Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Anthropology Ph.D.

Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Department of Anthropology, 395 Hubert H. Humphrey Center, 301 19th Ave S, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-625-3400; fax: 612-625-3095)
  • Program Type: Doctorate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Length of program in credits: 60
  • This program requires summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Doctor of Philosophy
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The Department of Anthropology offers graduate education in sociocultural and linguistic anthropology, archaeology, and biological anthropology. The program admits students only for the PhD, although some students do earn a master's degree as part of their PhD program. Major areas of faculty research and graduate student training in sociocultural and linguistic anthropology include art and visual culture, critical theory, queer theory, feminist theory, critical disability studies, environment, ecology, and the Anthropocene, cultures of capitalism, language and modernity, colonialism and imperialism, experimental writing, gender, race, and sexuality, medical anthropology, memory and haunting, religion, multi-species ethnography, new materialisms, legal and political anthropology, economic anthropology, anthropology of race and racism, philosophical anthropology, science and technology studies, sovereignty and the state, and temporality and futurity. Regional specializations include Europe, the Pacific, the Middle East, North America, the Caribbean, and East Asia. The program in archaeology applies social and ecological theories to produce new anthropological insights into the roles of material culture and the environment in indigenous, prehistoric, and historical contexts. Our archaeologists apply a range of scientific methods in the field and the laboratory to understand human-environmental interactions in the past, and to advance knowledge of landscape use and site formation processes. Regional specializations include Europe, Asia, Latin America, and North America. The program in biological anthropology offers training and research opportunities in two main areas: paleoanthropology and molecular anthropology. The paleoanthropology speciality combines biological anthropology, vertebrate paleobiology, and Paleolithic archaeology to interpret the evolution and behavior of hominins and other primates through the application of evolutionary theory to the analysis of skeletal morphology, faunal remains, community analysis, and site taphonomy. The molecular anthropology speciality studies the population history of humans by using ancient DNA and modern genomic methods to investigate processes such as migration, admixture, and adaptation, as well as historic trends in disease and health. Students also benefit from training and expertise in primate behavior and ecology, stable isotope paleoecology, phylogeography, geochronology, and phylogenetic methods through close collaborations and co-advising with faculty in other departments.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.30.
A bachelor of arts degree or equivalent is required for admission.
Special Application Requirements:
Visit https://cla.umn.edu/anthropology/graduate/how-apply for special application requirements for the Anthropology Ph.D. program.
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 79
    • Internet Based - Writing Score: 21
    • Internet Based - Reading Score: 19
    • Paper Based - Total Score: 600
  • IELTS
    • Total Score: 6.5
Key to test abbreviations (TOEFL, IELTS).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
24 credits are required in the major.
12 credits are required outside the major.
24 thesis credits are required.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses toward program requirements is permitted under certain conditions with adviser approval.
A minimum GPA of 3.00 is required for students to remain in good standing.
At least 2 semesters must be completed before filing a Degree Program Form.
Coursework offered on both the A-F and S/N grade basis must be taken A-F, with a minimum grade of B earned for each course. Language requirements depend upon student's special area of research.
Outside Coursework (12 credits)
Select 12 credits in consultation with the advisor. Course options are not limited to this list. Other courses can be applied to this requirement with approval by the advisor and director of graduate studies.
AFRO 5101 - Seminar: Introduction to Africa and the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
AFRO 5191 - Seminar: The African American Experience in South Africa (3.0 cr)
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race (3.0 cr)
AFRO 8910 - Topics in Studies of Africa and the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
AMES 8920 - Topics in Asian culture (1.0-3.0 cr)
AMIN 5409 - American Indian Women: Ethnographic and Ethnohistorical Perspectives [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5920 - Topics in American Indian Studies (3.0 cr)
AMIN 8301 - Critical Indigenous Theory (3.0 cr)
AMIN 8910 - Topics in American Indian and Indigenous Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
AMST 8289 - Ethnographic Research Methods: Research Strategies in American Studies (3.0 cr)
AMST 8920 - Topics in American Studies (3.0 cr)
ANAT 5095 - Advanced Problems in Anatomy (1.0-6.0 cr)
ANAT 5150 - Human Gross Anatomy (5.0 cr)
ARCH 5671 - Historic Preservation (3.0 cr)
ARCH 5673 - Historic Property Research and Documentation (3.0 cr)
ARTH 8320 - Seminar: Issues in Early Modern Visual Culture (3.0 cr)
ARTS 5760 - Experimental Film and Video (4.0 cr)
AST 8011 - High Energy Astrophysics (4.0 cr)
BTHX 5210 - Ethics of Human Subjects Research (3.0 cr)
BTHX 8120 - Dying in Contemporary Medical Culture (2.0 cr)
BTHX 8510 - Gender and the Politics of Health (3.0 cr)
BTHX 8610 - Medical Consumerism (3.0 cr)
CGSC 8041 - Cognitive Neuroscience (4.0 cr)
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
CHIC 5920 - Topics in Chicana(o) Studies (3.0 cr)
CI 8416 - Speculative Fiction, Radical Imagination, and Social Change (3.0 cr)
CI 8645 - Indigenous Language Revitalization and Activist Research Methods (3.0 cr)
CNRC 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
COMM 5211 - Critical Media Studies: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
COMM 8110 - Seminar: Communication Research Methods (3.0 cr)
COMM 8210 - Seminar: Selected Topics in U.S. Electronic Media (3.0 cr)
CSCL 8910 - Advanced Topics in Comparative Literature (3.0-4.0 cr)
CVM 6908 - Anatomy II (3.0 cr)
EEB 5371 - Principles of Systematics (3.0 cr)
EEB 5407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
EEB 8201 - Graduate Foundations in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Semester 1 (4.0 cr)
EEB 8202 - Graduate Foundations in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior - Semester 2 (4.0 cr)
EEB 8990 - Graduate Seminar (1.0-3.0 cr)
EEB 8991 - Independent Study: Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior (1.0-10.0 cr)
EMS 8250 - Seminar in Early Modern Studies (3.0 cr)
ENGL 5300 - Readings in American Minority Literature (3.0 cr)
ENGL 8400 - Seminar in Post-Colonial Literature, Culture, and Theory (3.0 cr)
ENGL 8520 - Seminar: Cultural Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis (3.0 cr)
ESCI 5302 - Isotope Geology (3.0 cr)
ESPM 5031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems (3.0 cr)
FNRM 5104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
FNRM 5262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
FNRM 5462 - Advanced Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis (3.0 cr)
FREN 8240 - Critical Issues: French and Francophone Cinema (3.0 cr)
GEOG 5511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
GEOG 8001 - Problems in Geographic Thought (3.0 cr)
GEOG 8230 - Theoretical Geography (3.0 cr)
GEOG 8260 - Seminar: Physical Geography (2.0 cr)
GEOG 8980 - Topics: Geography (1.0-3.0 cr)
GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I (3.0 cr)
GIS 5576 - Spatial Digital Humanities (3.0 cr)
GIS 5577 - Spatial Database Design and Administration (3.0 cr)
GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education (3.0 cr)
GRAD 8200 - Teaching and Learning Topics in Higher Education (1.0 cr)
GSD 8001 - Approaches to Textual Analysis (3.0 cr)
GWSS 5104 - Transnational Feminist Theory (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8109 - Feminist Knowledge Production (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8201 - Feminist Theory and Methods in the Social Sciences (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8220 - Seminar: Science, Technology & Environmental Justice (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8250 - Seminar: Nation, State, and Citizenship (1.0-3.0 cr)
GWSS 8260 - Seminar: Race, Representation and Resistance (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8490 - Seminar: Transnational, Postcolonial, Diaspora (3.0 cr)
HIST 5547 - Empire and Nations in the Middle East (3.0 cr)
HIST 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History (3.0 cr)
HIST 5910 - Topics in U.S. History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8015 - Scope and Methods of Historical Studies (3.0 cr)
HIST 8032 - Archives (3.0 cr)
HIST 8122 - Public Histories (3.0 cr)
HIST 8910 - Topics in U.S. History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8920 - Topics in African History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8950 - Topics in Latin American History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8960 - Topics in History (1.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 8970 - Advanced Research in Quantitative History (3.0 cr)
HMED 8002 - Foundations in the History of Modern Medicine, 1800-present (3.0 cr)
HMED 8113 - Research Methods in the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine (3.0 cr)
HSCI 8950 - Seminar: Science and Technology in Cultural Settings (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8001 - Who Owns the Past? Common Concerns and Big Questions in Heritage and Public History (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8002 - Core Practices in Heritage Studies and Public History (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8003 - Race and Indigeneity in Heritage Representation (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8004 - Capstone in Heritage Studies and Public History (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8005 - Leadership and Future of Historical Organizations (1.0 cr)
HSPH 8006 - Digital Methods for Heritage Studies & Public History (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8007 - Archives (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8010 - Topics in Heritage Studies and Public History (1.0-3.0 cr)
HSPH 8101 - Internship (3.0 cr)
HSPH 8992 - Directed Readings in HSPH (1.0-3.0 cr)
LAW 6063 - Law and Neuroscience (2.0 cr)
MST 5011 - Museum History and Philosophy (3.0 cr)
OBIO 8012 - Basic Concepts in Skeletal Biology (2.0 cr)
PA 5690 - Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy (0.5-3.0 cr)
PA 8690 - Advanced Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy (1.0-3.0 cr)
PHIL 8602 - Scientific Representation and Explanation (3.0 cr)
POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6045 - Skills for Policy Development (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6450 - Biostatistics I (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7475 - Statistical Learning and Data Mining (3.0 cr)
SOC 8090 - Topics in Sociology (1.5-3.0 cr)
SOC 8551 - Life Course Inequality & Health (3.0 cr)
SOC 8607 - Migration & Migrants in Demographic Perspective (3.0 cr)
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
TH 8120 - Seminar (3.0 cr)
SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance (3.0 cr)
SOC 8211 - The Sociology of Race & Racialization (3.0 cr)
Thesis Credits
Take 24 doctoral thesis credits.
ANTH 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral (1.0-24.0 cr)
Concentration Areas
Sociocultural Anthropology (24 credits)
Students must take at least one 8-level seminar in Anthropology both fall and spring semester the first year of study.
Required Core Courses (9 credits)
Take the following courses:
ANTH 8001 - Ethnography, Theory, History (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
Major Elective Courses (15 credits)
Select at least 15 credits from the following in consultation with the advisor. Other courses can be applied to this requirement with approval by the advisor and director of graduate studies.
ANTH 5008 - Advanced Flintknapping (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5009 - Human Behavioral Biology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5028 - Historical Archaeology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5113 - Primate Evolution (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5121 - Business Anthropology (2.0 cr)
ANTH 5128 - Anthropology of Education (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5269 - Analysis of Stone Tool Technology (4.0 cr)
ANTH 5327W -  Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5403 - Quantitative Methods in Biological Anthropology (4.0 cr)
ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis (4.0 cr)
ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5448 - Applied Heritage Management (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5450 - Spatial Analysis in Anthropology: Research Design and Field Applications (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5501 - Managing Museum Collections (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5980 - Topics in Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8004 - Foundations of Anthropological Archaeology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8005 - Linguistic Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8111 - Evolutionary Morphology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8113 - Primate Evolution (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8114 - Biological Anthropology Graduate Program Seminar: Behavioral Ecology of Primates (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8120 - Problems in Culture Change and Applied Anthropology (3.0-6.0 cr)
ANTH 8201 - Humans and Nonhumans: Hybrids and Collectives (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8205 - Economic Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8207 - Political and Social Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8213 - Ecological Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8215 - Anthropology of Gender (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8219 - Grant Writing (2.0 cr)
ANTH 8220 - Field School (6.0 cr)
ANTH 8223 - Anthropology of Place & Space (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8230 - Anthropological Research Design (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8510 - Topics in Archaeology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8980 - Anthropology Graduate Workshop (1.0 cr)
ANTH 8990 - Topics in Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8991 - Independent Study (1.0-18.0 cr)
ANTH 8992 - Directed Reading (1.0-18.0 cr)
ANTH 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-18.0 cr)
ANTH 8994 - Directed Research (1.0-18.0 cr)
-OR-
Biological Anthropology (24 credits)
Students must take at least one 8-level seminar in Anthropology both fall and spring semester the first year of study.
