Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Studies in Cinema and Media Culture Minor

Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2023
  • Required credits in this minor: 18
Studies in cinema and media culture (SCMC) examines cinema by emphasizing its location within the intricate social, historical, and cultural matrix of audiovisual forms and practices. Through our program's interdisciplinary framework, students explore the sounds and images of cinema as they have changed throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. Print, photography, radio, television, video, and digital media are also considered crucial to understanding the medium. Students develop the ability to "read" the production and circulation of meaning in cinema, especially within the institutions of mass culture; examine the history of cinema cultures; engage the cross-cultural and global dynamics of cinema production and reception; and explore the theoretical models that have shaped thinking about the cinema and its relations to other media. Core courses and electives are offered not only in the Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature (CSCL), but also in a number of other contributing departments, including Asian languages and literatures; gender, women, and sexuality studies; art; and journalism. Although the major includes a production component, its principal focus is on cultural contexts, history, and theory.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Students may earn a BA or a minor in studies in cinema and media culture, but not both.
Foundation Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTH 1921W - Introduction to Film Study [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· SCMC 1201W - Cinema [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or SCMC 1201V - Honors Course: Cinema [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or CSCL 1201W - Cinema [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or CSCL 1201V - Honors Course: Cinema [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· SCMC 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound [AH, TS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or CSCL 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound [AH, TS, WI] (4.0 cr)
Electives
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
· Studies in Cinema and Media Culture Electives
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· SCMC 3001W - History of Cinema and Media Culture [WI] (4.0 cr)
· SCMC 3201 - Fundamentals of Digital Filmmaking (4.0 cr)
· SCMC 3202 - Intermediate Digital Filmmaking (4.0 cr)
· SCMC 5001 - Critical Debates in the Study of Cinema and Media Culture (4.0 cr)
· SCMC 5002 - Advanced Film Analysis (4.0 cr)
· SCMC 3210 - Cinema and Ideology [AH] (4.0 cr)
or CSCL 3210 - Cinema and Ideology [AH] (4.0 cr)
· SCMC 3211 - Global and Transnational Cinemas [GP] (4.0 cr)
or CSCL 3211 - Global and Transnational Cinemas [GP] (4.0 cr)
· SCMC 3212W - Documentary Cinema: History and Politics [AH, CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or CSCL 3212W - Documentary Cinema: History and Politics [AH, CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· SCMC 3221 - On Television [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or CSCL 3221 - On Television [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· SCMC 3220W - Screen Cultures [AH, TS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or CSCL 3220W - Screen Cultures [AH, TS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SCMC 5303 - Sound Studies (3.0 cr)
or CSCL 5303 - Sound Studies (3.0 cr)
· Other Electives
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· AFRO 3654 - African Cinema [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3356W - Chinese Film [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3456 - Japanese Film [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3556 - Korean Film and Media [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3756 - Southeast Asian Cinema (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3304 - Indigenous Filmmakers [AH] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 3252W - American Popular Culture and Politics: 1900 to 1940 [HIS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 3253W - American Popular Culture and Politics: 1940 to the Present [HIS, CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3921W - Art of the Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3730 - Intermediate Digital Photography (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3740 - Lighting and the Constructed Image (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3790 - Phone It In: Mobile Imaging and the Connected World (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 5610 - New Media: Making Art Interactive (4.0 cr)
· COMM 3201 - Introduction to Electronic Media Production (4.0 cr)
· COMM 3202 - Audio Production and Media Literacy (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3204 - Advanced Electronic Media Production (4.0 cr)
· COMM 3211 - Introduction to Media Studies (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3231 - Reality TV: History, Culture, and Economics (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3263W - Media Literacy: Decoding Media Images and Messages [WI] (3.0 cr)
· COMM 4263 - Feminist Media Studies [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· COMM 5211 - Critical Media Studies: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
· COMM 5261 - Political Economy of Media Culture (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5411 - Avant-Garde Cinema (4.0 cr)
· ENGW 4205 - Screenwriting (3.0 cr)
· FREN 3451 - North African Cinema (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3374W - The City in Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GER 3604W - Introduction to German Cinema [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3307 - Feminist Film Studies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3614 - History of Media Communication [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3741 - Diversity and Media [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3745 - Media and Popular Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· PORT 3800 - Film Studies in Portuguese (3.0 cr)
· SCAN 3617 - Scandinavian Gothic: Horror and the Uncanny in Nordic Literature and Media [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3800 - Film Studies in Spanish (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3655 - African-American Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5655 - African-American Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3402 - American Indians and the Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 5402 - American Indians and the Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ARTS 3750 - Narrative Digital Filmmaking (4.0 cr)
or ARTS 5750 - Advanced Narrative Digital Filmmaking (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3760 - Experimental Film and Video (4.0 cr)
or ARTS 5760 - Experimental Film and Video (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 4921 - History of Computing [TS, HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 4321 - History of Computing [TS, HIS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3786 - Media and Politics (3.0 cr)
or POL 3786 - Media and Politics (3.0 cr)
· Directed Studies, Internships, and Topics
Take 0 - 2 course(s) from the following:
Directed Studies/Internship
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· SCMC 3896 - Internship for Academic Credit (1.0-4.0 cr)
· SCMC 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· SCMC 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· SCMC 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3896 - Internship for Academic Credit (1.0-4.0 cr)
· CSCL 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· CSCL 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· Topics
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· SCMC 3910 - Topics in Studies in Cinema and Media Culture (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3040 - Studies in Film (3.0 cr)
· FRIT 3850 - Topics in French and Italian Cinema (3.0 cr)
· GER 5630 - Topics in German Cinema (3.0 cr)
· PORT 3800 - Film Studies in Portuguese (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3800 - Film Studies in Spanish (3.0 cr)
· Other topics courses approved by the Film Studies Coordinator, based on the specific topic
 
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ARTH 1921W - Introduction to Film Study (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 1921W/CSCL 1201W/SCMC 120
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamentals of film analysis and an introduction to the major theories of the cinema, presented through detailed interpretations of representative films from the international history of the cinema.
