Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

History Ph.D.

History Department
College of Liberal Arts
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Department of History, 1110 Heller Hall, 271 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-624-5840; fax: 612-624-7096)
  • Program Type: Doctorate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2023
  • Length of program in credits: 63
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Doctor of Philosophy
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The History graduate program offers the following areas of concentration: Africa; ancient history; East and South Asia; late antiquity and the middle ages; medieval, early modern, and modern Europe; the early modern world; Middle East; Latin America; and the United States and its colonial background. Scholarly resources include Center for Austrian Studies, Center for German and European Studies, Center for Jewish Studies, Center for Medieval Studies, Immigration History Research Center, Minnesota Population Center, Modern Greek Studies, Center for Early Modern History, Institute for Advanced Study, and Consortium for the Study of the Premodern World.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
Completion of a Bachelor of Arts or equivalent. Applicants for whom English is not their first language must submit English language proficiency test scores.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Alternative English language tests, for applicants for whom English is not the first language, include the PTE Academic (Score: 59) and the Cambridge C1 Advanced (Score: 180). Contact the History Department for more information.
Special Application Requirements:
The preferred undergraduate GPA is 3.50 (on a 4.00 scale), with grades of A/A- for history coursework expected.
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 79
    • Internet Based - Writing Score: 21
    • Internet Based - Reading Score: 19
  • IELTS
    • Total Score: 6.5
  • MELAB
    • Final score: 80
The preferred English language test is Test of English as Foreign Language.
Key to test abbreviations (TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
27 credits are required in the major.
12 credits are required outside the major.
24 thesis credits are required.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
Language Requirement: At least one language other than English
A minimum GPA of 3.50 is required for students to remain in good standing.
At least one language requirement must be satisfied prior to the preliminary oral examination.
History Courses (6 credits)
Take HIST 8015 the first year of study, and HIST 8021 the second or third year of study.
HIST 8015 - Scope and Methods of Historical Studies (3.0 cr)
HIST 8021 - History Research Seminar (3.0 cr)
Electives (21 credits)
Select 21 credits from the following in consultation with the advisor:
HIST 5053 - Doing Roman History: Sources, Methods, and Trends (3.0 cr)
HIST 5264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries (3.0 cr)
HIST 5265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime (3.0 cr)
HIST 5461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age (3.0 cr)
HIST 5462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present (3.0 cr)
HIST 5478 - Tigers and Dragons: The Rise of the East Asian Economies, 1930-Present (3.0 cr)
HIST 5479 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
HIST 5513 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence (3.0 cr)
HIST 5547 - Empire and Nations in the Middle East (3.0 cr)
HIST 5708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
HIST 5711 - Cognitive History (3.0 cr)
HIST 5801 - Seminar in Early American History (3.0 cr)
HIST 5802 - Readings in American History, 1848-Present (3.0 cr)
HIST 5831 - Cultural Fallout: The Cold War and Its Legacy: Readings (3.0 cr)
HIST 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History (3.0 cr)
HIST 5901 - Latin America Proseminar: Colonial (3.0 cr)
HIST 5902 - Latin America Proseminar: Modern (3.0 cr)
HIST 5910 - Topics in U.S. History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 5932 - The Production of Knowledge, Negotiating the Past, and the Writing of African Histories (3.0 cr)
HIST 5960 - Topics in History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-16.0 cr)
HIST 5994 - Directed Research (1.0-16.0 cr)
HIST 8025 - Politics of Historical Memory (3.0 cr)
HIST 8031 - Doing Digital History (3.0 cr)
HIST 8032 - Archives (3.0 cr)
HIST 8122 - Public Histories (3.0 cr)
HIST 8245 - Human Rights: A Global History (3.0 cr)
HIST 8540 - Topics in Mediterranean Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8630 - Seminar in World History (3.0 cr)
HIST 8644 - Legal History Workshop (3.0 cr)
HIST 8645 - American Legal History (3.0 cr)
HIST 8801 - Seminar in Early American History (3.0 cr)
HIST 8802 - Readings in American History, 1848-Present (3.0 cr)
HIST 8900 - Topics in European/Medieval History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8910 - Topics in U.S. History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8920 - Topics in African History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8930 - Topics in Ancient History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8940 - Topics in Asian History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8960 - Topics in History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8980 - Topics in Comparative Women's History (3.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8990 - Topics in Comparative History-Research (3.0 cr)
HIST 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-16.0 cr)
HIST 8994 - Directed Research (1.0-16.0 cr)
Outside Coursework (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following in consultation with the advisor:
AAS 5993 - Directed Readings (1.0-4.0 cr)
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
AFRO 5932 - The Production of Knowledge, Negotiating the Past, and the Writing of African Histories (3.0 cr)
AFRO 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race (3.0 cr)
AFRO 8910 - Topics in Studies of Africa and the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
AMES 5920 - Topics in Asian Culture (3.0 cr)
AMES 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
AMES 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
AMIN 8301 - Critical Indigenous Theory (3.0 cr)
AMST 5920 - Topics in American Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
AMST 8202 - Theoretical Foundations and Current Practice in American Studies (3.0 cr)
AMST 8231 - Cultural Fallout: The Cold War and Its Legacy, Readings (3.0 cr)
AMST 8920 - Topics in American Studies (3.0 cr)
AMST 8970 - Independent Study in American Studies (1.0-9.0 cr)
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8510 - Topics in Archaeology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-18.0 cr)
ARAB 5101 - Advanced Arabic I (4.0 cr)
ARAB 5102 - Advanced Arabic II (4.0 cr)
ARTH 5302 - The Image Multiplied: Prints in Early Modern Europe (3.0 cr)
ARTH 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans (3.0 cr)
ARTH 5950 - Topics: Art History (3.0 cr)
ARTH 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
ARTH 8190 - Seminar: Issues in Ancient Art and Archaeology (3.0 cr)
ARTH 8320 - Seminar: Issues in Early Modern Visual Culture (3.0 cr)
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
CHIC 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
CHIC 5920 - Topics in Chicana(o) Studies (3.0 cr)
CHIC 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
CHN 5214 - Classical Chinese Language and Culture (3.0 cr)
CNRC 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
CNRC 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
CNRC 8190 - Seminar: Issues in Ancient Art and Archaeology (3.0 cr)
CNRC 8530 - Religions of the Ancient Mediterranean World (3.0 cr)
CSCL 5910 - Topics in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature (3.0-4.0 cr)
CSCL 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
CSCL 8002 - Basic Research Seminar in Comparative Literature II (3.0 cr)
CSCL 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
DSSC 8111 - Approaches to Knowledge and Truth: Ways of Knowing in Development Studies and Social Change (3.0 cr)
DSSC 8112 - Scholarship and Public Responsibility (1.0 cr)
