Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Human Rights Minor

Global Studies Department
College of Liberal Arts
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Institute for Global Studies, 232 Social Sciences Building, 267 19th Ave S, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-626-1879; fax: 612-626-2242)
  • Program Type: Graduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2018
  • Length of program in credits (master's): 9
  • Length of program in credits (doctoral): 12
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
The human rights minor, available to master's, doctoral, and law students, provides an interdisciplinary foundation in human rights studies and practical experience in human rights work. To satisfy the core requirements, students must complete two of the four core courses, each of which is 3 credits (GLOS 5403/LAW 6058 - Human Rights Advocacy; LAW 6886 - International Human Rights Law; POL 5485 - Human Rights and Democracy in the World; SOC 8090 - Topics: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Human Rights), and one 200-hour internship (no coursework is associated with the internship). Master's students must complete one additional elective course (3 credits), while doctoral and law students select at least two additional elective courses (totaling 6 credits) outside their major field from a designated course list. Other courses may be taken with the approval of the program director. Qualifying courses taken prior to approval of the minor will be applied retroactively.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
Admission to the minor is limited to enrolled graduate or professional students with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Doctoral students must declare their minor before taking their preliminary oral examination.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Students should submit a letter of application describing their background and motivation for applying to the minor program to the director of Graduate Studies. The director may request further information.
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
In addition to the required course credits, all students pursuing the human rights minor must complete one six-week internship that is approved by the program director.
Core Courses
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· LAW 6886 - International Human Rights Law (3.0 cr)
· POL 5485 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6058 - Human Rights Advocacy (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy (3.0 cr)
· SOC 8090 - Topics in Sociology (1.5-3.0 cr)
- Take with the topic: "Topics in Sociology: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Human Rights"
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
Master's
Electives
Take 3 or more credits from the following:
AFEE 5361 - World Development Problems (3.0 cr)
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race (3.0 cr)
AFRO 8554 - Seminar: Gender, Race, Nation, and Policy--Perspectives from Within the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
BTHX 5100 - Introduction to Clinical Ethics (3.0 cr)
BTHX 5220 - Standards for Research with Human Participants: A Lecture Series for Researchers (1.0 cr)
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the U.S.: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health (2.0 cr)
CSPH 5211 - Peacemaking and Spirituality: A Journey Toward Healing and Strength (2.0-3.0 cr)
EPSY 5135 - Human Relations Workshop (4.0 cr)
ESPM 5251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (3.0 cr)
GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy (3.0 cr)
HRIR 5252 - Employment and Labor Law for the HRIR Professional (2.0 cr)
KIN 5371 - Sport and Society (3.0 cr)
LAW 6030 - Contemporary Problems in Freedom of Speech and Press (3.0 cr)
LAW 6046 - Human Trafficking (2.0 cr)
LAW 6058 - Human Rights Advocacy (3.0 cr)
LAW 6602 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
LAW 6621 - Civil Rights: Citizenship and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
LAW 6827 - Women's International Human Rights (2.0 cr)
LAW 6889 - Laws of War (3.0 cr)
LAW 7400 - CL: Human Rights Litigation and International Legal Advocacy (4.0 cr)
LAW 7842 - CL: Immigration and Human Rights (4.0 cr)
OLPD 5104 - Strategies for International Development of Education Systems (3.0 cr)
OLPD 8121 - Doctoral Seminar: Comparative and International Development Education (1.0-6.0 cr)
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance (3.0 cr)
PA 5401 - Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5414 - Child Human Rights: Work and Education (3.0 cr)
PA 5421 - Racial Inequality and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5451 - Immigration, Health and Public Policy (3.0-4.0 cr)
PA 5452 - Immigration and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5490 - Topics in Social Policy (1.0-4.0 cr)
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5690 - Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy (1.0-3.0 cr)
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5823 - Managing Global Crises: Humanitarian & Human Rights Challenges for Policy Makers & Practitioners (3.0 cr)
PA 5885 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors (3.0 cr)
PA 5890 - Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs (1.0-5.0 cr)
POL 5485 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors (3.0 cr)
POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory (3.0 cr)
POL 8403 - International Norms and Institutions (3.0 cr)
POL 8460 - Topics in International Relations (3.0 cr)
PSY 8210 - Law, Race, and Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6055 - Social Inequalities in Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6066 - Building Communities, Increasing Health: Preparing for Community Health Work (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6115 - Worker Protection Law (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6131 - Working in Global Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6281 - Immigrant Health Issues (3.0-4.0 cr)
PUBH 6634 - Children and Families: Public Health Policy and Advocacy (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6801 - Health and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6807 - Global Health Relief, Development, and Religious and Non-Religious NGOs (3.0 cr)
SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance (3.0 cr)
SW 8505 - Advanced Community Organization and Advocacy (3.0 cr)
SW 8525 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
Doctoral
Electives
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AFEE 5361 - World Development Problems (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 8554 - Seminar: Gender, Race, Nation, and Policy--Perspectives from Within the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· BTHX 5100 - Introduction to Clinical Ethics (3.0 cr)
· BTHX 5220 - Standards for Research with Human Participants: A Lecture Series for Researchers (1.0 cr)
· CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the U.S.: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health (2.0 cr)
· CSPH 5211 - Peacemaking and Spirituality: A Journey Toward Healing and Strength (2.0-3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5135 - Human Relations Workshop (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 5251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy (3.0 cr)
· HRIR 5252 - Employment and Labor Law for the HRIR Professional (2.0 cr)
· KIN 5371 - Sport and Society (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6030 - Contemporary Problems in Freedom of Speech and Press (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6046 - Human Trafficking (2.0 cr)
· LAW 6058 - Human Rights Advocacy (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6602 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6621 - Civil Rights: Citizenship and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6827 - Women's International Human Rights (2.0 cr)
· LAW 6889 - Laws of War (3.0 cr)
· LAW 7400 - CL: Human Rights Litigation and International Legal Advocacy (4.0 cr)
· LAW 7842 - CL: Immigration and Human Rights (4.0 cr)
· OLPD 5104 - Strategies for International Development of Education Systems (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 8121 - Doctoral Seminar: Comparative and International Development Education (1.0-6.0 cr)
· PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance (3.0 cr)
· PA 5401 - Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5414 - Child Human Rights: Work and Education (3.0 cr)
· PA 5421 - Racial Inequality and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5451 - Immigration, Health and Public Policy (3.0-4.0 cr)
· PA 5452 - Immigration and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5490 - Topics in Social Policy (1.0-4.0 cr)
· PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5690 - Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy (1.0-3.0 cr)
· PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5823 - Managing Global Crises: Humanitarian & Human Rights Challenges for Policy Makers & Practitioners (3.0 cr)
· PA 5885 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors (3.0 cr)
· PA 5890 - Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs (1.0-5.0 cr)
· POL 5485 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors (3.0 cr)
· POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory (3.0 cr)
· POL 8403 - International Norms and Institutions (3.0 cr)
· POL 8460 - Topics in International Relations (3.0 cr)
· PSY 8210 - Law, Race, and Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6055 - Social Inequalities in Health (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6066 - Building Communities, Increasing Health: Preparing for Community Health Work (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6115 - Worker Protection Law (1.0 cr)
· PUBH 6131 - Working in Global Health (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6281 - Immigrant Health Issues (3.0-4.0 cr)
· PUBH 6634 - Children and Families: Public Health Policy and Advocacy (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6801 - Health and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6807 - Global Health Relief, Development, and Religious and Non-Religious NGOs (3.0 cr)
· SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance (3.0 cr)
· SW 8505 - Advanced Community Organization and Advocacy (3.0 cr)
· SW 8525 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
 
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LAW 6886 - International Human Rights Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of lawyers using procedures of the United Nations, Organization of American States, State Department, Congress, U.S. Courts, and nongovernmental organizations to address international human rights problems. Is there a law of international human rights? How is that law made, changed, and invoked? Problem method used.
POL 5485 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00864 - Pol 4485/Pol 5485/PA 5885
Typically offered: Every Fall
Politics of human rights issue emergence; relevant international, regional, and domestic norms; correlates of state repression; measurement of human rights abuse and remedies; human rights promotion by states, political parties, international organizations, NGOs, social movements, faith-based organizations, and providers of international development assistance.
LAW 6058 - Human Rights Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 5900/Law 6058
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will study the histories, philosophies and activities of human rights activists and organizations. The course examines the theoretical basis of the human rights movement, the principles underlying key organizations in the human rights field, as well as their strategies, tactics, and programs. The class will use case studies and other active methods to understand and to evaluate the work of human rights activists. Topics to be considered include fact-finding and documentation, campaigns on human rights issues, cultural relativism, economic rights, and corporate responsibility for human rights. Students will consider the basic organizational structure and fundraising needs of NGOs. Students will design and present a research project based on their selection of in-class topics. Readings include material on the history of NGOs; roots and development of the human rights movement; analysis of key NGOs; advocacy within international institutions; and reports and publications from NGOs working in the field.
GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01513
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
SOC 8090 - Topics in Sociology
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
AFEE 5361 - World Development Problems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01778
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development in Third World countries. Examples of First World development problems. Population, health and disease, education, agriculture, industry, finance, politics, and human rights. prereq: Grad students only
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/5866
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The "second reconstruction." Failure of Reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Post-1945 assault on white supremacy via courts/state, grass-roots southern movement in 1950s/1960s. Black struggle in north and west, emphasis on Black Power by new organizations/ideologies/leaders. Ascendancy of Reagan, conservative assault on movement.
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Shifting and contested meanings of "race" from the "Age of Conquest" to the present. Starting from the proposition that race is not a fixed or stable category of social thought or being, the seminar seeks to ascertain how and why Western ideas about race have changed.
