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Twin Cities Campus

Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences Minor

Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2023
  • Required credits in this minor: 14
The minor's curriculum examines the physical, biological, and behavioral foundations of human communication. Courses focus on the study of variation in speech, language, and hearing processes, and apply that knowledge to identifying, preventing, and managing disordered speech, language, and hearing.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Students may earn a BA or a minor in speech-language-hearing sciences, but not both.
Electives
Students may need instructor permission to take 5xxx courses.
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
· SLHS 3302 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanisms (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 3303 - Language Acquisition and Science (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 3304 - Phonetics (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 3305W - Speech Science [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 3306 - The Sense of Hearing (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 3401 - Introduction to Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 4301 - Introduction to the Neuroscience of Human Communication (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 4402 - Clinical Methods in Speech-Language Pathology (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 4801 - Clinical methods in assessing auditory function and disorders (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 4802 - Clinical Methods for Treating Hearing Disorders (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5401 - Counseling and Professional Issues (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5502 - Voice and Cleft Palate (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5503 - Stuttering Motor Speech Disorders (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5504 - Evaluation and Management of Dysphagia (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5602 - Speech Sound Disorders: Assessment and Treatment across Languages (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5603 - Assessment and Intervention of Language Disorders in Children (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5605 - Language and Cognitive Disorders in Adults (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5606 - Introduction to Augmentative and Alternative Communication (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5609 - Child Language Disorders in Diverse Populations (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5801 - Advanced Audiologic Assessment (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5802 - Hearing Aids I (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5803 - Pediatric Audiology (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5804 - Cochlear Implants (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5805 - Advanced Rehabilitative Audiology (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5806 - Auditory Disorders in Children (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5807 - Noise and Hearing Conservation (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5808 - Pathophysiology of Hearing Disorders (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 5810 - Laboratory Module in Audiology (1.0-2.0 cr)
· SLHS 5820 - Clinical Research and Practice: Grand Rounds (1.0-6.0 cr)
· SLHS 5830 - Clinical Foundations in Audiology (1.0-8.0 cr)
· SLHS 5900 - Topics in SLHS (2.0 cr)
· Directed Research or Study
Take at most 3 credit(s) from the following:
· SLHS 3994 - Directed Research (1.0-12.0 cr)
· SLHS 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-12.0 cr)
 
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· Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences Minor
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SLHS 3302 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanisms
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of anatomy and physiology of the auditory and speech production systems, including the nervous, respiratory, laryngeal, velopharyngeal and orofacial subsystems. Emphasis on normal processes and functions.
SLHS 3303 - Language Acquisition and Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of typical language development, major theoretical perspectives about development, and analyses of children's language.
SLHS 3304 - Phonetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is a click sound? Why is it that people who learned to speak English in New York City are more likely to produce the words Mary, merry, and marry differently than people who learned English in Minneapolis? Why does the name 'Beto' produced by a native speaker of English sound so much like the word 'pero' produced by a native speaker of Spanish? How is English-accented Japanese different from Japanese produced by a native speaker? How does one write the sounds of speech using the international phonetic alphabet? Phonetics is the science of speech production. In this course in phonetics, you will develop skills in phonetic transcription, and you will apply those new skills to understanding differences across languages, speech development, dialects, and individual speech styles. By the end of the course, you will be a skilled phonetic transcriber, and you will have used those skills to understand aspects of speech that can't be understood without a knowledge of phonetics. Your new knowledge of the sound structure of human languages will make you a more flexible listener when you encounter new languages, or new varieties of languages you already know. The skills in this course will be taught with a variety of in-person and on-line tools, including lectures, small group work, on-line self-paced modules, and interactive transcription practice.
SLHS 3305W - Speech Science (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Because speech is the acoustic representation of language, we will examine the time varying acoustic signal ?speech production - and the reception, separation and decoding of this signal into language? speech perception. For this class you will be presented with: (a) the basic principles of acoustics; (2) the physiology that produces the acoustic features that comprise speech; (3) basic theories of speech-motor control; (4) basic principles of speech perception; and (5) overview of current theories of speech perception, especially as they pertain to development of language in the first year of life.
SLHS 3306 - The Sense of Hearing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Have you ever wondered how the sense of hearing works? This course will give you a deep look at the science behind the sense of hearing. You will learn about how sound is created, and transmitted from the air to our ears. Once sound enters our ears, it makes an impressive journey through many stations along the auditory pathway... all the way up to our brains. In addition to the physiological process of sound transmission through the auditory system, this course also covers psychoacoustics measures that provide non-invasive techniques and methods to evaluate the transmission of sound through the auditory system. prereq: [3302, 3305W] or instr consent
SLHS 3401 - Introduction to Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: SLHS 1401/SLHS 3401
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In this course, students will be provided an introduction to the diverse field of speech-language pathology and audiology. Case studies, documentaries, and patient testimonials will be used to orient students to the clinical significance of impairments that contribute to deficits in cognition, communication, and deglutition. Students will gain an understanding of associated assessments and interventions to mitigate these deficits from experts practicing in the field. Lastly, students will be introduced to career paths in speech language pathology and audiology, as well as their associated practice setting and remuneration specifications.
