Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Feminist Studies Ph.D.

Gender, Women and Sexuality
College of Liberal Arts
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Department of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies, 425 Ford Hall, 224 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-624-6006)
Email: gwss@umn.edu
  • Program Type: Doctorate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Length of program in credits: 64
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Doctor of Philosophy
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The Ph.D in Feminist Studies is designed to help students develop a high level of competence in feminist theories, research methods, interdisciplinarity, and pedagogies. Our graduates demonstrate a high level of competence in interdisciplinary feminist theories, research methods, and pedagogies. Our graduate program provides a rigorous interdisciplinary education designed to develop well-prepared scholars in the field of feminist studies and gender, women, and sexuality studies. Feminist studies PhD students pursue general and specialized courses in feminist studies while conducting scholarly research and analysis that truly drives change. Our graduate students are scholars, teachers, and activists, bringing to their work remarkable intelligence and a commitment to analyzing how power operates in and across societies, economies, and cultures. To guarantee a high level of interdisciplinary exchange, the program is designed to bring feminist studies doctoral students together with graduate minor students who are pursuing a disciplinary specialty in their own home department. Along with feminist studies, the contribution of queer and trans* studies—in regard to gender, sexuality, and biological bodies—is also a central component of our graduate program. We offer a wide variety of courses, with emphases in: ● Critical race and transnational feminisms ● Social movements ● Critical gender and sexualities, trans*, and queer studies ● Feminist ethnography and geography ● Feminist health, medicine, and science studies ● Intersections of race, ethnicity, and nationalism
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.50.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Preferred but not required: ·Academic training/undergraduate degree in gender, women, and/or sexuality studies, or related field ·Master’s degree in gender, women, and sexuality studies or a related field ·Activist or political advocacy in these areas is considered but not required
Special Application Requirements:
Applicants must submit three letters of recommendation, a writing sample, a current curriculum vitae, and a clearly written statement of career interests, goals, and objectives. The application deadline is December 1; all applications are evaluated once each year in December. Graduate study in the program begins in the fall semester following admission.
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 79
    • Internet Based - Writing Score: 21
    • Internet Based - Reading Score: 19
    • Paper Based - Total Score: 550
  • IELTS
    • Total Score: 6.5
  • MELAB
    • Final score: 80
The preferred English language test is Test of English as Foreign Language.
Key to test abbreviations (TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
28 credits are required in the major.
12 credits are required outside the major.
24 thesis credits are required.
This program may not be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
A minimum GPA of 3.50 is required for students to remain in good standing.
At least 4 semesters must be completed before filing a Degree Program Form.
Students may take up to two courses S/N, in consultation with the director of graduate studies
Interdisciplinary Core and Required Courses (16 credits)
Required Core (9 credits)
Take the following courses:
GWSS 8107 - Feminist Pedagogies (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8108 - Genealogies of Feminist Theory (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8109 - Feminist Knowledge Production (3.0 cr)
Dissertation Workshop Requirement (3 credits)
Select one of the following in consultation with the advisor. GWSS 8997, if selected, must be taken for 3 credits.
GWSS 8997 - Dissertation Seminar (1.0-3.0 cr)
or DSSC 8211 - Doctoral Research Workshop in Development Studies and Social Change (3.0 cr)
Colloquia Credits (4 credits)
Take 1 credit of GWSS 8996 for 4 semesters for a total of 4 credits. When registered for GWSS 8996, participation in all colloquium presentations and discussions, and written reflections on the presentations, is required. This course does not count towards the overall S/N limit.
GWSS 8996 - Feminist Studies Colloquium (1.0 cr)
GWSS Seminars (6 credits)
Take 6 credits from the following in consultation with the advisor:
GWSS 5104 - Transnational Feminist Theory (3.0 cr)
GWSS 5406 - Black Feminist Thought in the American and African Diasporas (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8103 - Feminist Theories of Knowledge (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8210 - Seminar: Feminist Theory & Praxis (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8220 - Seminar: Science, Technology & Environmental Justice (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8230 - Seminar: Cultural Criticism and Media Studies (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8250 - Seminar: Nation, State, and Citizenship (1.0-3.0 cr)
GWSS 8260 - Seminar: Race, Representation and Resistance (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8270 - Seminar: Theories of Body (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8490 - Seminar: Transnational, Postcolonial, Diaspora (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-6.0 cr)
Research Methods and Tools (6 credits)
Select at least 6 credits from the list below, or in consultation with the director of graduate studies. Up to 6 of these credits can be applied to the 12-credit requirement for outside coursework.
