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Twin Cities Campus

Religious Studies Minor

Classical and Near Eastern Religions and Cultures
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2022
  • Required credits in this minor: 15
Religion is a fundamental part of human experience and meaning. It informs all aspects of human society, from individual and collective identity to personal relationships, from political sympathies to scientific investigation and artistic creativity. The academic study of religion, as a result, ranges widely across human experience and is informed by the methods of many disciplines. It is by its very nature interdisciplinary, drawing upon textual and literary studies, history, sociology, anthropology, the arts, and philosophy. The religious studies minor provides students with an opportunity to engage in interdisciplinary study by bringing together perspectives, approaches, questions, and expertise from faculty and courses across several departments. Students in the minor are thereby trained in the critical study of religious thought, practices, institutions, and communities throughout the world and across time periods. The minor provides students with a range of analytical tools as well as in-depth knowledge of particular traditions. For more information, visit the Religious Studies website at https://cla.umn.edu/religious-studies.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
The minor includes a total of five courses. Courses may be taken in any order. Students may earn a BA or a minor in religious studies, but not both.
Theory and Method in Religion
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· RELS 3001W - Theory and Method in Religion: Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5001 - Theory and Method in the Study of Religion: Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion (3.0 cr)
Electives
The purpose of the minor is to expose students to a diversity of religious traditions and methods of study. At least two religious traditions must be represented among the four elective courses. Elective courses should be selected in consultation with the DUS in order to promote coherence, breadth, and depth.
Take exactly 4 course(s) totaling 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AMES 3001 - Concepts in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3623W - The Age of Reformation [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5614 - The Medieval Church (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3626W - Witches, Seers, and Saints: Women, Gender, and Religion in the U.S. [WI] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3631 - Islam in America: A History of the Present (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3970 - Supplemental Discussion in Religious Studies (1.0 cr)
· RELS 3993 - Directed Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
· RELS 5504 - Development of Israelite Religion II (3.0 cr)
· RELS 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
· RELS 8190 - Comparative Seminar in Religions in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3534 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3070 - Topics in Religious Studies (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5070 - Topics in Religious Studies (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3076 - The Apostle Paul: Life, Letters, and Legacy (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3076 - Apostle Paul: Life, Letters, and Legacy (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3079 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3511 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3092 - Jesus in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3092 - Jesus in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3092 - Jesus in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3113 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3512 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3321 - American Indian Philosophies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3301 - American Indian Philosophies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3371 - Buddhism [GP] (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3672 - Buddhism [GP] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3373 - Religion and Society in Imperial China [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3373 - Religion and Society in Imperial China [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3466 - Religion and Society in Imperial China [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3374 - Introduction to Japanese Religions (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3471 - Introduction to Japanese Religions (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3377 - A Thousand Years of Buddhism in China: Beliefs, Practices, and Culture (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3377 - A Thousand Years of Buddhism in China: Beliefs, Practices, and Culture (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3415W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ARTH 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or AMES 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3520 - History of the Holocaust (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3727 - History of the Holocaust (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3520 - History of the Holocaust (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3543 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3544W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3081W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· RELS 3545 - History of Christianity II: From the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3082 - History of Christianity II: From the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3611 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3767 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3622 - 'Sinners, Saints, and Savages': Religion in Early America (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3802 - "Sinners, Saints, and Savages": Religion in Early America (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3623 - Religion and the American Culture Wars [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3804 - Religion and the American Culture Wars [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3624 - Atheists as ?Other?: Religious and Nonreligious Outsiders in the US [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3309 - Atheists as ?Other?: Religious & Nonreligious Outsiders in the US [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3625 - Magic and Medicine (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3285 - Magic and Medicine (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3627 - The End of the World in Literature and History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3025 - The End of the World in Literature and History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3671 - Hinduism (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3671 - Hinduism (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· RELS 3707W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5707W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3708 - The Cultures of the Silk Road (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3872 - The Cultures of the Silk Road (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3504 - The Cultures of the Silk Road (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3711 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3145 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3645 - Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3712 - Islam: Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3493 - Islam: Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3871 - Islam: Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3714 - Islam and the West (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3546 - Islam and the West (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3643 - Islam and the West (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3715 - History of the Crusades [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3613 - History of the Crusades [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3613 - History of the Crusades [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3716 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3717 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3718W - Christ in Islamic Thought [WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3494W - Christ in Islamic Thought [WI] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3721 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5721 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3513 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5513 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3722 - The Ottoman Empire [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3547 - The Ottoman Empire [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 4049 - Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 4049 - Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
· RELS 4309 - Religion in American Public Life: Culture, Politics, and Communities [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4309 - Religion in American Public Life: Culture, Politics, & Communities [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3704 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3074 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture [AH] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3628 - Jewish American Literature: Religion, Culture, and the Immigrant Experience [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3011 - Jewish American Literature: Religion, Culture, and the Immigrant Experience [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
 
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RELS 3001W - Theory and Method in Religion: Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: RelS 3001/5001/5521
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical/methodological issues in academic study of religion. Theories of origin, character, and function of religion as a human phenomenon. Psychological, sociological, anthropological, and phenomenological perspectives.