AFRO 8554 - Seminar: Gender, Race, Nation, and Policy--Perspectives from Within the African Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary analysis of U.S. domestic and foreign policies as they affect Africans and peoples of African descent in the diaspora. Intersections of gender, race, nation, and class. prereq: instr consent
AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00952 - AmIn 5890/Hist 5890
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will read recently published scholarship in American Indian and Indigenous history that takes up pressing research questions, promises to push inquiry in new directions, and that theorizes important interventions in our thinking to understand where the field is situated and moving. Reflecting the instinctively interdisciplinary nature of American Indian and Indigenous history, readings will be drawn not just from the discipline of history but across other disciplines such as Anthropology, American Studies, Geography, Literature, Political Science, and Legal Studies. As well, readings will include scholarship that reaches out to embrace the Global Indigenous studies turn. prereq: Advanced undergrad with instr consent or grad student
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar examines particular aspects of method and/or theory. Topics vary according to student and faculty interests.
BTHX 5100 - Introduction to Clinical Ethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Most frequent ethical problems faced by clinicians, patients/families, and ethics consultants. Forgoing life sustaining treatment, decisional capacity, informed consent, treatment refusals, death/dying, pediatric ethics, reproductive issues, research ethics, psychiatric illness. Real cases.
BTHX 5220 - Standards for Research with Human Participants: A Lecture Series for Researchers
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This series of lectures presents various legal and regulatory standards that apply to research using human participants. Some are of general interest (e.g., Informed Consent); others will interest more specialized researchers (e.g., International Research).
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the U.S.: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01146
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cultural contexts explored through field-trip immersion experiences. Aspects of different health care systems. Indigenous North American, Vedic, traditional Chinese, biomedicine. Writing assignment. prereq: [Jr, Sr, or grad student standing], instr consent
CSPH 5211 - Peacemaking and Spirituality: A Journey Toward Healing and Strength
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Influence of spirituality upon process of resolving conflict and making peace in intense interpersonal/intrapersonal conflicts in multiple health care and social work settings, including in families, between patients/clients and nurses/social workers, within communities, among friends, between co-workers, or within ourselves. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
EPSY 5135 - Human Relations Workshop
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Experiential course addressing issues of prejudice and discrimination in terms of history, power, and social perception. Includes knowledge and skills acquisition in cooperative learning, multicultural education, group dynamics, social influence, effective leadership, judgment and decision-making, prejudice reduction, conflict resolution.
ESPM 5251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3251/5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use in developing countries. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Latin American case studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01513
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
HRIR 5252 - Employment and Labor Law for the HRIR Professional
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of statutes/case law to work settings. Civil rights/equal opportunity. Discrimination/harassment. Compensation/benefits. Employee protection/privacy. Labor relations. Emphasizes application/ability to recognize legal aspects of HRIR issues. prereq: HRIR MA student must register A-F, 3021, [CSOM or HRD junior or senior or dept consent]
KIN 5371 - Sport and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01469 - Kin 5371/Rec 5371
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sport, sporting processes, social influences, systems. Structures that have effected and exist within/among societies, nations, and cultures. Contemporary issues such as social differentiation, violence, and honesty. prereq: [3126W, grad student] or instr consent
LAW 6030 - Contemporary Problems in Freedom of Speech and Press
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01143 - Jour 5777/Law 6030
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Legal/constitutional derivation of freedom of press/speech. Emphasizes case law, statutes, judicial theories. Leading cases in privacy torts, prior restraints, news gathering/dissemination. Access to courts/government, including via Internet. Legal-research techniques.
LAW 6046 - Human Trafficking
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Seminar will examine the breadth and depth of efforts to combat and raise awareness about human trafficking, a form of modern-day slavery in which people are compelled through force, fraud, coercion, or other means to engage in commercial sexual exploitation or forced labor. An optional two-credit externship, Law 6047, is available.
LAW 6058 - Human Rights Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 5900/Law 6058
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will study the histories, philosophies and activities of human rights activists and organizations. The course examines the theoretical basis of the human rights movement, the principles underlying key organizations in the human rights field, as well as their strategies, tactics, and programs. The class will use case studies and other active methods to understand and to evaluate the work of human rights activists. Topics to be considered include fact-finding and documentation, campaigns on human rights issues, cultural relativism, economic rights, and corporate responsibility for human rights. Students will consider the basic organizational structure and fundraising needs of NGOs. Students will design and present a research project based on their selection of in-class topics. Readings include material on the history of NGOs; roots and development of the human rights movement; analysis of key NGOs; advocacy within international institutions; and reports and publications from NGOs working in the field.
LAW 6621 - Civil Rights: Citizenship and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores an emerging, interdisciplinary field of inquiry that focuses on the relationships between Civil Rights Law in the United States and International Human Rights Law in the global context. Although the two areas represent distinct bodies of law, they also share many important features, objectives, and impediments. By examining the historical emergence of (1) Civil Rights Law in the United States, and (2) International Human Rights Law in the global context, students will gain a better understanding of the critical relationships and intersections between these two important areas of public law. Through an examination of the seminal cases and controversies in these areas, this course will explore the differences between various categories of rights; America’s “exceptionalism” why the United States pursues a strong human rights agenda abroad that is rarely applied in the domestic context; the gains (and losses) that the domestic civil rights movement has experienced in recent decades, among other topics.
LAW 6827 - Women's International Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar addresses the history and legal context of women’s human rights; the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and its impact; gender and human rights in the international system; specific topics such as property and other economic rights, reproductive rights, and violence against women; and the role of nongovernmental organizations in making CEDAW work for women.