AMST 8201 - Historical Foundations of American Studies (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
COMM 5211 - Critical Media Studies: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
COMM 8211 - Critical Communication Studies: History, Theory, Method (3.0 cr)
CSCL 8910 - Advanced Topics in Comparative Literature (3.0 cr)
ENGL 8610 - Seminar in Language and Discourse Studies (3.0 cr)
GEOG 8290 - Seminar in GIS and Cartography (3.0 cr)
HIST 5011 - Measuring the Past: Quantitative Methods for Historical Research (4.0 cr)
HIST 8015 - Scope and Methods of Historical Studies (3.0 cr)
HIST 8031 - Doing Digital History (3.0 cr)
HIST 8122 - Public Histories (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8002 - Core Practices in Heritage Studies and Public History (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8006 - Digital Methods for Heritage Studies & Public History (3.0 cr)
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
Outside Coursework (6 to 12 credits)
Take 6 to 12 credits from the following, in consultation with the director of graduate studies, to complete the required 12 credits of outside coursework. Other courses may be applied to this requirement with director of graduate studies approval.
AFRO 5101 - Seminar: Introduction to Africa and the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race (3.0 cr)
AFRO 8910 - Topics in Studies of Africa and the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
AMES 5866 - Gender and Sexuality in Modern Arabic Literature (3.0 cr)
AMES 5920 - Topics in Asian Culture (3.0 cr)
AMES 8990 - Directed Readings (1.0-4.0 cr)
AMIN 8301 - Critical Indigenous Theory (3.0 cr)
AMIN 8910 - Topics in American Indian and Indigenous Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
AMST 8920 - Topics in American Studies (3.0 cr)
AMST 8970 - Independent Study in American Studies (1.0-9.0 cr)
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8992 - Directed Reading (1.0-18.0 cr)
ARAB 5040 - Readings in Arabic Texts (3.0 cr)
ARAB 5992 - Directed Readings (1.0-3.0 cr)
BTHX 5520 - Social Justice and Bioethics (3.0 cr)
CHIC 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
CHIC 5920 - Topics in Chicana(o) Studies (3.0 cr)
CHIC 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
COMM 5211 - Critical Media Studies: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
COMM 5221 - Media, Race, and Identity (3.0 cr)
COMM 8210 - Seminar: Selected Topics in U.S. Electronic Media (3.0 cr)
COMM 8994 - Directed Research (1.0-3.0 cr)
DNCE 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
DSSC 8111 - Approaches to Knowledge and Truth: Ways of Knowing in Development Studies and Social Change (3.0 cr)
DSSC 8112 - Scholarship and Public Responsibility (1.0 cr)
DSSC 8310 - Topics in Development Studies and Social Change (1.0-3.0 cr)
ENGL 8400 - Seminar in Post-Colonial Literature, Culture, and Theory (3.0 cr)
ENGL 8610 - Seminar in Language and Discourse Studies (3.0 cr)
ENGW 8120 - Seminar: Writing of Poetry (4.0 cr)
ENGW 8130 - Seminar: Writing of Literary Nonfiction (4.0 cr)
GEOG 8230 - Theoretical Geography (3.0 cr)
GEOG 8290 - Seminar in GIS and Cartography (3.0 cr)
GEOG 8980 - Topics: Geography (1.0-3.0 cr)
GIS 5576 - Spatial Digital Humanities (3.0 cr)
GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy (3.0 cr)
GLOS 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 5932 - The Production of Knowledge, Negotiating the Past, and the Writing of African Histories (3.0 cr)
HIST 8910 - Topics in U.S. History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8960 - Topics in History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-16.0 cr)
HMED 8002 - Foundations in the History of Modern Medicine, 1800-present (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8003 - Race and Indigeneity in Heritage Representation (3.0 cr)
PHIL 8110 - Seminar: Metaphysics (3.0 cr)
PHIL 8510 - Seminar: Aesthetics Studies (3.0 cr)
POL 8201 - Understanding Political Theory (3.0 cr)
POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6115 - Worker Protection Law (1.0 cr)
SOC 8093 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
TH 8120 - Seminar (3.0 cr)
Thesis Credits
Take 24 doctoral thesis credits.