SCMC 1201W - Cinema (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 1921W/CSCL 1201W/SCMC 120
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical study of the visual in modernity, presented through sustained analysis of the cinema and cinematic codes. Emphases on formal film analysis and major film movements and conventions in the international history of cinema. Students develop a vocabulary for formal visual analysis and explore major theories of the cinema. *Students will not receive credit for CSCL 1201W if they have already taken SCMC 1201W, ARTH 1921W, CSCL 1921W, CSCL 1201 or SCMC 1201
SCMC 1201V - Honors Course: Cinema (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 1921W/CSCL 1201W/SCMC 120
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical study of the visual in modernity, presented through sustained analysis of the cinema and cinematic codes. Emphases on formal film analysis and major film movements and conventions in the international history of cinema. Students develop a vocabulary for formal visual analysis and explore major theories of the cinema. *Students will not receive credit for SCMC 1201V if they have already taken CSCL 1201V, CSCL 1201W, SCMC 1201W, ARTH 1921W, CSCL 1921W, CSCL 1201 or SCMC 1201
CSCL 1201W - Cinema (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 1921W/CSCL 1201W/SCMC 120
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical study of the visual in modernity, presented through sustained analysis of the cinema and cinematic codes. Emphases on formal film analysis and major film movements and conventions in the international history of cinema. Students develop a vocabulary for formal visual analysis and explore major theories of the cinema. *Students will not receive credit for CSCL 1201W if they have already taken SCMC 1201W, CSCL 1201V, SCMC 1201V, ARTH 1921W, CSCL 1921W, CSCL 1201 or SCMC 1201
CSCL 1201V - Honors Course: Cinema (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 1921W/CSCL 1201W/SCMC 120
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical study of the visual in modernity, presented through sustained analysis of the cinema and cinematic codes. Emphases on formal film analysis and major film movements and conventions in the international history of cinema. Students develop a vocabulary for formal visual analysis and explore major theories of the cinema. *Students will not receive credit for CSCL 1201V if they have already taken CSCLW, SCMC 1201W, ARTH 1921W, CSCL 1921W, CSCL 1201 or SCMC 1201
SCMC 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound (AH, TS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 1202W/SCMC 1202W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical and theoretical study of media and technology from Aristotle to the modern world. The first half of the course emphasizes theoretical readings in dialogue with historical apparatuses (printing press, photography, radio, cinema, television) and various expressive objects (the bible, early film, ethnographic sound recordings). The second half turns to the modern culture industry since World War II, and introduces students to the critical study of mass culture, the concept of ideology, and of the relationship between corporate power and media conglomerates.
CSCL 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound (AH, TS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 1202W/SCMC 1202W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical and theoretical study of media and technology from Aristotle to the modern world. The first half of the course emphasizes theoretical readings in dialogue with historical apparatuses (printing press, photography, radio, cinema, television) and various expressive objects (the bible, early film, ethnographic sound recordings). The second half turns to the modern culture industry since World War II, and introduces students to the critical study of mass culture, the concept of ideology, and of the relationship between corporate power and media conglomerates.
SCMC 3001W - History of Cinema and Media Culture (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Genealogy of cinema in relation to other media, notably photography, radio, television/video, and the Internet. Representative films from decisive moments in global development of cinema. Rise/fall of Hollywood studio system, establishment of different national cinemas, cinematic challenges to cultural imperialism, emergence of post-cinematic technologies.
SCMC 3201 - Fundamentals of Digital Filmmaking
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Practice of digital filmmaking. Digital techniques, practical tools required to produce films. Optical/digital devices as artistic tools. Historical/theoretical issues of cinema, its relation to other art forms.
