Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Mass Communication Ph.D.

School of Journalism & Mass Communication
College of Liberal Arts
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Hubbard School of Journalism and Mass Communication, 111 Murphy Hall, 206 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-625-1338; fax: 612-625-9525)
  • Program Type: Doctorate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2021
  • Length of program in credits: 70
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Doctor of Philosophy
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The Mass Communication PhD offers training for academic careers primarily in mass communication instruction, research, or policy. Areas of specialization include media processes, influences, and effects (including journalism, health communication, advertising, public relations, and political communication); media law, ethics, history; and media management. The program is suffused with the study of new communication technologies.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Students for whom English is a second language must meet the minimum acceptable level of spoken-English proficiency either by submitting TOEFL speaking test score of 18 or higher or SETTA test ELP rating of 4 or higher. Admission is considered for fall semester only; the application deadline is January 15. Applicants interested in the PhD in Mass Communication/JD degree must submit applications to Mass Communication and the Law School, which are reviewed separately. Applicants are asked to identify their intention to pursue the joint degree in their PhD statement of intent. For more information, contact sjmcgrad@umn.edu.
Special Application Requirements:
Applicants must submit a department application; a clearly written statement of career interests, goals, and objectives; three letters of recommendation from persons familiar with their scholarship and research potential; a complete set of transcripts; academic work samples in English; a resume or curriculum vita; and scores from the General Test of the GRE.
Applicants must submit their test score(s) from the following:
  • GRE
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
  • IELTS
  • MELAB
Key to test abbreviations (GRE, TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
34 credits are required in the major.
12 credits are required outside the major.
24 thesis credits are required.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses toward program requirements is permitted under certain conditions with adviser approval.
A minimum GPA of 3.50 is required for students to remain in good standing.
All coursework offered on the A/F and S/N grade basis must be taken A/F.
Mass Communication Theory Core Requirements (4 credits)
Take the following courses:
JOUR 8001 - Studies and Theories of Mass Communication (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8009 - Pro-seminar in Mass Communication (1.0 cr)
Second Theory Requirement (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following in consultation with the advisor. Other courses can be applied to this requirement with advisor approval.
JOUR 8002 - Studies in Mass Communication II (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8003 - Digital Media Issues and Theories (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8514 - Seminar: Advanced Mass Communication Theories (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8602 - Seminar: History of Mass Communication (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8620 - Seminar: Advertising Theory and Research (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8621 - Seminar: Public Relations Theory and Research (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8650 - Seminar: Psychology of Media Effects (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8651 - Seminar: Mass Communication, Audiences, and Society (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8661 - Seminar: Mediated Political Communication in the Digital Age (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8675 - Seminar: Issues in Information Access and Communication (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8678 - Seminar: Constitutional Law--Theories of Freedom of Expression (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8681 - Seminar: International Media Perspectives (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8720 - Health Communication Theory and Research (3.0 cr)
Methodology Core Requirements (6 credits)
Take the following courses:
JOUR 8501 - Research Methods in Mass Communication (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8503 - Advanced Qualitative Methods in Mass Communication Research (3.0 cr)
Additional Method Requirement (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following in consultation with the advisor. Other courses can be applied to this requirement with advisor approval.
EPSY 5244 - Survey Design, Sampling, and Implementation (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5247 - Qualitative Methods in Educational Psychology (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5262 - Intermediate Statistical Methods (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8265 - Factor Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8267 - Applied Multivariate Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8282 - Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8283 - Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis (3.0 cr)
HIST 8015 - Scope and Methods of Historical Studies (3.0 cr)
HIST 8021 - History Research Seminar (3.0 cr)
PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
PSY 5865 - Advanced Psychological and Educational Measurement (4.0 cr)
PSY 8209 - Research Methods in Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
PSY 8815 - Analysis of Psychological Data (4.0 cr)
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics (4.0 cr)
SOC 8851 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: In-Depth Interviewing (3.0 cr)
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum (3.0 cr)
SOC 8853 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Historical & Comparative Sociology (3.0 cr)
Electives (18 credits)
Select 18 credits in consultation with the advisor from the following. Other courses can be applied to this requirement with advisor approval.
JOUR 5501 - Communication, Public Opinion, and Social Media (3.0 cr)
JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health (3.0 cr)
JOUR 5552 - Law of Internet Communication (3.0 cr)
JOUR 5601W - History of Journalism [WI] (3.0 cr)
JOUR 5725 - Management of Media Organizations (3.0 cr)
JOUR 5777 - Contemporary Problems in Freedom of Speech and Press (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8002 - Studies in Mass Communication II (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8003 - Digital Media Issues and Theories (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8502 - Advanced Quantitative Research Methods (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8504 - Seminar: Analyzing Media Content (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8513 - Seminar: Ethnographic Methods in Mass Communication Research (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8514 - Seminar: Advanced Mass Communication Theories (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8601 - Seminar: Methods in Mass Communication History Research (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8602 - Seminar: History of Mass Communication (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8603 - Seminar: Theories and Models in Mass Communication History Research (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8620 - Seminar: Advertising Theory and Research (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8621 - Seminar: Public Relations Theory and Research (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8650 - Seminar: Psychology of Media Effects (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8651 - Seminar: Mass Communication, Audiences, and Society (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8661 - Seminar: Mediated Political Communication in the Digital Age (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8673 - Seminar: Media Management (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8675 - Seminar: Issues in Information Access and Communication (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8678 - Seminar: Constitutional Law--Theories of Freedom of Expression (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8679 - Seminar: Research Methods in Media Ethics and Law (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8681 - Seminar: International Media Perspectives (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8720 - Health Communication Theory and Research (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8721 - Seminar: Communication Agencies as Social Institutions (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8801 - Seminar: Comparative Research in Mass Communication, a Cross-National Approach (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8990 - Special Problems in Mass Communications (3.0-4.0 cr)
JOUR 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-6.0 cr)
Outside Coursework (12 credits)
Select 12 credits of outside coursework, in consultation with the advisor, from the following. Other courses can be applied to this requirement with advisor approval.
