Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Art History B.A.

Art History
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2021
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 35
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
Art history is the study of the visual world, both past and present. Art history operates with the understanding that visual and material artifacts may speak more directly and deeply about a culture than its written record. Put another way, if a picture is worth a thousand words, then art history equips students to read it. This is called "visual literacy" and it is an invaluable skill in the increasingly visual world in which we live. Not limited strictly to the so-called "fine arts," art history seeks to understand visual and material culture more broadly: from paintings and sculpture, to architecture and urban design; from films and photographs, to ceramics and textiles; from scientific illustration and political posters, to performance art and street graffiti. Through engaging closely with these and other forms of visual expression, students become adept practitioners of the following skills: visual analysis and interpretation, original research and careful argumentation, image-based thinking and communication, and clear and persuasive writing in a variety of modes Engaging visual approaches to learning and thinking, art history prepares students for a variety of professions. Graduates go on to enjoy careers in the following fields: visual arts (e.g., art criticism, art appraisal and sales, art therapy, fashion, interior design, museums, and conservation), the humanities (e.g., grant writing, historic preservation, and philanthropy), media and marketing (e.g., advertising, film, journalism, radio, and television), K-12 and post-secondary education (e.g., teaching and administration), information science and collections management (e.g., libraries and archives in public, non-profit, and corporate contexts), and medicine and law, two fields that have long prized art history alumni for their analytical precision, skills at information mastery, and "right-brain/left-brain" balance. For these and other reasons, students of art history go on to enjoy higher job satisfaction and lower unemployment rates over the course of their working lives than peers in vocational tracks. Because the discipline spans all eras of human production and expression, majors in art history are required to fulfill a variety of distribution requirements across geographic regions and historical eras. Likewise, because the discipline takes artistic processes seriously as sites of knowledge production, one studio art class is also required for the major. The department’s curriculum is structured so that classes at the 1xxx-level provide a large-scale orientation to the discipline at large, as well as instruction in rudimentary skills of research and writing; classes at the 3xxx-level offer orientations to the discipline’s sub-fields, as well as instruction in rudimentary and intermediary skills of research and writing; and classes at the 5xxx-level offer specialization within the sub-fields, as well as instruction in advanced skills of research and writing. Most classes have no prerequisites. Additionally, the total number of required credits for the major makes it an attractive option for double-majors and transfer students.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
CLA BA degrees require 18 upper-division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the Art History BA is ARTH. Students are encouraged to take courses from a variety of instructors to ensure exposure to various approaches and methods. At least 13 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. Students may earn a BA or a minor in art history, but not both. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence. All students must complete a capstone in at least one CLA major. The requirements for double majors completing the capstone in a different CLA major will be clearly stated. Students must also complete all major requirements in both majors to allow the additional capstone to be waived. Student completing an addition degree must complete the capstone in each degree area.
Art History Foundation
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTH 1001 - Introduction to Art History: Prehistoric to Contemporary [AH] (4.0 cr)
or ARTH 1002W - Why Art Matters [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ARTH 1004W - Introduction to Asian Art [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
Art Practice
This course must be hands-on and involve practical training in some area of visual arts production. Other courses not on the list may fulfill this requirement, even from departments besides Art, but only with prior approval from the undergraduate advisor or director of undergraduate studies.
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 1101 - Introduction to Drawing [AH] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 1102 - Introduction to Painting [AH] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 1103 - Introduction to Printmaking: Relief, Screen and Digital Processes [AH] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 1701 - Introduction to Photography [AH] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 1704 - Introduction to Moving Images [AH] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 1801 - Introduction to Ceramics: Wheel-Throwing and Hand-Building Techniques [AH] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 1802 - Introduction to Sculpture: Understanding the Fundamentals of the Practice of Sculpture [AH] (4.0 cr)
Art History Electives
To achieve training across the discipline and its skills, students must meet the following distribution requirements: Level Distribution Requirements: (0-1) 1xxx-level course (0-6) 3xxx-level courses (2-8) 5xxx-level courses Chronological and Geographic Distribution Requirements: -Take at least 1 course from each of the three historical eras -Take at least 1 course from at least two of the three geographical areas
Take exactly 8 course(s) totaling 24 or more credit(s) from the following:
Era I: Ancient to ca. 1300
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
Area: North America and Europe
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3009 - Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3009 - Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3609 -  Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5783 - Art, Diplomacy and Empire (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 8783 - Art, Diplomacy, and Empire (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds (3.0 cr)
· Area: Middle East and/or Islamic World
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3018 - Art of the Ottoman Empire (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5783 - Art, Diplomacy and Empire (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 8783 - Art, Diplomacy, and Empire (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds (3.0 cr)
· Area: South and/or East Asia
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 1004W - Introduction to Asian Art [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3013 - Introduction to East Asian Art [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3765 - Chinese Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5765 - Early Chinese Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5773 - Making Place: Concepts of Space in Indian Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or AMES 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3415W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds (3.0 cr)
· Era II: ca. 1300 to 1800
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
Area: North America and Europe
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3309 - Renaissance Art in Europe [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3311 - Baroque Art in Seventeenth Century Europe [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3312 - European Art of the Eighteenth Century: Rococo to Revolution [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5336 - Transformations in 17th Century Art: Caravaggio, Velazquez, and Bernini (3.0 cr)
· FRIT 3600 - The Renaissance (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3313 - Spanish Baroque Masters: Tradition and Experimentation in Golden Age Spain [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5313 - Spanish Baroque Masters: Tradition and Experimentation in Golden Age Spain [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3315 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5315 -  The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3708 -  The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3706 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5783 - Art, Diplomacy and Empire (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 8783 - Art, Diplomacy, and Empire (3.0 cr)
· Area: Middle East and/or Islamic World
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3018 - Art of the Ottoman Empire (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5783 - Art, Diplomacy and Empire (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 8783 - Art, Diplomacy, and Empire (3.0 cr)
· Area: South and/or East Asia
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 1004W - Introduction to Asian Art [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3013 - Introduction to East Asian Art [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3765 - Chinese Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5773 - Making Place: Concepts of Space in Indian Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or AMES 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3415W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
· Era III: 1800 to Present
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
Area: North America and Europe
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 1921W - Introduction to Film Study [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3005 - American Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3012 - 19th and 20th Century Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3401 - Art on Trial [AH, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment [AH, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3577 - Photo Nation: Photography in America [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3921W - Art of the Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3929 - Cinema Now [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5411 - Gender and Sexuality in Art Since 1863 (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5413 - Alternative Media: Video, Performance, Digital Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5417 - Twentieth Century Theory and Criticism (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art [WI] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art [AH, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 5216W - Chicana and Chicano Art [AH, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3655 - African-American Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5655 - African-American Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3655 - African-American Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Area: Middle East and/or Islamic World
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment [AH, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans (3.0 cr)
· Area: South and/or East Asia
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3013 - Introduction to East Asian Art [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment [AH, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3765 - Chinese Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5773 - Making Place: Concepts of Space in Indian Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or AMES 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3415W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
· Courses Requiring Advising Appointment for Application to the Distribution Requirements
The below courses are applicable to the distribution requirements described above, but vary in how they may be applied. Some courses span across time periods and geographic/cultural areas. Consult with the program advisor or director of undergraduate studies to determine which requirements these courses fulfill.