GWSS 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral (1.0-24.0 cr)
 
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GWSS 8107 - Feminist Pedagogies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explore feminist theories/critical approaches to pedagogy. Develop teaching philosophy statement, design syllabus, practice teach/learn problem-solving strategies for classroom. prereq: Feminist Studies grad student [Maj or Minor] or instr consent
GWSS 8108 - Genealogies of Feminist Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Two-semester seminar. First term: debates in gender theory; intersections of gender theory with critical race theory, post-colonial theory, sexuality theory, social class analysis. Second term: inter-/multi-disciplinary feminist research methodologies from humanities/social sciences. prereq: Feminist studies PhD or grad minor student or instr consent
GWSS 8109 - Feminist Knowledge Production
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Two-semester interdisciplinary seminar. First term: debates in gender theory; gender theory, critical race theory, post-colonial theory, sexuality theory, social class analysis. Second term: inter-/multi-disciplinary feminist research methods from humanities/social sciences. prereq: Feminist studies PhD or grad minor student or instr consent
GWSS 8997 - Dissertation Seminar
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02566 - AmSt 8801/GWSS 8997
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptualizing the research problem for the dissertation and structuring the process of writing a chapter of it. prereq: AmSt doctoral student beginning dissertation work
DSSC 8211 - Doctoral Research Workshop in Development Studies and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interdisciplinary workshop to assist doctoral students in writing successful research and grant proposals to support their dissertation research on themes related to global social change. Enables students to develop interdisciplinary peer review and feedback skills and consider ethical and practical issues global south research. prereq: Grad DSSC minor or instr consent
GWSS 8996 - Feminist Studies Colloquium
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
TBD prereq: Grad major or minor in feminist studies
GWSS 5104 - Transnational Feminist Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Third World and transnational feminisms. Interrogating the categories of "women," "feminism," and "Third World." Varieties of power/oppression that women have endured/resisted, including colonization, nationalism, globalization, and capitalism. Concentrates on postcolonial context.
GWSS 5406 - Black Feminist Thought in the American and African Diasporas
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02005 - Afro 4406/Afro 5406/GWSS 4406/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Critically examines spatiality of African descendant women in Americas/larger black diaspora. Writings from black feminist/queer geographies, history, contemporary cultural criticism. Recent black feminist theorizing.
GWSS 8103 - Feminist Theories of Knowledge
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Interdisciplinary seminar. Feminist approaches to knowledge and to criticism of paradigms of knowledge operative in the disciplines. Feminist use of concepts of subjectivity, objectivity, and intersubjectivity. Feminist empiricism, standpoint theory, and contextualism. Postmodern and postcolonial theorizing.
GWSS 8210 - Seminar: Feminist Theory & Praxis
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics in feminist theory.
GWSS 8220 - Seminar: Science, Technology & Environmental Justice
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics related to science, technology, environmental justice.
GWSS 8230 - Seminar: Cultural Criticism and Media Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics in literature, film, art.
GWSS 8250 - Seminar: Nation, State, and Citizenship
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics related to nation, state, citizenship.
GWSS 8260 - Seminar: Race, Representation and Resistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Race, racialization, racial justice as related to representation/struggles for social/economic justice. Intersectional analysis of power, politics, ideology/identity. Queer of color critique, women of color feminisms, critical sex/body positive approaches. prereq: Grad student
GWSS 8270 - Seminar: Theories of Body
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How body is configured in many social arenas. Legal decisions, public policy, medical research, cultural customs. Examine how attitudes toward male/female bodies influence social myths/discourses about social policy/change.
GWSS 8490 - Seminar: Transnational, Postcolonial, Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Graduate topics in comparative/global studies.
GWSS 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
TBD
AMST 8201 - Historical Foundations of American Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Exposition of American studies as a field of inquiry, including its history, major theoretical framework, and interdisciplinary methodologies. prereq: grad AmSt major
ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/perspectives in anthropology. Emphasizes American cultural anthropology. Rrecent work in semiotic, psychological, and feminist anthropology.
ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Classic and current issues in research methodology, including positivist, interpretivist, feminist, and postmodernist frameworks. Methodology, in the broadest sense of the concept, is evaluated. Students conduct three research exercises and set up an ethnographic research project. prereq: Grad anth major or instr consent
COMM 5211 - Critical Media Studies: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of theories, research methods, and scholars dominating critical media studies since late 1920s. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
COMM 8211 - Critical Communication Studies: History, Theory, Method
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Qualitative research methods for studying media institutions, texts, audiences, and contexts.
CSCL 8910 - Advanced Topics in Comparative Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 24.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02748
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical applications of specific methodologies and theories to a determined area. Topics vary by instructor and semester.
