social forces involved in creation of law (both civil and criminal), procedures of enforcement, and impact of law on social change.
SOC 8111 - Criminology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Overview of theoretical developments and empirical research. Underlying assumptions, empirical generalizations, and current controversies in criminological research.
SOC 8171 - Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives in Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This seminar will approach human rights issues from a variety of "disciplinary" perspectives, including history, the arts, law, the social sciences, and praxis. Empirical work in the social sciences will receive somewhat greater emphasis. One key focus will be the unique advantages (and disadvantages) of the different perspectives and fruitful ways to combine them to strengthen action that improves human rights situations in countries around the world, including the United States. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced topics in law, crime, and deviance. Social underpinnings of legal/illegal behavior and of legal systems.
SOC 8211 - The Sociology of Race & Racialization
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major theoretical debates. Classic and contemporary theoretical approaches to studying U.S. race relations; contemporary and historical experiences of specific racial and ethnic groups.
SOC 8221 - Sociology of Gender
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 8221/WoSt 8202
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Organization, culture, and dynamics of gender relations and gendered social structures. Sample topics: gender, race, and class inequalities in the workplace; women.s movement; social welfare and politics of gender inequality; theoretical and methodological debates in gender studies; sexuality; science; sociology of emotions.
SOC 8290 - Topics in Race, Class, Gender and other forms of Durable Inequality
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Comparative perspectives on racial inequality; race, class, and gender; quantitative research on gender stratification; stratification in post-communist societies; institutional change and stratification systems; industrialization and stratification. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SOC 8311 - Political Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social dimensions of political behavior and social origins of different forms of the state. How various theoretical traditions--Marxist, Weberian, and feminist--address key issues in political sociology, including citizenship, revolution, state formation, origins of democracy, welfare state, and fascism.
SOC 8390 - Topics in Political Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics with common focus on social underpinnings of political behavior/change. Topics specified in Class Schedule. Sample topics: democracy and development, international legal and political systems, power and protest in advanced capitalist states, xenophobia and international migration, and civil society and democracy.
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to theoretical/methodological foundations of social network analysis. Concepts/principles, measurements, computer techniques. Applications to friendships, communities, workteams, intra-/inter-organizational relations, international systems. Focuses on network visualizations.
SOC 8490 - Advanced Topics in Social Organization
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Content varies with instructor. Sample topics: gender and organizations, interorganizational relations, comparative study of organizations, nonprofit organizations, consumer behavior, industry and technology, social networks, conflict, coercion, and social exchange. Topics specified in [Class Schedule]. prereq: instr consent
SOC 8501 - Sociology of the Family
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical and empirical works from contemporary family sociology. Content varies with instructor. Sample topics: definitions of the family, family roles, family interactions, marriage and divorce, childbearing, parenthood, and cultural variations in families.
SOC 8540 - Topics in Family Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Families and mental health; families, work, and the labor market; historical/comparative research on the family. Topics specified in [Class Schedule].
SOC 8551 - Life Course Inequality & Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Seminar examines the changing life course in its social and historical context, including theoretical principles, methodologies, and policy implications. Focus on key societal institutions that offer unequal opportunities and constraints, depending on social class, race/ethnicity, and gender. Unequal access to age-graded social roles and resources shape the course of development, and in doing so, they have profound impacts on health. We will consider how inequality in the family, education, work, the military, and in the health care & criminal justice systems influence health behaviors and outcomes at different ages and life stages. prereq: grad student or instr consent
SOC 8590 - Topics in Life Course Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Sociology of aging, sociology of youth, and mental health and adjustment in early life course. Topics specified in [Class Schedule].
SOC 8607 - Migration & Migrants in Demographic Perspective
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
With fertility and mortality, migration is one of three core population processes. This course provides a graduate-level treatment of major theoretical and empirical debates in demographic/population research on migration and migrants. It examines topics like why and how people migrate, who migrates and who does not, and the effects of migration in migrant-receiving and migrant-sending areas. Along the way, it links to a number of related topics, including the impacts of migration on migrants themselves, the role of the state and policies governing migration and incorporation, and transnationalism. A common thread throughout is connecting these topics to issues of population size, composition, and change. While this course contains ?demographic? in the title and fulfills requirements for graduate trainees and the population studies minor in the Minnesota Population Center, it is necessarily interdisciplinary in scope and draws from research in economics, demography/population studies, human geography, history, political science, population health, public policy, and sociology. Credit will not be granted if the student has already completed a Soc 8090 topics course with the same title.
SOC 8701 - Sociological Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Traditions of social theory basic to sociological knowledge, their reflection and expansion in contemporary theory, their applications in selected areas of empirical research. Sample topics: social inequality, social organization and politics, family organization and social reproduction, social order and change, sociology of knowledge and religion.