Required Core Courses (9 credits)
Take the following courses:
ANTH 8111 - Evolutionary Morphology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8114 - Biological Anthropology Graduate Program Seminar: Behavioral Ecology of Primates (3.0 cr)
Major Elective Courses (15 credits)
Select at least 15 credits from the following in consultation with the advisor. Other courses can be applied to this requirement with approval by the advisor and director of graduate studies.
ANTH 5008 - Advanced Flintknapping (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5009 - Human Behavioral Biology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5028 - Historical Archaeology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5113 - Primate Evolution (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5121 - Business Anthropology (2.0 cr)
ANTH 5128 - Anthropology of Education (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5269 - Analysis of Stone Tool Technology (4.0 cr)
ANTH 5327W -  Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5403 - Quantitative Methods in Biological Anthropology (4.0 cr)
ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis (4.0 cr)
ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5448 - Applied Heritage Management (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5450 - Spatial Analysis in Anthropology: Research Design and Field Applications (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5501 - Managing Museum Collections (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5980 - Topics in Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8001 - Ethnography, Theory, History (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8004 - Foundations of Anthropological Archaeology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8005 - Linguistic Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8113 - Primate Evolution (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8120 - Problems in Culture Change and Applied Anthropology (3.0-6.0 cr)
ANTH 8201 - Humans and Nonhumans: Hybrids and Collectives (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8205 - Economic Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8207 - Political and Social Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8213 - Ecological Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8215 - Anthropology of Gender (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8219 - Grant Writing (2.0 cr)
ANTH 8220 - Field School (6.0 cr)
ANTH 8223 - Anthropology of Place & Space (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8230 - Anthropological Research Design (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8510 - Topics in Archaeology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8980 - Anthropology Graduate Workshop (1.0 cr)
ANTH 8990 - Topics in Anthropology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8991 - Independent Study (1.0-18.0 cr)
ANTH 8992 - Directed Reading (1.0-18.0 cr)
ANTH 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-18.0 cr)
ANTH 8994 - Directed Research (1.0-18.0 cr)
-OR-
Archaeology (24 credits)
Students must take at least one 8-level seminar in Anthropology both fall and spring semester the first year of study.
Required Core Courses (9 credits)
Take the following courses:
ANTH 8004 - Foundations of Anthropological Archaeology (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8230 - Anthropological Research Design (3.0 cr)
Methods Course (3 credits)
Select at least 3 credits from the following in consultation with the advisor. Additional courses taken from this list can be applied towards the Major Electives requirement.
ANTH 4101 - Decolonizing Archives (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5269 - Analysis of Stone Tool Technology (4.0 cr)
ANTH 5402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory (3.0 cr)
ANTH 5403 - Quantitative Methods in Biological Anthropology (4.0 cr)
ANTH 5450 - Spatial Analysis in Anthropology: Research Design and Field Applications (3.0 cr)
Archaeology Major Electives Courses (12 credits)
Select at least 12 credits from the following in consultation with the advisor. Other courses can be applied to this requirement with approval by the advisor and director of graduate studies.
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 5008 - Advanced Flintknapping (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5009 - Human Behavioral Biology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5028 - Historical Archaeology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5113 - Primate Evolution (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5121 - Business Anthropology (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 5128 - Anthropology of Education (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5269 - Analysis of Stone Tool Technology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 5327W -  Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5403 - Quantitative Methods in Biological Anthropology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5448 - Applied Heritage Management (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5450 - Spatial Analysis in Anthropology: Research Design and Field Applications (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5501 - Managing Museum Collections (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5980 - Topics in Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8001 - Ethnography, Theory, History (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8005 - Linguistic Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8111 - Evolutionary Morphology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8113 - Primate Evolution (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8114 - Biological Anthropology Graduate Program Seminar: Behavioral Ecology of Primates (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8120 - Problems in Culture Change and Applied Anthropology (3.0-6.0 cr)
· ANTH 8201 - Humans and Nonhumans: Hybrids and Collectives (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8205 - Economic Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8207 - Political and Social Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8213 - Ecological Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8215 - Anthropology of Gender (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8219 - Grant Writing (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 8220 - Field School (6.0 cr)
· ANTH 8223 - Anthropology of Place & Space (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8510 - Topics in Archaeology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8980 - Anthropology Graduate Workshop (1.0 cr)
· ANTH 8990 - Topics in Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 8991 - Independent Study (1.0-18.0 cr)
· ANTH 8992 - Directed Reading (1.0-18.0 cr)
· ANTH 8993 - Directed Study (1.0-18.0 cr)
· ANTH 8994 - Directed Research (1.0-18.0 cr)
 
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AFRO 5101 - Seminar: Introduction to Africa and the African Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative frameworks, related theories, and pivotal texts in study of Africa and African Diaspora.
AFRO 5191 - Seminar: The African American Experience in South Africa
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5191/Hist 5438
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Ideological, political, religious, and cultural ties that have informed African American and black South African relations from late 18th century to present.
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/Afro 5866/Hist 3856
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The "second reconstruction." Failure of Reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Post-1945 assault on white supremacy via courts/state, grass-roots southern movement in 1950s/1960s. Black struggle in north and west, emphasis on Black Power by new organizations/ideologies/leaders. Ascendancy of Reagan, conservative assault on movement.
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
At its heart, the 8202 seminar is about dialogue, interrogating scholarship on race, intellectual history, and knowledge production. We will be in deep conversation with one another as we negotiate meaning around the intellectual history of race. Dialogue, indeed, is at the heart of this graduate seminar experience. Given the multidisciplinary composition of the students and content in 8202, we build together to form a learning whole in a remote format. Central to our work is excavating the 500 year legacy of race thought and making into the contemporary period.
AFRO 8910 - Topics in Studies of Africa and the African Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AMES 8920 - Topics in Asian culture
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AMIN 5409 - American Indian Women: Ethnographic and Ethnohistorical Perspectives (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3409/AmIn 5409
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Comparative survey of ethnographic/ethnohistorical writings by/about American Indian women.
AMIN 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5890/Hist 5890
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will read recently published scholarship in American Indian and Indigenous history that takes up pressing research questions, promises to push inquiry in new directions, and that theorizes important interventions in our thinking to understand where the field is situated and moving. Reflecting the instinctively interdisciplinary nature of American Indian and Indigenous history, readings will be drawn not just from the discipline of history but across other disciplines such as Anthropology, American Studies, Geography, Literature, Political Science, and Legal Studies. As well, readings will include scholarship that reaches out to embrace the Global Indigenous studies turn. prereq: Advanced undergrad with instr consent or grad student
AMIN 5920 - Topics in American Indian Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Various topics in American Indian studies, depending upon instructor/semester.
AMIN 8301 - Critical Indigenous Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course covers the "critical turn" in American Indian and Native or Indigenous Studies as evident in the emergence of three overlapping threads or intellectual/political genealogies: critiques of Indigeneity (the claims and conditions of nativeness to specific places), Indigenous Feminist (which foregrounds the salience of gender in indigenous critiques of power structures), and Indigenous Queer, sometimes labeled "Two-Spirit" (which foregrounds sexuality). What are the analytical, political and cultural backgrounds and what are their purchases for theory, critique, and practice? For interrogating academic and non-academic (including Indigenous) forms of inquiry and knowledge production and being in the world?
AMIN 8910 - Topics in American Indian and Indigenous Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This is a topics shell
AMST 8289 - Ethnographic Research Methods: Research Strategies in American Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Students conduct an empirical research project, write a final paper. Assumptions/practices of positivism, reflexive science, and feminist methodology. Issues surrounding politics/ethics of feminist research. Dilemmas in practice of fieldwork, oral histories, reading, and writing. prereq: 8288 or instr consent
AMST 8920 - Topics in American Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANAT 5095 - Advanced Problems in Anatomy
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Exceptional projects that do not easily fit within confines of other ANAT offerings. Examples include but not limited to individual teaching or research projects. prereq: one or more ANAT classes, instr consent
ANAT 5150 - Human Gross Anatomy
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Human cadaveric dissection based on traditional preparation, lab dissection, review sections, radiographic analysis, clinical correlations. Taught by regions. Extremities, torso, head/neck. Assessment by mid-semester/final written/practical examinations. prereq: instr consent, For Medical Students, or Graduate students enrolled in an appropriate graduate program as determined by instructor.
ARCH 5671 - Historic Preservation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Philosophy, theory, origins of historic preservation. Historic archaeology/research, descriptive analysis, documentation of historic buildings. Government's role in historic preservation, preservation standards/guidelines, preservation/building codes, preservation advocacy.
ARCH 5673 - Historic Property Research and Documentation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Philosophy, theory, methods of historic building research. Descriptive analysis of buildings, building documentation, historical archaeology, architectural taxonomy. prereq: [3412, 3641, 4671, 5671, 4672 or 5672] or instr consent
ARTH 8320 - Seminar: Issues in Early Modern Visual Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Issues in visual culture of Europe and the Americas, 1500-1750. Topics vary, may include representation of body, collectors/collecting, impact of Reformation, image/book, art/discovery, early modern vision/visuality.
ARTS 5760 - Experimental Film and Video
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 3760/ArtS 5760
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Experimental approaches in producing digital video within a contemporary art context. Using digital media technologies in installation, performance, and interactive video art. Emphasizes expanding personal artistic development. Theoretical issues, critical/historical readings/writings in media arts. prereq: ARTS major, ARTS 1704
AST 8011 - High Energy Astrophysics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Energetic phenomena in the universe. Radiative processes in high energy regimes; supernovae, pulsars, and X-ray binaries; radio galaxies, quasars, and active galactic nuclei. prereq: instr consent
BTHX 5210 - Ethics of Human Subjects Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Issues in ethics of human subjects research. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
BTHX 8120 - Dying in Contemporary Medical Culture
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines practices of dying and death in contemporary U.S. culture, moral problems associated with these practices, possible solutions, and practical applications. Readings will consist of cultural critiques, bioethics literature, and empirical research.
BTHX 8510 - Gender and the Politics of Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Significance of gender to health and health care. Feminist analysis regarding moral/political importance of gender, possibly including contemporary western medicine?s understanding of the body, childbirth, and reproductive technologies; cosmetic surgery; chronic illness; disability; participation in research; gender and classification of disease. Care work, paid/non-paid. Readings from feminist theory, history, social science, bioethics, and moral philosophy. prereq: instr consent
BTHX 8610 - Medical Consumerism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Roots/implications of "medical consumerism." How consumerist model shapes concepts of disease/disability. Larger historical developments that have led to current situation. How movement toward consumerism changes the profession of medicine. How tools of medical enhancement shape the way we think about our identities and live our lives. Texts from philosophy, history, literature, law, film, and social sciences.
CGSC 8041 - Cognitive Neuroscience
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CgSc 8041/NSC 8041
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Relations between brain activity and cognitive function in mammals. Working memory, attention, decision processing, executive function, categorization, planning, sequence processing. Behavioral/physiological perspectives. Disruption of cognitive function following brain damage. Extracellular recording of single neuron activity in nonhuman primates. Functional neuroimaging/magnetoencephalography in humans. prereq: instr consent
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
CHIC 5920 - Topics in Chicana(o) Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Multidisciplinary themes in Chicana(o) studies. Issues of current interest.