ENGL 8610 - Seminar in Language and Discourse Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Current theoretical/methodological issues in discourse analysis. Social/psychological determinants of language choice (class, ethnicity, gender) in various English-speaking societies. Application to case studies, review of scholarship.
GEOG 8290 - Seminar in GIS and Cartography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected concepts/methods. Topics, which vary yearly, include spatial analysis methods in GIS; advanced visualization methods; data quality and error propagation in GIS; generalization methods in GIS and cartography; role of time in GIS; interactive/animated cartography; incorporation of uncertainty. prereq: instr consent
HIST 5011 - Measuring the Past: Quantitative Methods for Historical Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02029 - Hist 3011/Hist 5011
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Basics of quantitative historical data collection, measurement, and analysis. prereq: Primarily for 1st-yr grad students
HIST 8015 - Scope and Methods of Historical Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development of historical studies over time (especially in 19th and 20th centuries). Methodologies currently shaping historical research. Theoretical developments within the discipline during 19th and 20th centuries. prereq: instr consent
HIST 8031 - Doing Digital History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02692
Typically offered: Every Fall
Digital technologies are significantly altering the speed and scale of the foundational methodologies of archeology, history, and preservation. Moreover, they are shifting the way the public engages with the past in cultural institutions and across the myriad screens that pervade their daily life. In this course, students will not only learn how emerging digital technologies can enhance their research, but also how those technologies are fundamentally transforming the possibilities for the public presentation of that research. This course privileges hands-on learning and balances deepening essential methodological skills with exposure to a breadth of field-altering technologies. It is structured around five core methodologies--excavation, documentation, reconstruction, interpretation, and exhibition. In each unit, students will be first be tasked with identifying the underlying principles of these methodological approaches. They will then use class time to explore technologies that extend those methods such as high-resolution imaging, relational databases, text mining programs, virtual environments, and content management systems for website building. Bookending the course is a focus on effective collaboration--the foundation of successful digital projects--and public engagement in an increasingly connected yet fractured society.
HIST 8122 - Public Histories
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This seminar examines the variety of ways that "public history" is produced both within and outside the academy and explores interdisciplinary approaches to the making and critical analysis of public histories. Students will discuss recent scholarship by historians as well as scholars and practitioners in allied fields. Through discussion and collaborative project work, the seminar will also provide a hands-on introduction to the theory, methods, practice and politics of public history.
HSPH 8002 - Core Practices in Heritage Studies and Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Course is open to all Heritage Studies and Public History (HSPH) graduate students. DGS or Instructor permission required for others. Course offers a survey of how heritage and public history concern and ethics are embedded into practice. Through illustrated lectures, case studies, field trips, readings and class discussion, students will learn about the professional practice of heritage studies and public history, how approaches to practice are aligned to institutional mission, customization of programs for diverse audiences, and professional evaluation and management of financial resources.
HSPH 8006 - Digital Methods for Heritage Studies & Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02692 - Hist 8031/HSPH 8006
Typically offered: Every Fall
Digital technologies are significantly altering the speed and scale of the foundational methodologies of archeology, history, and preservation. Moreover, they are shifting the way the public engages with the past in cultural institutions and across the myriad screens that pervade their daily life. In this course, students will not only learn how emerging digital technologies can enhance their research, but also how those technologies are fundamentally transforming the possibilities for the public presentation of that research. This course privileges hands-on learning and balances deeping essential methodological skills with exposure to a breadth of field-altering technologies. It is structured around five core methodologies--excavation, documentation, reconstruction, interpretation, and exhibition. In each unit, students will be first be tasked with identifying the underlying principles of these methodological approaches. They will then use class time to explore technologies that extend those methods such as high-resolution imaging, relational databases, text mining programs, virtual environments, and content management systems for website building. Bookending the course is a focus on effective collaboration--the foundation of successful digital projects--and public engagement in an increasingly connected yet fractured society.
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Multiple objectives of social research and how they inform research design. Conceptualization and measurement of complex concepts. Broad issues in research design and quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and management. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
AFRO 5101 - Seminar: Introduction to Africa and the African Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative frameworks, related theories, and pivotal texts in study of Africa and African Diaspora.
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/5866
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The "second reconstruction." Failure of Reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Post-1945 assault on white supremacy via courts/state, grass-roots southern movement in 1950s/1960s. Black struggle in north and west, emphasis on Black Power by new organizations/ideologies/leaders. Ascendancy of Reagan, conservative assault on movement.