DSSC 8211 - Doctoral Research Workshop in Development Studies and Social Change (3.0 cr)
DSSC 8310 - Topics in Development Studies and Social Change (1.0-3.0 cr)
EMS 8100 - Workshop in Early Modern Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
EMS 8250 - Seminar in Early Modern Studies (3.0 cr)
EMS 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-6.0 cr)
ENGL 5150 - Readings in 19th-Century Literature and Culture (3.0 cr)
ENGL 5300 - Readings in American Minority Literature (3.0 cr)
ENGL 5510 - Readings in Criticism and Theory (3.0 cr)
ENGL 8090 - Seminar in Special Subjects (3.0 cr)
ENGL 8300 - Seminar in American Minority Literature (3.0 cr)
ENGL 8400 - Seminar in Post-Colonial Literature, Culture, and Theory (3.0 cr)
ENGL 8520 - Seminar: Cultural Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
FREN 5350 - Topics in Literature and Culture (3.0 cr)
FREN 8110 - Topics in Early Medieval French Literature (3.0 cr)
FREN 8114 - Troubadour Lyric and Old Occitan Language (3.0 cr)
FREN 8190 - Old French Workshop (1.0 cr)
FREN 8992 - Directed Readings for Graduate Students (1.0-5.0 cr)
GEOG 5385 - Globalization and Development: Political Economy (4.0 cr)
GEOG 8200 - Seminar: Urban Geography (2.0-3.0 cr)
GEOG 8230 - Theoretical Geography (3.0 cr)
GEOG 8302 - Research Development (3.0 cr)
GEOG 8970 - Directed Readings (1.0-5.0 cr)
GEOG 8980 - Topics: Geography (1.0-3.0 cr)
GER 5610 - German Literature in Translation (3.0 cr)
GER 5734 - Old Saxon (3.0 cr)
GER 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
GLOS 5900 - Topics in Global Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
GRAD 5105 - Practicum in University Teaching for Nonnative English Speakers (2.0 cr)
GRAD 8401 - Dissertation Proposal Development Seminar (3.0 cr)
GRK 5003 - Intermediate Greek Prose for Graduate Student Research (4.0 cr)
GRK 5200 - Advanced Readings in Greek Prose (3.0 cr)
GWSS 5104 - Transnational Feminist Theory (3.0 cr)
GWSS 5190 - Topics: Theory, Knowledge, and Power (3.0 cr)
GWSS 5406 - Black Feminist Thought in the American and African Diasporas (3.0 cr)
GWSS 5502 - Gender and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
GWSS 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-12.0 cr)
GWSS 8107 - Feminist Pedagogies (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8108 - Genealogies of Feminist Theory (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8210 - Seminar: Feminist Theory & Praxis (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8220 - Seminar: Science, Technology & Environmental Justice (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8270 - Seminar: Theories of Body (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8490 - Seminar: Transnational, Postcolonial, Diaspora (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-6.0 cr)
HMED 8113 - Research Methods in the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine (3.0 cr)
HMED 8135 - Disease and Debility in History (3.0 cr)
HMED 8220 - Seminar: Current Topics in the History of Medicine (3.0 cr)
HNDI 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
HORT 8280 - Current Topics in Applied Plant Sciences (1.0 cr)
HSCI 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-15.0 cr)
HSCI 8112 - Historiography of Science, Technology, and Medicine (3.0 cr)
HSCI 8930 - Seminar: History of Technology (3.0 cr)
HSCI 8993 - Directed Studies (1.0-5.0 cr)
HSPH 8001 - Who Owns the Past? Common Concerns and Big Questions in Heritage and Public History (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8002 - Core Practices in Heritage Studies and Public History (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8003 - Race and Indigeneity in Heritage Representation (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8006 - Digital Methods for Heritage Studies & Public History (3.0 cr)
JOUR 5601W - History of Journalism [WI] (3.0 cr)
JOUR 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
JOUR 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-6.0 cr)
JPN 5040 - Readings in Japanese Texts (3.0 cr)
JPN 5041 - Reading Japanese Texts: Literature and Culture (3.0 cr)
JPN 5993 - Directed Studies in Japanese (1.0-15.0 cr)
LAT 5001 - Intensive Latin (3.0 cr)
LAT 5003 - Intermediate Latin Prose for Graduate Student Research (4.0 cr)
LAT 5004 - Intermediate Latin Poetry for Graduate Research (4.0 cr)
LAT 5100 - Advanced Readings in Latin Poetry (3.0 cr)
LAT 5200 - Advanced Readings in Latin Prose (3.0 cr)
LAT 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
LAT 8100 - Readings in Latin Prose (3.0 cr)
LAT 8910 - Seminar (3.0 cr)
LAW 6702 - Legal History Workshop (2.0 cr)
LAW 7608 - Independent Research and Writing (1.0-3.0 cr)
MEST 5610 - Advanced Topics in Medieval Studies (3.0-4.0 cr)
MEST 5993 - Directed Studies in Medieval Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
MIMS 5910 - Topics in Moving Image Studies (2.0-4.0 cr)
MST 5011 - Museum History and Philosophy (3.0 cr)
MST 5012 - Museum Practices (3.0 cr)
MST 5020 - Internship (1.0-6.0 cr)
PA 5890 - Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs (0.5-5.0 cr)
PHIL 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
PHIL 8110 - Seminar: Metaphysics (3.0 cr)
PHIL 8710 - Seminar: Feminist Philosophy (3.0 cr)
PHIL 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
POL 8252 - Early Modern Political Thought (3.0 cr)
POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory (3.0 cr)
RELS 5001 - Theory and Method in the Study of Religion: Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion (3.0 cr)
RELS 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
RUSS 5411 - Dostoevsky in Translation [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
RUSS 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
SCAN 5701 - Old Norse Language and Literature (3.0 cr)
SCAN 5703 - Old Norse Poetry (3.0 cr)
SCAN 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
SOC 8090 - Topics in Sociology (1.5-3.0 cr)
SOC 8290 - Topics in Race, Class, Gender and other forms of Durable Inequality (3.0 cr)
SOC 8390 - Topics in Political Sociology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8607 - Migration & Migrants in Demographic Perspective (3.0 cr)
SOC 8790 - Advanced Topics in Sociological Theory (3.0 cr)
SOC 8890 - Advanced Topics in Research Methods (2.0-3.0 cr)
SPAN 5160 - Medieval Iberian Literatures and Cultures (3.0 cr)
SPAN 5560 - Global Colonial Studies in the Hispanic World (3.0 cr)
Thesis Credits
Take 24 doctoral thesis credits.
HIST 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral (1.0-24.0 cr)
 
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HIST 8015 - Scope and Methods of Historical Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development of historical studies over time (especially in 19th and 20th centuries). Methodologies currently shaping historical research. Theoretical developments within the discipline during 19th and 20th centuries. prereq: instr consent
HIST 8021 - History Research Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The History Research Seminar will help History PhD students to conceptualize and articulate a significant research proposal and to become more effective writers. The course will prioritize the format and expectations of the dissertation prospectus, but with permission of the instructor students may develop a different research project (e.g. a seminar paper to become part of their portfolio, or a chapter of an MA thesis or dissertation). In either case, students will focus on the process of rigorously conceptualizing their research by writing a proposal using a format that is suggested by the Graduate School's Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship application's "Statement of Research" as a model.
HIST 5053 - Doing Roman History: Sources, Methods, and Trends
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Survey of major scholarship in field of Roman history since Mommsen. Political, cultural, social, military, and economic history. Focuses on methodological problems posed by evidence. Ways in which these issues shape research. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
HIST 5264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3264/Hist 5264
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interaction with Europe and Asia; attempts at modernization and reform; emancipation of the serfs and rise of revolutionary movements.