ANTH 8001 - Ethnography, Theory, History (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
COMM 8211 - Critical Communication Studies: History, Theory, Method (3.0 cr)
COMM 8611 - Seminar: Rhetoric (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5244 - Survey Design, Sampling, and Implementation (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5245 - Advanced Survey Data Analysis for Categorical and Rating Scale Data (1.0 cr)
EPSY 5247 - Qualitative Methods in Educational Psychology (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5262 - Intermediate Statistical Methods (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8113 - The Psychology of Scientific Reasoning (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8114 - Seminar: Cognition and Learning (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8118 - Advanced Cognitive Psychology (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8265 - Factor Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8267 - Applied Multivariate Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8282 - Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8283 - Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis (3.0 cr)
HIST 8015 - Scope and Methods of Historical Studies (3.0 cr)
HIST 8021 - History Research Seminar (3.0 cr)
LAW 6007 - Constitutional Law (3.0 cr)
LAW 6103 - Data Privacy Law (3.0 cr)
LAW 6207 - Antitrust (3.0 cr)
LAW 6650 - Advanced Administrative Law (3.0 cr)
LAW 6804 - Government Secrecy (2.0 cr)
LAW 6832 - Cybercrime and Cybersecurity (2.0 cr)
MKTG 8809 - Consumer Behavior Research Methods (2.0 cr)
MKTG 8810 - Consumer Behavior Special Topics (2.0 cr)
MKTG 8811 - Consumer Attitudes and Persuasion I (2.0 cr)
MKTG 8812 - Consumer Attitudes and Persuasion II (2.0 cr)
MKTG 8813 - Consumer Judgment and Decision Making I (2.0 cr)
MKTG 8814 - Consumer Judgment and Decision Making II (2.0 cr)
MKTG 8831 - Seminar: Inter-Organizational Relations (4.0 cr)
MKTG 8842 - Quantitative Modeling I (2.0 cr)
MKTG 8843 - Quantitative Modeling II (2.0 cr)
MKTG 8851 - Seminar: Marketing Management and Strategy I (2.0 cr)
MKTG 8852 - Marketing Management & Strategy II (2.0 cr)
MSBA 6310 - Programming for Data Science (3.0 cr)
MSBA 6320 - Data Management, Databases, and Data Warehousing (3.0 cr)
MSBA 6330 - Big Data Analytics (3.0 cr)
MSBA 6410 - Exploratory Data Analytics (3.0 cr)
MSBA 6420 - Predictive Analytics (3.0 cr)
POL 8360 - Topics in American Politics (3.0 cr)
POL 8460 - Topics in International Relations (3.0 cr)
PSY 5014 - Psychology of Human Learning and Memory (3.0 cr)
PSY 5015 - Cognition, Computation, and Brain (3.0 cr)
PSY 5052 - Psychology of Attention (3.0 cr)
PSY 5062 - Cognitive Neuropsychology (3.0 cr)
PSY 5101 - Personality: Current Theory and Research (3.0 cr)
PSY 5202 - Attitudes and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
PSY 5205 - Applied Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
PSY 5206 - Social Psychology and Health Behavior (3.0 cr)
PSY 5207 - Personality and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
PSY 5708 - Organizational Psychology (3.0 cr)
PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
PSY 5865 - Advanced Psychological and Educational Measurement (4.0 cr)
PSY 8201 - Social Cognition (3.0 cr)
PSY 8205 - Principles of Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
PSY 8208 - Social Psychology: The Self (3.0 cr)
PSY 8209 - Research Methods in Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
PSY 8815 - Analysis of Psychological Data (4.0 cr)
PUBH 6250 - Foundations of Public Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6450 - Biostatistics I (4.0 cr)
PUBH 6451 - Biostatistics II (4.0 cr)
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
SOC 8701 - Sociological Theory (4.0 cr)
SOC 8790 - Advanced Topics in Sociological Theory (3.0 cr)
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics (4.0 cr)
SOC 8851 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: In-Depth Interviewing (3.0 cr)
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum (3.0 cr)
SOC 8853 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Historical & Comparative Sociology (3.0 cr)
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
STAT 5101 - Theory of Statistics I (4.0 cr)
STAT 5102 - Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations (3.0 cr)
STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis (4.0 cr)
STAT 5303 - Designing Experiments (4.0 cr)
STAT 5401 - Applied Multivariate Methods (3.0 cr)
STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data (3.0 cr)
STAT 5511 - Time Series Analysis (3.0 cr)
STAT 5601 - Nonparametric Methods (3.0 cr)
STAT 8051 - Advanced Regression Techniques: linear, nonlinear and nonparametric methods (3.0 cr)
STAT 8052 - Applied Statistical Methods 2: Design of Experiments and Mixed -Effects Modeling (3.0 cr)
STAT 8053 - Applied Statistical Methods 3: Multivariate Analysis and Advanced Regression (3.0 cr)
Subgroup
LAW 5026 - Intellectual Property and Technology Proseminar (1.0 cr)
or LAW 6926 - Intellectual Property and Technology Proseminar (1.0 cr)
Subgroup 1
LAW 5908 - Independent Research and Writing (1.0-2.0 cr)
or LAW 7606 - Independent Research and Writing (1.0-2.0 cr)
or LAW 7608 - Independent Research and Writing (1.0-2.0 cr)
Thesis Credits
Take 24 doctoral thesis credits.
JOUR 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral (1.0-24.0 cr)
Joint- or Dual-degree Coursework:
JD/ Mass Communications PhD
 
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JOUR 8001 - Studies and Theories of Mass Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to key concepts, theories, methods in study of mass communication from social sciences perspective. Survey of research literature using individualistic/structural approaches.
JOUR 8009 - Pro-seminar in Mass Communication
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction/socialization to scholarly discipline of mass communication, mass communication pedagogy, pathways to successful career. Develop action plan for completing graduate school/starting career in academy or relevant communication industries. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program
JOUR 8002 - Studies in Mass Communication II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Literature on history of the field, cultural and humanistic approaches to its study, and legal and ethical issues. prereq: 8001
JOUR 8003 - Digital Media Issues and Theories
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Nonprofessional skills course. Prepares entering graduate students to work in changing media environment. Political, social, economic, legal, ethical, technological implications nationally/globally. Produce scholarly research about changing media. prereq: Journalism grad student
JOUR 8514 - Seminar: Advanced Mass Communication Theories
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Research paradigms, concepts, findings for developing general theory of mass communication. prereq: 8001
JOUR 8602 - Seminar: History of Mass Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Research in history/development of U.S. mass media.
JOUR 8620 - Seminar: Advertising Theory and Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advertising as persuasive communication. Current research/theory related to advertising decision-making process. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8621 - Seminar: Public Relations Theory and Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of theoretical body of knowledge in public relations field. Diverse roles played by public relations in organization. Current state of public relations research in regard to theory building. How theory informs professional practice of public relations. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8650 - Seminar: Psychology of Media Effects
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In-depth study of psychological concepts/theories concerning individual cognitive processing of content of both traditional/new electronic media. Critically evaluate latest empirical research concerning how individuals respond to the content of both traditional mass media/newest electronic digital media. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8651 - Seminar: Mass Communication, Audiences, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Interplay between social theories/media studies. Pragmatism, structural-functionalism, Marxism, political economy, cultural studies, globalization. prereq: 8001 or 8002 or equiv
JOUR 8661 - Seminar: Mediated Political Communication in the Digital Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Mediated political communication in the digital age. How news, advertising, and entertainment media shape political perceptions, motivate voters, and influence policy decisions. Agenda-setting, priming, and framing, networked communications, micro-targeting, and mobile technology.
JOUR 8675 - Seminar: Issues in Information Access and Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Societal, industry, technological, and policy aspects/developments that affect information access, particularly through mass media. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8678 - Seminar: Constitutional Law--Theories of Freedom of Expression
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Jour 8678/Law 6059
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problems of constitutional/tort law affecting the press. Underlying theories. prereq: 5777 or instr consent or law student
JOUR 8681 - Seminar: International Media Perspectives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Main problems/currents. Concepts, research, policy relevant to global development. Issues of freedom/constraint, media technology, role of journalism in world affairs.
JOUR 8720 - Health Communication Theory and Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theories, methods, research that characterize field of health communication. Mass media influence on health, including use of mass media to promote health behaviors. Theoretical frameworks that inform health communication scholarship, as well as methodological approaches to studying health communication issues. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8501 - Research Methods in Mass Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Epistemological issues and overview of qualitative and quantitative methodological approaches in mass communication research, basic principles and logic of scientific research, relationship between theory and research, concept explication, measurement, instrumentation, and design issues.