CI 8416 - Speculative Fiction, Radical Imagination, and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Speculative fiction is a blanket term for fantasy, science fiction, horror, and other nonmimetic genres predicated on challenging consensus reality and its societal norms. The most dynamic and diverse field of modern storytelling, speculative fiction serves as a catalyst, in and beyond the classroom, for radical imagination: one that contests the oppressive socio-economic system by reimagining race, gender, class, and other real-world issues. This seminar examines the cultural work performed by speculative fiction addressed to children and young adults. Engaging with stories that suggest alternatives to how we live now, students develop mental habits of global citizens who value diversity and strive for social transformation. Works of speculative fiction for the young reader are discussed as particle accelerators for ideas of change and as sites of resistance against exclusion and systemic inequalities. The focus is on speculative fiction by indigenous, minority, and postcolonial authors. Exploring the ways in which these works interrogate dominant notions of reality and structures of meaning helps students appreciate speculative fiction as a tool for imagining radical social change.
CI 8645 - Indigenous Language Revitalization and Activist Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course is a hands-on look at activist research methods situated in the context of Indigenous Language Revitalization. That is, what happens when a community problem is the organizing force in research? Students will be expected to both engage in language learning, research, designing a research project, and connecting this to critical thinking as applied to culture, language and indigenous language revitalization.
CNRC 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
COMM 5211 - Critical Media Studies: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of theories, research methods, and scholars dominating critical media studies since late 1920s. prereq: Graduate students or undergraduates who have completed COMM 3211 (Introduction to Media Studies) or its equivalent
COMM 8110 - Seminar: Communication Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Evaluation of research methods in speech-communication. prereq: undergrad degree in spch-comm or equiv
COMM 8210 - Seminar: Selected Topics in U.S. Electronic Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Literature survey; evaluating research on topics; conducting independent research project on a particular topic. prereq: 5210 or instr consent; offered when feasible
CSCL 8910 - Advanced Topics in Comparative Literature
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 24.0]
Course Equivalencies: CL 8910/CSCL 8910/CSDS 8910
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical applications of specific methodologies and theories to a determined area. Topics vary by instructor and semester.
CVM 6908 - Anatomy II
Credits: 3.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sequential integration of normal gross/radiographic anatomy of ungulates. Knowledge gained will provide solid foundation for current/subsequent courses within veterinary professional curriculum.
EEB 5371 - Principles of Systematics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Theoretical/practical procedures of biological systematics. Phylogeny reconstruction. Computer-assisted analyses, morphological and molecular approaches, species concepts/speciation, comparative methods, classification, historical biogeography, nomenclature, use/value of museums. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
EEB 5407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity, and global dynamics of the earth.
EEB 8201 - Graduate Foundations in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Semester 1
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundational knowledge in ecology, evolution, behavior. prereq: Grad student in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior
EEB 8202 - Graduate Foundations in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior - Semester 2
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Foundational knowledge in ecology, evolution, behavior. Second semester of two-semester sequence. prereq: 8601, EEB grad student
EEB 8990 - Graduate Seminar
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 30.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Research topics in selected areas. prereq: instr consent
EEB 8991 - Independent Study: Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior
Credits: 1.0 -10.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Individual research on a specialized topic. prereq: instr consent
EMS 8250 - Seminar in Early Modern Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Current research and debates in early modern studies. Theoretical approaches to major questions shaping seminar's subject matter.
ENGL 5300 - Readings in American Minority Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3300/EngL 3300H/EngL 5300
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contextual readings of 19th-/20th-century American minority writers. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ENGL 8400 - Seminar in Post-Colonial Literature, Culture, and Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sample topics: Marxism and nationalism; modern India; feminism and decolonization; "the Empire Writes Back"; Islam and the West. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ENGL 8520 - Seminar: Cultural Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sample topics: semiotics applied to perspective paintings, numbers, and money; analysis of a particular set of cultural practices by applying various theories to them. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
General linear model used as context for regression. Matrix algebra, multiple regression, path analysis, polynomial regression, standardized regression, stepwise solutions, analysis of variance, weighted least squares, logistic regression. prereq: [8252 or equiv], regression/ANOVA course, familiarity with statistical analysis package
ESCI 5302 - Isotope Geology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory and uses of radioactive, radiogenic, and stable isotopes in geology. Radioactive dating, geothermometry, and tracer techniques in geologic processes. prereq: 3303W or instr consent
ESPM 5031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3031/ESPM 5031
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
GPS principles, operations, techniques to improve accuracy. Datum, projections, and coordinate systems. Differential correction, accuracy assessments discussed/applied in lab exercises. Code/carrier phase GPS used in exercises. GPS handheld units, PDA based ArcPad/GPS equipment. Transferring field data to/from desktop systems, integrating GPS data with GIS. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 5104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions on research topics, exercises, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Introductory biology course recommended.
FNRM 5262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3262/FNRM 5262
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite, aircraft, and drone imagery, and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory Statistics is recommended. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 5462 - Advanced Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3462/FNRM 5462
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course builds on the introductory remote sensing class, FNRM 3262/5262. It provides a detailed treatment of advanced remote sensing and geospatial theory and methods including Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA), lidar processing and derivatives, advanced classification algorithms (including Random Forest, Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines), biophysics of remote sensing, measurements and sensors, data transforms, data fusion, multi-temporal analysis, and empirical modeling. In-class and independent lab activities will be used to apply the course topics to real-world problems. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems, remote sensing, and statistics is necessary. Prereq: grad student or instr consent
FREN 8240 - Critical Issues: French and Francophone Cinema
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Critical issues relating to French/Francophone cinema.
GEOG 5511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Spring
Topics on data sources for mapping. History of thematic cartography (focused on 19th-century European activity). Multivariate classification/symbolization. Models for cartographic generalization, spatial interpolation, and surface representation. Animated/multimedia cartography.
GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, reading, and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: grad
GEOG 8001 - Problems in Geographic Thought
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Currents of geographic thought in biophysical, GIS, human, cultural, and human-environment subfields. Focuses on concepts/paradigms through which geographers have attempted to unify/codify the discipline, around which debate has flourished, and about which interdisciplinary histories can be traced.
GEOG 8230 - Theoretical Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced topics. Topics vary with interests of faculty offering course. Contemporary theoretical/philosophical themes transcending subdisciplines of human/physical geography. prereq: instr consent
GEOG 8260 - Seminar: Physical Geography
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Topics of contemporary research. Topics vary with interests of faculty offering course.
GEOG 8980 - Topics: Geography
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 30.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar offered by visiting or regular faculty. Topics vary with interests of faculty. prereq: instr consent
GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
First of a two-course series focusing on ArcGIS Desktop. Overview of ArcGIS system and its use for spatial data processing. Data capture, editing, geometric transformations, map projections, topology, Python scripting, and map production. prereq: [GEOG 5561 or equiv, status in MGIS program, familiarity with computer operating systems] or instr consent
GIS 5576 - Spatial Digital Humanities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Spatial Digital Humanities GIS 5576 is a basic overview of desktop GIS (both Esri and open source), as well as an introduction to a number of other mapping techniques (such as Esri Maps for Office, ArcGIS Online, web mapping basics, georeferencing historical maps, etc) in addition to digital scholarship techniques. Course objectives include: understanding the basics of mapping and geospatial information using GIS; documenting and managing spatial data using coherent/standardized methods; understanding several spatial analysis methods that are relevant to student research area; and applying spatial research methods into student research.
GIS 5577 - Spatial Database Design and Administration
Credits: 3.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Spatial database design, development planning/management, maintenance, security, access/distribution, and documentation. prereq: instr consent
GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Teaching methods/techniques. Active learning, critical thinking, practice teaching, and preparing a portfolio to document/reflect upon teaching. Readings, discussion, peer teaching, e-mail dialog, reflective writing, co-facilitation of course. prereq: Non-Degree Students: contact pffcollege consentumn.edu with questions about registration. If adding a section after first class meeting, contact your instructor as soon as you enroll.
GRAD 8200 - Teaching and Learning Topics in Higher Education
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Create course materials for context/discipline. Assess student learning. Write action plan. Topics may include active learning in sciences, teaching with technology, multicultural education, teaching in clinical settings, learning-community course design.
GSD 8001 - Approaches to Textual Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical approaches to textual analysis that shape disciplinary discussions in Germanic studies.
GWSS 5104 - Transnational Feminist Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Third World and transnational feminisms. Interrogating the categories of "women," "feminism," and "Third World." Varieties of power/oppression that women have endured/resisted, including colonization, nationalism, globalization, and capitalism. Concentrates on postcolonial context.
GWSS 8109 - Feminist Knowledge Production
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Two-semester interdisciplinary seminar. First term: debates in gender theory; gender theory, critical race theory, post-colonial theory, sexuality theory, social class analysis. Second term: inter-/multi-disciplinary feminist research methods from humanities/social sciences. prereq: Feminist studies PhD or grad minor student or instr consent
GWSS 8201 - Feminist Theory and Methods in the Social Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar on recent theories, including feminist versions of positivist, interpretivist, critical theoretical, and postmodernist models of social science knowledge. Methodologies congenial to feminist practices of inquiry, including use of narrative in theory, feminist ethnography, discourse analysis, and comparative methods in history.
GWSS 8220 - Seminar: Science, Technology & Environmental Justice
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics related to science, technology, environmental justice.
GWSS 8250 - Seminar: Nation, State, and Citizenship
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics related to nation, state, citizenship.
GWSS 8260 - Seminar: Race, Representation and Resistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Race, racialization, racial justice as related to representation/struggles for social/economic justice. Intersectional analysis of power, politics, ideology/identity. Queer of color critique, women of color feminisms, critical sex/body positive approaches. prereq: Grad student
GWSS 8490 - Seminar: Transnational, Postcolonial, Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Graduate topics in comparative/global studies.
HIST 5547 - Empire and Nations in the Middle East
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Modernity in non-Western imperial context. Identity, ideology, economy, environment, language. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
HIST 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5890/Hist 5890
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will read recently published scholarship in American Indian and Indigenous history that takes up pressing research questions, promises to push inquiry in new directions, and that theorizes important interventions in our thinking to understand where the field is situated and moving. Reflecting the instinctively interdisciplinary nature of American Indian and Indigenous history, readings will be drawn not just from the discipline of history but across other disciplines such as Anthropology, American Studies, Geography, Literature, Political Science, and Legal Studies. As well, readings will include scholarship that reaches out to embrace the Global Indigenous studies turn. prereq: Advanced undergrad with instr consent or grad student
HIST 5910 - Topics in U.S. History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
HIST 8015 - Scope and Methods of Historical Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development of historical studies over time (especially in 19th and 20th centuries). Methodologies currently shaping historical research. Theoretical developments within the discipline during 19th and 20th centuries. prereq: instr consent
HIST 8032 - Archives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Working in close collaboration with the archivists of the Department of Archives and Special Collections at the University Libraries, this hands-on course will explore how archivists do their work and how a deeper understanding of that work can help scholars in any field grasp the practice of historical research. Rooted in the theory and tradition of archival science, the course will cover the core practices of archivists as well as the emerging issues and technologies changing the way archives are built, maintained, and accessed. In this course, students will gain experience with archival theory, archival ethics, selection, appraisal, arrangement, description, reference, access, preservation, exhibits, and outreach. Through engaging with those topics, students will be prepared to situate archives and archival material within the socio-historical contexts in which they were produced and in which they are maintained, affording them a critical perspective on the historical sources they contain. Each week's course will be co-taught with an archivist from the Department of Archives and Special Collections at the University Libraries.
HIST 8122 - Public Histories
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This seminar examines the variety of ways that "public history" is produced both within and outside the academy and explores interdisciplinary approaches to the making and critical analysis of public histories. Students will discuss recent scholarship by historians as well as scholars and practitioners in allied fields. Through discussion and collaborative project work, the seminar will also provide a hands-on introduction to the theory, methods, practice and politics of public history.
HIST 8910 - Topics in U.S. History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 15.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8920 - Topics in African History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8950 - Topics in Latin American History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8960 - Topics in History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics not covered in regular courses.