HIST 5265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3265/Hist 5265
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of the factors that led to the collapse of the tsarist regime; discussion of the 1917 revolution, the evolution of the Soviet regime and the collapse of Soviet communism. Emphasis on the role of nationalities and the rise of the Commonwealth of independent states.
HIST 5461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comparative survey of early history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Early Chinese thought. Diffusion of Confucianism, Buddhism, and other values throughout East Asia. Political and social history of region to 1600.
HIST 5462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How Asian states, societies, economies, and cultures linked with one another and with European powers. How period's historical effects still resonate. Covers India, China, Japan, Korea, and Indochina.
HIST 5478 - Tigers and Dragons: The Rise of the East Asian Economies, 1930-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3278/Hist 3478/Hist 5478
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Rise of East Asian Economies, 1930-Present. prereq: Grad student
HIST 5513 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3513Hist 5513 /RelS 3721/
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
History of the Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and disputed territories of Western Sahara from time of Ottoman expansion/Sharifian dynasties [Sa'dian/'Alawid]) in 16th/17th Centuries to end of 20th century. Focus on encounter of Islamic cultures/societies of Maghrib and Africa/Europe
HIST 5547 - Empire and Nations in the Middle East
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Modernity in non-Western imperial context. Identity, ideology, economy, environment, language. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
HIST 5708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
HIST 5711 - Cognitive History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3711/HIST 5711
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Cognitive History will examine how research in cognitive neuroscience provides historians with new knowledge and methods for asking questions about the past. It is not a course on the history of the cognitive sciences. Instead, it is about practicing history in the cognitive age, a period that began more than fifty years ago, and an approach to explaining how humans think and act that has been adopted within fields across our universities. The course will combine broad readings and discussions in "Big History" and the shift from behaviorism to cognition with more specific studies about memory, narrative, aesthetics, the body, and violence. Students will have an opportunity to apply a cognitive history approach to a specific topic that emphasizes one of the following topics: Evolution, Behaviorism, Cognitive Cultural Studies, Memory, Narrative, Aesthetics, the Body, and Violence. Students will help guide discussions for the relevant class sessions on these topics and write an essay on the selected theme
HIST 5801 - Seminar in Early American History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 5801/Hist 8801
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to literature of early American history. Readings selected from some of best scholarship in field. Questions of colonial historians. Theories, methods, sources used in pursuit of those questions.
HIST 5802 - Readings in American History, 1848-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 5802/Hist 8802
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings-intensive course. U.S. history from Mexican-American War to present.
HIST 5831 - Cultural Fallout: The Cold War and Its Legacy: Readings
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmSt 8231/Hist 5831
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Culture of the Cold War, its legacy. How it affected/reflected domestic politics, public policies, civic life, gender expectations, sexuality, class relations, racial justice, and civil rights. Impact of domestic anti-communism and of American cultural politics abroad.
HIST 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5890/Hist 5890
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will read recently published scholarship in American Indian and Indigenous history that takes up pressing research questions, promises to push inquiry in new directions, and that theorizes important interventions in our thinking to understand where the field is situated and moving. Reflecting the instinctively interdisciplinary nature of American Indian and Indigenous history, readings will be drawn not just from the discipline of history but across other disciplines such as Anthropology, American Studies, Geography, Literature, Political Science, and Legal Studies. As well, readings will include scholarship that reaches out to embrace the Global Indigenous studies turn. prereq: Advanced undergrad with instr consent or grad student
HIST 5901 - Latin America Proseminar: Colonial
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduces beginning graduate and advanced undergraduate students to major historical writings on various Latin American themes. prereq: instr consent
HIST 5902 - Latin America Proseminar: Modern
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduces beginning graduate and advanced undergraduate students to major historical writings on various Latin American themes. prereq: instr consent
HIST 5910 - Topics in U.S. History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
HIST 5932 - The Production of Knowledge, Negotiating the Past, and the Writing of African Histories
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5932/Hist 5932
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Recent scholarship on social history of Africa. Focuses on new literature on daily lives of ordinary people in their workplaces, communities, households.
HIST 5960 - Topics in History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected topics in history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: [advanced undergrad with instr consent]
HIST 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq [Grad student or sr], instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
HIST 5994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Work on a tutorial basis. Prereq [Grad student or sr], instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
HIST 8025 - Politics of Historical Memory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ger 8820/Hist 8025
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Issues surrounding interaction of memory/history. Genealogy of historical memory. Individual narratives and circulation of historical memory. Sites/forms of collective memory. Justice and historical memory. Case studies, discussions, research projects.
HIST 8031 - Doing Digital History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 8031/HSPH 8006
Typically offered: Every Fall
Digital technologies are significantly altering the speed and scale of the foundational methodologies of archeology, history, and preservation. Moreover, they are shifting the way the public engages with the past in cultural institutions and across the myriad screens that pervade their daily life. In this course, students will not only learn how emerging digital technologies can enhance their research, but also how those technologies are fundamentally transforming the possibilities for the public presentation of that research. This course privileges hands-on learning and balances deepening essential methodological skills with exposure to a breadth of field-altering technologies. It is structured around five core methodologies--excavation, documentation, reconstruction, interpretation, and exhibition. In each unit, students will be first be tasked with identifying the underlying principles of these methodological approaches. They will then use class time to explore technologies that extend those methods such as high-resolution imaging, relational databases, text mining programs, virtual environments, and content management systems for website building. Bookending the course is a focus on effective collaboration--the foundation of successful digital projects--and public engagement in an increasingly connected yet fractured society.
HIST 8032 - Archives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Working in close collaboration with the archivists of the Department of Archives and Special Collections at the University Libraries, this hands-on course will explore how archivists do their work and how a deeper understanding of that work can help scholars in any field grasp the practice of historical research. Rooted in the theory and tradition of archival science, the course will cover the core practices of archivists as well as the emerging issues and technologies changing the way archives are built, maintained, and accessed. In this course, students will gain experience with archival theory, archival ethics, selection, appraisal, arrangement, description, reference, access, preservation, exhibits, and outreach. Through engaging with those topics, students will be prepared to situate archives and archival material within the socio-historical contexts in which they were produced and in which they are maintained, affording them a critical perspective on the historical sources they contain. Each week's course will be co-taught with an archivist from the Department of Archives and Special Collections at the University Libraries.
HIST 8122 - Public Histories
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This seminar examines the variety of ways that "public history" is produced both within and outside the academy and explores interdisciplinary approaches to the making and critical analysis of public histories. Students will discuss recent scholarship by historians as well as scholars and practitioners in allied fields. Through discussion and collaborative project work, the seminar will also provide a hands-on introduction to the theory, methods, practice and politics of public history.
HIST 8245 - Human Rights: A Global History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will focus on debates and social movements concerning human rights in the broadest sense, beginning with the seventeenth century and ending in the 1950s. Topics include colonization, slavery, torture, war crimes, rights to land, women's rights, sexual rights, and indigenous self-determination. The seminar will require a research or historiographical paper.