JOUR 8503 - Advanced Qualitative Methods in Mass Communication Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced qualitative research principles/techniques applied to mass communication research, including ethnography, interviews, focus groups, case study, qualitative content analysis, historical research.   prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
EPSY 5244 - Survey Design, Sampling, and Implementation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey methods, including mail, phone, and Web-based/e-mail surveys. Principles of measurement, constructing questions/forms, pilot testing, sampling, data analysis, reporting. Students develop a survey proposal and a draft survey, pilot the survey, and develop sampling/data analysis plans. prereq: [5221 or 5231 or 5261 or equiv], [CEHD grad student or MEd student]
EPSY 5247 - Qualitative Methods in Educational Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to qualitative methods of inquiry. Contrasting different research traditions (e.g., case study, phenomenology, ethnography, social interactionism, critical theory). Practice with field notes, observations, and interviewing. Use of NVIVO to track/code data. prereq: Graduate student or Applied Psychology in Educational and Community Settings Minor
EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/5231/5261/5263
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
EPSY 5261 is designed to engage students in statistics as a principled approach to data collection, prediction, and scientific inference. Students first learn about data collection (e.g., random sampling, random assignment) and examine data descriptively using graphs and numerical summaries. Students build conceptual understanding of statistical inference through the use of simulation-based methods (bootstrapping and randomization) before going on to learn parametric methods, such as t-tests (one-sample and two-sample means), z-tests (one-sample and two-sample proportions), chi-square tests, and regression. This course uses pedagogical methods grounded in research, such as small group activities and discussion. Attention undergraduates: As this is a graduate level course, it does not fulfill the Mathematical Thinking Liberal Education requirement. If you would like to take a statistics course in our department that fulfills that requirement, please consider EPSY 3264.
EPSY 5262 - Intermediate Statistical Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of statistical concepts/procedures. Analysis of variance, covariance, multiple regression. Experimental design: completely randomized, block, split plot/repeated measures. prereq: 3264 or 5261 or equiv
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8251/EPsy 8261
Prerequisites: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Statistical Methods in Education I is the first course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course covers estimation and hypothesis testing with a particular focus on ANOVA and an introduction to multiple linear regression. Prepares students for EPSY 8252/8262. prereq: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8252/EPsy 8262
Prerequisites: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical Methods in Education II is the second course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course focuses on multiple linear regression and provides an introduction to linear mixed models. prereq: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
General linear model used as context for regression. Matrix algebra, multiple regression, path analysis, polynomial regression, standardized regression, stepwise solutions, analysis of variance, weighted least squares, logistic regression. prereq: [8252 or equiv], regression/ANOVA course, familiarity with statistical analysis package
EPSY 8265 - Factor Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [8252 or equiv or #]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Factor analytic techniques/applications. Component, common factor, confirmatory analysis. Factor extraction, estimating number of dimensions. Rotation, factor scores, hierarchical factor analysis. prereq: [8252 or equiv or instr consent]
EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Quantitative techniques using manifest/latent variable approaches for analysis of educational/social science data. Introduction to structural equation modeling approaches to multiple regression, factor analysis, path modeling. Developing, estimating, interpreting structural equation models. prereq: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
EPSY 8267 - Applied Multivariate Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Use/interpretation of results from several multivariate statistical techniques. Matrix algebra, variance/covariance, Hotelling's T2, GLM, MANOVA, MANCOVA, discriminant analysis, canonical correlations, dimensionality, principal components, latent composites, distance, hierarchical clustering. prereq: [8252 or equiv], familiarity with matrix algebra, knowledge of a computerized statistics package
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual framework of hierarchical linear models for nested data, their application in educational research. Nature/effects of nested data, logic of hierarchical models, mixed-effects models. Estimation/hypothesis testing in these models, model-checking, nonlinear models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
EPSY 8282 - Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Traditional/modern approaches to analyzing longitudinal data. Dependent t-test, repeated measures ANOVA/MANOVA. Linear mixed models, multilevel models, generalized models. Required labs using SAS computer program. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
EPSY 8283 - Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Meta-analysis is a methodology for conducting quantitative literature reviews in which the outcomes of empirical research studies are aggregated and their variation studied. This course will cover topics on problem formulation, sampling, variable coding, data analysis, and presentation of results in meta-analytic research. prereq: EPSY 8252 or equiv
HIST 8015 - Scope and Methods of Historical Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development of historical studies over time (especially in 19th and 20th centuries). Methodologies currently shaping historical research. Theoretical developments within the discipline during 19th and 20th centuries. prereq: instr consent
HIST 8021 - History Research Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The History Research Seminar will help History PhD students to conceptualize and articulate a significant research proposal and to become more effective writers. The course will prioritize the format and expectations of the dissertation prospectus, but with permission of the instructor students may develop a different research project (e.g. a seminar paper to become part of their portfolio, or a chapter of an MA thesis or dissertation). In either case, students will focus on the process of rigorously conceptualizing their research by writing a proposal using a format that is suggested by the Graduate School's Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship application's "Statement of Research" as a model.
PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Types of measurements (tests, scales, inventories) and their construction. Theory/measurement of reliability/validity. prereq: 3801H or MATH 1271 or grad student
PSY 5865 - Advanced Psychological and Educational Measurement
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8222/Psy 5865
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Topics in test theory. Classical reliability/validity theory/methods, generalizability theory. Linking, scaling, equating. Item response theory, methods for dichotomous/polytomous responses. Comparisons between classical, item response theory methods in instrument construction. prereq: 5862 or instr consent
PSY 8209 - Research Methods in Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Experimental/quasi-experimental methods for research in social psychology. Statistical, interpretive, operational, and ethical issues. prereq: Psych PhD student
PSY 8815 - Analysis of Psychological Data
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Data-analytic procedures used in psychological research. Types of variables used in psychological research. Data collection designs, their limitations. Procedures for analyzing experimental/non-experimental data, both univariate and multivariate. Emphasizes selection of data-analytic procedures. Procedures and their assumptions. Computation using statistical software. Limitations, interpretation. Lecture, lab. prereq: 8814, instr consent
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to theoretical/methodological foundations of social network analysis. Concepts/principles, measurements, computer techniques. Applications to friendships, communities, workteams, intra-/inter-organizational relations, international systems. Focuses on network visualizations.
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Multiple objectives of social research and how they inform research design. Conceptualization and measurement of complex concepts. Broad issues in research design and quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and management. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
SOC 8851 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: In-Depth Interviewing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Interviewers have opened up other worlds to the sociological imagination and taught us much about the way people think, feel, and make sense of the world as well as of their own identities. We will conduct interviews; transcribe, code, and analyze interview data; and write up interview- based research. We will also consider a range of epistemological, practical, and ethical issues related to interviewing as a research method, reading materials drawn from a broad range of substantive sociological subfields as well as from geography. This course is best suited to graduate students who have an interview-based project in mind and want to acquire the skills for carrying out their research, and students who are considering using interviews in their dissertation research and want to try their hand at interviewing before making a decision. Because this is a hands-on, fieldwork-based course, no auditors are permitted.
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Ethnographic practice involves two core activities: engaging people in their own space and time, and separating yourself enough from the fieldwork site to write about observations and experiences with some degree of analytical distance and theoretical sophistication. Ethnographers are always both participant and observer, although some of them -- often those who start off as insiders at a site from the beginning -- will be more practically or emotionally enmeshed in a fieldwork site than others. This seminar emphasizes both these core activities: students develop the practice of shuttling constantly between fieldwork site and writing field notes and analysis. Complementing the field work will be reading and discussion of classic and contemporary ethnographies. Each student will undertake his or her own fieldwork project, learning how to generate field notes that include rich description and coherent, flexible analysis. These projects should generate a useful body of qualitative data, as well as an intensive, hands-on experience of the design, research process, and analysis of ethnography. Prerequisites: graduate student, and completion of SOC 8801, or instructor consent.
