Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Medieval Studies Minor

Premodern Studies, Center for
College of Liberal Arts
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Center for Premodern Studies. 1030 Heller Hall, 271 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-626-0805).
  • Program Type: Graduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Length of program in credits (master's): 6
  • Length of program in credits (doctoral): 12
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
The Medieval Studies minor covers the period between 300 and 1500 B.C.E. It includes the history, art history, theater and music history, literature, and languages of the period. The program allows students with an interest in the medieval period, or who are planning to pursue graduate work in one of the related areas, to concentrate their studies as a coherent whole.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
Special Application Requirements:
Students interested in the minor are strongly encouraged to confer with their major field advisor and director of graduate studies, and director of graduate studies for the Center of Premodern Studies regarding feasibility and requirements. Students must complete an application for the minor (available on the CMS website or in the office) and return it to the Center for Premodern Studies director of graduate studies.
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Use of 4xxx courses toward program requirements is permitted under certain conditions with adviser approval.
Use of 4xxx courses toward the minor is permitted only with the permission of the director of graduate studies in the Center of Premodern Studies. The minimum cumulative GPA for minor field coursework is 3.00.
Latin/Medieval Vernacular Coursework (3 to 6 credits)
Master's and doctoral students select 3 credits that demonstrate a command of Latin. LAT 5100 is recommended; however, another course can be substituted. Doctoral students select an additional 3 credits to meet this requirement. All courses selected must be outside the student’s major field and must be approved by the director of graduate studies.
ARAB 4xxx
CHN 5211 - Introductory Classical Chinese I (3.0 cr)
CHN 5212 - Introductory Classical Chinese II (3.0 cr)
DTCH 4001 - Beginning Dutch for Graduate Research (5.0 cr)
DTCH 4003 - Intermediate Dutch for Graduate Research (5.0 cr)
FREN 4001 - Beginning French for Graduate Student Research I (5.0 cr)
FREN 4002 - Beginning French for Graduate Student Research II (5.0 cr)
FREN 4004 - Intermediate French for Graduate Student Research II (5.0 cr)
GER 4001 - Beginning German for Graduate Research (5.0 cr)
GER 4002 - Beginning German for Graduate Research (5.0 cr)
GER 4004 - Intermediate German for Graduate Research (5.0 cr)
GRK 5003 - Intermediate Greek Prose for Graduate Student Research (4.0 cr)
HEBR 4011 - Intermediate Hebrew I for Graduate Student Research (5.0 cr)
HEBR 4104 - Beginning Biblical Hebrew I for Graduate Student Research (5.0 cr)
JPN 5211 - Introductory Classical Chinese I (3.0 cr)
KOR 5211 - Introductory Classical Chinese I (3.0 cr)
LAT 5100 - Advanced Readings in Latin Poetry (3.0 cr)
NOR 4001 - Beginning Norwegian for Graduate Research (5.0 cr)
NOR 4003 - Intermediate Norwegian for Graduate Research (5.0 cr)
PORT 4103 - Intermediate Portuguese for Graduate Student Research (5.0 cr)
RUSS 4101 - Beginning Russian for Graduate Research I (5.0 cr)
RUSS 4103 - Intermediate Russian for Graduate Research I (5.0 cr)
SCAN 4011 - Readings in Scandinavian Languages (2.0 cr)
SPAN 4001 - Beginning Spanish for Graduate Student Research (5.0 cr)
SPAN 4003 - Intermediate Spanish for Graduate Student Research (5.0 cr)
SWED 4001 - Beginning Swedish for Graduate Research (5.0 cr)
SWED 4003 - Intermediate Swedish for Graduate Research (5.0 cr)
Medieval Studies/Medieval Topics Coursework (3 to 6 credits)
Master's students select 3 credits and doctoral students select 6 credits from the following list, or other courses in consultation with the Medieval Studies director of graduate studies. Courses must be outside the student's major field. All courses must be approved by the Medieval Studies director of graduate studies.