RELS 5001 - Theory and Method in the Study of Religion: Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: RelS 3001/5001/5521
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical/methodological issues in academic study of religion. Theories of origin, character, and function of religion as a human phenomenon. Psychological, sociological, anthropological, and phenomenological perspectives. prereq: Sr or grad student or instr consent
AMES 3001 - Concepts in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to questions of modernity in Asia and the Middle East and foundational course for the major and the minor in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. Reflecting the range of geography covered by the department, it will cover topics related to the Middle East, South Asia, and East Asia, and highlight connections among them. Our primary goal is to become versed in a number of key concepts and issues that are essential to being a successful student in upper-division AMES courses. Furthermore, we will engage with theoretical, literary, and filmic texts concerning various regions of the Asian continent and develop the ability to respond to major questions in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies through the close reading of primary and secondary materials and the practical employment of key terms and concepts. There will be a strong focus on proper definitions and historical contextualization, and on analytical application and interpretation.
HIST 3623W - The Age of Reformation (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course will examine the great religious convulsion that gripped Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Chronologically, however, we will begin in the late medieval period as we consider important changes that were occurring in European culture and society culminating with Europe's first Reformation, not in Germany but in Bohemia. Geographically, we begin with Europe but our scope eventually widens out to consider developments also in Asia and the Americas. We conclude by considering the relaxation of religious tensions in the late seventeenth century and concurrent growth of toleration and skepticism. Throughout the course we will consider religion as a dynamic that has had a broad impact on society affecting not only personal belief but also the politics, social patterns, and intellectual and cultural production of the early modern world.
HIST 5614 - The Medieval Church
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to history of western church in Middle Ages. Emphasizes church teachings and institutional structures, beliefs/practices of lay people, medieval Christian encounter with non-Christian world. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
RELS 3626W - Witches, Seers, and Saints: Women, Gender, and Religion in the U.S. (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GWSS 3626W/RelS 3626W/RelS 362
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the development and ramifications of gender ideologies within several religious groups in North America from the colonial period to the present and explores women's strategies that have contributed to and resisted these ideologies.
RELS 3631 - Islam in America: A History of the Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3631/RelS 3631
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
From the ?Age of Discovery? and the African slave trade, to Malcolm X and the War on Terror, Islam has long been an integral part of the American landscape. In this course students will examine the history of Islam and social formation of Muslim communities in the United States. We will approach this history in the plural: as histories of Islam in America, paying particular attention to the different local and global dynamics that led to the migration of this racially, ethnically, and class variegated community. This course will explore how racial, national, cultural, and sectarian differences within and between Muslim communities shape and challenge the notion of a singular Islam or Muslim community. We will ask how and why Islam and Muslims have been characterized - both historically and today - as a "problem" in/for America. What does the emergence of terminology like ?American Muslim? and ?American Islam? tell us about these historical tensions, conceptions of good/bad citizenship, and identity politics more broadly, in the United States today?
RELS 3970 - Supplemental Discussion in Religious Studies
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Extra discussion section attached to a religious studies course/event.
RELS 3993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Student works with faculty on a subject decided upon by both.
RELS 5504 - Development of Israelite Religion II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Ancient Judaism from the Persian restoration (520 B.C.E.) to Roman times (2nd century C.E.). Religious, cultural, and historical developments are examined to understand Jewish life, work, and worship under a succession of foreign empires: Persian, Greek, Roman.