SLHS 4301 - Introduction to the Neuroscience of Human Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, especially as they relate to normal speech, language, and hearing processes.
SLHS 4402 - Clinical Methods in Speech-Language Pathology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course illustrates assessment and treatment methods in speech-language pathology. Students will gain a solid foundation for clinical practice with clients across the lifespan and across a range of communication impairments. The course is designed to prepare advanced undergraduate majors in SLHS and entry-level graduate students for entry into clinical settings in speech-language pathology. prereq: [1401 OR 3401, 3302, 3303, 3304, 4301 (either before registration for 4402 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4402)], or grad student, or instr consent
SLHS 4801 - Clinical methods in assessing auditory function and disorders
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Have you ever wondered why some people have normal hearing and others do not? This course will cover different methods (i.e. visual, behavioral, and physiological measures) that are used to assess auditory function in the outer, middle, inner ear, and beyond. Students will gain a solid introductory foundation on clinical methods that are used and how information gained from different assessment methods are combined to assess overall auditory function. In additional, students will also learn about genetic and non-genetic disorders that impact auditory function. prereq: [3302, 3305W] or instr consent
SLHS 4802 - Clinical Methods for Treating Hearing Disorders
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ever wondered how hearing loss is treated? This course will present an introductory foundation on treatment options for individuals with different types of hearing loss. The three Ts of rehabilitating hearing loss are covered. The first T includes how diagnostic visual, behavioral, and physiological tests results are interpreted and used in the design of treatment plans for individuals with hearing loss. The second T will cover technology that is used to treat hearing loss. This section will provide details on how hearing aids, cochlear implants, and other implantable hearing devices work and how clinical decisions are made with regards to who gets a hearing aid vs. a cochlear implant. Hearing assistive technology and wireless devices such as FM, loop and infrared systems will all be covered. The third T will cover treatment options for adults and children with hearing loss. This section will provide details on informational and personal-adjustment counseling, non-technology treatment options, and person-centered and family-centered intervention and training plans for adults as well as children with hearing loss.
SLHS 5401 - Counseling and Professional Issues
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic counseling principles and current professional issues related to practice in a dynamic multicultural environment. Application of counseling theory to clinical practice. Analysis of regulation, practice, and future direction of communication disorders. prereq: [[concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8720 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8820], grad student] recommended
SLHS 5502 - Voice and Cleft Palate
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Disordered voice and resonance. Presentation and discussion of the nature of etiologies, assessment and management of organic/functional voice disorders and cleft palate to meet clinical competencies for speech-language pathology. prereq: [3305, 4301] or [CDis 3305, CDis 4301] or instr consent
SLHS 5503 - Stuttering Motor Speech Disorders
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
SLHS 5503 is designed for graduate students who wish to increase their understanding of stuttering and motor speech disorders. Its goal is to provide students with a strong foundation on the basics of the physiology, diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of these communication disorders and to provide working knowledge of current trends in related fields. prereq: graduate SLHS student or department permission, [3305, 4301] or instr consent
SLHS 5504 - Evaluation and Management of Dysphagia
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Normal/disordered aspects of swallowing. Nature, etiologies, evaluation, management of swallowing disorders.
SLHS 5602 - Speech Sound Disorders: Assessment and Treatment across Languages
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature, assessment, and treatment of speech sound disorders in children. Assessment and treatment of phonological awareness and pre-literacy skills. This course covers cross-linguistic issues in speech sound disorders, including characteristics of speech sound disorders in a variety of languages, and the differential diagnosis of speech sound disorder from the effects of normal second-language acquisition. Emphasis on functional speech sound disorders, with some coverage given to disorders of a clear organic origin, like cerebral palsy, hearing impairment, and cleft palate. prereq: [3303, 3304, 4601] or instr consent
SLHS 5603 - Assessment and Intervention of Language Disorders in Children
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Assessment and intervention techniques approaches for treating language impairment in children with disabilities, such as specific language impairment, developmental delays, and autism spectrum disorder. prereq: 3303 or CDis 3303 or equiv or grad student or instr consent
SLHS 5605 - Language and Cognitive Disorders in Adults
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Acquired cognitive and communicative disorders in the adult population specifically including: stroke/aphasia, right hemisphere dysfunction, traumatic brain injury, and dementia. Consideration of neurological substrates, disorder symptomology, assessment, clinical intervention, and functional impact across the lifespan and amongst diverse populations. prereq: [3302, 4301] or [CDis 3302, CDis 4301] or instr consent
SLHS 5606 - Introduction to Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Description of the range of augmentative and alternative communication applications for persons with developmental and acquired disabilities. Topics include assessment, intervention strategies, progress monitoring, generalization, and maintenance; collateral behavior resulting from AAC applications.