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles (3.0 cr)
ARCH 5423 - Gothic Architecture (3.0 cr)
ARTH 5765 - Early Chinese Art (3.0 cr)
CNRC 8513 - Scripture and Interpretation (3.0 cr)
CNRC 8570 - Readings in Religious Texts (3.0 cr)
GRK 5003 - Intermediate Greek Prose for Graduate Student Research (4.0 cr)
HIST 5271 - The Viking World: Story, History, and Archaeology (3.0 cr)
HIST 8110 - Medieval History: Research Seminar (3.0 cr)
LAT 5200 - Advanced Readings in Latin Prose (3.0 cr)
LAT 8263 - Survey of Latin Literature II (3.0 cr)
LAT 8267 - Graduate Survey of Latin Literature of Late Antiquity (3.0 cr)
MEST 5610 - Advanced Topics in Medieval Studies (3.0-4.0 cr)
MEST 5993 - Directed Studies in Medieval Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
MEST 8010 - Medieval Studies Colloquium (3.0 cr)
MEST 8110 - Seminar in Medieval Studies (3.0-4.0 cr)
MUS 8631 - Seminar: Music in Medieval Europe (3.0 cr)
PHIL 8080 - Seminar: History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (3.0 cr)
POL 8251 - Ancient and Medieval Political Thought (3.0 cr)
RELS 8190 - Comparative Seminar in Religions in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
SCAN 5502 - The Icelandic Saga (3.0 cr)
SCAN 5701 - Old Norse Language and Literature (3.0 cr)
SCAN 5703 - Old Norse Poetry (3.0 cr)
SCAN 8500 - Seminar in Medieval Scandinavian Languages and Literature (3.0 cr)
SPAN 5160 - Medieval Iberian Literatures and Cultures (3.0 cr)
SPAN 5701 - History of Ibero-Romance (3.0 cr)
SPAN 8312 - Two Spanish Masterpieces: [Libro de Buen Amor] and [La Celestina] (3.0 cr)
Old English I
ENGL 4612 - Old English I (3.0 cr)
or MEST 4612 - Old English I (3.0 cr)
Old English II
ENGL 4613 - Old English II (3.0 cr)
or MEST 4613 - Old English II (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
Masters
Doctoral
 
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CHN 5211 - Introductory Classical Chinese I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chn 5211/Jpn 5211/Kor 5211
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading excerpts from canonical Chinese texts. Transnational nature of Classical Chinese/its importance in study of East Asian cultures. Taught in English. prereq: Two years of an East Asian language (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) or equivalent or instr consent
CHN 5212 - Introductory Classical Chinese II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chn 5212/Jpn 5212/Kor 5212
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Reading excerpts from canonical Chinese texts. Transnational nature of Classical Chinese/its importance in study of East Asian cultures. Taught in English. prereq: 5211 and two years of an East Asian language (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) or its equivalent or instr consent
DTCH 4001 - Beginning Dutch for Graduate Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Dtch 1001/Dtch 4001
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Emphasis on working toward novice-intermediate low proficiency in all four language modalities (listening, reading, speaking, writing). Topics include everyday subjects (shopping, directions, family, food, housing, etc.). Meets concurrently with 1001.
DTCH 4003 - Intermediate Dutch for Graduate Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Dtch 1003/Dtch 4003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Emphasis on intermediate proficiency in listening, reading, speaking, and writing. Contextualized work on grammar and vocabulary is combined with authentic readings and essay assignments. Meets concurrently with 1003.