SCMC 3202 - Intermediate Digital Filmmaking
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students complete a film of any length, 24 frames or feature-length. Emphasizes formal analysis of frames, shots, sequences, and relations of unit (frame or shot) to whole. prereq: 3201 or instr consent
SCMC 5001 - Critical Debates in the Study of Cinema and Media Culture
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course serves as a capstone within the Studies in Cinema and Media Culture program as well as an advanced seminar in cinema and media theory. It covers such topics as contemporary cinema, transnational television, video games, digital networks, and surveillance technologies. It builds on the knowledge of cinema and media studies that students have developed over their undergraduate education. Students are given the resources and encouragement to construct larger reading and viewing lists that will further develop their knowledge of media and cinema. The final grade is based on participation, critical essays, weekly viewing assignments, and an individualized project that can include creative and professional interests.
SCMC 5002 - Advanced Film Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Application of textual analysis to the reading of a film. Students work collaboratively to discern and interpret all component aural/visual elements of what the film says and how it says it.
SCMC 3210 - Cinema and Ideology (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3210/SCMC 3210
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The cinema as a social institution with emphasis on the complex relations it maintains with the ideological practices that define both the form and the content of its products. Specific films used to study how mass culture contributes to the process of shaping beliefs and identities of citizens.
CSCL 3210 - Cinema and Ideology (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3210/SCMC 3210
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The cinema as a social institution with emphasis on the complex relations it maintains with the ideological practices that define both the form and the content of its products. Specific films used to study how mass culture contributes to the process of shaping beliefs and identities of citizens.
SCMC 3211 - Global and Transnational Cinemas (GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3211/SCMC 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores Global and Transnational Cinemas as alternative traditions to the dominant Hollywood-centered accounts of film history. Students will grapple with the historical, social, and political motivations of cinematic projects that critique traditions of national cinema, or that resist the hegemonic force of neocolonial cultural centers. Italian Neo-realism and the French New Wave will be examined as movements that challenge politics and mass culture. Third Cinema in Latin America and pan-African cinematic movements will be examined through their struggles with both colonialism and the rise of post-colonial dictatorships. Indian and Japanese cinemas of the 50s & 60s will mark out new possibilities of filmmaking and distribution. Finally, counter-hegemonic and experimental movements in U.S.-based film, such as the L.A. Rebellion and Fluxus, will allow students to understand how opposition to Hollywood style could exist within the very centers of cultural power while also reaching out to larger global communities.
CSCL 3211 - Global and Transnational Cinemas (GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3211/SCMC 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores Global and Transnational Cinemas as alternative traditions to the dominant Hollywood-centered accounts of film history. Students will grapple with the historical, social, and political motivations of cinematic projects that critique traditions of national cinema, or that resist the hegemonic force of neocolonial cultural centers. Italian Neo-realism and the French New Wave will be examined as movements that challenge politics and mass culture. Third Cinema in Latin America and pan-African cinematic movements will be examined through their struggles with both colonialism and the rise of post-colonial dictatorships. Indian and Japanese cinemas of the 50s & 60s will mark out new possibilities of filmmaking and distribution. Finally, counter-hegemonic and experimental movements in U.S.-based film, such as the L.A. Rebellion and Fluxus, will allow students to understand how opposition to Hollywood style could exist within the very centers of cultural power while also reaching out to larger global communities.
SCMC 3212W - Documentary Cinema: History and Politics (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3212W/SCMC 3212W
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course explores the ethics and aesthetics of documentary cinema, arguably the very first genre of film. We will track the way documentary has widened from largely instructional and experimental uses early in its history to become a distinct genre among today?s familiar feature films. We will screen early documentaries, which may include shocking ethnographies (Nanook of the North, The Mad Masters). Over the course of the term, the syllabus makes its way to recent exemplars of the genre (films may include: Amy, American Teen, I Am Not Your Negro, A Jihad for Love, Generation Wealth, Fetish, Blackfish and so on). One of our aims will be to explore students? relations as viewers and documentarians themselves (via smartphones, Instagram, etc.) to this participatory, revelatory, and always controversial, politically fraught film practice. Documentary Cinema includes both full class lectures and discussions as well as small group discussion of films and readings, and may include the opportunity for students to create their own personal documentary. Intellectually, the course balances out a study of the grammar of documentary as an artistic practice with explorations of the ways the genre reflects broader currents of cinematic and cultural history. By the end of the semester, students should have a stronger understanding of the ways documentary cinema opens our senses to the world around us.
CSCL 3212W - Documentary Cinema: History and Politics (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3212W/SCMC 3212W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course explores the ethics and aesthetics of documentary cinema, arguably the very first genre of film. We will track the way documentary has widened from largely instructional and experimental uses early in its history to become a distinct genre among today?s familiar feature films. We will screen early documentaries, which may include shocking ethnographies (Nanook of the North, The Mad Masters). Over the course of the term, the syllabus makes its way to recent exemplars of the genre (films may include: Amy, American Teen, I Am Not Your Negro, A Jihad for Love, Generation Wealth, Fetish, Blackfish and so on). One of our aims will be to explore students? relations as viewers and documentarians themselves (via smartphones, Instagram, etc.) to this participatory, revelatory, and always controversial, politically fraught film practice. Documentary Cinema includes both full class lectures and discussions as well as small group discussion of films and readings, and may include the opportunity for students to create their own personal documentary. Intellectually, the course balances out a study of the grammar of documentary as an artistic practice with explorations of the ways the genre reflects broader currents of cinematic and cultural history. By the end of the semester, students should have a stronger understanding of the ways documentary cinema opens our senses to the world around us.