HIST 8970 - Advanced Research in Quantitative History
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students carry out publishable-quality research on quantitative history topic. prereq: Grad student
HMED 8002 - Foundations in the History of Modern Medicine, 1800-present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of Western medicine in Europe and America, from the Paris School and pathological anatomy in early 19c France through germ theories of disease, bacteriological revolution, reform of medical education, pharmaceutical revolution, growth of biomed research establishment, and comparative health care delivery systems.
HMED 8113 - Research Methods in the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HMed 8113/HSci 8113
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to sources, methods, and problems of research in history of science, technology, and medicine. Preparation of major research paper under faculty supervision. prereq: instr consent
HSCI 8950 - Seminar: Science and Technology in Cultural Settings
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
For advanced graduate students; topics in development of science and technology in or across specific geographic regions or particular cultures. prereq: instr consent
HSPH 8001 - Who Owns the Past? Common Concerns and Big Questions in Heritage and Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Course offers a survey through case studies of the common concerns, concepts and ethics of heritage and public history. Students will learn about the history and social contexts of heritage studies and public history, the stakes and stakeholders, and the conflicts and positive interventions that can be made through the work of these affiliated professions.
HSPH 8002 - Core Practices in Heritage Studies and Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Course is open to all Heritage Studies and Public History (HSPH) graduate students. DGS or Instructor permission required for others. Course offers a survey of how heritage and public history concern and ethics are embedded into practice. Through illustrated lectures, case studies, field trips, readings and class discussion, students will learn about the professional practice of heritage studies and public history, how approaches to practice are aligned to institutional mission, customization of programs for diverse audiences, and professional evaluation and management of financial resources.
HSPH 8003 - Race and Indigeneity in Heritage Representation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar will explore the changes in how diversity has been represented in historical interpretations in the past, and how practice is changing in response to the contemporary and anticipated social context of the United States. "Diversity" has historically been assumed to derive from categories such as race or culture, concepts constructed in the discipline of anthropology but taken up as the foundation for typologies in other arenas such as art history, architectural history, museums, and public policy. What is problematic in such an approach? What happens to communities defined by shared history, political sovereignty, and disenfranchisement? What are the implications beyond museums for those communities? Finally, how can we think differently about diversity without re-inscribing harmful constructions of difference?
HSPH 8004 - Capstone in Heritage Studies and Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will operate as a workshop, drawing together a cohort of students, working individually or as part of a team, to craft independent heritage studies and public history research projects under the supervision of a faculty instructor. Projects may be based in archival research, public exhibitions, archaeology, material culture studies and preservation, architecture and preservation, or landscape studies. Consistent with the values of the program, projects shall have multidisciplinary perspectives, broadly consider aspects of diversity, and will be accountable to some stakeholder(s) identified by the students.
HSPH 8005 - Leadership and Future of Historical Organizations
Credits: 1.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will operate as a series of lectures and discussions in which leaders of historical organizations explain how they are navigating major changes and challenges associated with their professional practice. Speakers in this course will be invited and organized by the instructor in coordination with HSPH faculty and colleagues at the Minnesota Historical Society. Topics to be presented by speakers may include: making history accessible and meaningful to increasingly diverse audiences; interpreting difficult or traumatic histories; gathering, storing, and providing access to physical collections in a digital age; engaging the public in historical research and interpretation; the financial management and leadership of historical organizations. The course has several objectives: students will learn from, and have the opportunity to meet, leaders of historical organizations located throughout Minnesota and the United States; it will also be a cohort-building opportunity as students in the first and second years of the program meet regularly in this course to hear from professional practitioners and discuss presentations and readings.
HSPH 8006 - Digital Methods for Heritage Studies & Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 8031/HSPH 8006
Typically offered: Every Fall
Digital technologies are significantly altering the speed and scale of the foundational methodologies of archeology, history, and preservation. Moreover, they are shifting the way the public engages with the past in cultural institutions and across the myriad screens that pervade their daily life. In this course, students will not only learn how emerging digital technologies can enhance their research, but also how those technologies are fundamentally transforming the possibilities for the public presentation of that research. This course privileges hands-on learning and balances deeping essential methodological skills with exposure to a breadth of field-altering technologies. It is structured around five core methodologies--excavation, documentation, reconstruction, interpretation, and exhibition. In each unit, students will be first be tasked with identifying the underlying principles of these methodological approaches. They will then use class time to explore technologies that extend those methods such as high-resolution imaging, relational databases, text mining programs, virtual environments, and content management systems for website building. Bookending the course is a focus on effective collaboration--the foundation of successful digital projects--and public engagement in an increasingly connected yet fractured society.
HSPH 8007 - Archives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Working in close collaboration with the archivists of the Department of Archives and Special Collections at the University Libraries, this hands-on course will explore how archivists do their work and how a deeper understanding of that work can help scholars in any field grasp the practice of historical research. Rooted in the theory and tradition of archival science, the course will cover the core practices of archivists as well as the emerging issues and technologies changing the way archives are built, maintained, and accessed. In this course, students will gain experience with archival theory, archival ethics, selection, appraisal, arrangement, description, reference, access, preservation, exhibits, and outreach. Through engaging with those topics, students will be prepared to situate archives and archival material within the socio-historical contexts in which they were produced and in which they are maintained, affording them a critical perspective on the historical sources they contain. Each week?s course will be co-taught with an archivist from the Department of Archives and Special Collections at the University Libraries.
HSPH 8010 - Topics in Heritage Studies and Public History
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics in Heritage Studies and Public History explores new and emerging issues in the field that are not examined in other coursework.
HSPH 8101 - Internship
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Internships are an opportunity to apply your skills and deepen your understanding of careers in historical sites and museums, community heritage organizations, or preservation/oversight agencies. This experience is for both skill-building and general professional development. Internship placements will be determined through conversations with advisors regarding student areas of interest and career goals, and available professional opportunities within the Minnesota Historical Society or a partnering organization. MHSPH degree students are required to complete two internships, one within MNHS and one outside. There are small stipends paid to students for their internship work, and depending on the site/project there may be funds available for project materials.
HSPH 8992 - Directed Readings in HSPH
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Directed Readings in Heritage Studies and Public History enable a student to explore new and emerging issues in the field that are not examined in other coursework. Student(s) will work with a member of the HSPH faculty to develop a reading list, schedule, deliverables, meeting times and other expectations, all of which will be recorded using the School of Arch Independent Study contract form.
LAW 6063 - Law and Neuroscience
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
What are adolescents, psychopaths, and white-collar fraud artists thinking? Why does emotional trauma for victims of abuse last so long? Why is eye-witness memory so poor? Do violent video games lead to violent children? How can you get into the heads of the judge and jury? Lawyers and courts, including the US Supreme Court, are already integrating neuroscience research into their arguments and opinions on questions such as these. This Law and Neuroscience course will introduce the exciting new field of “neurolaw” by covering issues such as the neuroscience of criminal culpability, brain-based lie detection, cognitive enhancement, emotions, decision making, and much more. Along the way we’ll discuss how the legal system can and should respond to new insights on topics such as adolescent brain development, addiction, psychopathy, Alzheimer’s, the effects of combat on soldiers’ brains, and concussions from sports injuries. New in the 2017 version of the course is a “Bridge to Practice” track, which emphasizes the real-world brief writing related to the use of neuroscientific evidence in practice. (Note that all scientific material in the class will be presented in an accessible manner, so no previous science background is required.)
MST 5011 - Museum History and Philosophy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical and philosophical roots of museums and emerging philosophical issues faced by museums today - from art, history, science, and youth to living collections, living history sites, and historic houses. Field trips to area museums.
OBIO 8012 - Basic Concepts in Skeletal Biology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cells (osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chrondrocytes) that make up skeleton. Transcription/signaling networks that regulate cell growth/differentiation. Mechanisms of bone remodeling. Regulation of bone by such agents such as hormones. Prereq Grad student or instr consent.
PA 5690 - Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 0.5 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 8690 - Advanced Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
PHIL 8602 - Scientific Representation and Explanation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Contemporary issues concerning representation and explanation of scientific facts.
POL 8260 - Topics in Political Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings and research in special topics or problems.
PUBH 6045 - Skills for Policy Development
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Skills relevant to policy development and implementation for public health-related issues.
PUBH 6450 - Biostatistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will cover the fundamental concepts of exploratory data analysis and statistical inference for univariate and bivariate data, including: ? study design and sampling methods, ? descriptive and graphical summaries, ? random variables and their distributions, ? interval estimation, ? hypothesis testing, ? relevant nonparametric methods, ? simple regression/correlation, and ? introduction to multiple regression. There will be a focus on analyzing data using statistical programming software and on communicating the results in short reports. Health science examples from the research literature will be used throughout the course. prereq: [College-level algebra, health sciences grad student] or instr consent
PUBH 7475 - Statistical Learning and Data Mining
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Various statistical techniques for extracting useful information (i.e., learning) from data. Linear discriminant analysis, tree-structured classifiers, feed-forward neural networks, support vector machines, other nonparametric methods, classifier ensembles, unsupervised learning. prereq: [[[6450, 6452] or equiv], programming backgroud in [FORTRAN or C/C++ or JAVA or Splus/R]] or instr consent; 2nd yr MS recommended
SOC 8090 - Topics in Sociology
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
SOC 8551 - Life Course Inequality & Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Seminar examines the changing life course in its social and historical context, including theoretical principles, methodologies, and policy implications. Focus on key societal institutions that offer unequal opportunities and constraints, depending on social class, race/ethnicity, and gender. Unequal access to age-graded social roles and resources shape the course of development, and in doing so, they have profound impacts on health. We will consider how inequality in the family, education, work, the military, and in the health care & criminal justice systems influence health behaviors and outcomes at different ages and life stages. prereq: grad student or instr consent
SOC 8607 - Migration & Migrants in Demographic Perspective
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
With fertility and mortality, migration is one of three core population processes. This course provides a graduate-level treatment of major theoretical and empirical debates in demographic/population research on migration and migrants. It examines topics like why and how people migrate, who migrates and who does not, and the effects of migration in migrant-receiving and migrant-sending areas. Along the way, it links to a number of related topics, including the impacts of migration on migrants themselves, the role of the state and policies governing migration and incorporation, and transnationalism. A common thread throughout is connecting these topics to issues of population size, composition, and change. While this course contains ?demographic? in the title and fulfills requirements for graduate trainees and the population studies minor in the Minnesota Population Center, it is necessarily interdisciplinary in scope and draws from research in economics, demography/population studies, human geography, history, political science, population health, public policy, and sociology. Credit will not be granted if the student has already completed a Soc 8090 topics course with the same title.
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: college algebra or instr consent; credit will not be granted if credit has been received for STAT 3011
TH 8120 - Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected research topics from various theatre fields and periods. Sample topics: Border Crossings--Theatre History and Representation; The Theatre and Drama of the Third Reich, 1927-1944.
SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced topics in law, crime, and deviance. Social underpinnings of legal/illegal behavior and of legal systems.
SOC 8211 - The Sociology of Race & Racialization
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major theoretical debates. Classic and contemporary theoretical approaches to studying U.S. race relations; contemporary and historical experiences of specific racial and ethnic groups.
ANTH 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral
Credits: 1.0 -24.0 [max 100.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required
ANTH 8001 - Ethnography, Theory, History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to foundational concepts, methods, and ethnographic work. Emphasizes theories that have shaped 20th-century thinking in cultural anthropology. Connection of these theories to fieldwork and contemporary issues.
ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/perspectives in anthropology. Emphasizes American cultural anthropology. Rrecent work in semiotic, psychological, and feminist anthropology.
ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Classic and current issues in research methodology, including positivist, interpretivist, feminist, and postmodernist frameworks. Methodology, in the broadest sense of the concept, is evaluated. Students conduct three research exercises and set up an ethnographic research project. prereq: Grad anth major or instr consent
ANTH 5008 - Advanced Flintknapping
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Hands-on training in techniques of advanced stone tool production, artifact reproduction, and lithic experimental design for academic/artistic purposes. prereq: [3008 or 5269] or instr consent
ANTH 5009 - Human Behavioral Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
In-depth introduction to, and critical review of, human behavioral biology, examining the approaches in anthropology and related fields. Classic texts/recent empirical studies of humans and other species. Theoretical underpinnings of this new discipline/how well theoretical predictions have been supported by subsequent research.
ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists/historians analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman Period. Interpreting archaeological evidence from specific sites to understand broad trends in human past.
ANTH 5028 - Historical Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3028/Anth 5028
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will explore the theories and methods of historical archaeology ? such as material culture studies, landscape perspectives, archival, and oral historical interpretation - as a means of intervening in contemporary discussions of diversity in the United States. Historical archaeology can be a very effective means to challenge some of the standard American narratives about our diverse past. Our aim is to move beyond either a simplistic ethnic pluralism or the superficial ?melting pot? progressive history and instead grapple with the materiality of settler colonialism, white supremacy, and capitalism. In learning about this field, we will consider what has distinguished historical archaeology from American archaeology more broadly, and how those differences are parlayed into specific research strengths. This includes several themes: colonialism; the modern world and globalizing economies; intersectional identities (race and ethnicity, class, sex and gender, religion, age, ability/disability) and social movements; public memory and commemoration; landscapes and social space; citizenship and subjectivity. Although historical archaeology until recently has been restrictively defined as addressing the European-colonized New World, the discipline in the past twenty years has significantly broadened its scope and impact on the practice of archaeology as a whole. Throughout the course we will discuss these developments, and what directions archaeology may take in the future as a result. Course work includes both reading/discussion and learning methods through practical exercises, and handling of archaeological material.
ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3145W/Anth 5045W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This class explores anthropological approaches to urban life. On one hand, the course examines the ontological nature of the city by looking into the relation between cities and their environment, and asking whether and how people differentiate "urban" and 'non-urban" spaces. It uncovers the social practices and behaviors that define urban life; urban-rural distinctions; the material and ecological processes that constitute cities; and popular representations of city and/or countryside. On the other hand, the course investigates the spatial and social divisions of the city, seeking to understand the historical struggles and ongoing processes that both draw together and differentiate the people of an urban environment. It studies how cities influence political decision-making, contributing to the uneven distribution of power and resources. It considers: industrialization; urban class conflict; gendered and racialized spaces; and suburbanization. Both of these approaches will also critically consider the city as a social object that we encounter and learn about through our engagement with kinds of media, such as novels and film. Hence, reading for the class will include literature from the social sciences and humanities, as well as critical works of fiction. Students will engage with these broader anthropological issues through an investigation of several global cities, especially Minneapolis-St. Paul, Chicago, Paris, Mexico City, Brasilia, and New Delhi. The class mixes lecture, discussion, and guided research. Lectures will introduce the history of urbanism and urban anthropology. Discussions will critically evaluate the readings, and offer insights and examples to better understand them. By participating in a guided research project, students will uncover hidden aspects of their own city, using ethnography or archaeology to shed light on the urban environment, social struggles over space, or other themes.
ANTH 5112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5112/Anth 8112
Prerequisites: Previous coursework in Biological Anthropology or Archaeology
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Major hypotheses regarding evolution of human behavior. Combine evidence from realm of biological anthropology as we consider link between bone biology/behavior. Archaeological record. Hypotheses about biocultural evolution regarding tool-use, hunting, scavenging, food sharing, grandmothers, cooking, long distance running. prereq: Previous coursework in Biological Anthropology or Archaeology
ANTH 5113 - Primate Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5113/Anth 8113
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Evolutionary history of primates. Particular focus on origin/diversification of apes/Old World monkeys. prereq: Anthropology major, junior or senior
ANTH 5121 - Business Anthropology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4121/Anth 5121
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological/ethnographic understandings/research techniques. prereq: MBA student
ANTH 5128 - Anthropology of Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5128/OLPD 5128
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Cross-cultural perspectives in examining educational patterns. Implicit/explicit cultural assumptions. Methods/approaches to cross-cultural studies in education.
ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The course examines material culture as a social creation, studied from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives (e.g., social anthropology, archaeology, primatology, history of science). The course examines the changing role of material culture from prehistory to the future.
ANTH 5244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5244/8244
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
To Interpret Ancient Bone we must sharpen observational skills, read about observations and analysis by previous workers, and learn to record and analyze complex information. The class combines seminar/discussion formats, in which we read literature about how to best accomplish this type of research, and laboratory time, to give students the opportunity to observe and record modifications to bones that form the basis of archaeological and forensic observations. Students analyze different kinds of tool marks on bone, weathering, carnivore modifications, eco-morphology, ages of death, bone tools, and bones from archaeological sites to infer the "life history" of a bone. We recommend you take the Human Skeleton or Zooarchaeology Laboratory before you take this class, but it is not absolutely required.
ANTH 5255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3255/Anth 5255/RelS 3254/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course discusses evidence for the origins of religion and its diverse roles in human societies over millennia. It focuses on how artifacts and architecture are essential to religious experience. It asks: What constitutes religion for different cultures? Why is religion at the heart of politics, social life, and cultural imagination?
ANTH 5269 - Analysis of Stone Tool Technology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course offers practical lab experience in analyzing archaeological collections of stone tools to learn about human behavior in the past. Students gain experience needed to get a job in the cultural resource management industry.
ANTH 5327W - Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3327W/Anth 5327W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course is an intensive examination of the emergence, growth, and conquest of native civilizations in ancient America, focusing on the Maya, Aztec, and Inca states. Lectures and discussions examine the culture and history of these Native American civilizations, while also introducing students to anthropological theories of the state, religion, aesthetics, and history.
ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3401/Anth 5401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Fossil evidence paleoanthropologists use to reconstruct human evolutionary history. Taxonomy, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, tool use, land use, and biogeography. Examination of fossil casts, readings from primary/secondary professional sources. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
ANTH 5402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists reconstruct the past through the study of animal bones associated with artifacts at archaeological sites. Skeletal element (e.g., humerus, femur, tibia), and taxon (e.g., horse, antelope, sheep, bison, hyena) when confronted with bone. Comparative collection of bones from known taxa.
ANTH 5403 - Quantitative Methods in Biological Anthropology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Quantitative methods used by biological anthropologists. Applying these methods to real anthropometric data. Lectures, complementary sessions in computer lab. prereq: Basic univariate statistics course or instr consent
ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3405/Anth 5405
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, design, and variability of modern human skeleton. Anatomy, functional morphology, development, evolutionary history. Bone histology/biology, excavation, preservation, taphonomy, pathology, forensic analyses. Differentiating between males/females, adults/sub-adults, and humans/non-humans. Quizzes, exams, research paper, project.
ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the inter connections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Have you ever wondered how archaeologists interpret the vast amount of archaeological evidence from the British Isles, one of the most studied and best documented parts of the world? And how do archaeologists and governmental agencies protect the heritage of Britain, from major monuments such as Stonehenge, Roman forts, and Shakespeare?s theaters, to the minor products of craft industries such as personal ornaments and coins? This course teaches you about the archaeology of the British Isles, in all of its aspects. You learn how archaeologists study the changing societies of Britain and Ireland, from the first settlers about a million years ago to modern times. You learn about the strategies that public institutions employ to preserve and protect archaeological sites, and about the place of archaeology in tourism in the British Isles and in the formation of identities among the diverse peoples of modern Britain.
ANTH 5448 - Applied Heritage Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Contexts of cultural heritage applicable to federal/state protection. Approaches to planning/management. Issues of heritage/stakeholder conflict.
ANTH 5450 - Spatial Analysis in Anthropology: Research Design and Field Applications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This advanced undergraduate and graduate course introduces students to spatial analyses essential to anthropological ethnography, archaeology, and historical ecology. It builds on introductory courses at UMN, providing students an opportunity to learn anthropological applications of spatial analysis methods, including: research design, field mapping, database management, digital survey platforms, GIS analyses, and integration of quantitative and qualitative (ethnographic and historical) data. The structure of the course will follow the trajectory of a typical doctoral-level anthropological project, from pre-field data acquisition and preparation, to in-field data collection, post-field analysis, and presentation. Students who take this course will master skills that are crucial for successful anthropological spatial analysis in the field and laboratory.
ANTH 5501 - Managing Museum Collections
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3501/Anth 5501
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course provides a hands-on and research experience in collections management utilizing artifact, archival, and digital collections. Museum collections, the objects or specimens they contain, the information associated with them, and their care and maintenance are a crucial part of both the sciences and the humanities. While seemingly disparate, many of the issues faced by those responsible for collections are quite similar: how to preserve and care for those collections, legal issues surrounding the materials they contain, how to organize and classify the items, how to facilitate discovery and access, and how to make the information contained in them available to the broadest audience possible. The course includes lectures by museum professionals, hands-on activities, and selected readings. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for ANTH 3501.
ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
ANTH 5980 - Topics in Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANTH 8004 - Foundations of Anthropological Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical foundations of anthropological archaeology in historical and contemporary perspective. prereq: 8001, 8002
ANTH 8005 - Linguistic Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduction to literature of anthropological linguistics.
ANTH 8009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3009/Anth 8009/Hist 3066
Typically offered: Every Spring
How did complex urban societies first develop? This course addresses this question in ten regions of the world including Maya Mesoamerica, Inca South America, Sumerian Near East, Shang Civilization in East Asia, and early Greece and Rome.
ANTH 8111 - Evolutionary Morphology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Basic foundation of diverse anatomical adaptations of living/fossil primates. Principles of evolutionary theory. Stages of embryogenesis/fetal development. Morphological diversity. Evolutionary morphology. Body size, allometry, heterochrony. Primate evolution.
ANTH 8112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5112/Anth 8112
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Consider major hypotheses regarding evolution of human behavior. Evidence/arguments used to support or reject hypotheses. Consider link between bone biology/behavior. Archaeological record for more holistic understanding of evidence.
ANTH 8113 - Primate Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5113/Anth 8113
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Evolutionary history of primates, with particular focus on origin/diversification of apes/Old World monkeys. prereq: Anthropology doctoral student
ANTH 8114 - Biological Anthropology Graduate Program Seminar: Behavioral Ecology of Primates
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Anthropology graduate student or #.
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Course focuses on the behavioral ecology of primates, including humans, with a focus on how the evolution of social behaviors relates to ecology. The course serves as one of three Biological Anthropology Graduate Program Seminars, which provide training in the foundations of biological anthropology. For Biological Anthropology graduate students, the take-home exam for this course will stand as one of the three required Preliminary Papers. Students outside of Biological Anthropology are welcome to enroll pending permission of the instructor. prereq: Anthropology graduate student or instr consent.
ANTH 8120 - Problems in Culture Change and Applied Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative studies of change in cultural systems. Impact of global processes on local cultures. Roles of anthropology and anthropologists in policy, planning, implementation, and evaluation.
ANTH 8201 - Humans and Nonhumans: Hybrids and Collectives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Social life as consisting of relationships not only among human beings, but also between humans and nonhumans: animals, plants, environments, technologies, etc. Focuses on figure of hybrid, its role in formations of collective life.
ANTH 8205 - Economic Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4053/8205
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theoretical foundations of economic anthropology examined through critical readings of traditional, classical, and contemporary authors. Ethnographic puzzles of material life and issues of ecological degradation, development, market expansion, gender, and transglobal processes.
ANTH 8207 - Political and Social Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Western concepts of politics, power, authority, society, state, and law. Cross-cultural approaches to these concepts in historical perspective. Major theoretical frameworks and current problems and positions in social and political anthropology. Ethnographic classics and new directions.