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Shifting and contested meanings of "race" from the "Age of Conquest" to the present. Starting from the proposition that race is not a fixed or stable category of social thought or being, the seminar seeks to ascertain how and why Western ideas about race have changed.
AFRO 8910 - Topics in Studies of Africa and the African Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AMES 5866 - Gender and Sexuality in Modern Arabic Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of modern Arabic literature’s key role in the articulation, construction, and subversion of gendered subjectivities. Explores the construction of masculine and feminine subjectivities, as well as the blurring of the dichotomy between the two. Also explores how homoerotic desire is presented in modern Arabic novels. Engages the complex interplay between the gender politics of literary texts, and the broader historical and political contexts from which they emerge. All texts covered in this course will be in English translation, however those able to read texts in the original Arabic are encouraged to do so.
AMES 5920 - Topics in Asian Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AMES 8990 - Directed Readings
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Directed readings in foreign language(s) of specialty, where appropriate. prereq: PhD student
AMIN 8301 - Critical Indigenous Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course covers the "critical turn" in American Indian and Native or Indigenous Studies as evident in the emergence of three overlapping threads or intellectual/political genealogies: critiques of Indigeneity (the claims and conditions of nativeness to specific places), Indigenous Feminist (which foregrounds the salience of gender in indigenous critiques of power structures), and Indigenous Queer, sometimes labeled "Two-Spirit" (which foregrounds sexuality). What are the analytical, political and cultural backgrounds and what are their purchases for theory, critique, and practice? For interrogating academic and non-academic (including Indigenous) forms of inquiry and knowledge production and being in the world?
AMIN 8910 - Topics in American Indian and Indigenous Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This is a topics shell
AMST 8920 - Topics in American Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AMST 8970 - Independent Study in American Studies
Credits: 1.0 -9.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Independent study of interdisciplinary aspects of American civilization under guidance of faculty members of various departments. prereq: instr consent, dept consent
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar examines particular aspects of method and/or theory. Topics vary according to student and faculty interests.
ANTH 8992 - Directed Reading
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 54.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
tbd prereq: instr consent
ARAB 5040 - Readings in Arabic Texts
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Post-advanced study of extensive, complex original Arabic texts and development of students' Arabic discussion and writing skills in the realms of literature, academia, media and/or business. All primary and secondary readings, assignments, in-class analysis and discussion are done fully in Arabic. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ARAB 5992 - Directed Readings
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Individual research and readings for advanced students.
BTHX 5520 - Social Justice and Bioethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course explores matters of social justice related to health. Readings from multiple disciplinary perspectives ground examination of how to understand social justice in this context. Class sessions will predominantly focus on specific practical issues such as health disparities, the politics of inclusion and exclusion in clinical research, resource allocation in resource poor settings, and health professional roles during war. Discussions incorporate consideration of these issues’ institutional and broader social contexts. This course is appropriate for a wide audience including students from the health professions, philosophy, social science, and law.
CHIC 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02631 - AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
CHIC 5920 - Topics in Chicana(o) Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Multidisciplinary themes in Chicana(o) studies. Issues of current interest.
CHIC 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading, research, and study for completion of the requirements for a senior paper or honors thesis. prereq: instr consent
COMM 5211 - Critical Media Studies: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of theories, research methods, and scholars dominating critical media studies since late 1920s. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
COMM 5221 - Media, Race, and Identity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Critical media studies perspective on cultural politics of race and ethnicity. Social construction of race, politics of racism, media representations of race. prereq: 3211 or instr consent
COMM 8210 - Seminar: Selected Topics in U.S. Electronic Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Literature survey; evaluating research on topics; conducting independent research project on a particular topic. prereq: 5210 or instr consent; offered when feasible
COMM 8994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Supervised research project.
DNCE 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual study. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
DSSC 8111 - Approaches to Knowledge and Truth: Ways of Knowing in Development Studies and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Grad DSSC minor or #
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Approaches practiced by physical, biological, social science, and humanities scholars. "Ways of knowing" in different cultures/groups. Issues/methodological challenges facing interdisciplinary/international studies. Taught by faculty from biological, social sciences, and humanities. prereq: Grad DSSC minor or instr consent
DSSC 8112 - Scholarship and Public Responsibility
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Seminar. Concerns/themes relevant to public engagement in academic work. Diverse practices of reading, writing, and pedagogy. Privileged locations of knowledge. Tactics of civil society organizing. Politics of collaborative work. prereq: Grad DSSC minor or instr consent
DSSC 8310 - Topics in Development Studies and Social Change
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seven-week to full semester seminar. Topical issues in development and social change.
