Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Political Science Ph.D.

Political Science Department
College of Liberal Arts
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Department of Political Science, 1414 Social Sciences, 267 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-624-4144; fax: 612-626-7599)
  • Program Type: Doctorate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Length of program in credits: 60
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Doctor of Philosophy
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The political science curriculum is divided into five subfields: formal models and methodology, political theory, American politics, international relations, and comparative politics.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
Special Application Requirements:
All students are admitted directly into the Ph.D. program. To apply, submit the following through the University's graduate online application: Unofficial transcripts, research and diversity statements, GRE scores, three letters of recommendation, curriculum vitae or resume, writing sample, TOEFL or IELTS for non-native English speakers. The application deadline is December 15. For more information, see the Political Science Admissions website.
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
30 credits are required in the major.
6 credits are required outside the major.
24 thesis credits are required.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
A minimum GPA of 3.30 is required for students to remain in good standing.
Students must select and complete the requirements for 2 emphases.
Professional Development Coursework (3 credits)
Take POL 8104 spring semester the first year of study, and POL 8105 fall semester the third year of study.
POL 8104 - Professional Development I (2.0 cr)
POL 8105 - Professional Development II (1.0 cr)
Additional Elective (3 credits)
Select 3 elective credits in consultation with the advisor.
POL 8xxx
Outside Coursework (6 credits)
Select 6 credits outside the major in consultation with the advisor.
AFRO 8910 - Topics in Studies of Africa and the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
AMIN 8910 - Topics in American Indian and Indigenous Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
AMST 8920 - Topics in American Studies (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5980 - Topics in Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8992 - Directed Reading (1.0-18.0 cr)
APEC 5031 - Methods of Economic Data Analysis (3.0 cr)
APEC 5032 - Economic Data Analysis for Managerial and Policy Decisions (3.0 cr)
APEC 5151 - Applied Microeconomics: Firm and Household (3.0 cr)
APEC 5451 - Food Marketing Economics (3.0 cr)
APEC 5481 - Futures and Options Markets (3.0 cr)
APEC 5721 - Economics of Science and Technology Policy (3.0 cr)
APEC 5751 - Global Trade and Policy (3.0 cr)
APEC 5831 - Food and Agribusiness Marketplace (2.0-3.0 cr)
APEC 8001 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Consumer Choice and Consumer Demand (2.0 cr)
APEC 8002 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Production and Choice Under Uncertainty (2.0 cr)
APEC 8601 - Natural Resource Economics (3.0 cr)
APEC 8793 - Master's Paper: Plan B Project (1.0-6.0 cr)
APEC 8901 - Graduate Seminar: MS & PhD (1.0 cr)
APEC 8902 - Graduate Research Development Seminar (1.0 cr)
ARAB 5101 - Advanced Arabic I (4.0 cr)
ARAB 5102 - Advanced Arabic II (4.0 cr)
CHIC 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
CLA 8000 - Topics in Graduate Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
COMM 5221 - Media, Race, and Identity (3.0 cr)
DSSC 8111 - Approaches to Knowledge and Truth: Ways of Knowing in Development Studies and Social Change (3.0 cr)
DSSC 8112 - Scholarship and Public Responsibility (1.0 cr)
DSSC 8211 - Doctoral Research Workshop in Development Studies and Social Change (3.0 cr)
DSSC 8310 - Topics in Development Studies and Social Change (1.0-3.0 cr)
ENGL 5300 - Readings in American Minority Literature (3.0 cr)
ENGL 8400 - Seminar in Post-Colonial Literature, Culture, and Theory (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods (3.0 cr)
ESL 5008 - Speaking for Professional Settings (2.0 cr)
FNRM 5131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (4.0 cr)
GEOG 8980 - Topics: Geography (1.0-3.0 cr)
GER 5610 - German Literature in Translation (3.0 cr)
GIS 5578 - GIS Programming (3.0 cr)
GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy (3.0 cr)
GRAD 5105 - Practicum in University Teaching for Nonnative English Speakers (2.0 cr)
GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education (3.0 cr)
GRAD 8200 - Teaching and Learning Topics in Higher Education (1.0 cr)
GWSS 5190 - Topics: Theory, Knowledge, and Power (3.0 cr)
GWSS 5406 - Black Feminist Thought in the American and African Diasporas (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8107 - Feminist Pedagogies (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8109 - Feminist Knowledge Production (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8220 - Seminar: Science, Technology & Environmental Justice (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8490 - Seminar: Transnational, Postcolonial, Diaspora (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-6.0 cr)
GWSS 8995 - Directed Research (1.0-8.0 cr)
GWSS 8996 - Feminist Studies Colloquium (1.0 cr)
HIST 5264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries (3.0 cr)
HIST 5265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime (3.0 cr)
HIST 5932 - The Production of Knowledge, Negotiating the Past, and the Writing of African Histories (3.0 cr)