SOC 8853 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Historical & Comparative Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is designed to teach graduate students to design and carry out theoretically informed and methodologically sophisticated historical research projects. In the first section of the course, we will explore the meaning of historical sociology, the disciplinary reflexes of sociologists and historians, conceptions of time in historical sociology, the uses of narrative in explanation, the use of case studies and comparisons in historical analysis, and varieties of explanation. The following section will examine the problems and potentials involved in different types of sources used by historically-oriented social scientists and the politics of historical memory. The final section will survey research by sociologists, historians, and political scientists that attempts to develop historically informed theories of various phenomena, such as race relations, nation and state formation, colonialism and imperialism, democratization and citizenship, gender and sexuality, and contentious politics. This course fulfills an advanced qualitative methods requirement for Sociology graduate students.
JOUR 5501 - Communication, Public Opinion, and Social Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Sharpen your understanding of public opinion and its role in political and civic life: What does it mean? Where does it come from? How is it measured? What impact does it have? How are the public?s preferences shaped by the larger communications environment and the strategic messages of politicians, interest groups, and other actors in society? What are polls really measuring, and why do they seem so unreliable sometimes? How are social media technologies giving voice to new segments and dimensions of public opinion? But how are they vulnerable to manipulation from bots and other efforts designed to alter perceptions of collective opinions? Examine the theories of communication, psychology, political science, and sociology that underlie these dynamic questions. We?ll consider cutting edge approaches used by market researchers, political analysts, and data scientists to harness new forms of data about what the public thinks. We investigate theories that explain how people form their opinions, deliberate with others, change their minds, and reveal their preferences, and we apply these frameworks to understand contemporary public opinion issues and campaigns.
JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Jour 5541/PubH 6074
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an overview of theory and research that lies at the intersection of mass communication and public health. We examine the potential for media exposure to influence public health outcomes, both as a product of people's everyday interactions with media and the strategic use of media messages to accomplish public health goals. To this end, we will explore large-scale public health campaigns in the context of tobacco, obesity, and cancer screening. We also will explore news media coverage of controversial health issues, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, and health information in entertainment media, such as smoking in movies. This course seeks to understand whether media messages have had intended and/or unintended effects on public attitudes and behavior. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal, medical, and digital media sources will be considered as well.
JOUR 5552 - Law of Internet Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Digital communication technologies continue to raise a variety of legal issues, including whether and how (and which) traditional media and regulatory laws will apply, and how policy should be applied through regulatory law to enhance and regulate that communication. This course is conducted as a seminar, with an open discussion of legal precedent and the influence of policy on internet and digital communications. This course covers the First Amendment as it applies in a digital era as well as regulatory topics like net neutrality, broadband access, privacy, and copyright.
JOUR 5601W - History of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is (real/fake) news? Who's a journalist? What is journalism? How did we get to where we are today regarding journalism both as a profession and as an essential tool of democracy? Learn the fundamental chronology of the development of journalism in the United States from the Revolution to today, and then delve into the big quandaries: How free has journalism been? What have been its professional standards? How has journalism affected a diverse audience? What are the challenges of international journalism? And how have new communication technologies interacted with journalism?
JOUR 5725 - Management of Media Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to concepts/principles of media management. Strategic planning, leadership, organizational strategies, ethical/legal issues. Working in teams. Balance sheets, income statements. Motivating/promoting people.
JOUR 5777 - Contemporary Problems in Freedom of Speech and Press
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Jour 5777/Law 6030
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Most of us use devices like Smartphones, GPS, streaming services, or hands-free speakers like Amazon's Echo that connect to online voice services like Alexa without thinking about them very much. But, what kind of information are they collecting? Are merchants allowed to gather your shopping history and use it to send you targeted advertising, or to sell it to other companies for profit? Should other people be able to post your personal information or photos online without your consent? Can the government read your emails, track your online browsing, or intercept your text messages? This course considers how growing concerns about privacy and national security affect the First Amendment and the rights of journalists to gather and report the news. We will read significant court decisions and take a look at current statutory and regulatory initiatives both in the United States and abroad. You can expect lively debates and discussion, and the opportunity to explore a privacy or national security issue in depth in a substantial research paper. prereq: Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program or graduate or law student status. Course is open to students have previously taken a relevant law course - contact instructor for permission.
JOUR 8002 - Studies in Mass Communication II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Literature on history of the field, cultural and humanistic approaches to its study, and legal and ethical issues. prereq: 8001
JOUR 8003 - Digital Media Issues and Theories
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Nonprofessional skills course. Prepares entering graduate students to work in changing media environment. Political, social, economic, legal, ethical, technological implications nationally/globally. Produce scholarly research about changing media. prereq: Journalism grad student
JOUR 8502 - Advanced Quantitative Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced quantitative research principles/techniques applied to mass communication research, including experimental methods, survey methods, among others. prereq: 8501, [EPsy 5260 or equiv or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in EPsy 5260]
JOUR 8504 - Seminar: Analyzing Media Content
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Methods of analyzing media content/application of methods to theoretically-driven studies of media content. Conceptual/methodological issues surrounding analyzing media content in today's contemporary digital media environment, including collecting social media data, computer-aided analyses. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8513 - Seminar: Ethnographic Methods in Mass Communication Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 8810/Jour 8513
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical foundations in anthropology/sociology. Field projects. prereq: [8001, 8002] or instr consent; same as Anth 8810
JOUR 8514 - Seminar: Advanced Mass Communication Theories
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Research paradigms, concepts, findings for developing general theory of mass communication. prereq: 8001
JOUR 8601 - Seminar: Methods in Mass Communication History Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Critical analysis of research in journalism/communication history. Research designs/methods. Development of a research project. prereq: 8001, 8002
JOUR 8602 - Seminar: History of Mass Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Research in history/development of U.S. mass media.
JOUR 8603 - Seminar: Theories and Models in Mass Communication History Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Literature on theory in historical research. Uses of theoretical models in historical explanations. Role of theory in historical research, debate about uses. Specific works in journalism/communication history in context of theoretical models. Development of major paper examining models/theories relevant to student's project. prereq: 5601, instr consent
JOUR 8620 - Seminar: Advertising Theory and Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advertising as persuasive communication. Current research/theory related to advertising decision-making process. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8621 - Seminar: Public Relations Theory and Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of theoretical body of knowledge in public relations field. Diverse roles played by public relations in organization. Current state of public relations research in regard to theory building. How theory informs professional practice of public relations. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8650 - Seminar: Psychology of Media Effects
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In-depth study of psychological concepts/theories concerning individual cognitive processing of content of both traditional/new electronic media. Critically evaluate latest empirical research concerning how individuals respond to the content of both traditional mass media/newest electronic digital media. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8651 - Seminar: Mass Communication, Audiences, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Interplay between social theories/media studies. Pragmatism, structural-functionalism, Marxism, political economy, cultural studies, globalization. prereq: 8001 or 8002 or equiv
JOUR 8661 - Seminar: Mediated Political Communication in the Digital Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Mediated political communication in the digital age. How news, advertising, and entertainment media shape political perceptions, motivate voters, and influence policy decisions. Agenda-setting, priming, and framing, networked communications, micro-targeting, and mobile technology.
JOUR 8673 - Seminar: Media Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Management issues in media organizations. Relation to dynamics of organization structure, employees, markets, economics/finances. prereq: 5725 recommended
JOUR 8675 - Seminar: Issues in Information Access and Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Societal, industry, technological, and policy aspects/developments that affect information access, particularly through mass media. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8678 - Seminar: Constitutional Law--Theories of Freedom of Expression
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Jour 8678/Law 6059
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problems of constitutional/tort law affecting the press. Underlying theories. prereq: 5777 or instr consent or law student
JOUR 8679 - Seminar: Research Methods in Media Ethics and Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Research at intersection of first amendment and media ethics.
JOUR 8681 - Seminar: International Media Perspectives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Main problems/currents. Concepts, research, policy relevant to global development. Issues of freedom/constraint, media technology, role of journalism in world affairs.