SCMC 3221 - On Television (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3221/SCMC 3221
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We will study writings on television and specific TV shows from a variety of angles to understand the rise of American broadcast technologies, how race and class are crafted on TV, representations of gender and the home, postmodernity and late capitalism, the rise and demise and of taste, global television and the public sphere, the production of ?reality? in our present historical moment, and changes in televisual technologies. Throughout the course, we will also consider what constitutes television?the technology, the form, and the content?and learn to read these three facets of it concurrently.
CSCL 3221 - On Television (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3221/SCMC 3221
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We will study writings on television and specific TV shows from a variety of angles to understand the rise of American broadcast technologies, how race and class are crafted on TV, representations of gender and the home, postmodernity and late capitalism, the rise and demise and of taste, global television and the public sphere, the production of ?reality? in our present historical moment, and changes in televisual technologies. Throughout the course, we will also consider what constitutes television?the technology, the form, and the content?and learn to read these three facets of it concurrently.
SCMC 3220W - Screen Cultures (AH, TS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3220W/SCMC 3220W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Screens increasingly define the ways that we communicate with one another and how we encounter the world. This course will offer a critical, historical approach to the emergence of ?screen cultures? from the beginning of photography and cinema to our own age of ubiquitous touch screen displays. We will pay a great deal of attention to the ways that such technologies drive our patterns of consumption and production as well as how they create and define our social environments.
CSCL 3220W - Screen Cultures (AH, TS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3220W/SCMC 3220W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Screens increasingly define the ways that we communicate with one another and how we encounter the world. This course will offer a critical, historical approach to the emergence of ?screen cultures? from the beginning of photography and cinema to our own age of ubiquitous touch screen displays. We will pay a great deal of attention to the ways that such technologies drive our patterns of consumption and production as well as how they create and define our social environments.
SCMC 5303 - Sound Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 5303 / SCMC 5303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
What is sound? Among the various ways of absorbing the world through the senses (looking, reading, watching, touching, tasting), what is unique to the actions of listening and hearing? And over the course of human history, how has sound been variously deployed, framed, and constructed? This course covers a diverse range of topics in the fast-developing interdisciplinary field of Sound Studies from the philosophy of sound to psychoanalytic theories of the voice, the gendered histories of telephones, accounts of radio and decolonization, film sound, sonic expressions of race, the politics of global popular music, mobile media technologies, and cutting-edge approaches to sound art.
CSCL 5303 - Sound Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 5303 / SCMC 5303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
What is sound? Among the various ways of absorbing the world through the senses (looking, reading, watching, touching, tasting), what is unique to the actions of listening and hearing? And over the course of human history, how has sound been variously deployed, framed, and constructed? This course covers a diverse range of topics in the fast-developing interdisciplinary field of Sound Studies from the philosophy of sound to psychoanalytic theories of the voice, the gendered histories of telephones, accounts of radio and decolonization, film sound, sonic expressions of race, the politics of global popular music, mobile media technologies, and cutting-edge approaches to sound art.
AFRO 3654 - African Cinema (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
This course introduces you to films written and directed by African filmmakers beginning the 2nd part of the 20th Century. Through an exploration of the stylistic and thematic issues raised by each film, it is expected that students will gain a broad understanding of how African filmmakers portray African social and cultural life, including the artistic and political contexts within which they work. In this way, students will gain an historical perspective on the origins of African filmmaking, confront the basic social, cultural and aesthetic questions raised by African filmmakers and critics, and consider how questions raised by African filmmakers and their films fit into the larger context of world cinema. We will contrast postcolonial African films with Hollywood jungle epics, settler/adventure romances in safari paradise, and colonial movies about Africa. Moving beyond strict categories and standards we will also examine the role of documentary films in shaping our understanding of African people's lives and the social construction of reality. We will review the place of documentary film in the current media-scape and discuss its functions and limitations. Most films will be screened in original languages with English subtitles.
AMES 3356W - Chinese Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of Chinese cinema from China (PRC), Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Emphasizes discussion/comparison of global, social, economic, sexual, gender, psychological, and other themes as represented through film.
AMES 3456 - Japanese Film (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Themes, stylistics, and genres of Japanese cinema through work of classic directors (Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, and Ozu) and more recent filmmakers (Itami, Morita). Focuses on representations of femininity/masculinity.
AMES 3556 - Korean Film and Media (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AMES 3556 / AMES 5556
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to Korean film from the Japanese colonial period (1910-1945) to the present day. We discuss the emergence of the Korean film industry under the conditions of colonial modernity and the various political pressures put on film production in South Korea until the 1990s. We will then turn to the last twenty years, during which South Korean film and television have experienced a boom in popularity in East Asia and globally. Throughout, we will focus on the formal and technical aspects of film, representations of history and historical memory, genre borrowing and genre mixing, and the relationships between art-house and culture industry productions.