HIST 8540 - Topics in Mediterranean Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 15.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Mediterranean history from Middle Ages to present. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad student or advanced undergrad with instr consent
HIST 8630 - Seminar in World History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Critical examination of historical literature dealing with theoretical approaches to world history and teaching of world history. prereq: instr consent
HIST 8644 - Legal History Workshop
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 8645/Law 6228
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to legal history and professional socialization. Work-in-progress of leading scholars working in field of legal history. Students can undertake original research. prereq: instr consent
HIST 8645 - American Legal History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 8645/Law 6228
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the interaction between law, politics, and culture in American society, concentrating on the period from the Revolution through the New Deal. Topics include: democracy and the rule of law; slavery; the public-private distinction; Civil War and Reconstruction; industrialization; expansion of the federal administrative state; law and the human sciences; crime and punishment; legal education and the role of the lawyer in the American polity. Readings will include primary legal sources, such as treatises, statutes, constitutions, and landmark cases, as well as contemporary religious, scientific, and literary works, which will help to situate the legal materials in broader cultural context. Several secondary sources will also be considered, both for insights into the topics covered, and to illustrate various approaches to legal-historical analysis. The course will encourage critical examination of these sources with the aim of clarifying how law has figured in the history and historiography of the United States. No previous background in American history is assumed.
HIST 8801 - Seminar in Early American History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 5801/Hist 8801
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to literature of early American history. Readings selected from some of best scholarship in field. Questions of colonial historians. Theories, methods, sources used in pursuit of those questions.
HIST 8802 - Readings in American History, 1848-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 5802/Hist 8802
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Readings-intensive course. U.S. history from Mexican-American War to present.
HIST 8900 - Topics in European/Medieval History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8910 - Topics in U.S. History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 15.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8920 - Topics in African History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8930 - Topics in Ancient History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8940 - Topics in Asian History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8960 - Topics in History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8980 - Topics in Comparative Women's History
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cross-cultural/thematic explorations in history of women. Gender/colonialism. Women/class formation. Women/religion. Sexuality. Medical construction of gender. Women's narratives as historical sources. Gender/politics. prereq: [advanced undergrad, instr consent]
HIST 8990 - Topics in Comparative History-Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics vary. Students read/discuss historical works from different geographic areas, develop proposals for comparative research, or pursue comparative research projects. prereq: instr consent
HIST 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students work on tutorial basis. Guided individual reading or study. prereq: Grad student, instr consent
HIST 8994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Work on a tutorial basis. prereq: instr consent
AAS 5993 - Directed Readings
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Directed reading--must be set up with individual instructor.
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/Afro 5866/Hist 3856
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The "second reconstruction." Failure of Reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Post-1945 assault on white supremacy via courts/state, grass-roots southern movement in 1950s/1960s. Black struggle in north and west, emphasis on Black Power by new organizations/ideologies/leaders. Ascendancy of Reagan, conservative assault on movement.
AFRO 5932 - The Production of Knowledge, Negotiating the Past, and the Writing of African Histories
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5932/Hist 5932
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Recent scholarship on social history of Africa. Focuses on new literature on daily lives of ordinary people in their workplaces, communities, households. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
AFRO 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading/study for qualified seniors and graduate students. prereq: instr consent
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
At its heart, the 8202 seminar is about dialogue, interrogating scholarship on race, intellectual history, and knowledge production. We will be in deep conversation with one another as we negotiate meaning around the intellectual history of race. Dialogue, indeed, is at the heart of this graduate seminar experience. Given the multidisciplinary composition of the students and content in 8202, we build together to form a learning whole in a remote format. Central to our work is excavating the 500 year legacy of race thought and making into the contemporary period.
AFRO 8910 - Topics in Studies of Africa and the African Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AMES 5920 - Topics in Asian Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AMES 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual reading/study, with guidance of a faculty member, on topics not covered in regular courses. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
AMES 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Directed readings in foreign language(s) of specialty, where appropriate. prereq: PhD student
AMIN 8301 - Critical Indigenous Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course covers the "critical turn" in American Indian and Native or Indigenous Studies as evident in the emergence of three overlapping threads or intellectual/political genealogies: critiques of Indigeneity (the claims and conditions of nativeness to specific places), Indigenous Feminist (which foregrounds the salience of gender in indigenous critiques of power structures), and Indigenous Queer, sometimes labeled "Two-Spirit" (which foregrounds sexuality). What are the analytical, political and cultural backgrounds and what are their purchases for theory, critique, and practice? For interrogating academic and non-academic (including Indigenous) forms of inquiry and knowledge production and being in the world?
AMST 5920 - Topics in American Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AMST 8202 - Theoretical Foundations and Current Practice in American Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of central theoretical work in the field and survey of key methodologies. prereq: grad AmSt major or instr consent or dept consent
AMST 8231 - Cultural Fallout: The Cold War and Its Legacy, Readings
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Culture of Cold War, its legacy. How it affected/reflected domestic politics, public policies, civic life, gender expectations, sexuality, class relations, racial justice, and civil rights. Impact of domestic anti-communism and of American cultural politics abroad.
AMST 8920 - Topics in American Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AMST 8970 - Independent Study in American Studies
Credits: 1.0 -9.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Independent study of interdisciplinary aspects of American civilization under guidance of faculty members of various departments. prereq: instr consent, dept consent
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3145W/Anth 5045W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This class explores anthropological approaches to urban life. On one hand, the course examines the ontological nature of the city by looking into the relation between cities and their environment, and asking whether and how people differentiate "urban" and 'non-urban" spaces. It uncovers the social practices and behaviors that define urban life; urban-rural distinctions; the material and ecological processes that constitute cities; and popular representations of city and/or countryside. On the other hand, the course investigates the spatial and social divisions of the city, seeking to understand the historical struggles and ongoing processes that both draw together and differentiate the people of an urban environment. It studies how cities influence political decision-making, contributing to the uneven distribution of power and resources. It considers: industrialization; urban class conflict; gendered and racialized spaces; and suburbanization. Both of these approaches will also critically consider the city as a social object that we encounter and learn about through our engagement with kinds of media, such as novels and film. Hence, reading for the class will include literature from the social sciences and humanities, as well as critical works of fiction. Students will engage with these broader anthropological issues through an investigation of several global cities, especially Minneapolis-St. Paul, Chicago, Paris, Mexico City, Brasilia, and New Delhi. The class mixes lecture, discussion, and guided research. Lectures will introduce the history of urbanism and urban anthropology. Discussions will critically evaluate the readings, and offer insights and examples to better understand them. By participating in a guided research project, students will uncover hidden aspects of their own city, using ethnography or archaeology to shed light on the urban environment, social struggles over space, or other themes.
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Have you ever wondered how archaeologists interpret the vast amount of archaeological evidence from the British Isles, one of the most studied and best documented parts of the world? And how do archaeologists and governmental agencies protect the heritage of Britain, from major monuments such as Stonehenge, Roman forts, and Shakespeare?s theaters, to the minor products of craft industries such as personal ornaments and coins? This course teaches you about the archaeology of the British Isles, in all of its aspects. You learn how archaeologists study the changing societies of Britain and Ireland, from the first settlers about a million years ago to modern times. You learn about the strategies that public institutions employ to preserve and protect archaeological sites, and about the place of archaeology in tourism in the British Isles and in the formation of identities among the diverse peoples of modern Britain.
ANTH 8510 - Topics in Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar examines particular aspects of archaeological methods and/or theory. Topics vary according to student and faculty interests.
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar examines particular aspects of method and/or theory. Topics vary according to student and faculty interests.