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 1001 - Introduction to Art History: Prehistoric to Contemporary [AH] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 1002W - Why Art Matters [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 19xx - Freshman Seminar
· ARTH 3940 - Topics in Art History (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTH 5766 - Chinese Painting (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5785 - Art of Islamic Iran (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5930 - Junior-Senior Seminar (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5950 - Topics: Art History (3.0 cr)
· Directed Museum Experience, Study, or Research
Take at most 3 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3896 - Directed Professional Experience (1.0-2.0 cr)
· ARTH 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTH 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTH 5994 - Directed Research (1.0-4.0 cr)
Capstone
Students are required to develop, research, and write a senior capstone paper (approximately 15 pages), typically based on one of their 5xxx-level ArtH courses. The Art History capstone will demonstrate student mastery over chosen subject matter, as well as the abilities both to define a question or problem within a chosen field (this may be an historical, intellectual, interpretive, or some other question/problem), and to address it through research, analysis, and argumentation.
To enroll in the course, students need formal permission from the advisor. It is recommended that students take their ARTH 5xxx course at least one semester prior to taking ARTH 3971W/V. Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major may waive the Art History BA capstone, and they do not need to replace the 3 credits.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3971W - Art History Capstone [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3971V - Honors: Art History Capstone [WI] (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3921W - Art of the Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· AMES 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ARTH 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3415W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3971W - Art History Capstone [WI] (3.0 cr)
ARTH 3971V - Honors: Art History Capstone [WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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ARTH 1001 - Introduction to Art History: Prehistoric to Contemporary (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major monuments/trends in art, prehistoric to present. Style, subject matter, patronage. Reconstructing artworks' original setting: religious, political, and social contexts. Western canon, occasionally in comparison with non-Western works.
ARTH 1002W - Why Art Matters (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to history of topics that investigate power/importance of art both globablly and in its diverse forms, from architecture and painting to video and prints. Sacred space, propaganda, the museum, art/gender, art/authority, tourism.
ARTH 1004W - Introduction to Asian Art (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 1004W/1004V/1016W/1016V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This one-semester course is an introduction to painting, sculpture, and architecture from South, Southeast, and East Asia. It will cover works from ancient cultures to those of contemporary Asian diasporas. Resisting the impossible task of covering everything, we will instead home in on specific objects in order to understand them in their broader cultural, religious, and social contexts. We will trace the ways in which common themes and problems appear in different art forms and in different places, and we will discover the ways in which seemingly disparate styles and objects may be productively understood in conversation with each other. We will work together to create an interpretive model that is synthetic, critical, and appreciative of the enormously diverse field that is Asian Art. Lectures will move from explanatory descriptions of objects and histories that are covered in the textbook to critical interpretations of the historiographies that shape the contemporary reception of Asian art.
ARTS 1101 - Introduction to Drawing (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 1101/ArtS 2101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an introductory studio course that exposes students to the ideas, methods, and materials of drawing. Fundamental elements such as line, value, texture, shape and space are explored in works using media such as graphite, charcoal and ink on a variety of surfaces. Found and other source materials are utilized in collage and mixed-media works. In hands-on exercises and projects, students will create original work based on observation and imagination. This course will also introduce techniques and methods to realize and evaluate visual ideas. Technical demonstrations, lectures and exhibition visits will provide starting points for further explorations. Individual and group critiques will help students to address technical concerns and contextualize their work within the rich history of drawing. Studio work outside of class time is expected.
ARTS 1102 - Introduction to Painting (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 1102/ArtS 2102
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an introductory studio course that will focus on the fundamentals of painting (oil and/or acrylic). We will explore a variety of media, techniques, and subject matter. Our assignments will emphasize developing the skills and understanding of basic painting fundamentals, using traditional and experimental approaches to painting, such as: color mixing and relationships, tone, mark-making, texture, abstraction, space, and visual language. There will be demonstrations, practice, field trip(s) and class discussion. We will develop the verbal and analytical skills necessary to critically examine students' work. We will look at historical and contemporary painters. This course provides an introduction the creative process through hands-on investigation, observation of the immediate environment, and the exploring the artist's imagination. Studio work outside of class is expected.
ARTS 1103 - Introduction to Printmaking: Relief, Screen and Digital Processes (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 1103/ArtS 2502
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students will be introduced to techniques of relief printing using oil based inks, screenprinting using water based inks, and digital printmaking. Relief projects (linoleum and woodcut) emphasize the exploration of mark making, printing techniques and color layering. Screen print and digital applications will explore layering, color and image making strategies. Students will learn digital strategies for creating images in screen printing, working from both photo and drawn sources. The course includes the historical context and recent innovations for each process in order to develop contemporary applications for these each method. Students will develop meaningful content in conjunction with the acquisition of technical skills. Individual and group critiques will help students to address technical concerns and contextualize their work within the rich history of printmaking. Studio work outside of scheduled class time is expected.
ARTS 1701 - Introduction to Photography (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 1701/ArtS 2701
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Presents conceptual, technical, historical aspects of photography within fine arts context. Emphasis on creative process through hands-on experience in use of camera, digital, black/white, darkroom processes.
ARTS 1704 - Introduction to Moving Images (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 1704/ArtS 2601
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to Moving Images provides students with the fundamentals of moving image production including camera work, lighting, and sound. Students will explore audio/visual aesthetics and fundamental elements of narrative, experimental, and animated moving images. Students create several short film projects, both individually and in groups and develop skills in critical evaluation through critique sessions that investigate the aesthetic, technical and cultural interpretation of moving images.This course is the prerequisite for intermediate level Department of Art courses in Moving Images including Narrative Digital Filmmaking, Experimental Film and Video, Animation and Super 8 and 16 mm Filmmaking.
ARTS 1801 - Introduction to Ceramics: Wheel-Throwing and Hand-Building Techniques (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Interested in working with a material and practice that dates back 20,000 years? Want direct engagement with creative processes and materials that correlate the hand and the eye with the mind? The course introduces an exciting hands-on experience of ceramic three-dimensional object making. The course introduces general aspects of ceramic practice in art form, based on wheel-throwing and hand-building techniques, using electric and gas firing methods. It also deals with the basic visual concepts of three-dimensional form whether utilitarian object or non-utilitarian object. The assignments in this course introduce various fundamental elements, technically and artistically, of artistic ceramic production. Students become familiar with the processes and techniques of working with and firing clay, and also the artistic formal languages and experience of externalizing inner thought. Critiques will be used as a tool for developing critical thinking and project development. Finished pieces will be produced that reflect the full ceramic production experience.
ARTS 1802 - Introduction to Sculpture: Understanding the Fundamentals of the Practice of Sculpture (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will help you gain an understanding of the fundamentals of sculpture through a studio practice with a variety of materials, concepts, techniques, and styles. The course is an introduction to the inherent nature of materials, the development of form in real space, and the shops and tools with which to create sculptural forms in our state-of-the-art facilities. We will focus on the foundations of sculpture through hands-on demonstrations of basic sculptural processes: for example, carving, modeling, assembling, and casting. You will also be exposed to, and experiment with, the diverse range of approaches, work methods, and topics that have occupied sculptors both past and present. Students learn the proper use and function of the wood and metal shops, as well as a variety of other tools and techniques, including new technologies such as the Laser Cutter and VR (Virtual Reality), along with more traditional techniques such as metal casting, paper folding, clay, and plaster. You will discover your individual creative process and aid the sculptural articulation of your conceptual issues through discussion and critique of your class accomplishments. Critiques will be used as a tool for developing critical thinking and project development.