HIST 5960 - Topics in History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8801 - Seminar in Early American History (3.0 cr)
HIST 8802 - Readings in American History, 1848-Present (3.0 cr)
HIST 8900 - Topics in European/Medieval History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8910 - Topics in U.S. History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8920 - Topics in African History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8960 - Topics in History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-16.0 cr)
JOUR 5251 - Strategic Communication Theory (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8503 - Advanced Qualitative Methods in Mass Communication Research (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8504 - Seminar: Analyzing Media Content (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8650 - Seminar: Psychology of Media Effects (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8661 - Seminar: Mediated Political Communication in the Digital Age (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8681 - Seminar: International Media Perspectives (3.0 cr)
LAW 5000 - Introduction to American Law and Legal Reasoning (3.0 cr)
LAW 6039 - U.S. Supreme Court and Great Cases that have Shaped the Nation (3.0 cr)
LAW 6071 - International Law (3.0 cr)
LAW 6081 - Constitutional Law: Fourteenth Amendment (3.0 cr)
LAW 6084 - Equal Protection: Race and the Civil Rights Acts (3.0 cr)
LAW 6846 - Philosophy of Punishment (3.0 cr)
LAW 6886 - International Human Rights Law (3.0 cr)
PA 5012 - The Politics of Public Affairs (3.0 cr)
PA 5041 - Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (4.0 cr)
PA 5401 - Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5490 - Topics in Social Policy (1.0-4.0 cr)
PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development (3.0 cr)
PA 5561 - Gender and International Development (3.0 cr)
PA 5711 - Science, Technology & Environmental Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5790 - Topics in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy (1.0-3.0 cr)
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5890 - Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs (0.5-5.0 cr)
PA 8081 - Capstone Workshop (3.0 cr)
PA 8302 - Applied Policy Analysis (4.0 cr)
PA 8690 - Advanced Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy (1.0-3.0 cr)
PA 8991 - Independent Study (0.5-4.0 cr)
PHIL 8110 - Seminar: Metaphysics (3.0 cr)
PSY 5202 - Attitudes and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
PSY 8201 - Social Cognition (3.0 cr)
PSY 8204 - Social Psychology of Prejudice and Intergroup Relations (3.0 cr)
PSY 8205 - Principles of Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
PSY 8208 - Social Psychology: The Self (3.0 cr)
PSY 8664 - Personality Assessment (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7250 - Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews (1.0 cr)
PUBH 7440 - Introduction to Bayesian Analysis (3.0 cr)
SOC 8090 - Topics in Sociology (1.5-3.0 cr)
SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance (3.0 cr)
SOC 8311 - Political Sociology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8731 - Sociology of Knowledge (3.0 cr)
SOC 8790 - Advanced Topics in Sociological Theory (3.0 cr)
SOC 8890 - Advanced Topics in Research Methods (2.0-3.0 cr)
WRIT 5051 - Graduate Research Writing for International Students (3.0 cr)
WRIT 5052 - Graduate Research Presentations and Conference Writing for Non-Native Speakers of English (3.0 cr)
Thesis Credits
Take 24 doctoral thesis credits.
POL 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral (1.0-24.0 cr)
Emphases
Select 2 emphases in consultation with the advisor. Complete the 12 credits required for each for a total of 24 credits.
Political Theory
Required Course (3 credits)
Students selecting the Political Theory emphasis must take the following course:
POL 8201 - Understanding Political Theory (3.0 cr)
Electives (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor, to complete the Political Theory emphasis.
POL 8235 - Democratic Theory (3.0 cr)
POL 8251 - Ancient and Medieval Political Thought (3.0 cr)
POL 8252 - Early Modern Political Thought (3.0 cr)
POL 8253 - Late Modern Political Thought (3.0 cr)
POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory (3.0 cr)
-OR-
American Politics
Required Course (3 Credits)
Students selecting the American Politics emphasis must take the following course:
POL 8301 - American Politics (3.0 cr)
Electives (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor, to complete the American Politics emphasis.
POL 8302 - Public Opinion and Political Behavior (3.0 cr)
POL 8311 - Political Psychology and Socialization (3.0 cr)
POL 8312 - Legislative Process (3.0 cr)
POL 8337 - Welfare State Theories and American Social Policy (3.0 cr)
POL 8360 - Topics in American Politics (3.0 cr)
-OR-
International Relations
Required Course (3 credits)
Students selecting the International Relations emphasis must take the following course:
POL 8401 - International Relations (3.0 cr)
Electives (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor, to complete the International Relations emphasis.
POL 8402 - International Security (3.0 cr)
POL 8403 - International Norms and Institutions (3.0 cr)
POL 8405 - International Political Economy (3.0 cr)
POL 8460 - Topics in International Relations (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Comparative Politics
Required Course (3 credits)
Students selecting the Comparative Politics emphasis must take the following course:
POL 8601 - Introduction to Comparative Politics (3.0 cr)
Electives (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor, to complete the Comparative Politics emphasis.