JOUR 8720 - Health Communication Theory and Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theories, methods, research that characterize field of health communication. Mass media influence on health, including use of mass media to promote health behaviors. Theoretical frameworks that inform health communication scholarship, as well as methodological approaches to studying health communication issues. prereq: Grad students enrolled in Mass Communication MA or PhD program or instr consent
JOUR 8721 - Seminar: Communication Agencies as Social Institutions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Influence/effects of mass communication, internal dynamics of media organizations, criticism/modes of reform. Theoretical frameworks for analysis.
JOUR 8801 - Seminar: Comparative Research in Mass Communication, a Cross-National Approach
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative research designs/strategies. Analysis of production, presentation, transmission, and consumption of mass media products/services (particularly news, entertainment, and information) across national borders. Theoretical concerns, empirical problems, policy. Ethical issues involving research on form/content of mass communication within/between countries. prereq: 4801 or 5825
JOUR 8990 - Special Problems in Mass Communications
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: Mass comm grad student or instr consent
JOUR 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study. prereq: Grad mass comm major or minor, instr consent, dept consent
ANTH 8001 - Ethnography, Theory, History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to foundational concepts, methods, and ethnographic work. Emphasizes theories that have shaped 20th-century thinking in cultural anthropology. Connection of these theories to fieldwork and contemporary issues.
ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/perspectives in anthropology. Emphasizes American cultural anthropology. Rrecent work in semiotic, psychological, and feminist anthropology.
ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Classic and current issues in research methodology, including positivist, interpretivist, feminist, and postmodernist frameworks. Methodology, in the broadest sense of the concept, is evaluated. Students conduct three research exercises and set up an ethnographic research project. prereq: Grad anth major or instr consent
COMM 8211 - Critical Communication Studies: History, Theory, Method
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Qualitative research methods for studying media institutions, texts, audiences, and contexts.
COMM 8611 - Seminar: Rhetoric
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History/criticism of rhetorical theory. Research in rhetoric. prereq: 5611 or instr consent
EPSY 5244 - Survey Design, Sampling, and Implementation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey methods, including mail, phone, and Web-based/e-mail surveys. Principles of measurement, constructing questions/forms, pilot testing, sampling, data analysis, reporting. Students develop a survey proposal and a draft survey, pilot the survey, and develop sampling/data analysis plans. prereq: [5221 or 5231 or 5261 or equiv], [CEHD grad student or MEd student]
EPSY 5245 - Advanced Survey Data Analysis for Categorical and Rating Scale Data
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Practical course. Specific nature of survey data (typically categorical or ordinal). Appropriate data analytic methods. prereq: 5244, 5261
EPSY 5247 - Qualitative Methods in Educational Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to qualitative methods of inquiry. Contrasting different research traditions (e.g., case study, phenomenology, ethnography, social interactionism, critical theory). Practice with field notes, observations, and interviewing. Use of NVIVO to track/code data. prereq: Graduate student or Applied Psychology in Educational and Community Settings Minor
EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/5231/5261/5263
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
EPSY 5261 is designed to engage students in statistics as a principled approach to data collection, prediction, and scientific inference. Students first learn about data collection (e.g., random sampling, random assignment) and examine data descriptively using graphs and numerical summaries. Students build conceptual understanding of statistical inference through the use of simulation-based methods (bootstrapping and randomization) before going on to learn parametric methods, such as t-tests (one-sample and two-sample means), z-tests (one-sample and two-sample proportions), chi-square tests, and regression. This course uses pedagogical methods grounded in research, such as small group activities and discussion. Attention undergraduates: As this is a graduate level course, it does not fulfill the Mathematical Thinking Liberal Education requirement. If you would like to take a statistics course in our department that fulfills that requirement, please consider EPSY 3264.
EPSY 5262 - Intermediate Statistical Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of statistical concepts/procedures. Analysis of variance, covariance, multiple regression. Experimental design: completely randomized, block, split plot/repeated measures. prereq: 3264 or 5261 or equiv
EPSY 8113 - The Psychology of Scientific Reasoning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Research at intersection of cognitive science, educational psychology, science education. What psychology tells us about how people think, reason, make decisions. Read empirical research that explores psychological processes that underlie scientific reasoning. prereq: 5114 or equivalent
EPSY 8114 - Seminar: Cognition and Learning
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced study in critical analysis and application of contemporary psychological theory and research in cognition and learning for education.
EPSY 8118 - Advanced Cognitive Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a graduate introduction to cognitive psychology. It is "advanced" in the sense that it focuses on higher-level cognition, and also in its emphasis on theories and models in addition to empirical results. Graduate students interested in cognitive psychology are invited to register for the course, regardless of disciplinary background.
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8251/EPsy 8261
Prerequisites: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Statistical Methods in Education I is the first course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course covers estimation and hypothesis testing with a particular focus on ANOVA and an introduction to multiple linear regression. Prepares students for EPSY 8252/8262. prereq: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8252/EPsy 8262
Prerequisites: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical Methods in Education II is the second course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course focuses on multiple linear regression and provides an introduction to linear mixed models. prereq: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
General linear model used as context for regression. Matrix algebra, multiple regression, path analysis, polynomial regression, standardized regression, stepwise solutions, analysis of variance, weighted least squares, logistic regression. prereq: [8252 or equiv], regression/ANOVA course, familiarity with statistical analysis package
EPSY 8265 - Factor Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [8252 or equiv or #]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Factor analytic techniques/applications. Component, common factor, confirmatory analysis. Factor extraction, estimating number of dimensions. Rotation, factor scores, hierarchical factor analysis. prereq: [8252 or equiv or instr consent]
EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Quantitative techniques using manifest/latent variable approaches for analysis of educational/social science data. Introduction to structural equation modeling approaches to multiple regression, factor analysis, path modeling. Developing, estimating, interpreting structural equation models. prereq: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
EPSY 8267 - Applied Multivariate Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Use/interpretation of results from several multivariate statistical techniques. Matrix algebra, variance/covariance, Hotelling's T2, GLM, MANOVA, MANCOVA, discriminant analysis, canonical correlations, dimensionality, principal components, latent composites, distance, hierarchical clustering. prereq: [8252 or equiv], familiarity with matrix algebra, knowledge of a computerized statistics package
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual framework of hierarchical linear models for nested data, their application in educational research. Nature/effects of nested data, logic of hierarchical models, mixed-effects models. Estimation/hypothesis testing in these models, model-checking, nonlinear models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
EPSY 8282 - Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Traditional/modern approaches to analyzing longitudinal data. Dependent t-test, repeated measures ANOVA/MANOVA. Linear mixed models, multilevel models, generalized models. Required labs using SAS computer program. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
EPSY 8283 - Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Meta-analysis is a methodology for conducting quantitative literature reviews in which the outcomes of empirical research studies are aggregated and their variation studied. This course will cover topics on problem formulation, sampling, variable coding, data analysis, and presentation of results in meta-analytic research. prereq: EPSY 8252 or equiv
HIST 8015 - Scope and Methods of Historical Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development of historical studies over time (especially in 19th and 20th centuries). Methodologies currently shaping historical research. Theoretical developments within the discipline during 19th and 20th centuries. prereq: instr consent
HIST 8021 - History Research Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The History Research Seminar will help History PhD students to conceptualize and articulate a significant research proposal and to become more effective writers. The course will prioritize the format and expectations of the dissertation prospectus, but with permission of the instructor students may develop a different research project (e.g. a seminar paper to become part of their portfolio, or a chapter of an MA thesis or dissertation). In either case, students will focus on the process of rigorously conceptualizing their research by writing a proposal using a format that is suggested by the Graduate School's Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship application's "Statement of Research" as a model.