RELS 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 24.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
TBD prereq: instr consent
RELS 8190 - Comparative Seminar in Religions in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Topics vary, see Class Schedule. Major cultural movement as it developed over several centuries. Draws on evidence in literature, archival records, inscriptions, documentary papyri, and archaeological remains. Artistic media such as wall painting, architectural ornament, funerary sculpture, or manuscript illumination. prereq: Grad student in relevant field
RELS 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course. Old: Significance of religious law in Judaism. Babylonian background of biblical law. Biblical creation of the person as a legal category. Rabbinic transformations of biblical norms. Covenant in Christianity/Islam. Contemporary Jewish literature/philosophy.
JWST 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
RELS 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
JWST 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
RELS 3034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1534/JwSt 1034/RelS1034
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the development of Judaism and Jewish civilizations from their beginnings to the present. With over three millennia as its subject, the course must of necessity be a general survey. Together we will explore the mythic structures, significant documents, historical experiences, narratives, practices, beliefs, and worldviews of the Jewish people. The course begins by examining the roots of Judaism in the Hebrew Bible and the history of ancient Israel but quickly focuses on the creative forces that developed within Judaism as a national narrative confronted the forces of history, especially in the forms of the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires. Rabbinic Judaism becomes the most dominant creative force and will receive our greatest attention, both in its formative years and as it encounters the rise of Christianity and Islam. After studying the Jewish experience in the medieval world, we will turn to Judaism?s encounter with the enlightenment and modernity. The historical survey concludes by attending to the transformations within Judaism and Jewish life of the last 150 years, including a confrontation with the experience of the Holocaust. Woven throughout this historical survey will be repeated engagements with core questions: ?Who is a Jew?? ?What do Jews believe?? ?What do Jews do?? ?What do we mean by ?religion??? ?How do Jews read texts within their tradition?? And perhaps most importantly, ?How many answers are there to a Jewish question?? Students in this course can expect to come away with some knowledge of the Bible in Judaism, rabbinic literature and law, Jewish mysticism and philosophy, Jewish nationalism and Zionism, Jewish culture, ritual, and worship in the synagogue, the home, and the community, and Jewish celebrations of life cycle events and the festivals.
HIST 3534 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1534/JwSt 1034/RelS1034
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the development of Judaism and Jewish civilizations from their beginnings to the present. With over three millennia as its subject, the course must of necessity be a general survey. Together we will explore the mythic structures, significant documents, historical experiences, narratives, practices, beliefs, and worldviews of the Jewish people. The course begins by examining the roots of Judaism in the Hebrew Bible and the history of ancient Israel but quickly focuses on the creative forces that developed within Judaism as a national narrative confronted the forces of history, especially in the forms of the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires. Rabbinic Judaism becomes the most dominant creative force and will receive our greatest attention, both in its formative years and as it encounters the rise of Christianity and Islam. After studying the Jewish experience in the medieval world, we will turn to Judaism?s encounter with the enlightenment and modernity. The historical survey concludes by attending to the transformations within Judaism and Jewish life of the last 150 years, including a confrontation with the experience of the Holocaust. Woven throughout this historical survey will be repeated engagements with core questions: ?Who is a Jew?? ?What do Jews believe?? ?What do Jews do?? ?What do we mean by ?religion??? ?How do Jews read texts within their tradition?? And perhaps most importantly, ?How many answers are there to a Jewish question?? Students in this course can expect to come away with some knowledge of the Bible in Judaism, rabbinic literature and law, Jewish mysticism and philosophy, Jewish nationalism and Zionism, Jewish culture, ritual, and worship in the synagogue, the home, and the community, and Jewish celebrations of life cycle events and the festivals.