ANTH 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed Study prereq: instr consent
ARAB 5101 - Advanced Arabic I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced readings in classical/modern Arabic. Compositions based on texts. prereq: Grade B- or higher in 3102 or instr consent
ARAB 5102 - Advanced Arabic II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Readings of Arabic texts. Writing compositions based on texts. Continuation of 5101.
ARTH 5302 - The Image Multiplied: Prints in Early Modern Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The technology of mechanically reproducing complex visual images on paper, a development of fifteenth-century Europe, transformed the early modern world no less than the emergence of digital media has transformed our own. Techniques of woodcut, engraving and etching quickly became important media for innovation within the fine arts. At the same time, they became equally important as sources for devotional imagery, for disseminating copies of other artworks, for the expansion of knowledge through scientific illustration, and for the effective broadcasting of political and religious messages during centuries of extraordinary political and religious upheaval. In this course we will investigate the cultural history of printed images in Europe from the time of their emergence in the fifteenth century through the mid-eighteenth century. Through lectures and class discussion, you will develop a familiarity with the technical aspects of printmaking and apply that understanding to the historical interpretation of specific works. The course will not be an exhaustive survey of printmakers and printmaking styles during the early modern era but will instead approach the early modern print through the changing cultural circumstances of its production and reception. While we will consider the work of many lesser-known (and anonymous) artists, we will concentrate on the work of major printmakers such as Mantegna, Dürer, Goltzius, Rembrandt, Callot, Hogarth, and Piranesi. The course will include visits to local collections.
ARTH 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5781/RelS 5781
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Artistic developments under the three most powerful Islamic empires of the 16th through 19th centuries: Ottomans of Turkey; Safavids of Iran; Mughals of India. Roles of religion and state will be considered to understand their artistic production.
ARTH 5950 - Topics: Art History
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ARTH 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
TBD prereq: instr consent
ARTH 8190 - Seminar: Issues in Ancient Art and Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 8190/CNES 8190
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected topics, with special attention to current scholarly disputes. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
ARTH 8320 - Seminar: Issues in Early Modern Visual Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Issues in visual culture of Europe and the Americas, 1500-1750. Topics vary, may include representation of body, collectors/collecting, impact of Reformation, image/book, art/discovery, early modern vision/visuality.
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
CHIC 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
CHIC 5920 - Topics in Chicana(o) Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Multidisciplinary themes in Chicana(o) studies. Issues of current interest.
CHIC 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading, research, and study for completion of the requirements for a senior paper or honors thesis. prereq: instr consent
CHN 5214 - Classical Chinese Language and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Classical Chinese, or literary Chinese, was the formal written language in China until the early 20th century, and also, during various periods, in Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. It is closely related to the modern Chinese language, especially for formal writing, and its literary heritage has laid the cornerstone of Chinese cultural values and worldviews. This class guides the students to comprehend the linguistic and cultural characteristics of classical Chinese, introduces them to key aspects of the tradition, and develops skills for translating classical Chinese into modern Chinese and English texts. The prerequisite is fourth-year Chinese (CHN 4042) or above. Please note that this class is entirely taught in modern Mandarin Chinese, although English study guides will be provided throughout the course.
CNRC 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNRC 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
CNRC 8190 - Seminar: Issues in Ancient Art and Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 8190/CNES 8190
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected issues, with special attention to current scholarly disputes. Topics specified in [Class Schedule].
CNRC 8530 - Religions of the Ancient Mediterranean World
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Intensive study of particular aspects of religious practice in the ancient Mediterranean world, often from a comparative perspective. Focus on scrutiny of primary sources and discussion of contemporary trends in scholarship. Topics specified in the Class Schedule.
CSCL 5910 - Topics in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 32.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
CSCL 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 5993/CSDS 5993
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
CSCL 8002 - Basic Research Seminar in Comparative Literature II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CL 8002//CSCL 8002/CSDS 8002
Typically offered: Every Spring
Key texts, positions, problematics in field of comparative critical theory. Special attention to historical precursors, influential contemporary debates, disciplinary genealogies.
CSCL 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 48.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 8993/CSDS 8993
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Catalog Description: Directed Study in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature prereq: instr consent
DSSC 8111 - Approaches to Knowledge and Truth: Ways of Knowing in Development Studies and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Approaches practiced by physical, biological, social science, and humanities scholars. "Ways of knowing" in different cultures/groups. Issues/methodological challenges facing interdisciplinary/international studies. Taught by faculty from biological, social sciences, and humanities. prereq: Grad DSSC minor or instr consent
DSSC 8112 - Scholarship and Public Responsibility
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Seminar. Concerns/themes relevant to public engagement in academic work. Diverse practices of reading, writing, and pedagogy. Privileged locations of knowledge. Tactics of civil society organizing. Politics of collaborative work. prereq: Grad DSSC minor or instr consent
DSSC 8211 - Doctoral Research Workshop in Development Studies and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interdisciplinary workshop to assist doctoral students in writing successful research and grant proposals to support their dissertation research on themes related to global social change. Enables students to develop interdisciplinary peer review and feedback skills and consider ethical and practical issues global south research. prereq: Grad DSSC minor or instr consent
DSSC 8310 - Topics in Development Studies and Social Change
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seven-week to full semester seminar. Topical issues in development and social change.
EMS 8100 - Workshop in Early Modern Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Lectures and workshops offered by various centers, departments, institutes, and libraries across disciplines on Twin Cities campus. Online reports and discussion. prereq: instr consent
EMS 8250 - Seminar in Early Modern Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Current research and debates in early modern studies. Theoretical approaches to major questions shaping seminar's subject matter.
EMS 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students work on tutorial basis. Guided individual reading or study. prereq: Grad student
ENGL 5150 - Readings in 19th-Century Literature and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics may include British Romantic or Victorian literatures, American literature, important writers from a particular literary school, a genre (e.g., the novel). Readings.
ENGL 5300 - Readings in American Minority Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3300/EngL 3300H/EngL 5300
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contextual readings of 19th-/20th-century American minority writers. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ENGL 5510 - Readings in Criticism and Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Major works of classical criticism in the English critical tradition from Renaissance to 1920. Leading theories of criticism from 1920 to present. Theories of fiction, narratology. Feminist criticisms. Marxist criticisms. Psychoanalytic criticisms. Theories of postmodernism.
ENGL 8090 - Seminar in Special Subjects
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Sample topics: literature of World War II, writings of the Holocaust, literature of English Civil War, advanced versification.
ENGL 8300 - Seminar in American Minority Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Sample topics: Harlem Renaissance, ethnic autobiographies, Black Arts movement. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ENGL 8400 - Seminar in Post-Colonial Literature, Culture, and Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sample topics: Marxism and nationalism; modern India; feminism and decolonization; "the Empire Writes Back"; Islam and the West. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ENGL 8520 - Seminar: Cultural Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sample topics: semiotics applied to perspective paintings, numbers, and money; analysis of a particular set of cultural practices by applying various theories to them. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
FREN 5350 - Topics in Literature and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Problem, period, author, or topic of interest. See Class Schedule. prereq: 3101 or equiv
FREN 8110 - Topics in Early Medieval French Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Introduction to epic, romance, allegory, and theater in Old French readings (12th-13th centuries). Specific topics/texts studied vary. Taught in French.