ARTH 3009 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
MEST 3009 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
RELS 3609 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
ARTH 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3152/CNES 3152
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will provide an introduction to the history of Greek art, architecture and archaeology from the formation of the Greek city states in the ninth century BCE, through the expansion of Greek culture across the Mediterranean and Asia in the Hellenistic period, to the coming of Rome in the first century BCE. While this survey concentrates on the main developments of Greek art, an important sub-theme of this course this is the changes Classical visual culture underwent as it served non-Greek peoples, including the role it played for Alexander and his successors in forging multiethnic, globally minded empires in Western, Central and South Asia. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to interdisciplinary study of art history and the classical world. A number of art historical methodologies will be introduced in order to not only give students a useful background in art history but to give them the tools to think as art historians and incorporate related visual and textual evidence meaningfully into their writing.
CNES 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3152/CNES 3152
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will provide an introduction to the history of Greek art, architecture and archaeology from the formation of the Greek city states in the ninth century BCE, through the expansion of Greek culture across the Mediterranean and Asia in the Hellenistic period, to the coming of Rome in the first century BCE. While this survey concentrates on the main developments of Greek art, an important sub-theme of this course this is the changes Classical visual culture underwent as it served non-Greek peoples, including the role it played for Alexander and his successors in forging multiethnic, globally minded empires in Western, Central and South Asia. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to interdisciplinary study of art history and the classical world. A number of art historical methodologies will be introduced in order to not only give students a useful background in art history but to give them the tools to think as art historians and incorporate related visual and textual evidence meaningfully into their writing.
ARTH 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3162/CNES 3162
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Introduction to history of Roman art, from formation of city-state of Rome under Etruscan domination, to transformation of visual culture in late antiquity under peoples influenced by the Romans.
CNES 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3162/CNES 3162
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduction to art and material culture of Roman world: origin, change, continuity. Progress/decay in later empire, its legacy to modern world.
ARTH 5783 - Art, Diplomacy and Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5783/ArtH 8783
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the mobility and agency of objects and people in diplomatic practice. An emerging body of scholarship within Renaissance and early modern studies explores the exchange and global circulation of objects and their role in cultural encounters. The possibilities offered by this 'material turn' highlight the potential of objects to enable cultural contact, conversion and exchange across traditional political and cultural boundaries. At the same time, recent innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to exchange highlight cultural aspects of the diplomatic encounter. As a result, the roles of diplomats, interpreters, merchants as well as various types of objects and services continue to be interpreted in new ways. This course will introduce students to canonical texts associated with gift-exchange and reciprocity, and will explore their relevance to the disciplines of history and art history particularly with regard to imperial encounters and exchanges.
ARTH 8783 - Art, Diplomacy, and Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5783/ArtH 8783
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the mobility and agency of objects and people in diplomatic practice. An emerging body of scholarship within Renaissance and early modern studies explores the exchange and global circulation of objects and their role in cultural encounters. The possibilities offered by this 'material turn' highlight the potential of objects to enable cultural contact, conversion, and exchange across traditional political and cultural boundaries. At the same time, recent innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to exchange highlight cultural aspects of the diplomatic encounter. As a result, the roles of diplomats, interpreters, merchants as well as various types of objects and services continue to be interpreted in new ways. This course will introduce students to canonical texts associated with gift-exchange and reciprocity, and will explore their relevance to the disciplines of history and art history particularly with regard to imperial encounters and exchanges.
ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5787/CNES 5787
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evaluate critical perspectives from variety of interdisciplinary conversations. Framework for studying cross-cultural interaction among ancient visual cultures that integrates practical, cognitive, object oriented approaches. Cross-continental movement/selective appropriation of objects/motifs.
CNES 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5787/CNES 5787
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evaluate critical perspectives from variety of interdisciplinary conversations. Framework for studying cross-cultural interaction among ancient visual cultures that integrates practical, cognitive, object oriented approaches. Cross-continental movement/selective appropriation of objects/motifs.
ARTH 3018 - Art of the Ottoman Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to visual culture under the Ottoman Empire. Initially formed as a small principality at the beginning of the fourteenth century in Anatolia, the Ottoman polity established itself as a major political and military power through the early modern period and beyond. With emphasis placed upon key monuments and objects, we will examine an array of artistic media, ranging from manuscript illumination and calligraphy to ceramics, textiles, metalwork, glasswork and jewelry. Major themes include the urban transformation of the Byzantine capital; the formation of imperial ideology and its visual articulation, the formation of a distinctive imperial style across media; the operation of court ateliers and societies of artists and artisans; contacts and interactions with the European and Islamic contemporaries; and cultural and artistic "decline."
ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
RELS 3706W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
ARTH 5783 - Art, Diplomacy and Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5783/ArtH 8783
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the mobility and agency of objects and people in diplomatic practice. An emerging body of scholarship within Renaissance and early modern studies explores the exchange and global circulation of objects and their role in cultural encounters. The possibilities offered by this 'material turn' highlight the potential of objects to enable cultural contact, conversion and exchange across traditional political and cultural boundaries. At the same time, recent innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to exchange highlight cultural aspects of the diplomatic encounter. As a result, the roles of diplomats, interpreters, merchants as well as various types of objects and services continue to be interpreted in new ways. This course will introduce students to canonical texts associated with gift-exchange and reciprocity, and will explore their relevance to the disciplines of history and art history particularly with regard to imperial encounters and exchanges.
ARTH 8783 - Art, Diplomacy, and Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5783/ArtH 8783
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the mobility and agency of objects and people in diplomatic practice. An emerging body of scholarship within Renaissance and early modern studies explores the exchange and global circulation of objects and their role in cultural encounters. The possibilities offered by this 'material turn' highlight the potential of objects to enable cultural contact, conversion, and exchange across traditional political and cultural boundaries. At the same time, recent innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to exchange highlight cultural aspects of the diplomatic encounter. As a result, the roles of diplomats, interpreters, merchants as well as various types of objects and services continue to be interpreted in new ways. This course will introduce students to canonical texts associated with gift-exchange and reciprocity, and will explore their relevance to the disciplines of history and art history particularly with regard to imperial encounters and exchanges.
ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5787/CNES 5787
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evaluate critical perspectives from variety of interdisciplinary conversations. Framework for studying cross-cultural interaction among ancient visual cultures that integrates practical, cognitive, object oriented approaches. Cross-continental movement/selective appropriation of objects/motifs.
CNES 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5787/CNES 5787
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evaluate critical perspectives from variety of interdisciplinary conversations. Framework for studying cross-cultural interaction among ancient visual cultures that integrates practical, cognitive, object oriented approaches. Cross-continental movement/selective appropriation of objects/motifs.
ARTH 1004W - Introduction to Asian Art (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 1004W/1004V/1016W/1016V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This one-semester course is an introduction to painting, sculpture, and architecture from South, Southeast, and East Asia. It will cover works from ancient cultures to those of contemporary Asian diasporas. Resisting the impossible task of covering everything, we will instead home in on specific objects in order to understand them in their broader cultural, religious, and social contexts. We will trace the ways in which common themes and problems appear in different art forms and in different places, and we will discover the ways in which seemingly disparate styles and objects may be productively understood in conversation with each other. We will work together to create an interpretive model that is synthetic, critical, and appreciative of the enormously diverse field that is Asian Art. Lectures will move from explanatory descriptions of objects and histories that are covered in the textbook to critical interpretations of the historiographies that shape the contemporary reception of Asian art.