AMES 3756 - Southeast Asian Cinema
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the social life and political functions of cinema and media cultures in Southeast Asia in relation to various contexts in which they emerged and circulate. The course is attentive to the impact of historical processes on film and media culture as well as to how film and media process historical events?colonialism, militarism, religious conflict, economic turmoil. The course will be divided into three different periods. We will, first, explore the period of the early twentieth century where colonialism in the region activates claims around nation and nationalism and we will examine the role modern media plays in these debates by looking at how notions of ?national media? produces ?others? who are at the margin of such development. Second, we will explore polarized ideological conflicts during the Cold War?the period in which Americanization and anti-American sentiment were expressed in media through genres that are now considered propaganda. We will also look at films and graphic literature that overtly document and critique violence. The final part of the course will focus on contemporary Southeast Asia?the financial crisis of 1996 and many forms of authoritarianism that still impact the discussions, understandings, and practices of human rights in the region.
AMIN 3304 - Indigenous Filmmakers (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of film/video made by American Indian writers, directors, producers within contexts of tribally specific cultures/histories, as well as within context of US culture/film history.
AMST 3252W - American Popular Culture and Politics: 1900 to 1940 (HIS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Historical analysis of how popular arts represent issues of gender, race, consumerism, and citizenship. How popular artists define boundaries of citizenship and public life: inclusions/exclusions in polity and national identity. How popular arts reinforce/alter political ideologies.
AMST 3253W - American Popular Culture and Politics: 1940 to the Present (HIS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Historical analysis of how popular arts represent issues of gender, race, consumerism, and citizenship. How popular artists define boundaries of citizenship and public life: inclusions/exclusions in polity and national identity. How popular arts reinforce/alter political ideologies.
ARTH 3921W - Art of the Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will engage with the history of film as an art form through a selection of significant movements, styles, filmmakers, institutions, and, of course, individual films from around the world. While this will not be a comprehensive study, it will address both mainstream, commercial films as well as oppositional, experimental, underground, and otherwise challenging works. Some of the wide-ranging selection of films we will watch and discuss: Germaine Dulac?s La Coquille et le Clergyman (The Seashell and the Clergyman) (1922), Gillo Pontecorvo?s The Battle of Algiers (1966), Julie Dash?s Daughters of the Dust (1991), and Alfonso Cuarón?s Roma (2018).
ARTS 3730 - Intermediate Digital Photography
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Photographic digital imaging in fine arts. Manipulation, computer applications. Editing in photo imaging software. prereq: 1701
ARTS 3740 - Lighting and the Constructed Image
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 3740/ArtS 5740
Typically offered: Every Spring
Take charge of your photographs and moving images. This class is about making pictures vs. taking pictures. Students will learn to use flash and continuous light sources to shape the content and feeling of your work, to create worlds, characters, and stories. Some projects will be specific to still photography, but you will have the option of working with moving image in others. You will learn principles of lighting that apply to all media. In addition to lighting, the use of props, sets, costumes and digital manipulation will be explored in a series of student projects. We will learn to control and shape light in the studio and on location, in table-top setups and large-scale outdoor productions. We will look at contemporary and historic artists in all genres who are masters of the constructed image. There will be a lot of hands-on skills taught in this class, but always in the service of exploring and expressing your personal vision. prereq: ARTS 1701 Introduction to Photography
ARTS 3790 - Phone It In: Mobile Imaging and the Connected World
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The making and sharing of still and moving images has fundamentally changed since the advent of the smartphone. And these images help change the world. The 10-minute video of the murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police on May 24, 2020 was shot by a high school student, who said ?The world needed to see what I was seeing.? Social distancing in response to the COVID-19 pandemic also highlights the impact of this technology. While our physical mobility may be limited, our mobile devices not only augment our experience of the world, in many ways they replace it. This is a hybrid art class involving both making and sharing of photographs, as well as readings, presentations and discussions. We will explore how mobile imaging technology and connectivity have transformed photography, as well as every other aspect of our lives- emotional, social, political, economic, and health. We will learn about the history, technology and infrastructure of mobile devices and the internet. This is a rapidly changing topic, and our exploration format will be one of co-teaching and co-learning for instructor and students alike. This is not your grandparents' photo class (although it is open to all generations.)
ARTS 5610 - New Media: Making Art Interactive
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Conceptual/aesthetic development with digital, interactive art. Experimental approaches to interactive technologies. Projects with responsive/tangible media. Theory/history of new media. prereq: 3601 or instr consent
COMM 3201 - Introduction to Electronic Media Production
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students work as a team to plan, script, and shoot video productions in a hands-on multi-camera television studio. By creating their own productions and reviewing the productions of others, students learn how media aesthetics shape the presentation of themes and messages.
COMM 3202 - Audio Production and Media Literacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introductory experience with sound design and production in podcasting, soundscape composition, music, and film. How sound advances media narratives and communicates emotion. The role sound plays in the producer's and audience's construction of worlds. Field recording, Foley work, vocal recording, music, and team production of longform nonfiction narrative podcast.