ENGL 8400 - Seminar in Post-Colonial Literature, Culture, and Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sample topics: Marxism and nationalism; modern India; feminism and decolonization; "the Empire Writes Back"; Islam and the West. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ENGL 8610 - Seminar in Language and Discourse Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Current theoretical/methodological issues in discourse analysis. Social/psychological determinants of language choice (class, ethnicity, gender) in various English-speaking societies. Application to case studies, review of scholarship.
ENGW 8120 - Seminar: Writing of Poetry
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Focuses on exploration and practice of various styles. Assignments in common and individual project. prereq: dept consent
ENGW 8130 - Seminar: Writing of Literary Nonfiction
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced workshop. Assignments in common and individual projects. prereq: dept consent
GEOG 8230 - Theoretical Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced topics. Topics vary with interests of faculty offering course. Contemporary theoretical/philosophical themes transcending subdisciplines of human/physical geography. prereq: instr consent
GEOG 8290 - Seminar in GIS and Cartography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected concepts/methods. Topics, which vary yearly, include spatial analysis methods in GIS; advanced visualization methods; data quality and error propagation in GIS; generalization methods in GIS and cartography; role of time in GIS; interactive/animated cartography; incorporation of uncertainty. prereq: instr consent
GEOG 8980 - Topics: Geography
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 30.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar offered by visiting or regular faculty. Topics vary with interests of faculty. prereq: instr consent
GIS 5576 - Spatial Digital Humanities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Spatial Digital Humanities GIS 5576 is a basic overview of desktop GIS (both Esri and open source), as well as an introduction to a number of other mapping techniques (such as Esri Maps for Office, ArcGIS Online, web mapping basics, georeferencing historical maps, etc) in addition to digital scholarship techniques. Course objectives include: understanding the basics of mapping and geospatial information using GIS; documenting and managing spatial data using coherent/standardized methods; understanding several spatial analysis methods that are relevant to student research area; and applying spatial research methods into student research.
GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01513
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
GLOS 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Prerequisites: #, %, @
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual reading or study. Open to qualified students for one or more semesters.
HIST 5932 - The Production of Knowledge, Negotiating the Past, and the Writing of African Histories
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02043 - Afro 5932/Hist 5932
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Recent scholarship on social history of Africa. Focuses on new literature on daily lives of ordinary people in their workplaces, communities, households.
HIST 8910 - Topics in U.S. History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8960 - Topics in History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students work on tutorial basis. Guided individual reading or study. prereq: Grad student, instr consent
HMED 8002 - Foundations in the History of Modern Medicine, 1800-present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of Western medicine in Europe and America, from the Paris School and pathological anatomy in early 19c France through germ theories of disease, bacteriological revolution, reform of medical education, pharmaceutical revolution, growth of biomed research establishment, and comparative health care delivery systems.
HSPH 8003 - Race and Indigeneity in Heritage Representation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar will explore the changes in how diversity has been represented in historical interpretations in the past, and how practice is changing in response to the contemporary and anticipated social context of the United States. "Diversity" has historically been assumed to derive from categories such as race or culture, concepts constructed in the discipline of anthropology but taken up as the foundation for typologies in other arenas such as art history, architectural history, museums, and public policy. What is problematic in such an approach? What happens to communities defined by shared history, political sovereignty, and disenfranchisement? What are the implications beyond museums for those communities? Finally, how can we think differently about diversity without re-inscribing harmful constructions of difference?
PHIL 8110 - Seminar: Metaphysics
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics vary by offering. prereq: 4101 or instr consent
PHIL 8510 - Seminar: Aesthetics Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics vary by offering.
POL 8201 - Understanding Political Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Key concepts/major approaches. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings and research in special topics or problems.
PUBH 6115 - Worker Protection Law
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Role of government in protecting rights of citizens. Labor movement history as starting point for discussion of systems for protecting workers in unsafe workplaces and compensating them for injuries. Laws against class-based discrimination.
SOC 8093 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study in sociology. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
TH 8120 - Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected research topics from various theatre fields and periods. Sample topics: Border Crossings--Theatre History and Representation; The Theatre and Drama of the Third Reich, 1927-1944.
GWSS 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral
Credits: 1.0 -24.0 [max 24.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required