LAW 6889 - Laws of War
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course focuses on two interrelated bodies of law: rules pertaining to the use of force in international law (known as the jus ad bellum) and rules regulating the conduct of hostilities under the laws of international and non-international armed conflict (known as international humanitarian law, the laws of armed conflict, or the jus in bello). The course will cover such issues as the “Just War” theory, its history and its relevance in the modern world; the general prohibition on the use of force under Article 2(4) of the UN Charter; use of force by the UN: collective security and law enforcement actions; individual and collective self-defense; humanitarian intervention; and nuclear weapons in international law. The course will also consider regulation of the means and methods of warfare focusing on the Geneva and Hague laws: the four Geneva conventions protecting the wounded, sick, and shipwrecked, prisoners of war, and civilians; the means and methods of war, including lawful and unlawful weapons and targets; the law of internal armed conflicts; and asymmetric warfare.
LAW 7400 - CL: Human Rights Litigation and International Legal Advocacy
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This clinic provides students with experience in human rights advocacy which may include litigation in federal or state courts and advocacy before the United Nations, the federal and state legislative and executive branches, and working in coalitions of nongovernmental organizations. The clinic provides participation in clinical projects and skill-building exercises. The process will facilitate discussion of the pros and cons of various advocacy mechanisms, possible conflicting strategies among stakeholders, and how particular strategies are chosen and implemented. The clinic's class component includes core lawyering skills such as interviewing, counseling, negotiation, and legal ethics in practice, and subjects such as how to practice before international human rights systems, how to use international law sources in legal arguments before U.S. courts, working with clients with Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome, the different types of oral advocacy and writing in human rights advocacy, and the use of education, outreach, and the media in advancing a strategy.
LAW 7842 - CL: Immigration and Human Rights
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This clinic, which is a part of the Center for New Americans, represents persons seeking asylum in the United States as well as immigrant detainees at removal hearings in U.S. It provides students with extensive client contact, legal writing, and courtroom advocacy experience. As part of their representation of asylum-seekers, students interview and counsel their clients, research conditions in the countries where their clients suffered persecution, write briefs and represent their clients in hearings at U.S. Immigration Court. Students may write appellate briefs to the Board of Immigration Appeals and the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals. Students also represent immigrant detainees at hearings in Immigration Court to determine if they have defenses to deportation, and work on public policy and community outreach projects which bring them into contact with immigrant rights groups.
OLPD 5104 - Strategies for International Development of Education Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Strategies for improving quality/efficiency of schooling in developing countries. Introduction to current research on what policy/programmatic interventions have proven most successful in increasing access, raising quality, and improving efficiency of education in developing countries. prereq: Grad student
OLPD 8121 - Doctoral Seminar: Comparative and International Development Education
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Focuses on needs of students while writing the dissertation; general guidance in how to construct the thesis. prereq: EdPA PhD candidate
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organizational analysis of international development and humanitarian assistance, including perspectives from sociology, political science, psychology, public administration, and management. Examines efforts of multiple organizational players, including NGOs, governments, bi-lateral and multi-lateral organizations, corporations, foundations, and international organizations. Critical analysis of aid organizations, especially regarding ways in which they reflect and create power and privilege, the manner in which individuals’ needs and desires interact with, support, or challenge the needs of the organization, and how all of this is influenced by forces outside the boundary of the organization. Students practice developing actionable recommendations to improve the effectiveness of international aid organizations in the context of multiple (and often contested) understandings of global development needs and conflicting stakeholder demands. Readings, class discussions, mini-lectures, simulations, case analyses, group projects, oral presentations, memo writing, opinion writing.
PA 5401 - Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/extent of poverty/inequality in the United States, causes/consequences, impact of government programs/policies. Extent/causes of poverty/inequality in other developed/developing countries. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5414 - Child Human Rights: Work and Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
International child labor issues. Options for improving child well-being, including policies/programs that have potential to affect the lives of millions of children. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5421 - Racial Inequality and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical roots of racial inequality in American society. Contemporary economic consequences. Public policy responses to racial inequality. Emphasizes thinking/analysis that is critical of strategies offered for reducing racism and racial economic inequality. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5451 - Immigration, Health and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00519 - PA 5451/PubH 5281
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How to access demographic, health, and background information on US immigrants. Characteristics and health needs of immigrants. Designing culturally competent health programs. How to advocate for needed policy changes to promote immigrant health and wellbeing. Community visits required. Online course.
PA 5452 - Immigration and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How to employ an analytical framework to analyze a current immigration policy proposal. Topics vary (e.g., president's guest worker proposal, democratic alternative proposals). prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5490 - Topics in Social Policy
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the key concepts and tools necessary for gender policy analysis. Survey of the major findings in the field of gender and public policy in policy areas such as poverty alleviation, health, international security, environment and work-family reconciliation. Scope includes local, national, and global policy arenas as well as exploration of gender and the politics of policy formulation.
PA 5690 - Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5823 - Managing Global Crises: Humanitarian & Human Rights Challenges for Policy Makers & Practitioners
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of efforts by the international community—governments, international organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and others—to respond to humanitarian, recovery and reconstruction challenges posed by civil conflict and complex emergencies. Disasters related to natural hazards, like storm surges and hurricanes. Issues and institutions related to humanitarian challenges and humanitarian suffering around the world including security, disaster response and human rights. The roles of the United States and international and non-governmental humanitarian organizations.