POL 8637 - Comparative Political Economy (3.0 cr)
POL 8660 - Topics in Comparative Politics (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Formal Models and Methodology
Required Course (12 credits)
Students selecting the Political Models and Methodology emphasis must take the following courses:
POL 8120 - Core Course in Political Methodology: Modeling Political Processes (3.0 cr)
POL 8107 - Quantitative Political Science II (3.0 cr)
POL 8108 - Maximum Likelihood Estimation (3.0 cr)
POL 8124 - Game Theory (3.0 cr)
 
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POL 8104 - Professional Development I
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1st year Pol graduate student
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The objectives of this course are as follows: (1) to provide students with professional advice that will help them move with dispatch through the graduate program; (2) to learn the formal and informal norms of the discipline; and (3) to help them prepare to do independent research and dissertation research. prereq: 1st year Pol graduate student
POL 8105 - Professional Development II
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Research ethics. Skills for teaching undergraduate courses in political science. Completion of dissertation prospecti or early chapters. prereq: Pol sci student, ABD, dept consent
AFRO 8910 - Topics in Studies of Africa and the African Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AMIN 8910 - Topics in American Indian and Indigenous Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This is a topics shell
AMST 8920 - Topics in American Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 5980 - Topics in Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/perspectives in anthropology. Emphasizes American cultural anthropology. Rrecent work in semiotic, psychological, and feminist anthropology.
ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Classic and current issues in research methodology, including positivist, interpretivist, feminist, and postmodernist frameworks. Methodology, in the broadest sense of the concept, is evaluated. Students conduct three research exercises and set up an ethnographic research project. prereq: Grad anth major or instr consent
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar examines particular aspects of method and/or theory. Topics vary according to student and faculty interests.
ANTH 8992 - Directed Reading
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 54.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
tbd prereq: instr consent
APEC 5031 - Methods of Economic Data Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Statistical and econometrics techniques for applied economists. Theory and application of multivariate regression model using data sets from published economic studies. Emphasis on use of statistical techniques to understand market behavior. prereq: APEC 3001, Math 1142 or Math 1272, Stat 3001 or Sco 2550 or grad student or instructor consent
APEC 5032 - Economic Data Analysis for Managerial and Policy Decisions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Statistical and econometric methods for the analysis of large data sets to support managerial and policy decisions. Methods for organizing, accessing, and ensuring the quality of data. Estimation techniques include panel data methods, limited dependent variable models, and time series analysis. Clarity of reporting and design of procedures for maintaining and updating data estimates. prereq: 5031 or instr consent
APEC 5151 - Applied Microeconomics: Firm and Household
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Quantitative techniques for analysis of economic problems of firms and households. Links between quantitative tools and economic analysis Regression analysis, mathematical programming, and present value analysis. prereq: (APEC 3001, Math 1142 or Math 1272, and Stat 3011 or Sco 2550) or equiv or grad student or instr consent
APEC 5451 - Food Marketing Economics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 4451W/ApEc 5451
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economics of food marketing in the United States. Food consumption trends. Consumer food behavior, expenditure, data collection. Consumer utility models, demand forecasting. Food distribution system. Changes in supply chain, industry structure that serves retail food outlets. Individual/group projects.
APEC 5481 - Futures and Options Markets
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 4481/5481
Typically offered: Every Spring
Economic concepts related to futures/options trading. Hedging, speculation.
APEC 5721 - Economics of Science and Technology Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course covers the economic effects of science and technology policies, such as intellectual property rights. The course considers the effects of policies on: (1) the economic growth and development levels of countries; (2) the international technology transfers that occur between countries through trade, foreign direct investment, and licensing arrangements; and (3) differences in the economic welfare of developed and developing countries. prereq: APEC 3001 or ECON 3101 or instr consent
APEC 5751 - Global Trade and Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Trade policies of import/export nations, gains from trade, trade negotiations/agreements. Free trade and common market areas. Exchange rate impacts. Primary commodities and market instability. Current trade issues. prereq: 3001 or Econ 3101 or PA 5021
APEC 5831 - Food and Agribusiness Marketplace
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This is a graduate student survey course of the industrial organization and current policy issues in the food and agribusiness marketplace. It represents a collaboration between the College of Food, Agricultural, and Natural Resource Sciences and the Carlson School of Management. The course uses short readings and speakers. A comprehensive look at all of the sectors in the food and agribusiness value chain is described. Topics include food policies (Farm Bills, food stamps, food labeling, and similar topics); environmental policies (water, invasive species, agriculture production and similar topics); and industrial organization issues (marketing and production contracts, overview of firm strategic orientation, distribution and similar topics). Readings, guest speakers, and presentations are used. prereq: graduate student
APEC 8001 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Consumer Choice and Consumer Demand
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8001/Econ 8001/Econ 8101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Consumer behavior/demand. Introduction to welfare analysis. General equilibrium analysis in pure exchange economy. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[5151 or ECON 3101 or ECON 5151 or intermediate microeconomic theory], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8002 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Production and Choice Under Uncertainty
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8002/Econ 8002/Econ 8102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Production, competitive markets, and choice under uncertainty. Technology and production, cost minimization and profit maximization, production duality, efficiency and technical change, general equilibrium of production. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[8001 or ECON 8001 or ECON 8101], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8601 - Natural Resource Economics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Economic analysis of resource use and management. Capital theory, dynamic resource allocation. Applications to renewable and nonrenewable resources. Empirical studies, policy issues. prereq: [5151, 8202, 8206 [ECON 5151 or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8793 - Master's Paper: Plan B Project
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students work under guidance of adviser to complete their Plan B Paper project. prereq: Agri/ApEc MS student or ApEc MS student
APEC 8901 - Graduate Seminar: MS & PhD
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Attendance and active participation in applied economics research seminars. Effective research methods. Research topics and observe professional methods of research presentations.