FREN 4001 - Beginning French for Graduate Student Research I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fren 1001/Mont 1001/Fren 4001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Bonjour! Join us in learning the global language of diplomacy, culture, cuisine, and commerce! French is spoken on five continents, in approximately 40 countries, and even in Maine and Louisiana. Studying French will deepen your understanding of world history and the relationships between different cultures around the globe and close to home. Studying the language of Les Misérables, Monet, and joie de vivre allows you to access some of the most amazing art, thought, and food on the planet! Beginning French (French 1001) is designed for students with little or no knowledge of the French language. It focuses on developing your intercultural, reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills. By the end of this course, you will be able to communicate about family, housing, and school. You will also gain familiarity with French-speaking communities around the world. The course features preparatory and practice activities outside of class designed to encourage analysis of language structure so that class time can be primarily devoted to meaningful interaction in French.
FREN 4002 - Beginning French for Graduate Student Research II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fren 1002/4002/4022/Mont 1002
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Bienvenue en 4002! Ready to embark on a new journey to further develop your knowledge of the beautiful language of French? If you passed French 1001/4001 or have taken the Entrance Proficiency Test (EPT) and were placed in 1002, this course is for you! While exploring topics such as French holidays and cultural celebrations and traditions, food, and ecology, you will further develop your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. You will also learn about the concept of laïcité, one of the pillars of French society, and the differences and similarities between the school systems in France and the US. Preparatory activities designed to encourage students to analyze grammar points need to be completed at home so that class time can be primarily devoted to meaningful interactions in French. prereq: FREN 1001/4001 or equivalent.
FREN 4004 - Intermediate French for Graduate Student Research II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fren 1004/Mont 1004/Fren 4004
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Vous êtes les bienvenus! Come join us in exploring some of the foundations of cultural identity. What does it mean to be "French?" What does it mean to be "American?" What are some things that people living within a particular culture have in common as a function of living in that culture? Where do personal and cultural identities intersect? We pay special attention to development of Intercultural Competence, comparing how food, child-rearing practices, elements of national identity, and diversity are treated in France and the US. We revisit many grammar concepts you have seen before, focusing on accuracy and extended language use. This course will allow you to be much more confident in using comparisons, narrating (past and present), linking ideas together into longer discourse, describing, etc. Upon successful completion of this course, you should be solidly in the Intermediate ranges of proficiency in French, able to travel and/or use French for your own goals. You will also be prepared for more advanced study in French here or abroad. prereq: C- or better in FREN 1003/4003, or EPT/LPE (for students taking their first French course at the U)
GER 4001 - Beginning German for Graduate Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ger 1001/Ger 4001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Emphasis on working toward novice-intermediate low proficiency in all four language modalities (listening, reading, speaking, writing). Topics include everyday subjects (shopping, directions, family, food, housing, etc.). Meets concurrently with 1001. prereq: Grad student
GER 4002 - Beginning German for Graduate Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ger 1002/Ger 4002
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Listening, reading, speaking, writing. Emphasizes proficiency. Topics include free-time activities, careers, and culture of German-speaking areas. Meets concurrently with 1002. prereq: Grad student
GER 4004 - Intermediate German for Graduate Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ger 1004/Ger 4004
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Listening, reading, speaking, writing. Contextualized grammar/vocabulary. Authentic readings. Essay assignments. Meets concurrently with 1004. prereq: Grad student
GRK 5003 - Intermediate Greek Prose for Graduate Student Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 3003/Grk 3113/Grk 5003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to Athenian prose authors of 5th/4th centuries BCE. Readings of continuous passages of unadapted Greek texts (history, speeches). Review of grammar/vocabulary. Some discussion of major themes/issues in Greek culture as illustrated by texts. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in [1002 or 5001] or [instr consent, grad student]
HEBR 4011 - Intermediate Hebrew I for Graduate Student Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 3011/Hebr 4011
Typically offered: Every Fall
Prepares students for CLA language requirement. Speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of modern Hebrew. Students read and discuss prose, poetry, news, and film. Taught primarily in Hebrew. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in [1002 or 4002] or instr consent
HEBR 4104 - Beginning Biblical Hebrew I for Graduate Student Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 1101/Hebr 4104
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The Hebrew Bible is one of the most important literary texts in world history, and one of the most culturally and morally influential in the development of western civilization. Most of this influence, however, has been via translation. Have you ever wondered if you can trust the translation? Does the Adam and Eve story really say what you think it does? Does the Hebrew Bible really include all the strict moral pronouncements and prohibitions that are attributed to it? This course offers the tools you need to read simple narrative texts in the Bible for yourself, while also introducing you to multiple approaches in biblical scholarship. Biblical Hebrew also satisfies the CLA Language requirement.