PA 5885 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00864
Typically offered: Every Fall
Politics of human rights issue emergence; relevant international, regional, and domestic norms; correlates of state repression; measurement of human rights abuse and remedies; human rights promotion by states, political parties, international organizations, NGOs, social movements, faith-based organizations, and providers of international development assistance.
PA 5890 - Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
POL 5485 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00864 - Pol 4485/Pol 5485/PA 5885
Typically offered: Every Fall
Politics of human rights issue emergence; relevant international, regional, and domestic norms; correlates of state repression; measurement of human rights abuse and remedies; human rights promotion by states, political parties, international organizations, NGOs, social movements, faith-based organizations, and providers of international development assistance.
POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Prerequisites: Grad pol sci major or #
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings and research in special topics or problems. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8403 - International Norms and Institutions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Origins, roles, and effectiveness of international norms and institutions; theoretical explanations and debates. Institution of sovereignty; rational choice versus constructivist perspectives; role of international law, international organizations, and non-governmental organizations; and international society and transnational cultural norms. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8460 - Topics in International Relations
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings and research in advanced topics or problems. Recent topics: global environmental issues, morality in world politics, and norms and institutions in world politics.
PSY 8210 - Law, Race, and Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01341
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Interdisciplinary seminar. Scientific foundations for and legal implications of implicit (vs explicit) racial or gender bias in four socio-legal domains: criminal law, affirmative action, employment discrimination, and legislative redistricting. prereq: 2nd or 3rd yr law student or PhD student in social science doctoral program
PUBH 6055 - Social Inequalities in Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Extent and causes of social inequalities in health. Degree to which understanding of these inequalities is hampered by methodological limitations in health research. Focuses on individual, community, and policy approaches to reducing social inequalities in health.
PUBH 6066 - Building Communities, Increasing Health: Preparing for Community Health Work
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Taught with Powderhorn-Phillips Cultural Wellness Center. Introduction to community building/organizing. Using culture as a resource for health, reducing barriers, identifying community assets, planning organizing strategy, understanding the impact of history. Emphasizes self-reflection and skill-building for authentic, grassroots community work.
PUBH 6115 - Worker Protection Law
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Role of government in protecting rights of citizens. Labor movement history as starting point for discussion of systems for protecting workers in unsafe workplaces and compensating them for injuries. Laws against class-based discrimination.
PUBH 6131 - Working in Global Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to key issues in global health. Global burden of disease. Cultural issues/health. Nutrition. Infectious diseases. Environmental problems. Women/children. Prereq Grad student.
PUBH 6281 - Immigrant Health Issues
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5451/PubH 5281
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to access demographic, health, and background information on U.S. immigrants. Characteristics and health needs of immigrants. Designing culturally competent health programs. How to advocate for changes to promote immigrant health. Community visits required. prereq: Public health or grad student or instr consent
PUBH 6634 - Children and Families: Public Health Policy and Advocacy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course will focus on how public policies at the federal, state and local level influence children's health. Students will develop practical skills to understand, analyze, communicate, and advocate on children’s policy issues. The course will include presentations and discussions with Minnesota's current leaders in children's health policy including legislators, advocates, and state commissioners. Instructor information: Lauren Gilchrist is the Senior Policy Advisor to Governor Mark Dayton. In this role, she works with commissioners, legislators, local government and stakeholders to advance health and human services policy issues for the state of Minnesota. She previously served as an advisor to the late Senator Ted Kennedy and Senator Al Franken.
PUBH 6801 - Health and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relationship of health and human rights in public health context. Philosophical frameworks/groundings. Nexus between health and human rights. Historical/contemporary topics. prereq: Grad student or professional student or instr consent
PUBH 6807 - Global Health Relief, Development, and Religious and Non-Religious NGOs
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Intersection of global health, relief, development, and roles/interaction of intergovernmental/governmental agencies and religious/non-religious NGOs in humanitarian response, development and social welfare generation supporting global health. Health, humanitarianism, culture, interagency relations. prereq: Public Health or grad student or instr consent
SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced topics in law, crime, and deviance. Social underpinnings of legal/illegal behavior and of legal systems.
SW 8505 - Advanced Community Organization and Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Methods for stimulating/supporting joint action for constructive change to fulfill community needs. Principles of working with local organizations. Social action to accomplish specific changes. prereq: [Foundation curriculum, advanced standing] or instr consent
AFEE 5361 - World Development Problems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01778
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development in Third World countries. Examples of First World development problems. Population, health and disease, education, agriculture, industry, finance, politics, and human rights. prereq: Grad students only
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/5866
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The "second reconstruction." Failure of Reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Post-1945 assault on white supremacy via courts/state, grass-roots southern movement in 1950s/1960s. Black struggle in north and west, emphasis on Black Power by new organizations/ideologies/leaders. Ascendancy of Reagan, conservative assault on movement.