SLHS 5609 - Child Language Disorders in Diverse Populations
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course covers topics across three broad areas of child language: cultural and linguistic diversity, early intervention, and social communication. The first section will address multicultural issues and bilingualism. The second section will focus on assessment and treatment of language disorders from birth through preschool. Finally, we will address the assessment and treatment of social communication and pragmatic language deficits across disorders and developmental levels, including early prelinguistic communication The course will include both theoretically and clinically motivated content.
SLHS 5801 - Advanced Audiologic Assessment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic audiometric battery, including pure tone thresholds, measures of speech understanding, masking and immittance in adults. Topics include video ostoscopy, ototoxicity, functional hearing loss, and identification of middle-ear fluid. Students enrolled in this course concurrently enroll in SLHS 5810. prereq: 4801 or CDis 4801 or instr consent
SLHS 5802 - Hearing Aids I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of modern hearing aids including history of development, electroacoustic functions, clinic and laboratory measurement techniques, sound field acoustics, techniques for selection. prereq: [[3305, 4801] or [CDIS 3305, CDIS 4801], SLHS grad] or instr consent
SLHS 5803 - Pediatric Audiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Behavioral, physiological approaches to assessment and identification, development of the auditory mechanism, etiologies of hearing losses in infants, children, principles of case management with children and families. prereq: [[4801 or CDIS 4801], SLHS grad] or instr consent
SLHS 5804 - Cochlear Implants
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Implantable auditory prostheses. History of device development, including cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants. Signal processing. Techniques for selection, fitting, and rehabilitation. Behavioral/physiological changes across life span. prereq: [[4802, 5801, 5802] or [CDIS 4802, CDIS 5801, CDIS 5802], SLHS grad] or instr consent
SLHS 5805 - Advanced Rehabilitative Audiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Analysis of speech perception/production. Communication skills/strategies. Sensory modalities. Rehabilitative techniques in adults, children, and infants with hearing losses. Tinnitus management. Audiology telepractice.
SLHS 5806 - Auditory Disorders in Children
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course students learn about assessing hearing and listening difficulties in children ?beyond the audiogram?, as well as the pediatric-specific considerations for intervention and management of identified hearing difficulties. This course covers the anatomy and physiology of the central auditory pathway, assessments to evaluate auditory disorders and processing skills, and techniques to address auditory processing weaknesses and disorders in children. Additional topics include normal and disordered auditory processing abilities, current and historical theories and controversies surrounding auditory assessment beyond the audiogram, and advances in the assessment and management of childhood hearing disorders. prereq: [4802 or CDIS 4802, SLHS grad] or instr consent
SLHS 5807 - Noise and Hearing Conservation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students in this course will learn to: Describe the auditory and nonauditory effects of noise on humans, Design a successful hearing conservation program, Measure noise levels in a variety of settings, Monitor hearing, Measure hearing protection devices, Develop educational materials, and Describe federal and state regulations as they relate to hearing conservation. prereq: [8801, 8802] or [CDis 8801, CDis 8802]
SLHS 5808 - Pathophysiology of Hearing Disorders
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Disorders of auditory system, including anatomical, physiological, perceptual, and audiological manifestations of pathologies affecting hearing. Focus will be on understanding current data on physiology, pharmacology, and novel treatment alternatives prereq: [[8801, 8802] or [CDIS 8801, CDIS 8802], SLHS grad] or instr consent
SLHS 5810 - Laboratory Module in Audiology
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 10.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive study of clinical methods in audiology. Supplements didactic courses in audiology curriculum. Laboratory study, individually or in small groups. Students enroll in this course concurrently with SLHS 5801, 5802, 8801, 8802. prereq: [4801 or CDIS 4801, SLHS grad] or instr consent
SLHS 5820 - Clinical Research and Practice: Grand Rounds
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Group discussions of current professional issues in audiology. Case presentations, guest presentations on current technology, clinical/research ethics. Group meets for an hour weekly with faculty coordinator who leads discussion. Integrates academic/clinical education. prereq: [[4801 or CDIS 4801 or equiv], SLHS grad] or instr consent
SLHS 5830 - Clinical Foundations in Audiology
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 24.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Clinical foundations in audiology for first year AuD graduate students. prereq: Grad SLHS major
SLHS 5900 - Topics in SLHS
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics listed in Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences office. prereq: SLHS grad student or instr consent
SLHS 3994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -12.0 [max 24.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
tbd prereq: Undergrad doing research
SLHS 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -12.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed readings and preparation of reports on selected topics. prereq: SLHS grad or instr consent Students enrolling in this directed study/research course will complete the University's common Directed Study/Research contract with the faculty mentor/evaluator. The Faculty member will ensure academic standards are upheld, including: *the work proposed is at the appropriate level for the course, academic in nature, and the student will be involved intellectually in the project. *the project scope is reasonable for one semester and the number of credits specified (42 hours of work per credit) *the faculty mentor is qualified to serve in this role *assessment of student learning and grading criteria are clear and appropriate *the student will be working in a respectful, inclusive environment