JPN 5211 - Introductory Classical Chinese I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chn 5211/Jpn 5211/Kor 5211
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading excerpts from canonical Chinese texts. Transnational nature of Classical Chinese/its importance in study of East Asian cultures. Taught in English. prereq: Two years of an East Asian language (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) or equivalent or instr consent
KOR 5211 - Introductory Classical Chinese I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chn 5211/Jpn 5211/Kor 5211
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading excerpts from canonical Chinese texts. Transnational nature of Classical Chinese/its importance in study of East Asian cultures. Taught in English. prereq: Two years of an East Asian language (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) or equivalent or instr consent
LAT 5100 - Advanced Readings in Latin Poetry
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The primary material for this course will be a selection of readings from three or more different Latin poets connected by genre (e.g. epic, dramatic, lyric), theme (e.g. heroism and the hero, the body, the good life), period (e.g. Augustan, late Antique), or the like. Primary readings and critical approach will vary from year to year, making the course repeatable. Some modern secondary reading will be assigned to provide a basis for discussion and a model for student written work. prereq: [3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Contact the Classical & Near Eastern Religions & Cultures Department with any questions.
NOR 4001 - Beginning Norwegian for Graduate Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Nor 1001/4001
Typically offered: Every Fall
Emphasis on working toward novice-intermediate low proficiency in all four language modalities (listening, reading, speaking, writing). Topics include everyday subjects (shopping, directions, family, food, housing, etc.). Meets concurrently with 1001.
NOR 4003 - Intermediate Norwegian for Graduate Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Nor 1003/4003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Emphasis on intermediate proficiency in listening, reading, speaking, and writing. Contextualized work on grammar and vocabulary is combined with authentic readings and essay assignments. Meets concurrently with 1003.
PORT 4103 - Intermediate Portuguese for Graduate Student Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Port 1103/Port 4103
Typically offered: Every Fall
Emphasizes speaking, comprehension. Reading/writing skills based on Portuguese-language materials. Cultures of Portugal, Brazil, or Lusophone Africa. Meets concurrently with 1103.
RUSS 4101 - Beginning Russian for Graduate Research I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Russ 1101/Russ 4101
Typically offered: Every Fall
Listening, speaking, reading, writing.
RUSS 4103 - Intermediate Russian for Graduate Research I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Russ 3001/Russ 4103
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conversation, composition, grammar review, translation, readings in literature. prereq: 4102
SCAN 4011 - Readings in Scandinavian Languages
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Scan 3011W/Scan 4011
Typically offered: Every Fall
Meets with 3011W. See 3011W for description. prereq: Grad student
SPAN 4001 - Beginning Spanish for Graduate Student Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Span 1001/Span 4001
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Listening, speaking, reading, writing. Emphasizes development of communicative competence. Cultural readings. Prereq: Less than 2 yrs of High School Spanish, and dept consent
SPAN 4003 - Intermediate Spanish for Graduate Student Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Span 1003/Span 4003
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Speaking/comprehension. Developing reading/writing skills based on materials from Spain/Spanish America. Grammar review. Compositions, oral presentations. Meets concurrently with 1003. Prereq: A Grade of C- or better in SPAN 1002 or SPAN 4002 or SPAN 1022 or SPAN 4022 or EPT placement of SPAN 1003
SWED 4001 - Beginning Swedish for Graduate Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Swed 1001/4001
Typically offered: Every Fall
Emphasis on working toward novice-intermediate low proficiency in all four language modalities (listening, reading, speaking, writing). Topics include everyday subjects (shopping, directions, family, food, housing, etc.). Meets concurrently with 1001.