APEC 8902 - Graduate Research Development Seminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Faculty, students, outside speakers present research ideas/results, which participants critique. Topics vary according to interests of speakers. prereq: ApEc MS student or ApEc PhD student
ARAB 5101 - Advanced Arabic I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced readings in classical/modern Arabic. Compositions based on texts. prereq: Grade B- or higher in 3102 or instr consent
ARAB 5102 - Advanced Arabic II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Readings of Arabic texts. Writing compositions based on texts. Continuation of 5101.
CHIC 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading, research, and study for completion of the requirements for a senior paper or honors thesis. prereq: instr consent
CLA 8000 - Topics in Graduate Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This is a topics course related to graduate students in CLA.
COMM 5221 - Media, Race, and Identity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Critical media studies perspective on cultural politics of race and ethnicity. Social construction of race, politics of racism, media representations of race. prereq: 3211 or instr consent
DSSC 8111 - Approaches to Knowledge and Truth: Ways of Knowing in Development Studies and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Approaches practiced by physical, biological, social science, and humanities scholars. "Ways of knowing" in different cultures/groups. Issues/methodological challenges facing interdisciplinary/international studies. Taught by faculty from biological, social sciences, and humanities. prereq: Grad DSSC minor or instr consent
DSSC 8112 - Scholarship and Public Responsibility
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Seminar. Concerns/themes relevant to public engagement in academic work. Diverse practices of reading, writing, and pedagogy. Privileged locations of knowledge. Tactics of civil society organizing. Politics of collaborative work. prereq: Grad DSSC minor or instr consent
DSSC 8211 - Doctoral Research Workshop in Development Studies and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interdisciplinary workshop to assist doctoral students in writing successful research and grant proposals to support their dissertation research on themes related to global social change. Enables students to develop interdisciplinary peer review and feedback skills and consider ethical and practical issues global south research. prereq: Grad DSSC minor or instr consent
DSSC 8310 - Topics in Development Studies and Social Change
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seven-week to full semester seminar. Topical issues in development and social change.
ENGL 5300 - Readings in American Minority Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3300/EngL 3300H/EngL 5300
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contextual readings of 19th-/20th-century American minority writers. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ENGL 8400 - Seminar in Post-Colonial Literature, Culture, and Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sample topics: Marxism and nationalism; modern India; feminism and decolonization; "the Empire Writes Back"; Islam and the West. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Quantitative techniques using manifest/latent variable approaches for analysis of educational/social science data. Introduction to structural equation modeling approaches to multiple regression, factor analysis, path modeling. Developing, estimating, interpreting structural equation models. prereq: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
ESL 5008 - Speaking for Professional Settings
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed for graduate students who speak a first language other than English and are seeking to improve their English speaking skills for professional contexts. The goal of this course is to help students refine their English skills for effective and culturally appropriate communication in specific professional situations. The course covers topics such as small talk, networking, interviewing, and presentation skills. Students will increase their confidence to communicate in a variety of settings including informal exchanges, career fairs, conference presentations, and job interviews. Prerequisite: Graduate student, a first language other than English
FNRM 5131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3131/FNRM 5131/FR 3131/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographic information systems (GIS), focusing on spatial data development and analysis in the science and management of natural resources. Basic data structures, sources, collection, and quality; geodesy and map projections; spatial and tabular data analyses; digital elevation data and terrain analyses; cartographic modeling and layout. Lab exercises provide practical experiences complementing theory covered in lecture. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
GEOG 8980 - Topics: Geography
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 30.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar offered by visiting or regular faculty. Topics vary with interests of faculty. prereq: instr consent
GER 5610 - German Literature in Translation
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study in depth of authors or topics from various periods in German literature. Requires no knowledge of German. prereq: No knowledge of German required; cr toward major or minor requires reading in German
GIS 5578 - GIS Programming
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Programming techniques using Python and other languages specifically relating to GIS technologies. prereq: instr consent
GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 5403/Law 6058
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
GRAD 5105 - Practicum in University Teaching for Nonnative English Speakers
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory, advanced practice in teaching in higher education for nonnative speakers of English. Emphasizes interactive teaching strategies, awareness of cross-cultural classroom issues,oral classroom presentation skills, and legal/policy issues. prereq: 5102 or English Language Proficiency Rating of 2; Contact cei@umn.edu for permission number.
GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Teaching methods/techniques. Active learning, critical thinking, practice teaching, and preparing a portfolio to document/reflect upon teaching. Readings, discussion, peer teaching, e-mail dialog, reflective writing, co-facilitation of course. prereq: Non-Degree Students: contact pffcollege consentumn.edu with questions about registration. If adding a section after first class meeting, contact your instructor as soon as you enroll.
GRAD 8200 - Teaching and Learning Topics in Higher Education
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Create course materials for context/discipline. Assess student learning. Write action plan. Topics may include active learning in sciences, teaching with technology, multicultural education, teaching in clinical settings, learning-community course design.
GWSS 5190 - Topics: Theory, Knowledge, and Power
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
GWSS 5406 - Black Feminist Thought in the American and African Diasporas
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 4406/Afro 5406/GWSS 4406/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Critically examines spatiality of African descendant women in Americas/larger black diaspora. Writings from black feminist/queer geographies, history, contemporary cultural criticism. Recent black feminist theorizing.
GWSS 8107 - Feminist Pedagogies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explore feminist theories/critical approaches to pedagogy. Develop teaching philosophy statement, design syllabus, practice teach/learn problem-solving strategies for classroom. prereq: Feminist Studies grad student [Maj or Minor] or instr consent
GWSS 8109 - Feminist Knowledge Production
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Two-semester interdisciplinary seminar. First term: debates in gender theory; gender theory, critical race theory, post-colonial theory, sexuality theory, social class analysis. Second term: inter-/multi-disciplinary feminist research methods from humanities/social sciences. prereq: Feminist studies PhD or grad minor student or instr consent
GWSS 8220 - Seminar: Science, Technology & Environmental Justice
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics related to science, technology, environmental justice.
GWSS 8490 - Seminar: Transnational, Postcolonial, Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Graduate topics in comparative/global studies.
GWSS 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
TBD
GWSS 8995 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 36.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
TBD
GWSS 8996 - Feminist Studies Colloquium
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
TBD prereq: Grad major or minor in feminist studies
HIST 5264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3264/Hist 5264
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interaction with Europe and Asia; attempts at modernization and reform; emancipation of the serfs and rise of revolutionary movements.
HIST 5265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3265/Hist 5265
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of the factors that led to the collapse of the tsarist regime; discussion of the 1917 revolution, the evolution of the Soviet regime and the collapse of Soviet communism. Emphasis on the role of nationalities and the rise of the Commonwealth of independent states.
HIST 5932 - The Production of Knowledge, Negotiating the Past, and the Writing of African Histories
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5932/Hist 5932
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Recent scholarship on social history of Africa. Focuses on new literature on daily lives of ordinary people in their workplaces, communities, households.
HIST 5960 - Topics in History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected topics in history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: [advanced undergrad with instr consent]
HIST 8801 - Seminar in Early American History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 5801/Hist 8801
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to literature of early American history. Readings selected from some of best scholarship in field. Questions of colonial historians. Theories, methods, sources used in pursuit of those questions.
HIST 8802 - Readings in American History, 1848-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 5802/Hist 8802
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Readings-intensive course. U.S. history from Mexican-American War to present.
HIST 8900 - Topics in European/Medieval History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8910 - Topics in U.S. History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 15.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8920 - Topics in African History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8960 - Topics in History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students work on tutorial basis. Guided individual reading or study. prereq: Grad student, instr consent
JOUR 5251 - Strategic Communication Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is an introduction to psychologically-grounded concepts, theories and research and their applications for strategic communication. The course objectives involve comprehension and application of a range of psychological concepts and theories related to attitude development, susceptibility to message influence, and opinion formation and change. The course will provide opportunities to apply theoretical concepts to critically evaluate strategic communications (advertising, public relations, brand marketing, etc.) and to use psychological theory and research to inform the development of communication strategies. The course will examine how these theories help us understand communication processes in digital media environments, as well as how they inform relationship-building areas of strategic communication such as reputation and crisis management. The course will provide opportunities for students to apply concepts and theories to potential research for graduate degree capstone projects.