COMM 3204 - Advanced Electronic Media Production
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Video as communicative medium integrating visual/aural aesthetics. Creation of broadcast-quality production integrating message creation, audience analysis, argument development, and visual/audio scripting. Utilization of media aesthetics to develop/shape production content. prereq: 3201 or instr consent
COMM 3211 - Introduction to Media Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Historical development and current issues in electronic media technologies and programming. Effects of governmental, industrial, and public organizations on message content. Problem areas of electronic media.
COMM 3231 - Reality TV: History, Culture, and Economics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Social, visual, cultural, economic, historical, and ethical dimensions of reality television.
COMM 3263W - Media Literacy: Decoding Media Images and Messages (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Analysis of media images/messages. Principles of literacy. Media content/industries. Media and identity. Media effects. Textbook/packet readings, videos, small groups of peer writing workshops, media analyses.
COMM 4263 - Feminist Media Studies (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Issues, controversies, and practices of gender and their relationship to U.S. media. Ways in which gender is represented in and comes into play with media texts/institutions. Histories of feminism, theories/methods/political economy, case studies. prereq: 3211 or instr consent
COMM 5211 - Critical Media Studies: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of theories, research methods, and scholars dominating critical media studies since late 1920s. prereq: Graduate students or undergraduates who have completed COMM 3211 (Introduction to Media Studies) or its equivalent
COMM 5261 - Political Economy of Media Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Organizational practices of media communicators. Media content as link between communicators and audiences. How viewers use/process media content. prereq: 3211 or instr consent
CSCL 5411 - Avant-Garde Cinema
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
In 1939, the art critic Clement Greenberg defined avant-garde art in opposition to the ?kitsch? of mass-produced culture. To what extent does this conception of the avant-garde apply to the cinema?an institution and art form that supposedly requires machines and industrial modes of production? This course introduces students to key works of avant-garde and experimental film made by artists working on the margins of commercial film and mainstream art institutions. From the first half of the twentieth century, we will consider influential films made under the banners of Futurism, Constructivism, Surrealism, and Dada, and discuss their complex relation to Hollywood commodities. In the postwar period, we will explore a range of increasingly global experimental film practices, from the queer underground cinema in Latin America to the use of film projection in avant-garde performance. We will examine these practices in light of larger debates about medium specificity as well as the aesthetics and politics of the personal vs. the structural. In the final unit, we will reflect on the way contemporary artists, scholars, and curators have assembled a tradition of avant-garde cinema in the age of new media, and contemplate new directions we want it to take.
ENGW 4205 - Screenwriting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngW 4205/EngW 5205
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introductory workshop to screenwriting basics, including formatting, style, and structure. In-class and take-home exercises will assist the students in learning techniques for developing engaging characters, writing concise description and vivid dialogue, and outlining a usable plot. prereq: EngL 3001W or 3001V or EngW 3102 or 3104 or 3106 or 3110, or jr or sr in SCMC major or minor
FREN 3451 - North African Cinema
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Cinemas of the Maghreb, the northern African nations of Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia. Themes may include North African cities/communities; gender, class and ethnicity; and impact of globalization in migratory patterns. Films. Readings in philosophy, history, sociology, anthropology, and cultural critique. prereq: 3101
GEOG 3374W - The City in Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3374W/3374V/5374W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cinematic portrayal of changes in 20th-century cities worldwide including social and cultural conflict, political and economic processes, changing gender relationships, rural versus urban areas, and population and development issues (especially as they affect women and children).
GER 3604W - Introduction to German Cinema (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
An introduction to the study of German cinema, with a focus on the relation between German film and German history, literature, culture, and politics.
GWSS 3307 - Feminist Film Studies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Construction of different notions of gender in film, social uses of these portrayals. Lectures on film criticism, film viewings, class discussions.
JOUR 3614 - History of Media Communication (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Glos 3605/Hist 3705/Jour 3614
Typically offered: Every Spring
In the history of humankind, there have been five major changes in how we communicate and we're in the middle of the latest revolution. This class helps you make sense of these uncharted waters by exploring how humanity adopted, and adapted to, past disruptions. From the alphabet to the internet and social media, learn how technological innovations in the media have changed not only how people share information and values but also what people have communicated throughout history. We will learn about these five phases in mediated communication over 5,000 years, and how they relate to major changes in politics, society and culture. And then we'll use history's lessons to peek into the future: When presidents tweet and everyone's foodie photos are on Instagram, how does the world communicate?
JOUR 3741 - Diversity and Media (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How are our perceptions of crime been influenced by the news? How do social movements use media to share their messages? What can we as audiences do? Social media, news and entertainment media help shape our ideas about identity and differences. Learn how representation and inclusion have been negotiated through media with a particular focus on local case studies. Topics include race, ethnicity, social class, physical ability, and gender. Students will learn how to use media literacy to build a just and equitable society.