SWED 4003 - Intermediate Swedish for Graduate Research
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Swed 1003/4003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Emphasis on intermediate proficiency in listening, reading, speaking, and writing. Contextualized work on grammar and vocabulary is combined with authentic readings and essay assignments. Meets concurrently with 1003.
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Have you ever wondered how archaeologists interpret the vast amount of archaeological evidence from the British Isles, one of the most studied and best documented parts of the world? And how do archaeologists and governmental agencies protect the heritage of Britain, from major monuments such as Stonehenge, Roman forts, and Shakespeare?s theaters, to the minor products of craft industries such as personal ornaments and coins? This course teaches you about the archaeology of the British Isles, in all of its aspects. You learn how archaeologists study the changing societies of Britain and Ireland, from the first settlers about a million years ago to modern times. You learn about the strategies that public institutions employ to preserve and protect archaeological sites, and about the place of archaeology in tourism in the British Isles and in the formation of identities among the diverse peoples of modern Britain.
ARCH 5423 - Gothic Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Arch 4423/Arch 5423
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
History of architecture and urban design in Western Europe, from 1150 to 1400. prereq: MS Arch or M Arch major or instr consent
ARTH 5765 - Early Chinese Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Art/material culture of early China from Neolithic age (ca. 10000-2000 BCE) to early imperial period (221 BCE-906 CE).
CNRC 8513 - Scripture and Interpretation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 5513W/JwSt 5513W/RelS 551
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Ideas of divine revelation. Impact upon religion/literature. How history of Bible's creation, transmission, interpretation helps us think critically about role of revelation in history of religious traditions. prereq: Grad student
CNRC 8570 - Readings in Religious Texts
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 8570/RelS 8070
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Close reading of selected literary or epigraphical texts of importance for the history of ancient Mediterranean religions, along with critical discussion of trends in recent scholarship. The texts may be read in the original languages (such as Greek, Latin, Hebrew, etc.) but may also be accessed in translation where appropriate.
GRK 5003 - Intermediate Greek Prose for Graduate Student Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 3003/Grk 3113/Grk 5003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to Athenian prose authors of 5th/4th centuries BCE. Readings of continuous passages of unadapted Greek texts (history, speeches). Review of grammar/vocabulary. Some discussion of major themes/issues in Greek culture as illustrated by texts. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in [1002 or 5001] or [instr consent, grad student]
HIST 5271 - The Viking World: Story, History, and Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3271/5271/MEST3271/ 5271
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Viking society and expansion of Viking influence abroad. Viking impact on Western Europe, interactions with Slavic lands, settlement of North Atlantic islands, Western Europe's impact on Scandinavian lands. Analyzes archaeological, historical, linguistic, and numismatic evidence.
HIST 8110 - Medieval History: Research Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Research in medieval European history, using primary source material. prereq: instr consent, good reading knowledge of Latin, French, one other European language
LAT 5200 - Advanced Readings in Latin Prose
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The primary material for this course will be a selection of readings from three or more different Latin prose authors connected by genre (e.g. historical writing, philosophy, religious texts), theme (e.g. Epicureanism and Stoicism, Christian apologetics, grammarians), period (e.g. Republican, Late Imperial), or the like. Primary readings and critical approach will vary from year to year, making the course repeatable. Some modern secondary reading will be assigned to provide a basis for discussion and a model for student written work. prereq: [LAT 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Contact the Classical & Near Eastern Religions & Cultures department (CNRC) with any questions.
LAT 8263 - Survey of Latin Literature II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Variety of works from Augustan and imperial periods.