JOUR 8503 - Advanced Qualitative Methods in Mass Communication Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced qualitative research principles/techniques applied to mass communication research, including ethnography, interviews, focus groups, case study, qualitative content analysis, historical research.   prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8504 - Seminar: Analyzing Media Content
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Methods of analyzing media content/application of methods to theoretically-driven studies of media content. Conceptual/methodological issues surrounding analyzing media content in today's contemporary digital media environment, including collecting social media data, computer-aided analyses. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8650 - Seminar: Psychology of Media Effects
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In-depth study of psychological concepts/theories concerning individual cognitive processing of content of both traditional/new electronic media. Critically evaluate latest empirical research concerning how individuals respond to the content of both traditional mass media/newest electronic digital media. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8661 - Seminar: Mediated Political Communication in the Digital Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Mediated political communication in the digital age. How news, advertising, and entertainment media shape political perceptions, motivate voters, and influence policy decisions. Agenda-setting, priming, and framing, networked communications, micro-targeting, and mobile technology.
JOUR 8681 - Seminar: International Media Perspectives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Main problems/currents. Concepts, research, policy relevant to global development. Issues of freedom/constraint, media technology, role of journalism in world affairs.
LAW 5000 - Introduction to American Law and Legal Reasoning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 3000/Law 5000
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Law pervades all areas of modern life. Yet it remains mysterious to those without legal training. This course will equip you to better answer such questions by exploring the tools that lawyers use to interpret and apply the law. Students will learn to think like lawyers through a series of contemporary case studies that require reading, writing, thinking, and problem solving like a lawyer. Cases will be drawn from topics such as contracts, torts, civil procedure, property, business law, criminal law, sports law, privacy, and law and science.
LAW 6039 - U.S. Supreme Court and Great Cases that have Shaped the Nation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Discussion of twenty-four U S Supreme Court cases that have shaped the nation, and three sensationalized trial court cases that shocked the nation.
LAW 6071 - International Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 6011/Law 6071
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course is an introduction to public international law. It will examine the sources and history of the law of nations and how international law is formed, interpreted, and (sometimes) enforced. It will also provide a brief introduction to the law of international organizations (specifically the United Nations), concepts of jurisdiction and conflicts of jurisdiction among nation states, international protection of human rights, the law of war, international criminal law, and the control of the use of force (including peacekeeping and related topics). prereq: Upper division students only
LAW 6081 - Constitutional Law: Fourteenth Amendment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course offers an overview of civil liberties and civil rights under the United States Constitution. It will cover First Amendment freedoms, including freedom of speech and of the press, freedom of assembly and association, and religious freedoms (prohibition on establishment of religion and protection of free exercise of religion). It will also cover rights protected by the Fourteenth Amendment, including due process of law and equal protection of the laws. A few other individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution will be briefly discussed (takings, contract clause, Second Amendment gun rights, Ninth Amendment "privacy" rights). It does not cover constitutional rights in criminal law matters, which are covered in the Criminal Procedure course.
LAW 6084 - Equal Protection: Race and the Civil Rights Acts
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will cover the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment and the three major civil rights acts passed in the 1960s to give content to that clause. The Choper casebook will be used for the equal protection clause and provide materials about the legislative histories and regulatory and statutory constructions of the major provisions of the 1964, 65, and 68 Civil Rights Acts.
LAW 6846 - Philosophy of Punishment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar concerns normative justifications for the substantive criminal law and for state systems of punishment for crime. It examines literatures in the philosophy of punishment from the early 19th century (e.g., Kant, Hegel, Bentham) onwards, in contemporary criminal law and punishment theory (many writers), and in social theory (e.g., Durkheim, Weber, Marx, Foucault, Wacquant), concerning justifications for punishing at all, and whom, and how much, and functional questions about the larger social purposes that punishment serves. A focus is on the usefulness of existing paradigms for understanding and justifying such recent developments as restorative justice, community justice, therapeutic jurisprudence, and specialized drug and domestic violence courts.
LAW 6886 - International Human Rights Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of lawyers using procedures of the United Nations, Organization of American States, State Department, Congress, U.S. Courts, and nongovernmental organizations to address international human rights problems. Is there a law of international human rights? How is that law made, changed, and invoked? Problem method used.
PA 5012 - The Politics of Public Affairs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Politics is how we make collective decisions about matters of shared consequence. This course examines politics and introduces students to key concepts and skills needed for effective political analysis. The central themes of the course focus on power; institutions and organizations; discourse; and citizenship.