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Shifting and contested meanings of "race" from the "Age of Conquest" to the present. Starting from the proposition that race is not a fixed or stable category of social thought or being, the seminar seeks to ascertain how and why Western ideas about race have changed.
AFRO 8554 - Seminar: Gender, Race, Nation, and Policy--Perspectives from Within the African Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary analysis of U.S. domestic and foreign policies as they affect Africans and peoples of African descent in the diaspora. Intersections of gender, race, nation, and class. prereq: instr consent
AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00952 - AmIn 5890/Hist 5890
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will read recently published scholarship in American Indian and Indigenous history that takes up pressing research questions, promises to push inquiry in new directions, and that theorizes important interventions in our thinking to understand where the field is situated and moving. Reflecting the instinctively interdisciplinary nature of American Indian and Indigenous history, readings will be drawn not just from the discipline of history but across other disciplines such as Anthropology, American Studies, Geography, Literature, Political Science, and Legal Studies. As well, readings will include scholarship that reaches out to embrace the Global Indigenous studies turn. prereq: Advanced undergrad with instr consent or grad student
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar examines particular aspects of method and/or theory. Topics vary according to student and faculty interests.
BTHX 5100 - Introduction to Clinical Ethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Most frequent ethical problems faced by clinicians, patients/families, and ethics consultants. Forgoing life sustaining treatment, decisional capacity, informed consent, treatment refusals, death/dying, pediatric ethics, reproductive issues, research ethics, psychiatric illness. Real cases.
BTHX 5220 - Standards for Research with Human Participants: A Lecture Series for Researchers
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This series of lectures presents various legal and regulatory standards that apply to research using human participants. Some are of general interest (e.g., Informed Consent); others will interest more specialized researchers (e.g., International Research).
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the U.S.: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01146
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cultural contexts explored through field-trip immersion experiences. Aspects of different health care systems. Indigenous North American, Vedic, traditional Chinese, biomedicine. Writing assignment. prereq: [Jr, Sr, or grad student standing], instr consent
CSPH 5211 - Peacemaking and Spirituality: A Journey Toward Healing and Strength
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Influence of spirituality upon process of resolving conflict and making peace in intense interpersonal/intrapersonal conflicts in multiple health care and social work settings, including in families, between patients/clients and nurses/social workers, within communities, among friends, between co-workers, or within ourselves. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
EPSY 5135 - Human Relations Workshop
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Experiential course addressing issues of prejudice and discrimination in terms of history, power, and social perception. Includes knowledge and skills acquisition in cooperative learning, multicultural education, group dynamics, social influence, effective leadership, judgment and decision-making, prejudice reduction, conflict resolution.
ESPM 5251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3251/5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use in developing countries. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Latin American case studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01513
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
HRIR 5252 - Employment and Labor Law for the HRIR Professional
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of statutes/case law to work settings. Civil rights/equal opportunity. Discrimination/harassment. Compensation/benefits. Employee protection/privacy. Labor relations. Emphasizes application/ability to recognize legal aspects of HRIR issues. prereq: HRIR MA student must register A-F, 3021, [CSOM or HRD junior or senior or dept consent]
KIN 5371 - Sport and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01469 - Kin 5371/Rec 5371
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sport, sporting processes, social influences, systems. Structures that have effected and exist within/among societies, nations, and cultures. Contemporary issues such as social differentiation, violence, and honesty. prereq: [3126W, grad student] or instr consent
LAW 6030 - Contemporary Problems in Freedom of Speech and Press
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01143 - Jour 5777/Law 6030
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Legal/constitutional derivation of freedom of press/speech. Emphasizes case law, statutes, judicial theories. Leading cases in privacy torts, prior restraints, news gathering/dissemination. Access to courts/government, including via Internet. Legal-research techniques.
LAW 6046 - Human Trafficking
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Seminar will examine the breadth and depth of efforts to combat and raise awareness about human trafficking, a form of modern-day slavery in which people are compelled through force, fraud, coercion, or other means to engage in commercial sexual exploitation or forced labor. An optional two-credit externship, Law 6047, is available.
LAW 6058 - Human Rights Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 5900/Law 6058
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will study the histories, philosophies and activities of human rights activists and organizations. The course examines the theoretical basis of the human rights movement, the principles underlying key organizations in the human rights field, as well as their strategies, tactics, and programs. The class will use case studies and other active methods to understand and to evaluate the work of human rights activists. Topics to be considered include fact-finding and documentation, campaigns on human rights issues, cultural relativism, economic rights, and corporate responsibility for human rights. Students will consider the basic organizational structure and fundraising needs of NGOs. Students will design and present a research project based on their selection of in-class topics. Readings include material on the history of NGOs; roots and development of the human rights movement; analysis of key NGOs; advocacy within international institutions; and reports and publications from NGOs working in the field.
LAW 6621 - Civil Rights: Citizenship and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores an emerging, interdisciplinary field of inquiry that focuses on the relationships between Civil Rights Law in the United States and International Human Rights Law in the global context. Although the two areas represent distinct bodies of law, they also share many important features, objectives, and impediments. By examining the historical emergence of (1) Civil Rights Law in the United States, and (2) International Human Rights Law in the global context, students will gain a better understanding of the critical relationships and intersections between these two important areas of public law. Through an examination of the seminal cases and controversies in these areas, this course will explore the differences between various categories of rights; America’s “exceptionalism” why the United States pursues a strong human rights agenda abroad that is rarely applied in the domestic context; the gains (and losses) that the domestic civil rights movement has experienced in recent decades, among other topics.