LAW 6007 - Constitutional Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Judicial review authority; problems of government structure (federalism, intergovernmental relations, separation of powers); and individual rights and limitations on government power (protection of economic and property claims, equality under the law, personal liberties, freedom of speech and of religion).
LAW 6103 - Data Privacy Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Every single day, the newspaper contains stories—plural intended—about data privacy and security. Whether they concern the National Security Agency, Facebook, or a data breach at a small business, the handling of personal information has become a central concern of our time. In response, a complex law of data privacy has emerged and now it is a fast growing area of legal practice. This course will equip students to counsel clients about an array of federal, state, and international legal requirements—while also analyzing them critically and thinking about the societal challenges posed by new information technology. Assessment will include group projects and a take-home final.
LAW 6207 - Antitrust
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The course provides an overview of U.S. antitrust (competition) law. It covers the historical development of antitrust, the role of economic analysis in contemporary antitrust law, and the principal areas of substantive antitrust including horizontal restraints (between competitors), vertical restraints (franchise or distributional restrictions), monopolization, and mergers.
LAW 6650 - Advanced Administrative Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 5606/Law 6606/Law 6650
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will study laws and doctrines governing the administrative practices of federal government agencies and judicial review thereof. The course will cover topics including privatization of government functions, presidential supervision and control of agency officials, and various doctrines limiting judicial review of agency actions.
LAW 6804 - Government Secrecy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course introduces students to major mechanisms by which the executive branch of the federal government keeps secrets, including the classification system, the doctrines of executive privilege and state secrets privilege, and prosecuting information leakers. The course also introduces students to some of the major means by which secrecy is challenged, including the Freedom of Information Act, first amendment access and newsgathering claims, and whistleblower protection laws. Throughout the semester, we will discuss a number of recurring themes including the connection between government secrecy and constitutional theories of presidential power, the politics of secrecy and transparency and the role of constitutional discourse in the same, and the costs and benefits of secrecy and transparency.
LAW 6832 - Cybercrime and Cybersecurity
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 6638/Law 6832
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course will cover the key constitutional, statutory, technological, and policy issues regarding computer crime, electronic-evidence gathering (including electronic surveillance), and cybersecurity. The course grade will be determined by a final paper, a brief class presentation based on the final paper, and class participation. Criminal Procedure: Investigation (LAW 6085) is recommended but not required as a prerequisite.
MKTG 8809 - Consumer Behavior Research Methods
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar. Topics related to conceptual theories/arguments about experimental design and statistical analysis of experiments. How to design experimental research for testing hypotheses and drawing conclusions. prereq: Doctoral student or [masters programs student, instr consent]
MKTG 8810 - Consumer Behavior Special Topics
Credits: 2.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics related to the fundamentals of consumer behavior such as attitudes, behavioral research methods, branding, consumer well-being, decision making, information processing, and perceptions. See "Class Notes" for details. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
MKTG 8811 - Consumer Attitudes and Persuasion I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Reading, discussing, and evaluating theories of consumer attitudes and persuasion. Theoretical analysis, rather than practitioner focus. prereq: [[MBA 6210 or equiv], business admin PhD student] or instr consent
MKTG 8812 - Consumer Attitudes and Persuasion II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Science of persuasion. Principles of stickiness--universal principles that lead messages to succeed rather than fail. Principles of influence--universal psychological principles that motivate a person to say "yes." prereq: Doctoral student or instr consent
MKTG 8813 - Consumer Judgment and Decision Making I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Different theoretical approaches taken in judgment and decision-making research. Heuristics/biases, affect in decision making, judgments/decisions over time. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
MKTG 8814 - Consumer Judgment and Decision Making II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Draws from work on prospect theory and its derivatives. Anomalous choice. Emphasizes on applications to Marketing theory, from inter-temporal choice to regret and counterfactual thinking in consumers/managers. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
MKTG 8831 - Seminar: Inter-Organizational Relations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
From an efficiency perspective, inter-organizational networks involved in task of moving goods and services from point of production to point of consumption. Literature covering the functional, institutional, analytical, and methodological traditions, as well as the behavioral school of thought and transaction cost and relational contracting. prereq: business admin PhD student or instr consent
MKTG 8842 - Quantitative Modeling I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced readings seminar. Quantitative research in marketing. Topics from theoretical/empirical research in marketing, econometrics, and industrial organization. Classic/contemporary articles. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
MKTG 8843 - Quantitative Modeling II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced readings seminar. Quantitative research in marketing. Topics from theoretical/empirical research streams in marketing, econometrics, and industrial organization. Classic/contemporary articles. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
MKTG 8851 - Seminar: Marketing Management and Strategy I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics in marketing management and formulation and implementation of marketing strategies. Diversity of thought, within marketing and strategic management literature. prereq: [[MBA 6210 or equiv], business admin PhD student] or instr consent
MKTG 8852 - Marketing Management & Strategy II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
PhD seminar. Role of branding within the organization, its business strategy, and its success. Brand management. Critically evaluate fundamental ideas and more recent developments. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MSBA 6310 - Programming for Data Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
According to recent industry surveys, Python is one of the most popular tools used by organizations data analysis. We will explore the emerging popularity of Python for tasks such as general purpose computing, data analysis, website scraping, and data visualization. You will first learn the basics of the Python language. Participants will then learn how to apply functionality from powerful and popular data science-focused libraries. In addition, we will learn advanced programming techniques such as lambda functions and closures. We will spend most of our class time completing practical hands-on exercises.
MSBA 6320 - Data Management, Databases, and Data Warehousing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamentals of database modeling/design, normalization. Extract, transform, load. Data cubes/setting up data warehouse. Data pre-processing, quality, integration/stewardship issues. Advances in database/storage technologies.
MSBA 6330 - Big Data Analytics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Big data infrastructure and ecosystem, ingesting and managing big data, analytics with big data; Hadoop, MapReduce, Sqoop, Pig, Hive, Spark, SQL for Big Data, Machine Learning for Big Data, Real-time Streaming for Big Data; cloud computing and other recent developments in big data.
MSBA 6410 - Exploratory Data Analytics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamentals of exploratory business analytics. Solving real-world business problems using appropriate data analysis techniques and effective technical/managerial communication. Foundational methods allow for the detection of relationships and patterns in structured and unstructured data through clustering, dimensionality reduction, probabilistic graphical models, anomaly detection, and deep neural networks.
MSBA 6420 - Predictive Analytics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamentals of predictive modeling and machine learning, assessing the performance of predictive models: logistic regression, decision trees, naïve Bayesian classifiers, support vector machine, ensemble learning, deep neural network, and their applications in structured and unstructured data.
POL 8360 - Topics in American Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings and research in special topics or problems. prereq: instr consent
POL 8460 - Topics in International Relations
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings and research in advanced topics or problems. Recent topics: global environmental issues, morality in world politics, and norms and institutions in world politics.