FREN 8114 - Troubadour Lyric and Old Occitan Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Language and literature of Old Occitan (Old Proven[c]al), chiefly troubadours' songs. Some language instruction, reading of lyrics, consideration of social context, introduction to scholarly tradition. Knowledge of French, Spanish, Italian, or Latin desirable. Taught in English.
FREN 8190 - Old French Workshop
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Workshop runs concurrently with seminars on Old French literature. Advanced practicum in reading Old French, with discussions of the particularities of seminar texts and formal, aesthetic, and hermeneutic issues directly related to the original language. Students read portions of texts in Old French and prepare an original translation. The workshop is not an introduction to Old French Students planning to make medieval French literature their research field should register for the workshop each time it is offered. prereq: French 5571 or other prior course on Old French language, concurrent registration in the related Ph.D. seminar.
FREN 8992 - Directed Readings for Graduate Students
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 25.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
tbd prereq: instr consent
GEOG 5385 - Globalization and Development: Political Economy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Nature/scope of modern world system (capitalism), its impact on regional development processes. Roles of state and of international financial institutions. prereq: Sr or grad or instr consent
GEOG 8200 - Seminar: Urban Geography
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Contemporary research. Topics vary with the interests of faculty.
GEOG 8230 - Theoretical Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced topics. Topics vary with interests of faculty offering course. Contemporary theoretical/philosophical themes transcending subdisciplines of human/physical geography. prereq: instr consent
GEOG 8302 - Research Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Students in geography and related social sciences are guided in key steps to effective research proposal writing. prereq: instr consent
GEOG 8970 - Directed Readings
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
tbd prereq: dept consent
GEOG 8980 - Topics: Geography
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 30.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar offered by visiting or regular faculty. Topics vary with interests of faculty. prereq: instr consent
GER 5610 - German Literature in Translation
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study in depth of authors or topics from various periods in German literature. Requires no knowledge of German. prereq: No knowledge of German required; cr toward major or minor requires reading in German
GER 5734 - Old Saxon
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of the poetry of Old Saxon. Detailed investigation of Old Saxon in comparison with the other Old Germanic languages.
GER 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
GLOS 5900 - Topics in Global Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Proseminar. Selected issues in global studies. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
GRAD 5105 - Practicum in University Teaching for Nonnative English Speakers
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory, advanced practice in teaching in higher education for nonnative speakers of English. Emphasizes interactive teaching strategies, awareness of cross-cultural classroom issues,oral classroom presentation skills, and legal/policy issues. prereq: 5102 or English Language Proficiency Rating of 2; Contact cei@umn.edu for permission number.
GRAD 8401 - Dissertation Proposal Development Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This seminar is the culminating component of intensive work on dissertation proposal development. The program involves a five-day spring workshop, independent summer research, a five-day fall workshop, and opportunities for on-going interactions with the cohort and with faculty instructors. The work is designed to help participants develop cogent and fundable dissertation research proposals. The main goal of the spring workshop is to help clarify students? research questions and scope as well as to better prepare them for a productive predissertation summer research experience. The fall workshop is intended to help students build on their spring workshop efforts and summer research experiences to prepare full dissertation research proposals. These proposals are intended to serve as the foundation for department prospectus requirements and for internal and external dissertation research and completion grants. All components of the program are required though registration is only for the fall seminar. Admission will be based on application in the prior year and requires a commitment to participate in all components of the program. A grade of Satisfactory will be based on attendance at and satisfactory performance in all of the spring and fall workshops, demonstrated completion of independent research over the summer, and the submission of a dissertation research proposal as part of the fall workshop. Students must be enrolled in a doctoral degree program, must be pre-ABD (may not have passed the prelim oral exam), and have advisor approval. prereq: PhD student who has not passed prelim oral exams
GRK 5003 - Intermediate Greek Prose for Graduate Student Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 3003/Grk 3113/Grk 5003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to Athenian prose authors of 5th/4th centuries BCE. Readings of continuous passages of unadapted Greek texts (history, speeches). Review of grammar/vocabulary. Some discussion of major themes/issues in Greek culture as illustrated by texts. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in [1002 or 5001] or [instr consent, grad student]
GRK 5200 - Advanced Readings in Greek Prose
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The primary material for this course will be a selection of readings from three or more different Greek prose authors connected by genre (e.g. historical writing, philosophy, oratory, novel), theme (e.g. medicine, Athenian politics of the 5 th /4 th centuries, religious innovation), period (e.g. classical period, Second Sophistic), or the like. Primary readings and critical approach will vary from year to year, making the course repeatable. Some modern secondary reading will be assigned to provide a basis for discussion and a model for student written work. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Contact the Classical & Near Eastern Religions & Cultures Department (CNRC) with any questions.
GWSS 5104 - Transnational Feminist Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Third World and transnational feminisms. Interrogating the categories of "women," "feminism," and "Third World." Varieties of power/oppression that women have endured/resisted, including colonization, nationalism, globalization, and capitalism. Concentrates on postcolonial context.
GWSS 5190 - Topics: Theory, Knowledge, and Power
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
GWSS 5406 - Black Feminist Thought in the American and African Diasporas
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 4406/Afro 5406/GWSS 4406/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Critically examines spatiality of African descendant women in Americas/larger black diaspora. Writings from black feminist/queer geographies, history, contemporary cultural criticism. Recent black feminist theorizing.
GWSS 5502 - Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GLBT 4502/GWSS 4502/GWSS 5502
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Public policy issues, processes, and histories as these affect women-, children-, and gender-related issues.
GWSS 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -12.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
TBD
GWSS 8107 - Feminist Pedagogies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explore feminist theories/critical approaches to pedagogy. Develop teaching philosophy statement, design syllabus, practice teach/learn problem-solving strategies for classroom. prereq: Feminist Studies grad student [Maj or Minor] or instr consent
GWSS 8108 - Genealogies of Feminist Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Two-semester seminar. First term: debates in gender theory; intersections of gender theory with critical race theory, post-colonial theory, sexuality theory, social class analysis. Second term: inter-/multi-disciplinary feminist research methodologies from humanities/social sciences. prereq: Feminist studies PhD or grad minor student or instr consent
GWSS 8210 - Seminar: Feminist Theory & Praxis
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics in feminist theory.
GWSS 8220 - Seminar: Science, Technology & Environmental Justice
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics related to science, technology, environmental justice.
GWSS 8270 - Seminar: Theories of Body
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How body is configured in many social arenas. Legal decisions, public policy, medical research, cultural customs. Examine how attitudes toward male/female bodies influence social myths/discourses about social policy/change.
GWSS 8490 - Seminar: Transnational, Postcolonial, Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Graduate topics in comparative/global studies.
GWSS 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
TBD
HMED 8113 - Research Methods in the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HMed 8113/HSci 8113
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to sources, methods, and problems of research in history of science, technology, and medicine. Preparation of major research paper under faculty supervision. prereq: instr consent
HMED 8135 - Disease and Debility in History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this graduate seminar we will examine how concepts of disease and health have changed over time and across place. We?ll move from debates over the identity of the Black Death in 14th century Europe to the treatment of infectious diseases in Imperial China and colonial India, and to the contested diagnoses of AIDS and fetal alcohol syndrome in late 20th century United States. Along the way we?ll evaluate the different methodological approaches used by scholars to study the history of disease, and we?ll examine the ways in which social values, cultural assumptions, and political interests have shaped how diseases have been defined, experienced, and treated, and we?ll consider the role that diseases have played in the shaping of health care institutions, policies, and practices. At the same time, we?ll examine the processes of medicalization and demedicalization; colonialism, post-colonialism, and the politics of state-building; the ecological understandings of disease, environmentalism, and the politics of place; and the increasingly visible role of the politicized consumer and patient activist in late 20th century health care politics.