PA 5041 - Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
PA 5401 - Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/extent of poverty/inequality in the United States, causes/consequences, impact of government programs/policies. Extent/causes of poverty/inequality in other developed/developing countries. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5490 - Topics in Social Policy
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
What makes some countries wealthier than others, one group of people healthier and more educated than another? How does the behavior of rich nations affect poor nations? Origins of development thought, contemporary frameworks and policy debates. Economic, human, and sustainable development. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5561 - Gender and International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Women and men are affected differently by development and participate differently in policy formulation and implementation. Gender-sensitive perspective. Historical, political context. Global South. Policy, practice, and experience (theory and measurement; international, national, local stakeholders; effects of policy and practice on development). prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5711 - Science, Technology & Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interplay of science, technology, the environment, and society. Approaches from across the social sciences will cover how science and technology can create new environmental pressures as well as policy challenges in a range of spheres from climate change to systems of intellectual property and international development.
PA 5790 - Topics in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5890 - Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs
Credits: 0.5 -5.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
PA 8081 - Capstone Workshop
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
PA 8302 - Applied Policy Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Design/evaluation of public policies. Emphasizes market/non-market contexts. Microeconomics and welfare economics of policy analysis. Econometric tools for measurement of policy outcomes. Applications to policy problems. prereq: Intermediate microeconomics, introduction to econometrics
PA 8690 - Advanced Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
PA 8991 - Independent Study
Credits: 0.5 -4.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
PHIL 8110 - Seminar: Metaphysics
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics vary by offering. prereq: 4101 or instr consent
PSY 5202 - Attitudes and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory/research on social psychology of beliefs/attitudes. Persuasion principles. prereq: 3201 or instr consent
PSY 8201 - Social Cognition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Social psychological theory/research on social inference and reasoning processes. Psychology of prejudice/stereotyping. prereq: Psych PhD candidate
PSY 8204 - Social Psychology of Prejudice and Intergroup Relations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Approaches, findings, and controversies in research on social psychology of prejudice, racial attitudes, and intergroup relations. Focuses on approaches based in social psychology and on related work from political science and sociology.
PSY 8205 - Principles of Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contemporary theoretical positions and related research. prereq: Psy PhD student
PSY 8208 - Social Psychology: The Self
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Social psychological theory and research concerning the self and social behavior. prereq: Psych background especially in personality and soc psych
PSY 8664 - Personality Assessment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Concepts/issues concerning individual differences in personality and their assessment; content, reality, and significance of personality traits; classification of personality traits; major approaches to measurement of personality. prereq: Psy grad student or instr consent
PUBH 7250 - Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Interactive, intensive overview of focus group procedures for public/non-profit environments. Practical approaches to determining appropriate use of focus groups. Design options, developing questions, recruiting participants, moderating. Analyzing/reporting results.
PUBH 7440 - Introduction to Bayesian Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Bayesian methods. Comparison with traditional frequentist methods. Emphasizes data analysis via modern computing methods: Gibbs sampler, WinBUGS software package. prereq: [[7401 or STAT 5101 or equiv], [public health MPH or biostatistics or statistics] grad student] or instr consent
SOC 8090 - Topics in Sociology
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced topics in law, crime, and deviance. Social underpinnings of legal/illegal behavior and of legal systems.
SOC 8311 - Political Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social dimensions of political behavior and social origins of different forms of the state. How various theoretical traditions--Marxist, Weberian, and feminist--address key issues in political sociology, including citizenship, revolution, state formation, origins of democracy, welfare state, and fascism.
SOC 8731 - Sociology of Knowledge
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Knowledge and related terms (ideology, stereotype, prejudice, belief, truth). Variation of knowledge across social groups/categories (e.g., gender, race, class, generation, nationality); institutions (e.g., politics, law, science); and societies across time and space. Power, rituals, institution, networks, and knowledge. Genealogy of theories.
SOC 8790 - Advanced Topics in Sociological Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Sample topics: theories of conflict, theories of purposive action, Marxist theory, and structure-agency debate.
SOC 8890 - Advanced Topics in Research Methods
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced Research Methods (e.g., multilevel models), historical/comparative, field, survey research. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 8801, 8811, or instr consent. Cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
WRIT 5051 - Graduate Research Writing for International Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graduate research writing emphasizes writing techniques, structures, style, and formal language for scholarly writing including research proposals and abstracts, critiques/reviews, and thesis/dissertations and publications. Special focus on field-specific scholarly expectations, documentation, structure/style, grammar, formal or scholarly vocabulary, and extensive revising/editing based on instructor and mentor feedback to meet graduate standards. Discussions. prereq: Grad student
WRIT 5052 - Graduate Research Presentations and Conference Writing for Non-Native Speakers of English
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practice in writing/presenting graduate-level research for conferences or professional seminars. Delivery of professional academic presentations to U.S. audiences. Conference abstract, paper, and poster presentation. Communication in research process. Students select topics from their own research/studies. Format, style, transitions, topic narrowing, non-verbal presentation skills. prereq: [Grad student, non-native speaker of English] or instr consent
POL 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral
Credits: 1.0 -24.0 [max 100.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required
POL 8201 - Understanding Political Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Key concepts/major approaches. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
POL 8235 - Democratic Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Competing models of democracy: classical, republican, liberal, radical, Marxist, neo-Marxist, pragmatist, populist, pluralist, postmodern, participatory. Domestic and international struggles over meaning of "democracy"; social science models of and findings on democracy. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8251 - Ancient and Medieval Political Thought
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Politics and ethics in Greece, Rome, Christendom: Thucydides, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Aquinas, Marsilius. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8252 - Early Modern Political Thought
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theorists and texts from Renaissance to French Revolution. Selectively includes Machiavelli, More, Calvin, Luther, Grotius, Bodin, Hobbes, Winstanley, Harrington, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Hume, Smith, Burke, and Wollstonecraft; key debates over liberty, law, power, and knowledge. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8253 - Late Modern Political Thought
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theoretical responses to and rival interpretations of Western economy, society, politics, and democratic culture in the modern age; theories of history; class struggle; the end of metaphysics and the death of God; technology and bureaucracy; psychology of culture, in Hegel, Marx, Tocqueville, Mill, Nietzsche, Weber, Freud. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings and research in special topics or problems.