PSY 5014 - Psychology of Human Learning and Memory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Human memory encoding/retrieval. How we adaptively use memory. Brain systems that support memory. Episodic/semantic memory. Working/short-term memory. Procedural memory. Repetition priming. Prospective remembering. Autobiographical memory. prereq: 3011 or 3051 or honors or grad student
PSY 5015 - Cognition, Computation, and Brain
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Human cognitive abilities (perception, memory, attention) from different perspectives (e.g., cognitive psychological approach, cognitive neuroscience approach). prereq: [Honors or grad] or [[jr or sr], [3011 or 3031 or 3051 or 3061]] or instr consent
PSY 5052 - Psychology of Attention
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Is attention needed for perception? Are we more likely to attend to locations associated with reward? Does brain training work? Are attention deficits at the root of autism spectrum disorders? This course will introduce students to advanced topics in the psychology of attention. It will combine didactic lecturing, instructor-led discussions, and student-led discussions on core topics of attention and its neural substrates. Students will acquire familiarity with theories, phenomena, and experimental paradigms of attention. prereq: Psy 3051 or equivalent
PSY 5062 - Cognitive Neuropsychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Consequences of different types of brain damage on human perception/cognition. Neural mechanisms of normal perceptual/cognitive functions. Vision/attention disorders, split brain, language deficits, memory disorders, central planning deficits. Emphasizes function/phenomenology. Minimal amount of brain anatomy. prereq: Grad or [[jr or sr], [3011 or 3031 or 3051 or 3061]] or instr consent
PSY 5101 - Personality: Current Theory and Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Current theory and research on personality functioning and personality structure. Descriptive, biological, evolutionary, cognitive, developmental, cultural, and narrative perspectives on personality. prereq: Psy 3001W and either Psy 3101 or Psy 3135 OR Psychology PhD student
PSY 5202 - Attitudes and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory/research on social psychology of beliefs/attitudes. Persuasion principles. prereq: 3201 or instr consent
PSY 5205 - Applied Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Applications of social psychology research/theory to domains such as physical/mental health, education, the media, desegregation, the legal system, energy conservation, public policy. prereq: 3201 or grad student or instr consent
PSY 5206 - Social Psychology and Health Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Survey of social psychological theory/research regarding the processes that shape people's beliefs about health and how these beliefs affect and are affected by their health behavior. Consideration of how theory and evidence regarding these processes informs the development and testing of intervention strategies to promote health behavior change. Prerequisite: Psy 3201
PSY 5207 - Personality and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 4207/Psy 5207
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual/methodological strategies for scientific study of individuals and their social worlds. Applications of theory/research to issues of self, identity, and social interaction. prereq: 3101 or 3201 or honors or grad student or instr consent
PSY 5708 - Organizational Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 5702/5705/5708
Typically offered: Every Spring
Psychological causes of behavior in work organizations. Consequences for individual fulfillment and organizational effectiveness. Individual differences, social perception, motivation, stress, job design, leadership, job satisfaction, teamwork, organizational culture. Prereq: Psy 3001W or 3001V and 3711 OR Psy grad
PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Types of measurements (tests, scales, inventories) and their construction. Theory/measurement of reliability/validity. prereq: 3801H or MATH 1271 or grad student
PSY 5865 - Advanced Psychological and Educational Measurement
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8222/Psy 5865
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Topics in test theory. Classical reliability/validity theory/methods, generalizability theory. Linking, scaling, equating. Item response theory, methods for dichotomous/polytomous responses. Comparisons between classical, item response theory methods in instrument construction. prereq: 5862 or instr consent
PSY 8201 - Social Cognition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Social psychological theory/research on social inference and reasoning processes. Psychology of prejudice/stereotyping. prereq: Psych PhD candidate
PSY 8205 - Principles of Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contemporary theoretical positions and related research. prereq: Psy PhD student
PSY 8208 - Social Psychology: The Self
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Social psychological theory and research concerning the self and social behavior. prereq: Psych background especially in personality and soc psych
PSY 8209 - Research Methods in Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Experimental/quasi-experimental methods for research in social psychology. Statistical, interpretive, operational, and ethical issues. prereq: Psych PhD student
PSY 8815 - Analysis of Psychological Data
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Data-analytic procedures used in psychological research. Types of variables used in psychological research. Data collection designs, their limitations. Procedures for analyzing experimental/non-experimental data, both univariate and multivariate. Emphasizes selection of data-analytic procedures. Procedures and their assumptions. Computation using statistical software. Limitations, interpretation. Lecture, lab. prereq: 8814, instr consent
PUBH 6250 - Foundations of Public Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this course we will examine values, contexts, principles, and frameworks of public health. We will provide an introduction to public health, consider the history of public health, social/political determinants, impact of health disparities on race, class and gender, moral and legal foundations, public health structures, historical trauma and cultural competence, health and human rights, advocacy and health equity, communication and financing, and the future of public health in the 21st century. Grounded in theory and concepts, we will incorporate core competencies and skills for public health professionals and will focus on developing problem solving and decision-making skills through critical analysis, reflection, case studies, readings, and paper assignments.
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course provides an understanding of basic methods and tools used by epidemiologists to study the health of populations.
PUBH 6450 - Biostatistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Descriptive statistics. Gaussian probability models, point/interval estimation for means/proportions. Hypothesis testing, including t, chi-square, and nonparametric tests. Simple regression/correlation. ANOVA. Health science applications using output from statistical packages. prereq: [College-level algebra, health sciences grad student] or instr consent
PUBH 6451 - Biostatistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Two-way ANOVA, interactions, repeated measures, general linear models. Logistic regression for cohort and case-control studies. Loglinear models, contingency tables, Poisson regression, survival data, Kaplan-Meier methods, proportional hazards models. prereq: [PubH 6450 with grade of at least B, health sciences grad student] or instr consent
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to theoretical/methodological foundations of social network analysis. Concepts/principles, measurements, computer techniques. Applications to friendships, communities, workteams, intra-/inter-organizational relations, international systems. Focuses on network visualizations.
SOC 8701 - Sociological Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Traditions of social theory basic to sociological knowledge, their reflection and expansion in contemporary theory, their applications in selected areas of empirical research. Sample topics: social inequality, social organization and politics, family organization and social reproduction, social order and change, sociology of knowledge and religion.
SOC 8790 - Advanced Topics in Sociological Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Sample topics: theories of conflict, theories of purposive action, Marxist theory, and structure-agency debate.
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Multiple objectives of social research and how they inform research design. Conceptualization and measurement of complex concepts. Broad issues in research design and quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and management. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
SOC 8851 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: In-Depth Interviewing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Interviewers have opened up other worlds to the sociological imagination and taught us much about the way people think, feel, and make sense of the world as well as of their own identities. We will conduct interviews; transcribe, code, and analyze interview data; and write up interview- based research. We will also consider a range of epistemological, practical, and ethical issues related to interviewing as a research method, reading materials drawn from a broad range of substantive sociological subfields as well as from geography. This course is best suited to graduate students who have an interview-based project in mind and want to acquire the skills for carrying out their research, and students who are considering using interviews in their dissertation research and want to try their hand at interviewing before making a decision. Because this is a hands-on, fieldwork-based course, no auditors are permitted.
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Ethnographic practice involves two core activities: engaging people in their own space and time, and separating yourself enough from the fieldwork site to write about observations and experiences with some degree of analytical distance and theoretical sophistication. Ethnographers are always both participant and observer, although some of them -- often those who start off as insiders at a site from the beginning -- will be more practically or emotionally enmeshed in a fieldwork site than others. This seminar emphasizes both these core activities: students develop the practice of shuttling constantly between fieldwork site and writing field notes and analysis. Complementing the field work will be reading and discussion of classic and contemporary ethnographies. Each student will undertake his or her own fieldwork project, learning how to generate field notes that include rich description and coherent, flexible analysis. These projects should generate a useful body of qualitative data, as well as an intensive, hands-on experience of the design, research process, and analysis of ethnography. Prerequisites: graduate student, and completion of SOC 8801, or instructor consent.