ARTH 3013 - Introduction to East Asian Art (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3013/EAS 3013
Typically offered: Every Fall
A selective examination of works of art produced in China, Korea and Japan from the neolithic era to modern times. Nearly every major type of object and all major styles are represented.
ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class provides an introduction to Buddhist art and architecture, from the sixth-century BCE to the present. Beginning with the life of the historical Buddha (563-483), it will follow the development of Buddhist art in India before tracing it across the Silk Road to China, Korea, and Japan. The class will consider how art and architecture evolved to serve the needs of Buddhism as its doctrine and practice evolved. At the same, we will consider how Buddhist cosmology and metaphysics were translated into culturally specific modes that served the multifarious cultural and artistic traditions of Asia.
ARTH 3765 - Chinese Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class provides an introduction to Chinese art and architecture, from prehistory to the present. Proceeding chronologically and thematically, the class will consider a broad range of artistic media including jade, stone, bronze, paintings, calligraphy, ceramics, printing, photography, and architecture. Through a close connoisseurial engagement and visual analysis these materials, the class will examine how Chinese art developed in relation to broader themes of Chinese political, religious, and cultural history. At the same time, it will consider how the art of China engaged in cultural and artistic dialogue with other traditions and cultures of East Asia.
ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course traces the development and diversity of the Indian temple, focusing the ways in which people interact with sacred space and how religious art addresses its viewers. We primarily focus on Hinduism, but also include Buddhism and Jainism. We will discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, dance, and food within the temple. We will also examine how the legacy of colonial and orientalist scholarship inflects our study of these traditions and monuments. Although the architecture of both structural and rock-cut temples will be our main object of study, we will also discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, and food within the temple. Our consideration of the structures will be attentive to the ways in which people interact with the space and how objects of sacred art address their viewers. In classroom discussions we will work together to create an interpretive model that is synthetic, critical, and appreciative of the enormously diverse field that is South Asian Art. Lectures will move from explanatory descriptions of objects and histories that are covered in the textbook to critical interpretations of the historiographies that shape their contemporary reception. Class discussions and assignments are intended to encourage students to bring their own ways of looking at this art, to read critically in light of what they see, and to consider new approaches to the material. No prior experience in the history of art or religions of South Asia is required for this course.
ARTH 5765 - Early Chinese Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Art/material culture of early China from Neolithic age (ca. 10000-2000 BCE) to early imperial period (221 BCE-906 CE).
ARTH 5773 - Making Place: Concepts of Space in Indian Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to major monuments, sites, and media of South Asian art and religion by investigating theories and representations of space and place in South Asia. We will examine works of art from the major religious traditions of South Asia (Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, and Buddhism) and across media such as murals, poetry, architecture, and urban form. Critical theory since the 1980s has come to understand space ?as a variegated, complex, often bewildering series of different types of locations: physical, mythological, symbolic, imagined, linguistic, cartographic, perceptual, representational, i.e., space as suspended between matter and meaning? (Warf and Arias, 2009). This course will consider the complexity and historical and cultural specificities of notions of space and place in the art and architecture of South Asia. We will survey the diversity of representations and concepts of space, such as painted banners, murals, poetry, architecture, and urban form. We will examine works of art from the major religious traditions of South Asia: Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, and Buddhism. Course readings will interweave theoretical or methodological texts with historical examples. We will closely examine the transformation of sacred sites and networks and their reuse and appropriation by successive patrons and populations; pilgrimage, both physical and notional, as constitutive of differing notions of space; city planning that reflects ideas about sacred topographies, and the built environment of the city as expressive of identity. This course introduces students to major monuments, sites, and media of South Asian art and religion by investigating how those objects have been understood in the physical and notional environments of their production and reception.
ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course explores the concept of embodiment and the nature of representation, from images of gods to human portraits, in Hindu, Jain, Buddhist, Muslim, and courtly contexts. We consider diverse media from ancient to modern periods, including painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and literature. This course explores the concept of embodiment in the diverse artistic traditions of South Asia. We will consider how ideas of representation of an individual have been understood and expressed differently across the history of South Asian art and religions. The course will consider the embodied representation of deities and semidivine figures along with those of ?real? people; we will consider, given the ontologies of such representations in their religious and cultural contexts. Representation of an individual ? a portrait ? is a foundational subject in the canon of art history. What does the very idea of a portrait mean so far outside the canon of (Western) art history? As we survey the diverse traditions and media of images of the body, we will be attentive to questions such as, Does media make meaning for these types of images? Can a ?portrait? be textual? Is verisimilitude essential to the depiction of a person? In what ways are practices of depiction informed by other modes of image-making, such as images of religious devotion, and traditions of representation encountered through trade or gift? We will consider diverse media from Ancient India to the modern period, including painting, stone and metal sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and even a Sanskrit play.
ARTH 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
AMES 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
RELS 3415W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting, from prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to present.
ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5787/CNES 5787
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evaluate critical perspectives from variety of interdisciplinary conversations. Framework for studying cross-cultural interaction among ancient visual cultures that integrates practical, cognitive, object oriented approaches. Cross-continental movement/selective appropriation of objects/motifs.
CNES 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5787/CNES 5787
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evaluate critical perspectives from variety of interdisciplinary conversations. Framework for studying cross-cultural interaction among ancient visual cultures that integrates practical, cognitive, object oriented approaches. Cross-continental movement/selective appropriation of objects/motifs.
ARTH 3309 - Renaissance Art in Europe (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major monuments of painting/sculpture in Western Europe, 1400-1600. Close reading of individual works in historical context. Influence of patrons. Major social/political changes such as Renaissance humanism, Protestant Reformation, market economy.
ARTH 3311 - Baroque Art in Seventeenth Century Europe (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Dominant trends/figures of Italian, French, Flemish, and Dutch Baroque period. Works of major masters, including Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, Velazquez, Rembrandt, and Rubens. Development of illusionistic ceiling decoration. Theoretical basis of Baroque art. Art's subservience to Church and royal court.
ARTH 3312 - European Art of the Eighteenth Century: Rococo to Revolution (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major developments in 18-century painting, sculpture, and interior decoration, from emergence of Rococo to dawn of Neoclassicism. Response of art to new forms of patronage. Erotics of 18-century art. Ways art functioned as social/political commentary.
ARTH 5336 - Transformations in 17th Century Art: Caravaggio, Velazquez, and Bernini
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course offers an in-depth examination of three of the most innovative masters of early modern European art, the painters Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio and Diego Velázquez, and the sculptor and architect Gianlorenzo Bernini. Through selected readings, slide presentations and discussions, we will explore the lives and works of these artists, paying particular attention to the ways they created an entirely new relationship between the work of art and the viewer and ushered in a radically new way of conceiving visual imagery.
FRIT 3600 - The Renaissance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3600/CLA 3600/FrIt 3600/H
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Relationships between the visual arts, literature, science, philosophy, and politics in Europe from about 1300-1600. Works of artists, writers, and intellectuals (e.g., Michelangelo Buonarotti, Niccolo Machiavelli, Michel de Montaigne), different artistic and literary forms (e.g., portrait, sonnet, essay), and broad thematic issues, including the individual, antiquity, the state, and discovery. Team taught.
ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
RELS 3706W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
ARTH 3313 - Spanish Baroque Masters: Tradition and Experimentation in Golden Age Spain (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3313/ArtH 5313
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This seminar focuses on some of the major masters of Spanish Baroque art, including Francisco de Zurbarán, Diego Velázquez, Jusepe de Ribera, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, and Juan Sánchez Cotán. We will explore their works from a variety of perspectives in an effort to understand the unique character and contributions of the art of the Spanish Golden Age.
ARTH 5313 - Spanish Baroque Masters: Tradition and Experimentation in Golden Age Spain (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3313/ArtH 5313
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This seminar focuses on some of the major masters of Spanish Baroque art, including Francisco de Zurbarán, Diego Velázquez, Jusepe de Ribera, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, and Juan Sánchez Cotán. We will explore their works from a variety of perspectives in an effort to understand the unique character and contributions of the art of the Spanish Golden Age.
ARTH 3315 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
ARTH 5315 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
HIST 3708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
HIST 5708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
ARTH 3335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
ARTH 5335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
HIST 3706 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
RELS 3612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
RELS 5612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
ARTH 3422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3422/ArtH 5422
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History/theory of creation of lithography, social caricature (e.g., Daumier, Gavarni), revival of etching (e.g., Goya/mid-century practitioners, Whistler), and color lithography (e.g., Toulouse-Lautrec, Vuillard, Bonnard). Media changes of 20th century. Revolutionary nature of new media.
ARTH 5422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3422/ArtH 5422
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History/theory of creation of lithography, social caricature (e.g., Daumier, Gavarni), revival of etching (e.g., Goya, mid-century practitioners, Whistler), and color lithography (e.g., Toulouse-Lautrec, Vuillard, Bonnard). Media changes of 20th century. Revolutionary nature of new media.
ARTH 5783 - Art, Diplomacy and Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5783/ArtH 8783
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the mobility and agency of objects and people in diplomatic practice. An emerging body of scholarship within Renaissance and early modern studies explores the exchange and global circulation of objects and their role in cultural encounters. The possibilities offered by this 'material turn' highlight the potential of objects to enable cultural contact, conversion and exchange across traditional political and cultural boundaries. At the same time, recent innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to exchange highlight cultural aspects of the diplomatic encounter. As a result, the roles of diplomats, interpreters, merchants as well as various types of objects and services continue to be interpreted in new ways. This course will introduce students to canonical texts associated with gift-exchange and reciprocity, and will explore their relevance to the disciplines of history and art history particularly with regard to imperial encounters and exchanges.
ARTH 8783 - Art, Diplomacy, and Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5783/ArtH 8783
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the mobility and agency of objects and people in diplomatic practice. An emerging body of scholarship within Renaissance and early modern studies explores the exchange and global circulation of objects and their role in cultural encounters. The possibilities offered by this 'material turn' highlight the potential of objects to enable cultural contact, conversion, and exchange across traditional political and cultural boundaries. At the same time, recent innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to exchange highlight cultural aspects of the diplomatic encounter. As a result, the roles of diplomats, interpreters, merchants as well as various types of objects and services continue to be interpreted in new ways. This course will introduce students to canonical texts associated with gift-exchange and reciprocity, and will explore their relevance to the disciplines of history and art history particularly with regard to imperial encounters and exchanges.
ARTH 3018 - Art of the Ottoman Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to visual culture under the Ottoman Empire. Initially formed as a small principality at the beginning of the fourteenth century in Anatolia, the Ottoman polity established itself as a major political and military power through the early modern period and beyond. With emphasis placed upon key monuments and objects, we will examine an array of artistic media, ranging from manuscript illumination and calligraphy to ceramics, textiles, metalwork, glasswork and jewelry. Major themes include the urban transformation of the Byzantine capital; the formation of imperial ideology and its visual articulation, the formation of a distinctive imperial style across media; the operation of court ateliers and societies of artists and artisans; contacts and interactions with the European and Islamic contemporaries; and cultural and artistic "decline."
ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
RELS 3706W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
ARTH 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5781/RelS 5781
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Artistic developments under the three most powerful Islamic empires of the 16th through 19th centuries: Ottomans of Turkey; Safavids of Iran; Mughals of India. Roles of religion and state will be considered to understand their artistic production.
RELS 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5781/RelS 5781
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Artistic developments under the three most powerful Islamic empires of the 16th through 19th centuries: Ottomans of Turkey; Safavids of Iran; Mughals of India. Roles of religion and state will be considered to understand their artistic production.
ARTH 5783 - Art, Diplomacy and Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5783/ArtH 8783
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the mobility and agency of objects and people in diplomatic practice. An emerging body of scholarship within Renaissance and early modern studies explores the exchange and global circulation of objects and their role in cultural encounters. The possibilities offered by this 'material turn' highlight the potential of objects to enable cultural contact, conversion and exchange across traditional political and cultural boundaries. At the same time, recent innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to exchange highlight cultural aspects of the diplomatic encounter. As a result, the roles of diplomats, interpreters, merchants as well as various types of objects and services continue to be interpreted in new ways. This course will introduce students to canonical texts associated with gift-exchange and reciprocity, and will explore their relevance to the disciplines of history and art history particularly with regard to imperial encounters and exchanges.
ARTH 8783 - Art, Diplomacy, and Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5783/ArtH 8783
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the mobility and agency of objects and people in diplomatic practice. An emerging body of scholarship within Renaissance and early modern studies explores the exchange and global circulation of objects and their role in cultural encounters. The possibilities offered by this 'material turn' highlight the potential of objects to enable cultural contact, conversion, and exchange across traditional political and cultural boundaries. At the same time, recent innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to exchange highlight cultural aspects of the diplomatic encounter. As a result, the roles of diplomats, interpreters, merchants as well as various types of objects and services continue to be interpreted in new ways. This course will introduce students to canonical texts associated with gift-exchange and reciprocity, and will explore their relevance to the disciplines of history and art history particularly with regard to imperial encounters and exchanges.
ARTH 1004W - Introduction to Asian Art (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 1004W/1004V/1016W/1016V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This one-semester course is an introduction to painting, sculpture, and architecture from South, Southeast, and East Asia. It will cover works from ancient cultures to those of contemporary Asian diasporas. Resisting the impossible task of covering everything, we will instead home in on specific objects in order to understand them in their broader cultural, religious, and social contexts. We will trace the ways in which common themes and problems appear in different art forms and in different places, and we will discover the ways in which seemingly disparate styles and objects may be productively understood in conversation with each other. We will work together to create an interpretive model that is synthetic, critical, and appreciative of the enormously diverse field that is Asian Art. Lectures will move from explanatory descriptions of objects and histories that are covered in the textbook to critical interpretations of the historiographies that shape the contemporary reception of Asian art.
ARTH 3013 - Introduction to East Asian Art (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3013/EAS 3013
Typically offered: Every Fall
A selective examination of works of art produced in China, Korea and Japan from the neolithic era to modern times. Nearly every major type of object and all major styles are represented.
ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class provides an introduction to Buddhist art and architecture, from the sixth-century BCE to the present. Beginning with the life of the historical Buddha (563-483), it will follow the development of Buddhist art in India before tracing it across the Silk Road to China, Korea, and Japan. The class will consider how art and architecture evolved to serve the needs of Buddhism as its doctrine and practice evolved. At the same, we will consider how Buddhist cosmology and metaphysics were translated into culturally specific modes that served the multifarious cultural and artistic traditions of Asia.
ARTH 3765 - Chinese Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class provides an introduction to Chinese art and architecture, from prehistory to the present. Proceeding chronologically and thematically, the class will consider a broad range of artistic media including jade, stone, bronze, paintings, calligraphy, ceramics, printing, photography, and architecture. Through a close connoisseurial engagement and visual analysis these materials, the class will examine how Chinese art developed in relation to broader themes of Chinese political, religious, and cultural history. At the same time, it will consider how the art of China engaged in cultural and artistic dialogue with other traditions and cultures of East Asia.
ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course traces the development and diversity of the Indian temple, focusing the ways in which people interact with sacred space and how religious art addresses its viewers. We primarily focus on Hinduism, but also include Buddhism and Jainism. We will discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, dance, and food within the temple. We will also examine how the legacy of colonial and orientalist scholarship inflects our study of these traditions and monuments. Although the architecture of both structural and rock-cut temples will be our main object of study, we will also discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, and food within the temple. Our consideration of the structures will be attentive to the ways in which people interact with the space and how objects of sacred art address their viewers. In classroom discussions we will work together to create an interpretive model that is synthetic, critical, and appreciative of the enormously diverse field that is South Asian Art. Lectures will move from explanatory descriptions of objects and histories that are covered in the textbook to critical interpretations of the historiographies that shape their contemporary reception. Class discussions and assignments are intended to encourage students to bring their own ways of looking at this art, to read critically in light of what they see, and to consider new approaches to the material. No prior experience in the history of art or religions of South Asia is required for this course.
ARTH 5773 - Making Place: Concepts of Space in Indian Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to major monuments, sites, and media of South Asian art and religion by investigating theories and representations of space and place in South Asia. We will examine works of art from the major religious traditions of South Asia (Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, and Buddhism) and across media such as murals, poetry, architecture, and urban form. Critical theory since the 1980s has come to understand space ?as a variegated, complex, often bewildering series of different types of locations: physical, mythological, symbolic, imagined, linguistic, cartographic, perceptual, representational, i.e., space as suspended between matter and meaning? (Warf and Arias, 2009). This course will consider the complexity and historical and cultural specificities of notions of space and place in the art and architecture of South Asia. We will survey the diversity of representations and concepts of space, such as painted banners, murals, poetry, architecture, and urban form. We will examine works of art from the major religious traditions of South Asia: Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, and Buddhism. Course readings will interweave theoretical or methodological texts with historical examples. We will closely examine the transformation of sacred sites and networks and their reuse and appropriation by successive patrons and populations; pilgrimage, both physical and notional, as constitutive of differing notions of space; city planning that reflects ideas about sacred topographies, and the built environment of the city as expressive of identity. This course introduces students to major monuments, sites, and media of South Asian art and religion by investigating how those objects have been understood in the physical and notional environments of their production and reception.
ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course explores the concept of embodiment and the nature of representation, from images of gods to human portraits, in Hindu, Jain, Buddhist, Muslim, and courtly contexts. We consider diverse media from ancient to modern periods, including painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and literature. This course explores the concept of embodiment in the diverse artistic traditions of South Asia. We will consider how ideas of representation of an individual have been understood and expressed differently across the history of South Asian art and religions. The course will consider the embodied representation of deities and semidivine figures along with those of ?real? people; we will consider, given the ontologies of such representations in their religious and cultural contexts. Representation of an individual ? a portrait ? is a foundational subject in the canon of art history. What does the very idea of a portrait mean so far outside the canon of (Western) art history? As we survey the diverse traditions and media of images of the body, we will be attentive to questions such as, Does media make meaning for these types of images? Can a ?portrait? be textual? Is verisimilitude essential to the depiction of a person? In what ways are practices of depiction informed by other modes of image-making, such as images of religious devotion, and traditions of representation encountered through trade or gift? We will consider diverse media from Ancient India to the modern period, including painting, stone and metal sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and even a Sanskrit play.
ARTH 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
AMES 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
RELS 3415W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting, from prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to present.
ARTH 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact. There are no prerequisites for this course.
ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
RELS 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact. There are no prerequisites for this course.
RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
ARTH 1921W - Introduction to Film Study (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 1921W/CSCL 1201W/SCMC 120
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamentals of film analysis and an introduction to the major theories of the cinema, presented through detailed interpretations of representative films from the international history of the cinema.
ARTH 3005 - American Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Artistic practice in the United States: colonial period to cold war. America as idea/identity shaped, expressed, represented, and contested through art. Canon of American art history. Works by individuals outside of traditional channels of art instruction/reception. Questions about what does/does not count as art history.
ARTH 3012 - 19th and 20th Century Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major monuments/issues of modern period. Sculpture, architecture, painting, prints. Neo-classicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, evolution of modernism, symbolism, fauvism, cubism, dadaism, surrealism, abstract expressionism, pop art, conceptualism, postmodernism.
ARTH 3401 - Art on Trial (AH, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Analysis of visual representations in fine arts and popular media, in context of social issues. Obscenity, censorship, democracy, technology, commerce, the museum, propaganda, social role of artist. Understanding the contemporary world through analysis of dominant aesthetic values.
ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment (AH, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical development of land, earth, and environmental art since 1968. Artists' engagement with environmental problems. Responses to changing aesthetic, political, biological, economic, agricultural, technological, and climactic conditions from global perspective.
ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Broad chronological overview of U.S./international art movements since 1945. Assessment of critical writings by major theoreticians (e.g., Clement Greenberg) associated with those movements. Theoretical perspective of postmodernism.
ARTH 3577 - Photo Nation: Photography in America (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Development of photography, from 19th century to present. Photography as legitimate art form. Portraits/photo albums in culture. Birth of criminal justice system. Technological/market aspects. Politics of aesthetics. Women in photography. Ways in which idea of America has been shaped by photographs.
ARTH 3921W - Art of the Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will engage with the history of film as an art form through a selection of significant movements, styles, filmmakers, institutions, and, of course, individual films from around the world. While this will not be a comprehensive study, it will address both mainstream, commercial films as well as oppositional, experimental, underground, and otherwise challenging works. Some of the wide-ranging selection of films we will watch and discuss: Germaine Dulac?s La Coquille et le Clergyman (The Seashell and the Clergyman) (1922), Gillo Pontecorvo?s The Battle of Algiers (1966), Julie Dash?s Daughters of the Dust (1991), and Alfonso Cuarón?s Roma (2018).
ARTH 3929 - Cinema Now (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Course examines contemporary cinema, including fiction films, documentaries, animation, and avant-garde experiments. Focuses on feature-length theatrical films, but will also consider other aspects of the contemporary media world: graphic novels, video games, television series and the Internet (e.g., Youtube). Examines media production, distribution, marketing, exhibition, and reception. Course will also present a survey of developments in contemporary cinema studies, since the choice of films will support a variety of critical approaches including economic, aesthetic (generic, auteurist, formalist), ideological (race, class, gender), and reception studies.