POL 8301 - American Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar on main themes of theory and research in American politics, institutions, law, and policy. Major works on individual, mass, elite, and institutional behavior and their relationship to each other. Foundation for advanced seminars in American politics. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8302 - Public Opinion and Political Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major theoretical perspectives/research on political participation, voting behavior, public opinion. Voter turnout, importance of party identification, effects of campaigns, long-term change in public opinion, designing/conducting research. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8311 - Political Psychology and Socialization
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to political psychology. Personality and politics; political cognition, emotion, and political behavior; political expertise; media and politics; aggression, authoritarianism, and political behavior; altruism and politics. prereq: Grad pol sci major or pol psych minor or instr consent
POL 8312 - Legislative Process
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of legislative politics; theories of legislative institutions and individual behavior; congressional elections; congressional committees, parties, and leaders. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8337 - Welfare State Theories and American Social Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Rival theoretical explanations for cause and nature of welfare state development in context of four American social policies: social security, welfare, education, and healthcare. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8360 - Topics in American Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings and research in special topics or problems. prereq: instr consent
POL 8401 - International Relations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic theories/approaches to study of international politics. Surveys representative work/central issues of scholarship. prereq: Grad pol sci major or dept consent
POL 8402 - International Security
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduction to contending theories of international conflict/security. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8403 - International Norms and Institutions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Origins, roles, and effectiveness of international norms and institutions; theoretical explanations and debates. Institution of sovereignty; rational choice versus constructivist perspectives; role of international law, international organizations, and non-governmental organizations; and international society and transnational cultural norms. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8405 - International Political Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theoretical and policy issues in international economic relations. Different approaches for understanding outcomes in international economy. Trade, finance, labor markets, creation and maintenance of international regimes, and "globalization" of economic liberalism. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8460 - Topics in International Relations
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings and research in advanced topics or problems. Recent topics: global environmental issues, morality in world politics, and norms and institutions in world politics.
POL 8601 - Introduction to Comparative Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Main theoretical approaches and issues: comparative method, the state and class; political culture; development, democratization, rational choice, social movements. prereq: Grad pol sci major
POL 8637 - Comparative Political Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Connections between democracy and markets, emphasizing experiences of countries in North America and Europe. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8660 - Topics in Comparative Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings in advanced topics or problems. Supervised research/training. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
POL 8120 - Core Course in Political Methodology: Modeling Political Processes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Methods used and potential for creating models of political processes. Designing political institutions, discerning/forecasting election outcomes, producing early warnings of international conflicts, increasing turnout in elections. Using mathematics to study political strategy and collective decision making in committees/legislatures. Using statistics to measure political variables, design experiments with human subjects, and test micro/macro political theories. prereq: Pol sci grad major or instr consent
POL 8107 - Quantitative Political Science II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Multiple linear regression model applied to political science data. How to use regression techniques to analyze data, interpret statistical results, and summarize/report the findings. Estimation of model. Underlying assumptions. Inference. Model diagnostics. Extensions of model. prereq: Political science grad major or instr consent
POL 8108 - Maximum Likelihood Estimation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course presents an overview of the likelihood theory of statistical inference, and its wide range of uses in applied quantitative political science. When dependent variables take the form of ordered or unordered categories, event counts, or otherwise violate the traditional assumptions of the linear regression model, models estimated by maximum likelihood provide an essential alternative. Topics covered include binary, multinomial, and ordered logit/probit, Poisson regression, and multilevel models. We will rely heavily on computational methods of analysis using the R statistical computing environment, and instruction on how to use R for applied research will be provided throughout the length of the course.
POL 8124 - Game Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Application of noncooperative game theory in political science. Equilibrium concepts, bargaining, repeated games, games of incomplete information, signaling games, reputation, learning in games. prereq: [8122, grad pol sci major] or instr consent