JOUR 3745 - Media and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Popular culture is everywhere. Social media, film, music, video games, television, websites, and news bring popular culture into our daily lives. In this class, we will examine popular culture in modern and historical contexts through various mass communication, sociological, and cultural theories. Is popular culture of the people? or dictated by corporate interests? What social and commercial pressures result in stereotypes, misrepresentation and exclusion in popular culture? Does popular culture mirror or shape social reality? This course will provide you with the tools to become active and thoughtful consumers of media and popular culture.
PORT 3800 - Film Studies in Portuguese
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Films from Portuguese-speaking world in their historical, (geo)political, and socioeconomic contexts. Films from Brazil, Portugal, or Lusophone Africa analyzed under interdisciplinary framework, noting aspects related to cinematography/rhetoric. prereq: 3003 or instr consent or dept consent
SCAN 3617 - Scandinavian Gothic: Horror and the Uncanny in Nordic Literature and Media (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Scandinavia is popularly thought of as a bastion of social democracy, gender equality, and sleek modern design. Despite this well-earned reputation for political and aesthetic progressivism, there has also been a significant undercurrent of anti-rationalism and supernatural horror in Nordic culture. In Gothic fiction, the unwelcome appearance of primitive, irrational, and malevolent forces often takes the form of supernatural or monstrous figures?ghosts, vampires, witches, and trolls. As conventions established abroad mingled with a home-grown tradition of social realism, the Scandinavian Gothic became a vehicle for representing marginalized voices and revealing the shortcomings of Nordic societies. We will examine Gothic works of literature, film, television, popular music, and visual art. Through this examination, we will build an analytical vocabulary to formally analyze works of Gothic art in all of these media, and will practice that through in-class discussions as well as formal and informal writing.
SPAN 3800 - Film Studies in Spanish
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Films from Spain or Spanish-speaking world in their historical, (geo)political, and socioeconomic contexts. Films analyzed under interdisciplinary frameworks, noting aspects related to cinematography/rhetoric. prereq: Span 3104W or Span 3105W or Tldo 3104 or Tldo 3105 or Venz 3104 or Venz 3512 or Argn 3104W or Span 3104v or Span 3105v
AAS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3409W/GWSS 3409W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Diversity of cultures designated "Asian American." Understanding women's lives in historical, cultural, economic, and racial contexts.
GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3409W/GWSS 3409W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis of media, art, literature, performance, on artistic contributions. History, politics, culture of Asian American women. Interpret cultural production to better understand role of race, gender, nation within American society/citizenship.
ARTH 3655 - African-American Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3655/ArtH 3655/ArtH 5655
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
African American cinematic achievements from silent films of Oscar Micheaux through contemporary Hollywood and independent films. Class screenings, critical readings.
ARTH 5655 - African-American Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3655/ArtH 3655/ArtH 5655
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
African American cinematic achievements, from silent films of Oscar Micheaux through contemporary Hollywood and independent films. Class screenings, critical readings.
AMIN 3402 - American Indians and the Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3402/AmIn 5402
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Representations of American Indians in film, historically/contemporarily. What such representations assert about Native experience and cultural viability. What they reflect about particular relationships of power.
AMIN 5402 - American Indians and the Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3402/AmIn 5402
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Representations of American Indians in film, historically/contemporarily. What such representations assert about Native experience and cultural viability. What they reflect about particular relationships of power.
ARTS 3750 - Narrative Digital Filmmaking
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 3750/ArtS 5750
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Narrative forms of video. Documentary, live action, memoir, experimental forms. Digital video production and editing. Personal aesthetic and conceptual directions. Theory, critical readings about historical and contemporary works in video. prereq: [1704 or instr consent]
ARTS 5750 - Advanced Narrative Digital Filmmaking
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 3750/ArtS 5750
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Narrative forms of video. Documentary, live action, memoir, experimental forms. Digital video production and editing. Personal aesthetic and conceptual directions. Theory, critical readings about historical and contemporary works in video. prereq: 3750
ARTS 3760 - Experimental Film and Video
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 3760/ArtS 5760
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Experimental approaches in producing digital video within a contemporary art context. Using digital media technologies in installation, performance, and interactive video art. Emphasizes expanding personal artistic development. Theoretical issues, critical/historical readings/writings in media arts. prereq: ARTS 1704
ARTS 5760 - Experimental Film and Video
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 3760/ArtS 5760
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Experimental approaches in producing digital video within a contemporary art context. Using digital media technologies in installation, performance, and interactive video art. Emphasizes expanding personal artistic development. Theoretical issues, critical/historical readings/writings in media arts. prereq: ARTS major, ARTS 1704
CSCI 4921 - History of Computing (TS, HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 4921/HSci 4321
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Developments in last 150 years; evolution of hardware and software; growth of computer and semiconductor industries and their relation to other businesses; changing relationships resulting from new data-gathering and analysis techniques; automation; social and ethical issues.
HSCI 4321 - History of Computing (TS, HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 4921/HSci 4321
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Developments in the last 150 years; evolution of hardware and software; growth of computer and semiconductor industries and their relation to other business areas; changing relationships resulting from new data-gathering and analysis techniques; automation; social and ethical issues.