SOC 8721 - Social Psychology: Micro-Sociological Approaches to Inequalities and Identities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Social psychology is basic to an understanding of contemporary social life. This subfield of sociology focuses on social phenomena at the micro-level. Small group dynamics, social interactions, and individual experiences are importantly structured by the macro-structural context, e.g., by socioeconomic status, race, gender, sexuality, and other dimensions of social inequality. At the same time, these and other micro-sociological processes reflect individual-level identities, perceptions, motivations and cognitions. This seminar examines a wide range of social psychological phenomena linked to inequality (e.g., the effects of class, minority status, and gender on disparities in identity, self-concept, and health; the development of status hierarchies in small group interaction; intergroup relations, prejudice, and discrimination). We begin with a consideration of ?personal structure,? emphasizing the cultural and structural variability of self-conceptions and identities, cognitive processes, and motivation, as well as the biosocial bases of action. These may be considered individual-level ?building blocks? of social psychological theories (along with emotions, attitudes, values, and ideologies). We then address prominent theoretical perspectives in social psychology that illuminate the linkages between micro-social contexts of inequality and identity, including symbolic interactionism, exchange theory, structural social psychology (?social structure and personality?) and the social psychology of the life course. Social psychological theory and research are foundational to many specialty fields in sociology, including the sociology of the family, education, health, deviance, work, social mobility, social movements, emotions, and the sociology of childhood, youth, and aging. Social psychology is also central to prominent theoretical debates in sociology surrounding the relationship between social structure and agency; individual-level identities, perceptions, motivations, goals, and strategies are both structured by the social context and affect the capacity of individuals to act agentically and to achieve their goals.
SOC 8731 - Sociology of Knowledge
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Knowledge and related terms (ideology, stereotype, prejudice, belief, truth). Variation of knowledge across social groups/categories (e.g., gender, race, class, generation, nationality); institutions (e.g., politics, law, science); and societies across time and space. Power, rituals, institution, networks, and knowledge. Genealogy of theories.
SOC 8735 - Sociology of Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Definition/importance of culture as dimension of social life. Structural/Durkheimian approaches, cultural Marxism, practice theory. Cultural creation/reception. Identities as cultural formations. Culture/social inequality. Culture and race. Cultural construction of social problems. Culture and globalization.
SOC 8790 - Advanced Topics in Sociological Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Sample topics: theories of conflict, theories of purposive action, Marxist theory, and structure-agency debate.
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Multiple objectives of social research and how they inform research design. Conceptualization and measurement of complex concepts. Broad issues in research design and quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and management. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
SOC 8851 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: In-Depth Interviewing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Interviewers have opened up other worlds to the sociological imagination and taught us much about the way people think, feel, and make sense of the world as well as of their own identities. We will conduct interviews; transcribe, code, and analyze interview data; and write up interview- based research. We will also consider a range of epistemological, practical, and ethical issues related to interviewing as a research method, reading materials drawn from a broad range of substantive sociological subfields as well as from geography. This course is best suited to graduate students who have an interview-based project in mind and want to acquire the skills for carrying out their research, and students who are considering using interviews in their dissertation research and want to try their hand at interviewing before making a decision. Because this is a hands-on, fieldwork-based course, no auditors are permitted.
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Ethnographic practice involves two core activities: engaging people in their own space and time, and separating yourself enough from the fieldwork site to write about observations and experiences with some degree of analytical distance and theoretical sophistication. Ethnographers are always both participant and observer, although some of them -- often those who start off as insiders at a site from the beginning -- will be more practically or emotionally enmeshed in a fieldwork site than others. This seminar emphasizes both these core activities: students develop the practice of shuttling constantly between fieldwork site and writing field notes and analysis. Complementing the field work will be reading and discussion of classic and contemporary ethnographies. Each student will undertake his or her own fieldwork project, learning how to generate field notes that include rich description and coherent, flexible analysis. These projects should generate a useful body of qualitative data, as well as an intensive, hands-on experience of the design, research process, and analysis of ethnography. Prerequisites: graduate student, and completion of SOC 8801, or instructor consent.
SOC 8853 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Historical & Comparative Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is designed to teach graduate students to design and carry out theoretically informed and methodologically sophisticated historical research projects. In the first section of the course, we will explore the meaning of historical sociology, the disciplinary reflexes of sociologists and historians, conceptions of time in historical sociology, the uses of narrative in explanation, the use of case studies and comparisons in historical analysis, and varieties of explanation. The following section will examine the problems and potentials involved in different types of sources used by historically-oriented social scientists and the politics of historical memory. The final section will survey research by sociologists, historians, and political scientists that attempts to develop historically informed theories of various phenomena, such as race relations, nation and state formation, colonialism and imperialism, democratization and citizenship, gender and sexuality, and contentious politics. This course fulfills an advanced qualitative methods requirement for Sociology graduate students.
SOC 8890 - Advanced Topics in Research Methods
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced Research Methods (e.g., multilevel models), historical/comparative, field, survey research. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 8801, 8811, or instr consent. Cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title