HMED 8220 - Seminar: Current Topics in the History of Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics vary. prereq: instr consent
HNDI 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual reading or study of modern Hindi-Urdu texts. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
HORT 8280 - Current Topics in Applied Plant Sciences
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics presented by faculty or visiting scientists. prereq: Grad major in [hort or applied plnt sciences or ent or agro or plnt brdg or plnt path or soil] or instr consent
HSCI 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -15.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. prereq: instr consent
HSCI 8112 - Historiography of Science, Technology, and Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Models of practice, different schools. Work of representative historians of science, technology, and medicine.
HSCI 8930 - Seminar: History of Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
For advanced graduate students; topics in development of technology from ancient times to the present. prereq: instr consent
HSCI 8993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
TBD prereq: instr consent
HSPH 8001 - Who Owns the Past? Common Concerns and Big Questions in Heritage and Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Course offers a survey through case studies of the common concerns, concepts and ethics of heritage and public history. Students will learn about the history and social contexts of heritage studies and public history, the stakes and stakeholders, and the conflicts and positive interventions that can be made through the work of these affiliated professions.
HSPH 8002 - Core Practices in Heritage Studies and Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Course is open to all Heritage Studies and Public History (HSPH) graduate students. DGS or Instructor permission required for others. Course offers a survey of how heritage and public history concern and ethics are embedded into practice. Through illustrated lectures, case studies, field trips, readings and class discussion, students will learn about the professional practice of heritage studies and public history, how approaches to practice are aligned to institutional mission, customization of programs for diverse audiences, and professional evaluation and management of financial resources.
HSPH 8003 - Race and Indigeneity in Heritage Representation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar will explore the changes in how diversity has been represented in historical interpretations in the past, and how practice is changing in response to the contemporary and anticipated social context of the United States. "Diversity" has historically been assumed to derive from categories such as race or culture, concepts constructed in the discipline of anthropology but taken up as the foundation for typologies in other arenas such as art history, architectural history, museums, and public policy. What is problematic in such an approach? What happens to communities defined by shared history, political sovereignty, and disenfranchisement? What are the implications beyond museums for those communities? Finally, how can we think differently about diversity without re-inscribing harmful constructions of difference?
HSPH 8006 - Digital Methods for Heritage Studies & Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 8031/HSPH 8006
Typically offered: Every Fall
Digital technologies are significantly altering the speed and scale of the foundational methodologies of archeology, history, and preservation. Moreover, they are shifting the way the public engages with the past in cultural institutions and across the myriad screens that pervade their daily life. In this course, students will not only learn how emerging digital technologies can enhance their research, but also how those technologies are fundamentally transforming the possibilities for the public presentation of that research. This course privileges hands-on learning and balances deeping essential methodological skills with exposure to a breadth of field-altering technologies. It is structured around five core methodologies--excavation, documentation, reconstruction, interpretation, and exhibition. In each unit, students will be first be tasked with identifying the underlying principles of these methodological approaches. They will then use class time to explore technologies that extend those methods such as high-resolution imaging, relational databases, text mining programs, virtual environments, and content management systems for website building. Bookending the course is a focus on effective collaboration--the foundation of successful digital projects--and public engagement in an increasingly connected yet fractured society.
JOUR 5601W - History of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is (real/fake) news? Who's a journalist? What is journalism? How did we get to where we are today regarding journalism both as a profession and as an essential tool of democracy? Learn the fundamental chronology of the development of journalism in the United States from the Revolution to today, and then delve into the big quandaries: How free has journalism been? What have been its professional standards? How has journalism affected a diverse audience? What are the challenges of international journalism? And how have new communication technologies interacted with journalism?
JOUR 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study/projects. Prereq [Jour major or jour minor or approved IDIM major or ICP major or BIS major], GPA of at least 3.00, college consent, dept consent, instr consent. Students enrolling in this directed study/research course will complete the University's common Directed Study/Research contract with the faculty mentor/evaluator. The Faculty member will ensure academic standards are upheld, including: the work proposed is at the appropriate level for the course, academic in nature, and the student will be involved intellectually in the project. the project scope is reasonable for one semester and the number of credits specified (42 hours of work per credit) the faculty mentor is qualified to serve in this role assessment of student learning and grading criteria are clear and appropriate the student will be working in a respectful, inclusive environment
JOUR 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study. prereq: Grad mass comm major or minor, instr consent, dept consent
JPN 5040 - Readings in Japanese Texts
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students read authentic materials of various types to increase reading and speaking ability. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 4042 or equiv or instr consent
JPN 5041 - Reading Japanese Texts: Literature and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is conducted 100% in modern Japanese, including course materials, lectures, and discussions. Close reading of texts written in modern Japanese, including a recent novel, essays on social phenomena, critical essays on Japanese society, and/or academic papers. Read and translate these texts accurately and critically; discuss them in Japanese, and/or compose an essay entirely in modern Japanese. Pre-requisite: JPN 4042 or equivalent or instructor consent.
JPN 5993 - Directed Studies in Japanese
Credits: 1.0 -15.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Individual study with guidance of a faculty member. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
LAT 5001 - Intensive Latin
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 1001/Lat 1111H/Lat 3111/La
Typically offered: Every Fall
Covers material usually taught over two semesters. prereq: Prev experience in another foreign language is desirable
LAT 5003 - Intermediate Latin Prose for Graduate Student Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 3003/Lat 5003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to Latin prose authors of 1st centuries BCE/CE. Readings of continuous passages of unadapted Latin texts (history, speeches, letters). Review of grammar/vocabulary as needed. Some discussion of major themes/issues in Roman culture as illustrated by texts. prereq: [Grade of at least [C- or S] in [1002 or 5001] or instr consent]
LAT 5004 - Intermediate Latin Poetry for Graduate Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 3300/Lat 5004/Lat 3114/Lat
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Roman epic poetry. Readings of selections from Vergil's Aeneid. Quantitative meter and poetic devices. Discussion of major themes and issues as developed in Vergil's poetry. Meets with 3004.
LAT 5100 - Advanced Readings in Latin Poetry
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The primary material for this course will be a selection of readings from three or more different Latin poets connected by genre (e.g. epic, dramatic, lyric), theme (e.g. heroism and the hero, the body, the good life), period (e.g. Augustan, late Antique), or the like. Primary readings and critical approach will vary from year to year, making the course repeatable. Some modern secondary reading will be assigned to provide a basis for discussion and a model for student written work. prereq: [3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Contact the Classical & Near Eastern Religions & Cultures Department with any questions.