ANTH 8213 - Ecological Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar on method, theory, and key problems in ecological anthropology and human ecology. Examines approaches in light of human practices, interactions between culture and the environment, global environmental change, and our understanding of human dimensions of ecosystem-based management.
ANTH 8215 - Anthropology of Gender
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative, cross-cultural approach to gender. Focuses on various theories (e.g., feminist, postmodernist, psychoanalytic) of power, gender, authority, and femininity and masculinity. Gender ambiguity and issues of sexuality. prereq: Grad anth major or instr consent
ANTH 8219 - Grant Writing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students draft a research proposal in their area of interest. Seminar involves reading and evaluating proposals, learning about funding and process of submitting proposals, nuts of bolts of composing a proposal, and ethics of research in anthropology. prereq: Grad anth majors preparing to submit research grant proposals next academic yr
ANTH 8220 - Field School
Credits: 6.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3221/Anth 8220
Typically offered: Every Summer
Advanced field excavation, survey, and research. Intensive training in excavation techniques, recordation, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological materials or prehistoric remains.
ANTH 8223 - Anthropology of Place & Space
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course asks questions about the meaning of place, the relationship of space to place, the relationship of identity to place, and the relationship of place to environmental change in the event of industrial pollution, development projects, natural disasters and climate change. Theories of and ethnographic accounts of space and place in Cultural Anthropology and Geography will be discussed. In addition to foundational texts in the topic, we will also be reading contemporary accounts of nonwestern places.
ANTH 8230 - Anthropological Research Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Training seminar on research development, coordination, grant management, field/laboratory research management, fundraising. prereq: Anth grad student or instr consent
ANTH 8244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5244/8244
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
To Interpret Ancient Bone we must sharpen observational skills, read about observations and analysis by previous workers, and learn to record and analyze complex information. The class combines seminar/discussion formats, in which we read literature about how to best accomplish this type of research, and laboratory time, to give students the opportunity to observe and record modifications to bones that form the basis of archaeological and forensic observations. Students analyze different kinds of tool marks on bone, weathering, carnivore modifications, eco-morphology, ages of death, bone tools, and bones from archaeological sites to infer the "life history" of a bone. We recommend you take the Human Skeleton or Zooarchaeology Laboratory before you take this class, but it is not absolutely required.
ANTH 8510 - Topics in Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar examines particular aspects of archaeological methods and/or theory. Topics vary according to student and faculty interests.
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar examines particular aspects of method and/or theory. Topics vary according to student and faculty interests.
ANTH 8980 - Anthropology Graduate Workshop
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar examines aspects of the discipline that transcend traditional subfield boundaries.
ANTH 8990 - Topics in Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar examines aspects of the discipline that transcend traditional subfield boundaries.
ANTH 8991 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Under special circumstances and with instructor approval, qualified students may register for a listed course on a tutorial basis. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 8992 - Directed Reading
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 54.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
tbd prereq: instr consent
ANTH 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed Study prereq: instr consent
ANTH 8994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
N/A prereq: instr consent
ANTH 8111 - Evolutionary Morphology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Basic foundation of diverse anatomical adaptations of living/fossil primates. Principles of evolutionary theory. Stages of embryogenesis/fetal development. Morphological diversity. Evolutionary morphology. Body size, allometry, heterochrony. Primate evolution.
ANTH 8112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5112/Anth 8112
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Consider major hypotheses regarding evolution of human behavior. Evidence/arguments used to support or reject hypotheses. Consider link between bone biology/behavior. Archaeological record for more holistic understanding of evidence.
ANTH 8114 - Biological Anthropology Graduate Program Seminar: Behavioral Ecology of Primates
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Anthropology graduate student or #.
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Course focuses on the behavioral ecology of primates, including humans, with a focus on how the evolution of social behaviors relates to ecology. The course serves as one of three Biological Anthropology Graduate Program Seminars, which provide training in the foundations of biological anthropology. For Biological Anthropology graduate students, the take-home exam for this course will stand as one of the three required Preliminary Papers. Students outside of Biological Anthropology are welcome to enroll pending permission of the instructor. prereq: Anthropology graduate student or instr consent.
ANTH 5008 - Advanced Flintknapping
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Hands-on training in techniques of advanced stone tool production, artifact reproduction, and lithic experimental design for academic/artistic purposes. prereq: [3008 or 5269] or instr consent
ANTH 5009 - Human Behavioral Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
In-depth introduction to, and critical review of, human behavioral biology, examining the approaches in anthropology and related fields. Classic texts/recent empirical studies of humans and other species. Theoretical underpinnings of this new discipline/how well theoretical predictions have been supported by subsequent research.
ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists/historians analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman Period. Interpreting archaeological evidence from specific sites to understand broad trends in human past.
ANTH 5028 - Historical Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3028/Anth 5028
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will explore the theories and methods of historical archaeology ? such as material culture studies, landscape perspectives, archival, and oral historical interpretation - as a means of intervening in contemporary discussions of diversity in the United States. Historical archaeology can be a very effective means to challenge some of the standard American narratives about our diverse past. Our aim is to move beyond either a simplistic ethnic pluralism or the superficial ?melting pot? progressive history and instead grapple with the materiality of settler colonialism, white supremacy, and capitalism. In learning about this field, we will consider what has distinguished historical archaeology from American archaeology more broadly, and how those differences are parlayed into specific research strengths. This includes several themes: colonialism; the modern world and globalizing economies; intersectional identities (race and ethnicity, class, sex and gender, religion, age, ability/disability) and social movements; public memory and commemoration; landscapes and social space; citizenship and subjectivity. Although historical archaeology until recently has been restrictively defined as addressing the European-colonized New World, the discipline in the past twenty years has significantly broadened its scope and impact on the practice of archaeology as a whole. Throughout the course we will discuss these developments, and what directions archaeology may take in the future as a result. Course work includes both reading/discussion and learning methods through practical exercises, and handling of archaeological material.
ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3145W/Anth 5045W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This class explores anthropological approaches to urban life. On one hand, the course examines the ontological nature of the city by looking into the relation between cities and their environment, and asking whether and how people differentiate "urban" and 'non-urban" spaces. It uncovers the social practices and behaviors that define urban life; urban-rural distinctions; the material and ecological processes that constitute cities; and popular representations of city and/or countryside. On the other hand, the course investigates the spatial and social divisions of the city, seeking to understand the historical struggles and ongoing processes that both draw together and differentiate the people of an urban environment. It studies how cities influence political decision-making, contributing to the uneven distribution of power and resources. It considers: industrialization; urban class conflict; gendered and racialized spaces; and suburbanization. Both of these approaches will also critically consider the city as a social object that we encounter and learn about through our engagement with kinds of media, such as novels and film. Hence, reading for the class will include literature from the social sciences and humanities, as well as critical works of fiction. Students will engage with these broader anthropological issues through an investigation of several global cities, especially Minneapolis-St. Paul, Chicago, Paris, Mexico City, Brasilia, and New Delhi. The class mixes lecture, discussion, and guided research. Lectures will introduce the history of urbanism and urban anthropology. Discussions will critically evaluate the readings, and offer insights and examples to better understand them. By participating in a guided research project, students will uncover hidden aspects of their own city, using ethnography or archaeology to shed light on the urban environment, social struggles over space, or other themes.
ANTH 5112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5112/Anth 8112
Prerequisites: Previous coursework in Biological Anthropology or Archaeology
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Major hypotheses regarding evolution of human behavior. Combine evidence from realm of biological anthropology as we consider link between bone biology/behavior. Archaeological record. Hypotheses about biocultural evolution regarding tool-use, hunting, scavenging, food sharing, grandmothers, cooking, long distance running. prereq: Previous coursework in Biological Anthropology or Archaeology
ANTH 5113 - Primate Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5113/Anth 8113
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Evolutionary history of primates. Particular focus on origin/diversification of apes/Old World monkeys. prereq: Anthropology major, junior or senior
ANTH 5121 - Business Anthropology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4121/Anth 5121
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological/ethnographic understandings/research techniques. prereq: MBA student
ANTH 5128 - Anthropology of Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5128/OLPD 5128
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Cross-cultural perspectives in examining educational patterns. Implicit/explicit cultural assumptions. Methods/approaches to cross-cultural studies in education.
ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The course examines material culture as a social creation, studied from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives (e.g., social anthropology, archaeology, primatology, history of science). The course examines the changing role of material culture from prehistory to the future.
ANTH 5244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5244/8244
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
To Interpret Ancient Bone we must sharpen observational skills, read about observations and analysis by previous workers, and learn to record and analyze complex information. The class combines seminar/discussion formats, in which we read literature about how to best accomplish this type of research, and laboratory time, to give students the opportunity to observe and record modifications to bones that form the basis of archaeological and forensic observations. Students analyze different kinds of tool marks on bone, weathering, carnivore modifications, eco-morphology, ages of death, bone tools, and bones from archaeological sites to infer the "life history" of a bone. We recommend you take the Human Skeleton or Zooarchaeology Laboratory before you take this class, but it is not absolutely required.
ANTH 5255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3255/Anth 5255/RelS 3254/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course discusses evidence for the origins of religion and its diverse roles in human societies over millennia. It focuses on how artifacts and architecture are essential to religious experience. It asks: What constitutes religion for different cultures? Why is religion at the heart of politics, social life, and cultural imagination?
ANTH 5269 - Analysis of Stone Tool Technology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course offers practical lab experience in analyzing archaeological collections of stone tools to learn about human behavior in the past. Students gain experience needed to get a job in the cultural resource management industry.
ANTH 5327W - Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3327W/Anth 5327W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course is an intensive examination of the emergence, growth, and conquest of native civilizations in ancient America, focusing on the Maya, Aztec, and Inca states. Lectures and discussions examine the culture and history of these Native American civilizations, while also introducing students to anthropological theories of the state, religion, aesthetics, and history.
ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3401/Anth 5401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Fossil evidence paleoanthropologists use to reconstruct human evolutionary history. Taxonomy, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, tool use, land use, and biogeography. Examination of fossil casts, readings from primary/secondary professional sources. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
ANTH 5402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists reconstruct the past through the study of animal bones associated with artifacts at archaeological sites. Skeletal element (e.g., humerus, femur, tibia), and taxon (e.g., horse, antelope, sheep, bison, hyena) when confronted with bone. Comparative collection of bones from known taxa.
ANTH 5403 - Quantitative Methods in Biological Anthropology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Quantitative methods used by biological anthropologists. Applying these methods to real anthropometric data. Lectures, complementary sessions in computer lab. prereq: Basic univariate statistics course or instr consent
ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3405/Anth 5405
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, design, and variability of modern human skeleton. Anatomy, functional morphology, development, evolutionary history. Bone histology/biology, excavation, preservation, taphonomy, pathology, forensic analyses. Differentiating between males/females, adults/sub-adults, and humans/non-humans. Quizzes, exams, research paper, project.
ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the inter connections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Have you ever wondered how archaeologists interpret the vast amount of archaeological evidence from the British Isles, one of the most studied and best documented parts of the world? And how do archaeologists and governmental agencies protect the heritage of Britain, from major monuments such as Stonehenge, Roman forts, and Shakespeare?s theaters, to the minor products of craft industries such as personal ornaments and coins? This course teaches you about the archaeology of the British Isles, in all of its aspects. You learn how archaeologists study the changing societies of Britain and Ireland, from the first settlers about a million years ago to modern times. You learn about the strategies that public institutions employ to preserve and protect archaeological sites, and about the place of archaeology in tourism in the British Isles and in the formation of identities among the diverse peoples of modern Britain.
ANTH 5448 - Applied Heritage Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Contexts of cultural heritage applicable to federal/state protection. Approaches to planning/management. Issues of heritage/stakeholder conflict.