LAT 8267 - Graduate Survey of Latin Literature of Late Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Latin literature of 3rd to 6th centuries A.D., including Ammianus and Augustine. prereq: instr consent, dept consent
MEST 5610 - Advanced Topics in Medieval Studies
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
From late antiquity through end of Middle Ages (circa 300-1500 A.D.). Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: One yr work in some area of Middle Ages, reading knowledge of appropriate language.
MEST 5993 - Directed Studies in Medieval Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Directed study with one of the core faculty of medieval studies program. prereq: One yr work in some area of Middle Ages, reading knowledge of appropriate language, instr consent
MEST 8010 - Medieval Studies Colloquium
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Lectures by and discussions with faculty and visiting speakers.
MEST 8110 - Seminar in Medieval Studies
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 48.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Offered when feasible. prereq: Appropriate languages
MUS 8631 - Seminar: Music in Medieval Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Selected genres of polyphonic and monophonic music, 9th-14th centuries, for analysis and cultural criticism. Social roles of music and performance traditions; current musicological issues. prereq: Undergrad music degree
PHIL 8080 - Seminar: History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics vary by offering. prereq: instr consent
POL 8251 - Ancient and Medieval Political Thought
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Politics and ethics in Greece, Rome, Christendom: Thucydides, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Aquinas, Marsilius. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
RELS 8190 - Comparative Seminar in Religions in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics vary. Major cultural movement as it developed over several centuries. Draws on evidence in literature, archival records, inscriptions, documentary papyri, and archaeological remains. Artistic media such as wall painting, architectural ornament, funerary sculpture, or manuscript illumination. prereq: Grad student in relevant field
SCAN 5502 - The Icelandic Saga
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of the sagas written in 13th-century Iceland. Discussion includes cultural and historical information about medieval Iceland and analysis of a selection of saga texts using contemporary critical approaches. All readings in translation.
SCAN 5701 - Old Norse Language and Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MEST 5701/SCAN 5701
Typically offered: Every Fall
Acquisition of a reading knowledge of Old Norse; linguistic, philological and literary study of Old Norse language and literature.
SCAN 5703 - Old Norse Poetry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading and analysis of either eddic poetry from the Poetic Edda or skaldic poetry. Texts read in Old Norse.
SCAN 8500 - Seminar in Medieval Scandinavian Languages and Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Sample topics: [Volsunga Saga], studies in Snorri Sturluson's [Edda], dialogue analysis in the Icelandic saga.
SPAN 5160 - Medieval Iberian Literatures and Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The major literary genres developed in Spain from the Reconquest to 1502, with reference to the crucial transformations of the Middle Ages, including primitive lyric, epic, clerical narrative, storytelling, debates, collections, chronicles, "exempla," and the Celestina (1499-1502).
SPAN 5701 - History of Ibero-Romance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Origins and developments of Ibero-Romance languages; evolution of Spanish, Portuguese, and Catalan. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
SPAN 8312 - Two Spanish Masterpieces: [Libro de Buen Amor] and [La Celestina]
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Cultural reappraisal of the late Middle Ages by reference to two Spanish masterpieces: the Archpriest's [Book of True Love] and Rojas' [La Celestina] (1499-1502). Emphasizes historical function of varied genres, motifs, and sources adapted by the authors. prereq: 5106, 5107 or 5xxx course in Portuguese
ENGL 4612 - Old English I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 4612/EngL 5612/MeSt 4612
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
"I am learning Anglo-Saxon and it is a vastly superior thing to what we have now" (Gerard Manley Hopkins, letter to fellow poet Robert Bridges, 1882). This course is an introduction to the rich language and literature of Anglo-Saxon England (ca. 500-1100). "Old English," or as it is sometimes known, "Anglo-Saxon," is the earliest form of the English language; therefore, the primary course goal will be to acquire the ability to read Old English texts in the original. No previous experience with Old English or any other language is necessary or expected; undergraduates and graduate students from all departments are welcome. For graduate students in English, Old English I may count for the rhetoric/language/literacy distribution area. This course also fulfills the literary theory/linguistic requirement for the undergraduate English major. A knowledge of Old English will allow you to touch the most ancient literary sensibilities in the English tradition; these sensibilities are familiar and strange at the same time, as we sense our deep cultural connection to these texts across the centuries, yet also find that the past is a strange place indeed. The power of Old English literature has profoundly influenced authors such as Tennyson, Pound, Graves, Wilbur, Hopkins, Gunn, Auden, Seamus Heaney, C.S. Lewis, and of course, J.R.R. Tolkien.