LAW 6827 - Women's International Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar addresses the history and legal context of women’s human rights; the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and its impact; gender and human rights in the international system; specific topics such as property and other economic rights, reproductive rights, and violence against women; and the role of nongovernmental organizations in making CEDAW work for women.
LAW 6889 - Laws of War
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course focuses on two interrelated bodies of law: rules pertaining to the use of force in international law (known as the jus ad bellum) and rules regulating the conduct of hostilities under the laws of international and non-international armed conflict (known as international humanitarian law, the laws of armed conflict, or the jus in bello). The course will cover such issues as the “Just War” theory, its history and its relevance in the modern world; the general prohibition on the use of force under Article 2(4) of the UN Charter; use of force by the UN: collective security and law enforcement actions; individual and collective self-defense; humanitarian intervention; and nuclear weapons in international law. The course will also consider regulation of the means and methods of warfare focusing on the Geneva and Hague laws: the four Geneva conventions protecting the wounded, sick, and shipwrecked, prisoners of war, and civilians; the means and methods of war, including lawful and unlawful weapons and targets; the law of internal armed conflicts; and asymmetric warfare.
LAW 7400 - CL: Human Rights Litigation and International Legal Advocacy
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This clinic provides students with experience in human rights advocacy which may include litigation in federal or state courts and advocacy before the United Nations, the federal and state legislative and executive branches, and working in coalitions of nongovernmental organizations. The clinic provides participation in clinical projects and skill-building exercises. The process will facilitate discussion of the pros and cons of various advocacy mechanisms, possible conflicting strategies among stakeholders, and how particular strategies are chosen and implemented. The clinic's class component includes core lawyering skills such as interviewing, counseling, negotiation, and legal ethics in practice, and subjects such as how to practice before international human rights systems, how to use international law sources in legal arguments before U.S. courts, working with clients with Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome, the different types of oral advocacy and writing in human rights advocacy, and the use of education, outreach, and the media in advancing a strategy.
LAW 7842 - CL: Immigration and Human Rights
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This clinic, which is a part of the Center for New Americans, represents persons seeking asylum in the United States as well as immigrant detainees at removal hearings in U.S. It provides students with extensive client contact, legal writing, and courtroom advocacy experience. As part of their representation of asylum-seekers, students interview and counsel their clients, research conditions in the countries where their clients suffered persecution, write briefs and represent their clients in hearings at U.S. Immigration Court. Students may write appellate briefs to the Board of Immigration Appeals and the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals. Students also represent immigrant detainees at hearings in Immigration Court to determine if they have defenses to deportation, and work on public policy and community outreach projects which bring them into contact with immigrant rights groups.
OLPD 5104 - Strategies for International Development of Education Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Strategies for improving quality/efficiency of schooling in developing countries. Introduction to current research on what policy/programmatic interventions have proven most successful in increasing access, raising quality, and improving efficiency of education in developing countries. prereq: Grad student
OLPD 8121 - Doctoral Seminar: Comparative and International Development Education
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Focuses on needs of students while writing the dissertation; general guidance in how to construct the thesis. prereq: EdPA PhD candidate
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organizational analysis of international development and humanitarian assistance, including perspectives from sociology, political science, psychology, public administration, and management. Examines efforts of multiple organizational players, including NGOs, governments, bi-lateral and multi-lateral organizations, corporations, foundations, and international organizations. Critical analysis of aid organizations, especially regarding ways in which they reflect and create power and privilege, the manner in which individuals’ needs and desires interact with, support, or challenge the needs of the organization, and how all of this is influenced by forces outside the boundary of the organization. Students practice developing actionable recommendations to improve the effectiveness of international aid organizations in the context of multiple (and often contested) understandings of global development needs and conflicting stakeholder demands. Readings, class discussions, mini-lectures, simulations, case analyses, group projects, oral presentations, memo writing, opinion writing.
PA 5401 - Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/extent of poverty/inequality in the United States, causes/consequences, impact of government programs/policies. Extent/causes of poverty/inequality in other developed/developing countries. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5414 - Child Human Rights: Work and Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
International child labor issues. Options for improving child well-being, including policies/programs that have potential to affect the lives of millions of children. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5421 - Racial Inequality and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical roots of racial inequality in American society. Contemporary economic consequences. Public policy responses to racial inequality. Emphasizes thinking/analysis that is critical of strategies offered for reducing racism and racial economic inequality. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5451 - Immigration, Health and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00519 - PA 5451/PubH 5281
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How to access demographic, health, and background information on US immigrants. Characteristics and health needs of immigrants. Designing culturally competent health programs. How to advocate for needed policy changes to promote immigrant health and wellbeing. Community visits required. Online course.