ANTH 5450 - Spatial Analysis in Anthropology: Research Design and Field Applications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This advanced undergraduate and graduate course introduces students to spatial analyses essential to anthropological ethnography, archaeology, and historical ecology. It builds on introductory courses at UMN, providing students an opportunity to learn anthropological applications of spatial analysis methods, including: research design, field mapping, database management, digital survey platforms, GIS analyses, and integration of quantitative and qualitative (ethnographic and historical) data. The structure of the course will follow the trajectory of a typical doctoral-level anthropological project, from pre-field data acquisition and preparation, to in-field data collection, post-field analysis, and presentation. Students who take this course will master skills that are crucial for successful anthropological spatial analysis in the field and laboratory.
ANTH 5501 - Managing Museum Collections
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3501/Anth 5501
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course provides a hands-on and research experience in collections management utilizing artifact, archival, and digital collections. Museum collections, the objects or specimens they contain, the information associated with them, and their care and maintenance are a crucial part of both the sciences and the humanities. While seemingly disparate, many of the issues faced by those responsible for collections are quite similar: how to preserve and care for those collections, legal issues surrounding the materials they contain, how to organize and classify the items, how to facilitate discovery and access, and how to make the information contained in them available to the broadest audience possible. The course includes lectures by museum professionals, hands-on activities, and selected readings. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for ANTH 3501.
ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
ANTH 5980 - Topics in Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANTH 8001 - Ethnography, Theory, History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to foundational concepts, methods, and ethnographic work. Emphasizes theories that have shaped 20th-century thinking in cultural anthropology. Connection of these theories to fieldwork and contemporary issues.
ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/perspectives in anthropology. Emphasizes American cultural anthropology. Rrecent work in semiotic, psychological, and feminist anthropology.
ANTH 8004 - Foundations of Anthropological Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical foundations of anthropological archaeology in historical and contemporary perspective. prereq: 8001, 8002
ANTH 8005 - Linguistic Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduction to literature of anthropological linguistics.
ANTH 8009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3009/Anth 8009/Hist 3066
Typically offered: Every Spring
How did complex urban societies first develop? This course addresses this question in ten regions of the world including Maya Mesoamerica, Inca South America, Sumerian Near East, Shang Civilization in East Asia, and early Greece and Rome.
ANTH 8113 - Primate Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5113/Anth 8113
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Evolutionary history of primates, with particular focus on origin/diversification of apes/Old World monkeys. prereq: Anthropology doctoral student
ANTH 8120 - Problems in Culture Change and Applied Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative studies of change in cultural systems. Impact of global processes on local cultures. Roles of anthropology and anthropologists in policy, planning, implementation, and evaluation.
ANTH 8201 - Humans and Nonhumans: Hybrids and Collectives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Social life as consisting of relationships not only among human beings, but also between humans and nonhumans: animals, plants, environments, technologies, etc. Focuses on figure of hybrid, its role in formations of collective life.
ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Classic and current issues in research methodology, including positivist, interpretivist, feminist, and postmodernist frameworks. Methodology, in the broadest sense of the concept, is evaluated. Students conduct three research exercises and set up an ethnographic research project. prereq: Grad anth major or instr consent
ANTH 8205 - Economic Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4053/8205
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theoretical foundations of economic anthropology examined through critical readings of traditional, classical, and contemporary authors. Ethnographic puzzles of material life and issues of ecological degradation, development, market expansion, gender, and transglobal processes.
ANTH 8207 - Political and Social Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Western concepts of politics, power, authority, society, state, and law. Cross-cultural approaches to these concepts in historical perspective. Major theoretical frameworks and current problems and positions in social and political anthropology. Ethnographic classics and new directions.
ANTH 8213 - Ecological Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar on method, theory, and key problems in ecological anthropology and human ecology. Examines approaches in light of human practices, interactions between culture and the environment, global environmental change, and our understanding of human dimensions of ecosystem-based management.
ANTH 8215 - Anthropology of Gender
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative, cross-cultural approach to gender. Focuses on various theories (e.g., feminist, postmodernist, psychoanalytic) of power, gender, authority, and femininity and masculinity. Gender ambiguity and issues of sexuality. prereq: Grad anth major or instr consent
ANTH 8219 - Grant Writing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students draft a research proposal in their area of interest. Seminar involves reading and evaluating proposals, learning about funding and process of submitting proposals, nuts of bolts of composing a proposal, and ethics of research in anthropology. prereq: Grad anth majors preparing to submit research grant proposals next academic yr
ANTH 8220 - Field School
Credits: 6.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3221/Anth 8220
Typically offered: Every Summer
Advanced field excavation, survey, and research. Intensive training in excavation techniques, recordation, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological materials or prehistoric remains.
ANTH 8223 - Anthropology of Place & Space
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course asks questions about the meaning of place, the relationship of space to place, the relationship of identity to place, and the relationship of place to environmental change in the event of industrial pollution, development projects, natural disasters and climate change. Theories of and ethnographic accounts of space and place in Cultural Anthropology and Geography will be discussed. In addition to foundational texts in the topic, we will also be reading contemporary accounts of nonwestern places.
ANTH 8230 - Anthropological Research Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Training seminar on research development, coordination, grant management, field/laboratory research management, fundraising. prereq: Anth grad student or instr consent
ANTH 8244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5244/8244
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
To Interpret Ancient Bone we must sharpen observational skills, read about observations and analysis by previous workers, and learn to record and analyze complex information. The class combines seminar/discussion formats, in which we read literature about how to best accomplish this type of research, and laboratory time, to give students the opportunity to observe and record modifications to bones that form the basis of archaeological and forensic observations. Students analyze different kinds of tool marks on bone, weathering, carnivore modifications, eco-morphology, ages of death, bone tools, and bones from archaeological sites to infer the "life history" of a bone. We recommend you take the Human Skeleton or Zooarchaeology Laboratory before you take this class, but it is not absolutely required.
ANTH 8510 - Topics in Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar examines particular aspects of archaeological methods and/or theory. Topics vary according to student and faculty interests.
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar examines particular aspects of method and/or theory. Topics vary according to student and faculty interests.
ANTH 8980 - Anthropology Graduate Workshop
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar examines aspects of the discipline that transcend traditional subfield boundaries.
ANTH 8990 - Topics in Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar examines aspects of the discipline that transcend traditional subfield boundaries.
ANTH 8991 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Under special circumstances and with instructor approval, qualified students may register for a listed course on a tutorial basis. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 8992 - Directed Reading
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 54.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
tbd prereq: instr consent
ANTH 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed Study prereq: instr consent
ANTH 8994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
N/A prereq: instr consent
ANTH 8004 - Foundations of Anthropological Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical foundations of anthropological archaeology in historical and contemporary perspective. prereq: 8001, 8002
ANTH 8009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3009/Anth 8009/Hist 3066
Typically offered: Every Spring
How did complex urban societies first develop? This course addresses this question in ten regions of the world including Maya Mesoamerica, Inca South America, Sumerian Near East, Shang Civilization in East Asia, and early Greece and Rome.
ANTH 8230 - Anthropological Research Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Training seminar on research development, coordination, grant management, field/laboratory research management, fundraising. prereq: Anth grad student or instr consent
ANTH 4101 - Decolonizing Archives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Archives are not neutral. In order to decolonize them, scholars in anthropology and other disciplines must first understand the ways in which Western settler values have structured them. Who decides acquisition policy? How are items indexed, described, and related to one another? Who has access, and under what conditions? And who is structurally excluded? In this course we decolonize by recontextualizing both the archives as institutions and their contents. In other words, we use methods appropriate for contemporary anthropological archival research. We will consider preservation, curation, organizational bias in archives, analytic scale, voice, and how historical texts are material culture. Students engage in original archival research.
ANTH 5269 - Analysis of Stone Tool Technology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course offers practical lab experience in analyzing archaeological collections of stone tools to learn about human behavior in the past. Students gain experience needed to get a job in the cultural resource management industry.
ANTH 5402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists reconstruct the past through the study of animal bones associated with artifacts at archaeological sites. Skeletal element (e.g., humerus, femur, tibia), and taxon (e.g., horse, antelope, sheep, bison, hyena) when confronted with bone. Comparative collection of bones from known taxa.
ANTH 5403 - Quantitative Methods in Biological Anthropology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Quantitative methods used by biological anthropologists. Applying these methods to real anthropometric data. Lectures, complementary sessions in computer lab. prereq: Basic univariate statistics course or instr consent
ANTH 5450 - Spatial Analysis in Anthropology: Research Design and Field Applications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This advanced undergraduate and graduate course introduces students to spatial analyses essential to anthropological ethnography, archaeology, and historical ecology. It builds on introductory courses at UMN, providing students an opportunity to learn anthropological applications of spatial analysis methods, including: research design, field mapping, database management, digital survey platforms, GIS analyses, and integration of quantitative and qualitative (ethnographic and historical) data. The structure of the course will follow the trajectory of a typical doctoral-level anthropological project, from pre-field data acquisition and preparation, to in-field data collection, post-field analysis, and presentation. Students who take this course will master skills that are crucial for successful anthropological spatial analysis in the field and laboratory.
ANTH 5008 - Advanced Flintknapping
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Hands-on training in techniques of advanced stone tool production, artifact reproduction, and lithic experimental design for academic/artistic purposes. prereq: [3008 or 5269] or instr consent
ANTH 5009 - Human Behavioral Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
In-depth introduction to, and critical review of, human behavioral biology, examining the approaches in anthropology and related fields. Classic texts/recent empirical studies of humans and other species. Theoretical underpinnings of this new discipline/how well theoretical predictions have been supported by subsequent research.
ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists/historians analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman Period. Interpreting archaeological evidence from specific sites to understand broad trends in human past.
ANTH 5028 - Historical Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3028/Anth 5028
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will explore the theories and methods of historical archaeology ? such as material culture studies, landscape perspectives, archival, and oral historical interpretation - as a means of intervening in contemporary discussions of diversity in the United States. Historical archaeology can be a very effective means to challenge some of the standard American narratives about our diverse past. Our aim is to move beyond either a simplistic ethnic pluralism or the superficial ?melting pot? progressive history and instead grapple with the materiality of settler colonialism, white supremacy, and capitalism. In learning about this field, we will consider what has distinguished historical archaeology from American archaeology more broadly, and how those differences are parlayed into specific research strengths. This includes several themes: colonialism; the modern world and globalizing economies; intersectional identities (race and ethnicity, class, sex and gender, religion, age, ability/disability) and social movements; public memory and commemoration; landscapes and social space; citizenship and subjectivity. Although historical archaeology until recently has been restrictively defined as addressing the European-colonized New World, the discipline in the past twenty years has significantly broadened its scope and impact on the practice of archaeology as a whole. Throughout the course we will discuss these developments, and what directions archaeology may take in the future as a result. Course work includes both reading/discussion and learning methods through practical exercises, and handling of archaeological material.
ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3145W/Anth 5045W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This class explores anthropological approaches to urban life. On one hand, the course examines the ontological nature of the city by looking into the relation between cities and their environment, and asking whether and how people differentiate "urban" and 'non-urban" spaces. It uncovers the social practices and behaviors that define urban life; urban-rural distinctions; the material and ecological processes that constitute cities; and popular representations of city and/or countryside. On the other hand, the course investigates the spatial and social divisions of the city, seeking to understand the historical struggles and ongoing processes that both draw together and differentiate the people of an urban environment. It studies how cities influence political decision-making, contributing to the uneven distribution of power and resources. It considers: industrialization; urban class conflict; gendered and racialized spaces; and suburbanization. Both of these approaches will also critically consider the city as a social object that we encounter and learn about through our engagement with kinds of media, such as novels and film. Hence, reading for the class will include literature from the social sciences and humanities, as well as critical works of fiction. Students will engage with these broader anthropological issues through an investigation of several global cities, especially Minneapolis-St. Paul, Chicago, Paris, Mexico City, Brasilia, and New Delhi. The class mixes lecture, discussion, and guided research. Lectures will introduce the history of urbanism and urban anthropology. Discussions will critically evaluate the readings, and offer insights and examples to better understand them. By participating in a guided research project, students will uncover hidden aspects of their own city, using ethnography or archaeology to shed light on the urban environment, social struggles over space, or other themes.