ARTH 5411 - Gender and Sexuality in Art Since 1863
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of art from late 19th to early 21st century. How gender/sexuality have been central to that period?s artistic production, art criticism, and aesthetic theorization. How gender/sexuality are important themes for artists. How the writing of history reveals assumptions about gender/sex. Critical reading/writing.
ARTH 5413 - Alternative Media: Video, Performance, Digital Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
In-depth examination of development of alternative media in 20th/21st century art. Video technologies. Performance, time based art. Digital art. prereq: 3464 or instr consent
ARTH 5417 - Twentieth Century Theory and Criticism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Trends in 20th-century art theory, historical methodology, criticism. Key philosophical ideas of modernism/postmodernism: formalism, semiotics, poststructuralism, feminism, marxism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction. prereq: 3464 or instr consent
ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Survey of the art and important critical literature of the period after 1970. Origins and full development of postmodern and subsequent aesthetic philosophies. prereq: 3464 or instr consent
ARTH 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3216W/Chic 3216W/Chic 512
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A Chicana/o has been described as a Mexican-American with a political sense of identity that emerges from a desire for social justice. One journalist bluntly stated, "A Chicano is a Mexican-American with a non-Anglo image of himself" (Ruben Salazar, Los Angeles Times, 1970). This identity emerged through the Chicano Movement, a social and political mobilization that began in the 1960s and 1970s. The Chicano Movement witnessed the rise of community-based political organizing to improve the working conditions, education, housing opportunities, health, and civil rights for Mexican-Americans. For its inception, the Chicano Movement attracted artists who created a new aesthetic and framework for producing art. A major focus of Chicana/o artists of the 1960s and 1970s was representation, the right to self-determination, and the role of art in fostering civic and public engagement. This focus continues to inform Chicana/o cultural production. Social intervention, empowerment, and institutional critique remain some of the most important innovations of American art of the last several decades, and Chicana/o artists played a significant role in this trend.
CHIC 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A Chicana/o has been described as a Mexican-American with a political sense of identity that emerges from a desire for social justice. One journalist bluntly stated, "A Chicano is a Mexican-American with a non-Anglo image of himself" (Ruben Salazar, Los Angeles Times, 1970). This identity emerged through the Chicano Movement, a social and political mobilization that began in the 1960s and 1970s. The Chicano Movement witnessed the rise of community-based political organizing to improve the working conditions, education, housing opportunities, health, and civil rights for Mexican-Americans. For its inception, the Chicano Movement attracted artists who created a new aesthetic and framework for producing art. A major focus of Chicana/o artists of the 1960s and 1970s was representation, the right to self-determination, and the role of art in fostering civic and public engagement. This focus continues to inform Chicana/o cultural production. Social intervention, empowerment, and institutional critique remain some of the most important innovations of American art of the last several decades, and Chicana/o artists played a significant role in this trend.
CHIC 5216W - Chicana and Chicano Art (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3216W/Chic 3216W/Chic 512
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A Chicana/o has been described as a Mexican-American with a political sense of identity that emerges from a desire for social justice. One journalist bluntly stated, "A Chicano is a Mexican-American with a non-Anglo image of himself" (Ruben Salazar, Los Angeles Times, 1970). This identity emerged through the Chicano Movement, a social and political mobilization that began in the 1960s and 1970s. The Chicano Movement witnessed the rise of community-based political organizing to improve the working conditions, education, housing opportunities, health, and civil rights for Mexican-Americans. For its inception, the Chicano Movement attracted artists who created a new aesthetic and framework for producing art. A major focus of Chicana/o artists of the 1960s and 1970s was representation, the right to self-determination, and the role of art in fostering civic and public engagement. This focus continues to inform Chicana/o cultural production. Social intervention, empowerment, and institutional critique remain some of the most important innovations of American art of the last several decades, and Chicana/o artists played a significant role in this trend.
ARTH 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3627/Afro 5627/ArtH 3627/
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review Harlem Renaissance from variety of perspectives. Literary, historical, cultural, political, international. Explore complex patterns of permeation/interdependency between worlds inside/outside of what W.E.B. Du Bois called "Veil of Color."
AFRO 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3627/Afro 5627/ArtH 3627/
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review Harlem Renaissance from variety of perspectives. Literary, historical, cultural, political, international. Explore complex patterns of permeation/interdependency between worlds inside/outside of what W.E.B. Du Bois called "Veil of Color."
ARTH 3655 - African-American Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3655/ArtH 3655/ArtH 5655
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
African American cinematic achievements from silent films of Oscar Micheaux through contemporary Hollywood and independent films. Class screenings, critical readings.
ARTH 5655 - African-American Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3655/ArtH 3655/ArtH 5655
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
African American cinematic achievements, from silent films of Oscar Micheaux through contemporary Hollywood and independent films. Class screenings, critical readings.
AFRO 3655 - African-American Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3655/ArtH 3655/ArtH 5655
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
African American cinematic achievements from silent films of Oscar Micheaux through contemporary Hollywood and independent films. Class screenings, critical readings.
ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment (AH, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical development of land, earth, and environmental art since 1968. Artists' engagement with environmental problems. Responses to changing aesthetic, political, biological, economic, agricultural, technological, and climactic conditions from global perspective.
ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Broad chronological overview of U.S./international art movements since 1945. Assessment of critical writings by major theoreticians (e.g., Clement Greenberg) associated with those movements. Theoretical perspective of postmodernism.
ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Survey of the art and important critical literature of the period after 1970. Origins and full development of postmodern and subsequent aesthetic philosophies. prereq: 3464 or instr consent
ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
RELS 3706W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
ARTH 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5781/RelS 5781
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Artistic developments under the three most powerful Islamic empires of the 16th through 19th centuries: Ottomans of Turkey; Safavids of Iran; Mughals of India. Roles of religion and state will be considered to understand their artistic production.
RELS 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5781/RelS 5781
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Artistic developments under the three most powerful Islamic empires of the 16th through 19th centuries: Ottomans of Turkey; Safavids of Iran; Mughals of India. Roles of religion and state will be considered to understand their artistic production.
ARTH 3013 - Introduction to East Asian Art (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3013/EAS 3013
Typically offered: Every Fall
A selective examination of works of art produced in China, Korea and Japan from the neolithic era to modern times. Nearly every major type of object and all major styles are represented.
ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class provides an introduction to Buddhist art and architecture, from the sixth-century BCE to the present. Beginning with the life of the historical Buddha (563-483), it will follow the development of Buddhist art in India before tracing it across the Silk Road to China, Korea, and Japan. The class will consider how art and architecture evolved to serve the needs of Buddhism as its doctrine and practice evolved. At the same, we will consider how Buddhist cosmology and metaphysics were translated into culturally specific modes that served the multifarious cultural and artistic traditions of Asia.
ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment (AH, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical development of land, earth, and environmental art since 1968. Artists' engagement with environmental problems. Responses to changing aesthetic, political, biological, economic, agricultural, technological, and climactic conditions from global perspective.
ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Broad chronological overview of U.S./international art movements since 1945. Assessment of critical writings by major theoreticians (e.g., Clement Greenberg) associated with those movements. Theoretical perspective of postmodernism.