PA 5452 - Immigration and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How to employ an analytical framework to analyze a current immigration policy proposal. Topics vary (e.g., president's guest worker proposal, democratic alternative proposals). prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5490 - Topics in Social Policy
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the key concepts and tools necessary for gender policy analysis. Survey of the major findings in the field of gender and public policy in policy areas such as poverty alleviation, health, international security, environment and work-family reconciliation. Scope includes local, national, and global policy arenas as well as exploration of gender and the politics of policy formulation.
PA 5690 - Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5823 - Managing Global Crises: Humanitarian & Human Rights Challenges for Policy Makers & Practitioners
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of efforts by the international community—governments, international organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and others—to respond to humanitarian, recovery and reconstruction challenges posed by civil conflict and complex emergencies. Disasters related to natural hazards, like storm surges and hurricanes. Issues and institutions related to humanitarian challenges and humanitarian suffering around the world including security, disaster response and human rights. The roles of the United States and international and non-governmental humanitarian organizations.
PA 5885 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00864
Typically offered: Every Fall
Politics of human rights issue emergence; relevant international, regional, and domestic norms; correlates of state repression; measurement of human rights abuse and remedies; human rights promotion by states, political parties, international organizations, NGOs, social movements, faith-based organizations, and providers of international development assistance.
PA 5890 - Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
POL 5485 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00864 - Pol 4485/Pol 5485/PA 5885
Typically offered: Every Fall
Politics of human rights issue emergence; relevant international, regional, and domestic norms; correlates of state repression; measurement of human rights abuse and remedies; human rights promotion by states, political parties, international organizations, NGOs, social movements, faith-based organizations, and providers of international development assistance.
POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Prerequisites: Grad pol sci major or #
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings and research in special topics or problems. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8403 - International Norms and Institutions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Origins, roles, and effectiveness of international norms and institutions; theoretical explanations and debates. Institution of sovereignty; rational choice versus constructivist perspectives; role of international law, international organizations, and non-governmental organizations; and international society and transnational cultural norms. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8460 - Topics in International Relations
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings and research in advanced topics or problems. Recent topics: global environmental issues, morality in world politics, and norms and institutions in world politics.
PSY 8210 - Law, Race, and Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01341
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Interdisciplinary seminar. Scientific foundations for and legal implications of implicit (vs explicit) racial or gender bias in four socio-legal domains: criminal law, affirmative action, employment discrimination, and legislative redistricting. prereq: 2nd or 3rd yr law student or PhD student in social science doctoral program
PUBH 6055 - Social Inequalities in Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Extent and causes of social inequalities in health. Degree to which understanding of these inequalities is hampered by methodological limitations in health research. Focuses on individual, community, and policy approaches to reducing social inequalities in health.
PUBH 6066 - Building Communities, Increasing Health: Preparing for Community Health Work
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Taught with Powderhorn-Phillips Cultural Wellness Center. Introduction to community building/organizing. Using culture as a resource for health, reducing barriers, identifying community assets, planning organizing strategy, understanding the impact of history. Emphasizes self-reflection and skill-building for authentic, grassroots community work.
PUBH 6115 - Worker Protection Law
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Role of government in protecting rights of citizens. Labor movement history as starting point for discussion of systems for protecting workers in unsafe workplaces and compensating them for injuries. Laws against class-based discrimination.
PUBH 6131 - Working in Global Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to key issues in global health. Global burden of disease. Cultural issues/health. Nutrition. Infectious diseases. Environmental problems. Women/children. Prereq Grad student.
PUBH 6281 - Immigrant Health Issues
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5451/PubH 5281
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to access demographic, health, and background information on U.S. immigrants. Characteristics and health needs of immigrants. Designing culturally competent health programs. How to advocate for changes to promote immigrant health. Community visits required. prereq: Public health or grad student or instr consent
PUBH 6634 - Children and Families: Public Health Policy and Advocacy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course will focus on how public policies at the federal, state and local level influence children's health. Students will develop practical skills to understand, analyze, communicate, and advocate on children’s policy issues. The course will include presentations and discussions with Minnesota's current leaders in children's health policy including legislators, advocates, and state commissioners. Instructor information: Lauren Gilchrist is the Senior Policy Advisor to Governor Mark Dayton. In this role, she works with commissioners, legislators, local government and stakeholders to advance health and human services policy issues for the state of Minnesota. She previously served as an advisor to the late Senator Ted Kennedy and Senator Al Franken.
PUBH 6801 - Health and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relationship of health and human rights in public health context. Philosophical frameworks/groundings. Nexus between health and human rights. Historical/contemporary topics. prereq: Grad student or professional student or instr consent
PUBH 6807 - Global Health Relief, Development, and Religious and Non-Religious NGOs
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Intersection of global health, relief, development, and roles/interaction of intergovernmental/governmental agencies and religious/non-religious NGOs in humanitarian response, development and social welfare generation supporting global health. Health, humanitarianism, culture, interagency relations. prereq: Public Health or grad student or instr consent
SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced topics in law, crime, and deviance. Social underpinnings of legal/illegal behavior and of legal systems.
SW 8505 - Advanced Community Organization and Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Methods for stimulating/supporting joint action for constructive change to fulfill community needs. Principles of working with local organizations. Social action to accomplish specific changes. prereq: [Foundation curriculum, advanced standing] or instr consent