ANTH 5112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5112/Anth 8112
Prerequisites: Previous coursework in Biological Anthropology or Archaeology
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Major hypotheses regarding evolution of human behavior. Combine evidence from realm of biological anthropology as we consider link between bone biology/behavior. Archaeological record. Hypotheses about biocultural evolution regarding tool-use, hunting, scavenging, food sharing, grandmothers, cooking, long distance running. prereq: Previous coursework in Biological Anthropology or Archaeology
ANTH 5113 - Primate Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5113/Anth 8113
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Evolutionary history of primates. Particular focus on origin/diversification of apes/Old World monkeys. prereq: Anthropology major, junior or senior
ANTH 5121 - Business Anthropology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4121/Anth 5121
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological/ethnographic understandings/research techniques. prereq: MBA student
ANTH 5128 - Anthropology of Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5128/OLPD 5128
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Cross-cultural perspectives in examining educational patterns. Implicit/explicit cultural assumptions. Methods/approaches to cross-cultural studies in education.
ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The course examines material culture as a social creation, studied from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives (e.g., social anthropology, archaeology, primatology, history of science). The course examines the changing role of material culture from prehistory to the future.
ANTH 5244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5244/8244
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
To Interpret Ancient Bone we must sharpen observational skills, read about observations and analysis by previous workers, and learn to record and analyze complex information. The class combines seminar/discussion formats, in which we read literature about how to best accomplish this type of research, and laboratory time, to give students the opportunity to observe and record modifications to bones that form the basis of archaeological and forensic observations. Students analyze different kinds of tool marks on bone, weathering, carnivore modifications, eco-morphology, ages of death, bone tools, and bones from archaeological sites to infer the "life history" of a bone. We recommend you take the Human Skeleton or Zooarchaeology Laboratory before you take this class, but it is not absolutely required.
ANTH 5255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3255/Anth 5255/RelS 3254/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course discusses evidence for the origins of religion and its diverse roles in human societies over millennia. It focuses on how artifacts and architecture are essential to religious experience. It asks: What constitutes religion for different cultures? Why is religion at the heart of politics, social life, and cultural imagination?
ANTH 5269 - Analysis of Stone Tool Technology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course offers practical lab experience in analyzing archaeological collections of stone tools to learn about human behavior in the past. Students gain experience needed to get a job in the cultural resource management industry.
ANTH 5327W - Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3327W/Anth 5327W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course is an intensive examination of the emergence, growth, and conquest of native civilizations in ancient America, focusing on the Maya, Aztec, and Inca states. Lectures and discussions examine the culture and history of these Native American civilizations, while also introducing students to anthropological theories of the state, religion, aesthetics, and history.
ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3401/Anth 5401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Fossil evidence paleoanthropologists use to reconstruct human evolutionary history. Taxonomy, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, tool use, land use, and biogeography. Examination of fossil casts, readings from primary/secondary professional sources. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
ANTH 5402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists reconstruct the past through the study of animal bones associated with artifacts at archaeological sites. Skeletal element (e.g., humerus, femur, tibia), and taxon (e.g., horse, antelope, sheep, bison, hyena) when confronted with bone. Comparative collection of bones from known taxa.
ANTH 5403 - Quantitative Methods in Biological Anthropology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Quantitative methods used by biological anthropologists. Applying these methods to real anthropometric data. Lectures, complementary sessions in computer lab. prereq: Basic univariate statistics course or instr consent
ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3405/Anth 5405
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, design, and variability of modern human skeleton. Anatomy, functional morphology, development, evolutionary history. Bone histology/biology, excavation, preservation, taphonomy, pathology, forensic analyses. Differentiating between males/females, adults/sub-adults, and humans/non-humans. Quizzes, exams, research paper, project.
ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the inter connections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Have you ever wondered how archaeologists interpret the vast amount of archaeological evidence from the British Isles, one of the most studied and best documented parts of the world? And how do archaeologists and governmental agencies protect the heritage of Britain, from major monuments such as Stonehenge, Roman forts, and Shakespeare?s theaters, to the minor products of craft industries such as personal ornaments and coins? This course teaches you about the archaeology of the British Isles, in all of its aspects. You learn how archaeologists study the changing societies of Britain and Ireland, from the first settlers about a million years ago to modern times. You learn about the strategies that public institutions employ to preserve and protect archaeological sites, and about the place of archaeology in tourism in the British Isles and in the formation of identities among the diverse peoples of modern Britain.
ANTH 5448 - Applied Heritage Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Contexts of cultural heritage applicable to federal/state protection. Approaches to planning/management. Issues of heritage/stakeholder conflict.
ANTH 5450 - Spatial Analysis in Anthropology: Research Design and Field Applications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This advanced undergraduate and graduate course introduces students to spatial analyses essential to anthropological ethnography, archaeology, and historical ecology. It builds on introductory courses at UMN, providing students an opportunity to learn anthropological applications of spatial analysis methods, including: research design, field mapping, database management, digital survey platforms, GIS analyses, and integration of quantitative and qualitative (ethnographic and historical) data. The structure of the course will follow the trajectory of a typical doctoral-level anthropological project, from pre-field data acquisition and preparation, to in-field data collection, post-field analysis, and presentation. Students who take this course will master skills that are crucial for successful anthropological spatial analysis in the field and laboratory.
ANTH 5501 - Managing Museum Collections
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3501/Anth 5501
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course provides a hands-on and research experience in collections management utilizing artifact, archival, and digital collections. Museum collections, the objects or specimens they contain, the information associated with them, and their care and maintenance are a crucial part of both the sciences and the humanities. While seemingly disparate, many of the issues faced by those responsible for collections are quite similar: how to preserve and care for those collections, legal issues surrounding the materials they contain, how to organize and classify the items, how to facilitate discovery and access, and how to make the information contained in them available to the broadest audience possible. The course includes lectures by museum professionals, hands-on activities, and selected readings. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for ANTH 3501.
ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
ANTH 5980 - Topics in Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANTH 8001 - Ethnography, Theory, History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to foundational concepts, methods, and ethnographic work. Emphasizes theories that have shaped 20th-century thinking in cultural anthropology. Connection of these theories to fieldwork and contemporary issues.
ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/perspectives in anthropology. Emphasizes American cultural anthropology. Rrecent work in semiotic, psychological, and feminist anthropology.
ANTH 8005 - Linguistic Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduction to literature of anthropological linguistics.
ANTH 8111 - Evolutionary Morphology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Basic foundation of diverse anatomical adaptations of living/fossil primates. Principles of evolutionary theory. Stages of embryogenesis/fetal development. Morphological diversity. Evolutionary morphology. Body size, allometry, heterochrony. Primate evolution.
ANTH 8112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5112/Anth 8112
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Consider major hypotheses regarding evolution of human behavior. Evidence/arguments used to support or reject hypotheses. Consider link between bone biology/behavior. Archaeological record for more holistic understanding of evidence.
ANTH 8113 - Primate Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5113/Anth 8113
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Evolutionary history of primates, with particular focus on origin/diversification of apes/Old World monkeys. prereq: Anthropology doctoral student
ANTH 8114 - Biological Anthropology Graduate Program Seminar: Behavioral Ecology of Primates
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Anthropology graduate student or #.
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Course focuses on the behavioral ecology of primates, including humans, with a focus on how the evolution of social behaviors relates to ecology. The course serves as one of three Biological Anthropology Graduate Program Seminars, which provide training in the foundations of biological anthropology. For Biological Anthropology graduate students, the take-home exam for this course will stand as one of the three required Preliminary Papers. Students outside of Biological Anthropology are welcome to enroll pending permission of the instructor. prereq: Anthropology graduate student or instr consent.
ANTH 8120 - Problems in Culture Change and Applied Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative studies of change in cultural systems. Impact of global processes on local cultures. Roles of anthropology and anthropologists in policy, planning, implementation, and evaluation.
ANTH 8201 - Humans and Nonhumans: Hybrids and Collectives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Social life as consisting of relationships not only among human beings, but also between humans and nonhumans: animals, plants, environments, technologies, etc. Focuses on figure of hybrid, its role in formations of collective life.
ANTH 8203 - Research Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Classic and current issues in research methodology, including positivist, interpretivist, feminist, and postmodernist frameworks. Methodology, in the broadest sense of the concept, is evaluated. Students conduct three research exercises and set up an ethnographic research project. prereq: Grad anth major or instr consent
ANTH 8205 - Economic Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4053/8205
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theoretical foundations of economic anthropology examined through critical readings of traditional, classical, and contemporary authors. Ethnographic puzzles of material life and issues of ecological degradation, development, market expansion, gender, and transglobal processes.
ANTH 8207 - Political and Social Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Western concepts of politics, power, authority, society, state, and law. Cross-cultural approaches to these concepts in historical perspective. Major theoretical frameworks and current problems and positions in social and political anthropology. Ethnographic classics and new directions.
ANTH 8213 - Ecological Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar on method, theory, and key problems in ecological anthropology and human ecology. Examines approaches in light of human practices, interactions between culture and the environment, global environmental change, and our understanding of human dimensions of ecosystem-based management.
ANTH 8215 - Anthropology of Gender
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative, cross-cultural approach to gender. Focuses on various theories (e.g., feminist, postmodernist, psychoanalytic) of power, gender, authority, and femininity and masculinity. Gender ambiguity and issues of sexuality. prereq: Grad anth major or instr consent
ANTH 8219 - Grant Writing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students draft a research proposal in their area of interest. Seminar involves reading and evaluating proposals, learning about funding and process of submitting proposals, nuts of bolts of composing a proposal, and ethics of research in anthropology. prereq: Grad anth majors preparing to submit research grant proposals next academic yr
ANTH 8220 - Field School
Credits: 6.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3221/Anth 8220
Typically offered: Every Summer
Advanced field excavation, survey, and research. Intensive training in excavation techniques, recordation, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological materials or prehistoric remains.
ANTH 8223 - Anthropology of Place & Space
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course asks questions about the meaning of place, the relationship of space to place, the relationship of identity to place, and the relationship of place to environmental change in the event of industrial pollution, development projects, natural disasters and climate change. Theories of and ethnographic accounts of space and place in Cultural Anthropology and Geography will be discussed. In addition to foundational texts in the topic, we will also be reading contemporary accounts of nonwestern places.
ANTH 8244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5244/8244
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
To Interpret Ancient Bone we must sharpen observational skills, read about observations and analysis by previous workers, and learn to record and analyze complex information. The class combines seminar/discussion formats, in which we read literature about how to best accomplish this type of research, and laboratory time, to give students the opportunity to observe and record modifications to bones that form the basis of archaeological and forensic observations. Students analyze different kinds of tool marks on bone, weathering, carnivore modifications, eco-morphology, ages of death, bone tools, and bones from archaeological sites to infer the "life history" of a bone. We recommend you take the Human Skeleton or Zooarchaeology Laboratory before you take this class, but it is not absolutely required.
ANTH 8510 - Topics in Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar examines particular aspects of archaeological methods and/or theory. Topics vary according to student and faculty interests.
ANTH 8810 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar examines particular aspects of method and/or theory. Topics vary according to student and faculty interests.
ANTH 8980 - Anthropology Graduate Workshop
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar examines aspects of the discipline that transcend traditional subfield boundaries.
ANTH 8990 - Topics in Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar examines aspects of the discipline that transcend traditional subfield boundaries.
ANTH 8991 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Under special circumstances and with instructor approval, qualified students may register for a listed course on a tutorial basis. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 8992 - Directed Reading
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 54.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
tbd prereq: instr consent
ANTH 8993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed Study prereq: instr consent
ANTH 8994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -18.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
N/A prereq: instr consent