JOUR 3786 - Media and Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Jour 3786/Pol 3786
Typically offered: Every Fall
Do facts matter anymore? Is press freedom under threat? Are audiences trapped in filter bubbles? Why do people hate the media, and how can the news be improved to better serve citizens? Explore the historical and contemporary dynamics that shape the relationship between professionals in the media, the mass public, and political actors across different parts of government. Study major forms of mass media, including television and newspapers, alongside new forms such as digital and social media. Look at specific reporting rituals and practices, as well as issues involving media ownership, regulation, ethics, and press freedom. We will study politicians? efforts to craft messages, advertise strategically, and target select audiences for political gain. The course will focus primarily, but not exclusively, on the United States, and you will be asked to engage with current events and the role of communication technologies in political and civic life.
POL 3786 - Media and Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Jour 3786/Pol 3786
Typically offered: Every Fall
Do facts matter anymore? Is press freedom under threat? Are audiences trapped in filter bubbles? Why do people hate the media, and how can the news be improved to better serve citizens? Explore the historical and contemporary dynamics that shape the relationship between professionals in the media, the mass public, and political actors across different parts of government. Study major forms of mass media, including television and newspapers, alongside new forms such as digital and social media. Look at specific reporting rituals and practices, as well as issues involving media ownership, regulation, ethics, and press freedom. We will study politicians? efforts to craft messages, advertise strategically, and target select audiences for political gain. The course will focus primarily, but not exclusively, on the United States, and you will be asked to engage with current events and the role of communication technologies in political and civic life.
SCMC 3896 - Internship for Academic Credit
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
An applied learning experience in an agreed-upon, short-term, supervised workplace activity, with defined goals, which may be related to a student's major field or area of interest. The work can be full or part time, paid or unpaid, primarily in off-campus environments. Internships integrate classroom knowledge and theory with practical application and skill development in professional or community settings. The skills and knowledge learned should be transferable to other employment settings and not simply to advance the operations of the employer. Typically the student’s work is supervised and evaluated by a site coordinator or instructor.
SCMC 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual reading or study.
SCMC 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual reading or study.
SCMC 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual reading or study.
CSCL 3896 - Internship for Academic Credit
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
CSCL students who would like to pursue paid or unpaid internships can also earn credit toward their degree. This course includes a series of reflective assignments on the internship experience that help students develop their career goals, aspirations, and plans. CSCL students often find internships at media companies, advertising agencies, film festivals, arts institutions and galleries, publishing houses, non-profits, and community organizations. Typically a student?s work is supervised and evaluated by a site coordinator and the instructor works with a student on readings and assignments. Credits taken are determined by the number of weekly or total hours for onsite internship work, course readings, assignments, and meetings. The following are minimum hours and weekly averages based on a 16 week semester: 1 credit - 45-hour minimum (average 3-4 hours per week) 2 credit - 90-hour minimum (average 5-7 hours per week) 3 credit - 135-hour minimum (average 8-9 hours per week) 4 credit - 180-hour minimum (average 10-12 hours per week) There is also a deferred enrollment section of the course that allows students to take a summer internship followed by fall enrollment for credit. Students interested or registered in this section must contact the instructor at the start of their internship or during registration for more information. Students are also encouraged to apply for CLA Internship and Leadership Scholarships. For more information on this course or internship possibilities, please contact the Film Studies Coordinator (stou0046@umn.edu). Students can also use Goldpass to search for internship possibilities.
CSCL 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
CSCL 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual study.
CSCL 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 5993/CSDS 5993
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
SCMC 3910 - Topics in Studies in Cinema and Media Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ENGL 3040 - Studies in Film
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3040/EngL 3040H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics regarding film in variety of interpretive contexts, from range/historic development of American, English, Anglophone film.
FRIT 3850 - Topics in French and Italian Cinema
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Theme, problem, period, filmmaker, or topic of interest in French/Italian cinema. See Class Schedule. Taught in English. prereq: Knowledge of [French or Italian] helpful but not required
GER 5630 - Topics in German Cinema
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics chosen may focus on specific directors, genres, film production or reception, and/or other formal, theoretical, historical, or political issues. prereq: 3xxx film course or instr consent
PORT 3800 - Film Studies in Portuguese
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Films from Portuguese-speaking world in their historical, (geo)political, and socioeconomic contexts. Films from Brazil, Portugal, or Lusophone Africa analyzed under interdisciplinary framework, noting aspects related to cinematography/rhetoric. prereq: 3003 or instr consent or dept consent
SPAN 3800 - Film Studies in Spanish
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Films from Spain or Spanish-speaking world in their historical, (geo)political, and socioeconomic contexts. Films analyzed under interdisciplinary frameworks, noting aspects related to cinematography/rhetoric. prereq: Span 3104W or Span 3105W or Tldo 3104 or Tldo 3105 or Venz 3104 or Venz 3512 or Argn 3104W or Span 3104v or Span 3105v