MEST 4612 - Old English I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 4612/EngL 5612/MeSt 4612
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
"I am learning Anglo-Saxon and it is a vastly superior thing to what we have now" (Gerard Manley Hopkins, letter to fellow poet Robert Bridges, 1882). This course is an introduction to the rich language and literature of Anglo-Saxon England (ca. 500-1100). "Old English," or as it is sometimes known, "Anglo-Saxon," is the earliest form of the English language; therefore, the primary course goal will be to acquire the ability to read Old English texts in the original. No previous experience with Old English or any other language is necessary or expected; undergraduates and graduate students from all departments are welcome. For graduate students in English, Old English I may count for the rhetoric/language/literacy distribution area. This course also fulfills the literary theory/linguistic requirement for the undergraduate English major. A knowledge of Old English will allow you to touch the most ancient literary sensibilities in the English tradition; these sensibilities are familiar and strange at the same time, as we sense our deep cultural connection to these texts across the centuries, yet also find that the past is a strange place indeed. The power of Old English literature has profoundly influenced authors such as Tennyson, Pound, Graves, Wilbur, Hopkins, Gunn, Auden, Seamus Heaney, C.S. Lewis, and of course, J.R.R. Tolkien.
ENGL 4613 - Old English II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 4613/MeSt 4613
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The second semester of Old English is devoted to a full translation and study of the great Anglo-Saxon epic "Beowulf." J.R.R. Tolkien wrote of the poem that "its maker was telling of things already old and weighted with regret, and he expended his art in making keen that touch upon the heart which sorrows have that are both poignant and remote." "Beowulf" is an exciting tale of strife and heroism; but it is also a subtle meditation upon the character of humanity as it struggles to understand the hazards of a harsh world, the inscrutability of fate, and the nature of history itself. "Beowulf" is not only important for a detailed understanding of Anglo-Saxon culture, but it is also a significant and moving poetic achievement in the context of world literature. We will read and translate the poem in the original Old English; thus ENGL 4612 (or a similar course resulting in a basic reading knowledge of Old English) is a prerequisite. "Beowulf" has been the object of intensive scholarly study; we will delve into the debates over the poem's date, genesis, manuscript and historical context and critical interpretation. Spending an entire semester studying one complex work can be an invaluable experience. Please contact the instructor for any questions concerning the prerequisite.
MEST 4613 - Old English II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 4613/MeSt 4613
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The second semester of Old English is devoted to a full translation and study of the great Anglo-Saxon epic "Beowulf." J.R.R. Tolkien wrote of the poem that "its maker was telling of things already old and weighted with regret, and he expended his art in making keen that touch upon the heart which sorrows have that are both poignant and remote." "Beowulf" is an exciting tale of strife and heroism; but it is also a subtle meditation upon the character of humanity as it struggles to understand the hazards of a harsh world, the inscrutability of fate, and the nature of history itself. "Beowulf" is not only important for a detailed understanding of Anglo-Saxon culture, but it is also a significant and moving poetic achievement in the context of world literature. We will read and translate the poem in the original Old English; thus ENGL 4612 (or a similar course resulting in a basic reading knowledge of Old English) is a prerequisite. "Beowulf" has been the object of intensive scholarly study; we will delve into the debates over the poem's date, genesis, manuscript and historical context and critical interpretation. Spending an entire semester studying one complex work can be an invaluable experience. Please contact the instructor for any questions concerning the prerequisite.