ARTH 3765 - Chinese Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class provides an introduction to Chinese art and architecture, from prehistory to the present. Proceeding chronologically and thematically, the class will consider a broad range of artistic media including jade, stone, bronze, paintings, calligraphy, ceramics, printing, photography, and architecture. Through a close connoisseurial engagement and visual analysis these materials, the class will examine how Chinese art developed in relation to broader themes of Chinese political, religious, and cultural history. At the same time, it will consider how the art of China engaged in cultural and artistic dialogue with other traditions and cultures of East Asia.
ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course traces the development and diversity of the Indian temple, focusing the ways in which people interact with sacred space and how religious art addresses its viewers. We primarily focus on Hinduism, but also include Buddhism and Jainism. We will discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, dance, and food within the temple. We will also examine how the legacy of colonial and orientalist scholarship inflects our study of these traditions and monuments. Although the architecture of both structural and rock-cut temples will be our main object of study, we will also discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, and food within the temple. Our consideration of the structures will be attentive to the ways in which people interact with the space and how objects of sacred art address their viewers. In classroom discussions we will work together to create an interpretive model that is synthetic, critical, and appreciative of the enormously diverse field that is South Asian Art. Lectures will move from explanatory descriptions of objects and histories that are covered in the textbook to critical interpretations of the historiographies that shape their contemporary reception. Class discussions and assignments are intended to encourage students to bring their own ways of looking at this art, to read critically in light of what they see, and to consider new approaches to the material. No prior experience in the history of art or religions of South Asia is required for this course.
ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Survey of the art and important critical literature of the period after 1970. Origins and full development of postmodern and subsequent aesthetic philosophies. prereq: 3464 or instr consent
ARTH 5773 - Making Place: Concepts of Space in Indian Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to major monuments, sites, and media of South Asian art and religion by investigating theories and representations of space and place in South Asia. We will examine works of art from the major religious traditions of South Asia (Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, and Buddhism) and across media such as murals, poetry, architecture, and urban form. Critical theory since the 1980s has come to understand space ?as a variegated, complex, often bewildering series of different types of locations: physical, mythological, symbolic, imagined, linguistic, cartographic, perceptual, representational, i.e., space as suspended between matter and meaning? (Warf and Arias, 2009). This course will consider the complexity and historical and cultural specificities of notions of space and place in the art and architecture of South Asia. We will survey the diversity of representations and concepts of space, such as painted banners, murals, poetry, architecture, and urban form. We will examine works of art from the major religious traditions of South Asia: Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, and Buddhism. Course readings will interweave theoretical or methodological texts with historical examples. We will closely examine the transformation of sacred sites and networks and their reuse and appropriation by successive patrons and populations; pilgrimage, both physical and notional, as constitutive of differing notions of space; city planning that reflects ideas about sacred topographies, and the built environment of the city as expressive of identity. This course introduces students to major monuments, sites, and media of South Asian art and religion by investigating how those objects have been understood in the physical and notional environments of their production and reception.
ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course explores the concept of embodiment and the nature of representation, from images of gods to human portraits, in Hindu, Jain, Buddhist, Muslim, and courtly contexts. We consider diverse media from ancient to modern periods, including painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and literature. This course explores the concept of embodiment in the diverse artistic traditions of South Asia. We will consider how ideas of representation of an individual have been understood and expressed differently across the history of South Asian art and religions. The course will consider the embodied representation of deities and semidivine figures along with those of ?real? people; we will consider, given the ontologies of such representations in their religious and cultural contexts. Representation of an individual ? a portrait ? is a foundational subject in the canon of art history. What does the very idea of a portrait mean so far outside the canon of (Western) art history? As we survey the diverse traditions and media of images of the body, we will be attentive to questions such as, Does media make meaning for these types of images? Can a ?portrait? be textual? Is verisimilitude essential to the depiction of a person? In what ways are practices of depiction informed by other modes of image-making, such as images of religious devotion, and traditions of representation encountered through trade or gift? We will consider diverse media from Ancient India to the modern period, including painting, stone and metal sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and even a Sanskrit play.
ARTH 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
AMES 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
RELS 3415W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting, from prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to present.
ARTH 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact. There are no prerequisites for this course.
ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
RELS 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact. There are no prerequisites for this course.
RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
ARTH 1001 - Introduction to Art History: Prehistoric to Contemporary (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major monuments/trends in art, prehistoric to present. Style, subject matter, patronage. Reconstructing artworks' original setting: religious, political, and social contexts. Western canon, occasionally in comparison with non-Western works.
ARTH 1002W - Why Art Matters (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to history of topics that investigate power/importance of art both globablly and in its diverse forms, from architecture and painting to video and prints. Sacred space, propaganda, the museum, art/gender, art/authority, tourism.
ARTH 3940 - Topics in Art History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ARTH 5766 - Chinese Painting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major works from the late bronze age to the modern era that illustrate the development of Chinese landscape painting and associated literary traditions.
ARTH 5785 - Art of Islamic Iran
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Architecture, painting, and related arts in Iran from the inception of Islam (7th century) through the 20th century. Understanding the nature of Islam in Persianate cultural settings and how artistic production here compares to the Islamic world.
ARTH 5930 - Junior-Senior Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major art-historical theme, artist, period, or genre. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [Jr or sr] ArtH major, instr consent
ARTH 5950 - Topics: Art History
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ARTH 3896 - Directed Professional Experience
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Internship or research assistantship in approved program, art institution, business or museum. prereq: instr consent
ARTH 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
TBD prereq: instr consent
ARTH 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
TBD prereq: instr consent
ARTH 5994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
tbd prereq: instr consent
ARTH 3971W - Art History Capstone (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3971W/ArtH 3971V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Capstone course for art history majors, which teaches writing skills and strategies, and aids students in the completion of senior paper projects through the study of art historical methods. Students work with both the class instructor and individual faculty advisers on independent research and writing. prereq: ArtH major, instr consent
ARTH 3971V - Honors: Art History Capstone (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3971W/ArtH 3971V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Capstone course for art history majors, which teaches writing skills and strategies, and aids students in the completion of senior paper projects through the study of art historical methods. Students work with both the class instructor and individual faculty advisers on independent research and writing.
ARTH 3921W - Art of the Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will engage with the history of film as an art form through a selection of significant movements, styles, filmmakers, institutions, and, of course, individual films from around the world. While this will not be a comprehensive study, it will address both mainstream, commercial films as well as oppositional, experimental, underground, and otherwise challenging works. Some of the wide-ranging selection of films we will watch and discuss: Germaine Dulac?s La Coquille et le Clergyman (The Seashell and the Clergyman) (1922), Gillo Pontecorvo?s The Battle of Algiers (1966), Julie Dash?s Daughters of the Dust (1991), and Alfonso Cuarón?s Roma (2018).
AMES 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
ARTH 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
RELS 3415W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting, from prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to present.
ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
RELS 3706W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
ARTH 3971W - Art History Capstone (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3971W/ArtH 3971V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Capstone course for art history majors, which teaches writing skills and strategies, and aids students in the completion of senior paper projects through the study of art historical methods. Students work with both the class instructor and individual faculty advisers on independent research and writing. prereq: ArtH major, instr consent
ARTH 3971V - Honors: Art History Capstone (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3971W/ArtH 3971V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Capstone course for art history majors, which teaches writing skills and strategies, and aids students in the completion of senior paper projects through the study of art historical methods. Students work with both the class instructor and individual faculty advisers on independent research and writing.