LAT 5200 - Advanced Readings in Latin Prose
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The primary material for this course will be a selection of readings from three or more different Latin prose authors connected by genre (e.g. historical writing, philosophy, religious texts), theme (e.g. Epicureanism and Stoicism, Christian apologetics, grammarians), period (e.g. Republican, Late Imperial), or the like. Primary readings and critical approach will vary from year to year, making the course repeatable. Some modern secondary reading will be assigned to provide a basis for discussion and a model for student written work. prereq: [LAT 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Contact the Classical & Near Eastern Religions & Cultures department (CNRC) with any questions.
LAT 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. prereq: instr consent, dept consent
LAT 8100 - Readings in Latin Prose
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reading/discussion of Latin prose texts.
LAT 8910 - Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 30.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics in Latin literature examined in depth. Emphasizes current scholarship, original student research.
LAW 6702 - Legal History Workshop
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This seminar brings in leading scholars engaged in projects at the intersection of law and history. The goal of the seminar is to provide students with an introduction to the field of legal history and an opportunity to engage with scholars working on innovative projects that span from the ancient to the modern world, covering a range of geographical regions as well. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of works-in-progress of the guest scholars. Collectively, their works will encourage students to think comparatively about the role of law in defining the nature and limits of state power, and more broadly about the historical dynamics of law and society, with particular attention to the ways in which law has served not only as a mode of governance, but also as a cultural resource, enabling individuals to contest conventional ideas about race, class, and gender difference, and the very meaning of social justice.
LAW 7608 - Independent Research and Writing
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Law 7606 and 7608 provide credit for independent writing projects; the difference is that 7606 satisfies the J.D. upper division writing requirement, while 7608 does not (except on a case-by-case basis before fall 2016). The registrar will assign students to 7606 or 7608 based on whether the student seeks and the supervisor approves upper division writing credit. Students may earn 1 or 2 credits (and in exceptional circumstances 3 credits) for researching and writing a note, article, memo, or other paper on a legal topic. At least 3,750 words are required for one credit, at least 7,500 for two credits, and at least 11,250 for three credits. To register, the student should confer with a supervising faculty member, draft a description of the proposed project, and complete the online Independent Research form.
MEST 5610 - Advanced Topics in Medieval Studies
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
From late antiquity through end of Middle Ages (circa 300-1500 A.D.). Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: One yr work in some area of Middle Ages, reading knowledge of appropriate language.
MEST 5993 - Directed Studies in Medieval Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Directed study with one of the core faculty of medieval studies program. prereq: One yr work in some area of Middle Ages, reading knowledge of appropriate language, instr consent
MIMS 5910 - Topics in Moving Image Studies
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Special topics in moving image studies.
MST 5011 - Museum History and Philosophy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical and philosophical roots of museums and emerging philosophical issues faced by museums today - from art, history, science, and youth to living collections, living history sites, and historic houses. Field trips to area museums.
MST 5012 - Museum Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Grad student or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical aspects of museum work. Standards, practices, responsibilities, issues, all set in greater museum context. Curatorial/educational duties, collections management, security, funding, boards, public relations, installation, budgeting. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
MST 5020 - Internship
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 32.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students arrange to perform a professional-level task in a museum of good standing under close supervision of a member of the museum's professional staff. Instructor must approve a work plan and report. prereq: 5011, 5012, dept consent
PA 5890 - Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs
Credits: 0.5 -5.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
PHIL 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. prereq: instr consent, dept consent, college consent
PHIL 8110 - Seminar: Metaphysics
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics vary by offering. prereq: 4101 or instr consent
PHIL 8710 - Seminar: Feminist Philosophy
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Topics vary by offering. prereq: 4622 or 5622 or WoSt 4122 or WoSt 5122 or instr consent
PHIL 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
tbd prereq: instr consent
POL 8252 - Early Modern Political Thought
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theorists and texts from Renaissance to French Revolution. Selectively includes Machiavelli, More, Calvin, Luther, Grotius, Bodin, Hobbes, Winstanley, Harrington, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Hume, Smith, Burke, and Wollstonecraft; key debates over liberty, law, power, and knowledge. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings and research in special topics or problems.
RELS 5001 - Theory and Method in the Study of Religion: Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: RelS 3001/5001/5521
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical/methodological issues in academic study of religion. Theories of origin, character, and function of religion as a human phenomenon. Psychological, sociological, anthropological, and phenomenological perspectives. prereq: Sr or grad student or instr consent
RELS 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 24.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
TBD prereq: instr consent
RUSS 5411 - Dostoevsky in Translation (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Russ 3411/5411
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Novels, stories, and other writings of Fyodor Dostoevsky.
RUSS 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual study. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
SCAN 5701 - Old Norse Language and Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MEST 5701/SCAN 5701
Typically offered: Every Fall
Acquisition of a reading knowledge of Old Norse; linguistic, philological and literary study of Old Norse language and literature.
SCAN 5703 - Old Norse Poetry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading and analysis of either eddic poetry from the Poetic Edda or skaldic poetry. Texts read in Old Norse.
SCAN 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading and study. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
SOC 8090 - Topics in Sociology
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
SOC 8290 - Topics in Race, Class, Gender and other forms of Durable Inequality
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Comparative perspectives on racial inequality; race, class, and gender; quantitative research on gender stratification; stratification in post-communist societies; institutional change and stratification systems; industrialization and stratification. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SOC 8390 - Topics in Political Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics with common focus on social underpinnings of political behavior/change. Topics specified in Class Schedule. Sample topics: democracy and development, international legal and political systems, power and protest in advanced capitalist states, xenophobia and international migration, and civil society and democracy.
SOC 8607 - Migration & Migrants in Demographic Perspective
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
With fertility and mortality, migration is one of three core population processes. This course provides a graduate-level treatment of major theoretical and empirical debates in demographic/population research on migration and migrants. It examines topics like why and how people migrate, who migrates and who does not, and the effects of migration in migrant-receiving and migrant-sending areas. Along the way, it links to a number of related topics, including the impacts of migration on migrants themselves, the role of the state and policies governing migration and incorporation, and transnationalism. A common thread throughout is connecting these topics to issues of population size, composition, and change. While this course contains ?demographic? in the title and fulfills requirements for graduate trainees and the population studies minor in the Minnesota Population Center, it is necessarily interdisciplinary in scope and draws from research in economics, demography/population studies, human geography, history, political science, population health, public policy, and sociology. Credit will not be granted if the student has already completed a Soc 8090 topics course with the same title.
SOC 8790 - Advanced Topics in Sociological Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Sample topics: theories of conflict, theories of purposive action, Marxist theory, and structure-agency debate.
SOC 8890 - Advanced Topics in Research Methods
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced Research Methods (e.g., multilevel models), historical/comparative, field, survey research. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 8801, 8811, or instr consent. Cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
SPAN 5160 - Medieval Iberian Literatures and Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The major literary genres developed in Spain from the Reconquest to 1502, with reference to the crucial transformations of the Middle Ages, including primitive lyric, epic, clerical narrative, storytelling, debates, collections, chronicles, "exempla," and the Celestina (1499-1502).
SPAN 5560 - Global Colonial Studies in the Hispanic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
Discourse production in Spanish America between 1492 and 1700. Conquest/colonial writing/counter writing. Historical origin, evolution, impact of cultural, political, socioeconomic factors. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
HIST 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral
Credits: 1.0 -24.0 [max 100.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
(No description) prereq: Max 14 cr per semester or summer, 24 cr required