SOC 8853 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Historical & Comparative Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is designed to teach graduate students to design and carry out theoretically informed and methodologically sophisticated historical research projects. In the first section of the course, we will explore the meaning of historical sociology, the disciplinary reflexes of sociologists and historians, conceptions of time in historical sociology, the uses of narrative in explanation, the use of case studies and comparisons in historical analysis, and varieties of explanation. The following section will examine the problems and potentials involved in different types of sources used by historically-oriented social scientists and the politics of historical memory. The final section will survey research by sociologists, historians, and political scientists that attempts to develop historically informed theories of various phenomena, such as race relations, nation and state formation, colonialism and imperialism, democratization and citizenship, gender and sexuality, and contentious politics. This course fulfills an advanced qualitative methods requirement for Sociology graduate students.
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: college algebra or instr consent; credit will not be granted if credit has been received for STAT 3011
STAT 5101 - Theory of Statistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Logical development of probability, basic issues in statistics. Probability spaces. Random variables, their distributions and expected values. Law of large numbers, central limit theorem, generating functions, multivariate normal distribution. prereq: (MATH 2263 or MATH 2374 or MATH 2573H), (CSCI 2033 or MATH 2373 or MATH 2243)
STAT 5102 - Theory of Statistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sampling, sufficiency, estimation, test of hypotheses, size/power. Categorical data. Contingency tables. Linear models. Decision theory. prereq: [5101 or Math 5651 or instr consent]
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simple random, systematic, stratified, unequal probability sampling. Ratio, model based estimation. Single stage, multistage, adaptive cluster sampling. Spatial sampling. prereq: 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Simple, multiple, and polynomial regression. Estimation, testing, prediction. Use of graphics in regression. Stepwise and other numerical methods. Weighted least squares, nonlinear models, response surfaces. Experimental research/applications. prereq: 3032 or 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent Please note this course generally does not count in the Statistical Practice BA or Statistical Science BS degrees. Please consult with a department advisor with questions.
STAT 5303 - Designing Experiments
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Analysis of variance. Multiple comparisons. Variance-stabilizing transformations. Contrasts. Construction/analysis of complete/incomplete block designs. Fractional factorial designs. Confounding split plots. Response surface design. prereq: 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5401 - Applied Multivariate Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Bivariate and multivariate distributions. Multivariate normal distributions. Analysis of multivariate linear models. Repeated measures, growth curve, and profile analysis. Canonical correlation analysis. Principal components and factor analysis. Discrimination, classification, and clustering. pre-req: STAT 3032 or 3301 or 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent Although not a formal prerequisite of this course, students are encouraged to have familiarity with linear algebra prior to enrolling. Please consult with a department advisor with questions.
STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Varieties of categorical data, cross-classifications, contingency tables. Tests for independence. Combining 2x2 tables. Multidimensional tables/loglinear models. Maximum-likelihood estimation. Tests for goodness of fit. Logistic regression. Generalized linear/multinomial-response models. prereq: STAT 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 5302 or 4051 or 8051 or 5102 or 4102
STAT 5511 - Time Series Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Characteristics of time series. Stationarity. Second-order descriptions, time-domain representation, ARIMA/GARCH models. Frequency domain representation. Univariate/multivariate time series analysis. Periodograms, non parametric spectral estimation. State-space models. prereq: STAT 4102 or STAT 5102
STAT 5601 - Nonparametric Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Order statistics. Classical rank-based procedures (e.g., Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis). Goodness of fit. Topics may include smoothing, bootstrap, and generalized linear models. prereq: Stat classes 3032 or 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 8051 - Advanced Regression Techniques: linear, nonlinear and nonparametric methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Linear/generalized linear models, modern regression methods including nonparametric regression, generalized additive models, splines/basis function methods, regularization, bootstrap/other resampling-based inference. prereq: Statistics grad or instr consent
STAT 8052 - Applied Statistical Methods 2: Design of Experiments and Mixed -Effects Modeling
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Design experiments/analyze data with fixed effects, random/mixed effects models. ANOVA for factorial designs. Contrasts, multiple comparisons, power/sample size, confounding, fractional factorials. Computer-generated designs. Response surfaces. Multi-level models. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) for longitudinal data with non-normal errors. prereq: 8051 or instr consent
STAT 8053 - Applied Statistical Methods 3: Multivariate Analysis and Advanced Regression
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: PhD student in stat or DGS permission and 8052
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Standard multivariate analysis. Multivariate linear model, classification, clustering, principal components, factor analysis, canonical correlation. Topics in advanced regression. prereq: PhD student in stat or DGS permission and 8052
LAW 5026 - Intellectual Property and Technology Proseminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 5026/Law 6926
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The field of intellectual property extends across the boundaries of business, technology, innovation, and law. In this course, students will be introduced to a broad range of IP related topics presented by leading practitioners working at the intersection of law and technology. Topics may include trade secrets, copyrights, trademarks, patents, IP transactions, IP litigation, emerging technologies, intellectual asset management, IP valuation and commercialization. Lecturers may include corporate general counsels, firm lawyers, transactional lawyers, litigators, consultants, tech transfer officers, R&D Leaders, and CTO.
LAW 6926 - Intellectual Property and Technology Proseminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 5026/Law 6926
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The field of intellectual property extends across the boundaries of business, technology, innovation, and law. In this course, students will be introduced to a broad range of IP related topics presented by leading practitioners working at the intersection of law and technology. Topics may include trade secrets, copyrights, trademarks, patents, IP transactions, IP litigation, emerging technologies, intellectual asset management, IP valuation and commercialization. Lecturers may include corporate general counsels, firm lawyers, transactional lawyers, litigators, consultants, tech transfer officers, R&D Leaders, and CTO.
LAW 5908 - Independent Research and Writing
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students may earn 1 or 2 credits (and in exceptional circumstances, 3 credits) for researching and writing a note, article, memo, or other paper on a legal topic. At least 3,750 words are required for one credit, at least 7,500 for two credits, and at least 11,250 for three credits. To register, the student should confer with a supervising faculty member, draft a description of the proposed project, and complete the online Independent Research form. LAW 5908 is for students who are not enrolled in the Law School, as well as MSPL candidates. Other law school degree candidates should enroll in LAW 7606 or LAW 7608 instead of LAW 5908.
LAW 7606 - Independent Research and Writing
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 8.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 7606/Law 7608
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Note: Law 7606 and 7608 both provide credit for independent writing projects; the difference is that 7606 satisfies the J.D. Upper Division Writing Requirement, while 7608 does not (except on a case-by-case basis before fall 2016). The registrar will assign students to 7606 or 7608 based on whether the student seeks, and the supervisor approves, upper division writing credit. Students may earn 1 or 2 credits (and in exceptional circumstances, 3 credits) for researching and writing a note, article, memo, or other paper on a legal topic. At least 5,000 words are required for one credit, at least 7,500 for two credits, and at least 11,250 for three credits. Students must consult with their faculty supervisor on their topic and research plan and receive feedback from their supervisor on the drafting process. To register, the student should confer with a supervising faculty member, draft a description of the proposed project, and complete the online Independent Research form. prereq: Law student. Non-law students may enroll in LAW 5908 or LAW 7608.
LAW 7608 - Independent Research and Writing
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Law 7606 and 7608 provide credit for independent writing projects; the difference is that 7606 satisfies the J.D. upper division writing requirement, while 7608 does not (except on a case-by-case basis before fall 2016). The registrar will assign students to 7606 or 7608 based on whether the student seeks and the supervisor approves upper division writing credit. Students may earn 1 or 2 credits (and in exceptional circumstances 3 credits) for researching and writing a note, article, memo, or other paper on a legal topic. At least 3,750 words are required for one credit, at least 7,500 for two credits, and at least 11,250 for three credits. To register, the student should confer with a supervising faculty member, draft a description of the proposed project, and complete the online Independent Research form.
JOUR 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral
Credits: 1.0 -24.0 [max 100.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required