JWST 3034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1534/JwSt 1034/RelS1034
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the development of Judaism and Jewish civilizations from their beginnings to the present. With over three millennia as its subject, the course must of necessity be a general survey. Together we will explore the mythic structures, significant documents, historical experiences, narratives, practices, beliefs, and worldviews of the Jewish people. The course begins by examining the roots of Judaism in the Hebrew Bible and the history of ancient Israel but quickly focuses on the creative forces that developed within Judaism as a national narrative confronted the forces of history, especially in the forms of the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires. Rabbinic Judaism becomes the most dominant creative force and will receive our greatest attention, both in its formative years and as it encounters the rise of Christianity and Islam. After studying the Jewish experience in the medieval world, we will turn to Judaism?s encounter with the enlightenment and modernity. The historical survey concludes by attending to the transformations within Judaism and Jewish life of the last 150 years, including a confrontation with the experience of the Holocaust. Woven throughout this historical survey will be repeated engagements with core questions: ?Who is a Jew?? ?What do Jews believe?? ?What do Jews do?? ?What do we mean by ?religion??? ?How do Jews read texts within their tradition?? And perhaps most importantly, ?How many answers are there to a Jewish question?? Students in this course can expect to come away with some knowledge of the Bible in Judaism, rabbinic literature and law, Jewish mysticism and philosophy, Jewish nationalism and Zionism, Jewish culture, ritual, and worship in the synagogue, the home, and the community, and Jewish celebrations of life cycle events and the festivals.
RELS 3070 - Topics in Religious Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule and Course Guide.
RELS 5070 - Topics in Religious Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule and Course Guide.
RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3171.
RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Sources include literature, art, and archaeology. Homer and Olympian deities, ritual performance, prayer/sacrifice, temple architecture, death and the afterlife, mystery cults, philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions.
CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 3076 - The Apostle Paul: Life, Letters, and Legacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
How/what can we know about Paul. What his message was. What he was fighting. How he was later understood by friends/foes.
CNES 3076 - Apostle Paul: Life, Letters, and Legacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3076/5076/RelA 3076/5076
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
How/what can we know about Paul. What his message was. What he was fighting. How he was later understood by friends/foes.
RELS 3079 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3511/JwSt 3511/RelS 3079
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Diversity of social/cultural interactions between Muslims and Jews and between Islam and Judaism since 1700. What enabled the two religious communities to peacefully coexist? What were causes of conflict? Why is history of Muslim-Jewish relations such a contested issue?
HIST 3511 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3511/JwSt 3511/RelS 3079
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Diversity of social/cultural interactions between Muslims and Jews and between Islam and Judaism since 1700. What enabled the two religious communities to peacefully coexist? What were causes of conflict? Why is history of Muslim-Jewish relations such a contested issue?
RELS 3092 - Jesus in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNRC 1082/Hist 1082/RelS 1082/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Who was Jesus? While there has been some basic consistency in the depictions of Jesus throughout history, there has also been lots of variety. We will explore a whole host of portraits of Jesus at different points in history to demonstrate not only the varying ways that Jesus has been thought of but also to understand the relationship between these portraits and the historical and cultural contexts in which they were created. We will look at the gospels of the New Testament and some from outside the New Testament. We will look at ancient and medieval art. And we will look at modern film. Although we might not get to the bottom of who Jesus was, we might understand more fully how communities throughout history have thought about him. Intended as a course of interest to undergraduates in all colleges of the TC campus. Students of any, all, or no religious background are welcome.
CNES 3092 - Jesus in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNRC 1082/Hist 1082/RelS 1082/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Who was Jesus? While there has been some basic consistency in the depictions of Jesus throughout history, there has also been lots of variety. We will explore a whole host of portraits of Jesus at different points in history to demonstrate not only the varying ways that Jesus has been thought of but also to understand the relationship between these portraits and the historical and cultural contexts in which they were created. We will look at the gospels of the New Testament and some from outside the New Testament. We will look at ancient and medieval art. And we will look at modern film. Although we might not get to the bottom of who Jesus was, we might understand more fully how communities throughout history have thought about him. Intended as a course of interest to undergraduates in all colleges of the TC campus. Students of any, all, or no religious background are welcome.
HIST 3092 - Jesus in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNRC 1082/Hist 1082/RelS 1082/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Who was Jesus? While there has been some basic consistency in the depictions of Jesus throughout history, there has also been lots of variety. We will explore a whole host of portraits of Jesus at different points in history to demonstrate not only the varying ways that Jesus has been thought of but also to understand the relationship between these portraits and the historical and cultural contexts in which they were created. We will look at the gospels of the New Testament and some from outside the New Testament. We will look at ancient and medieval art. And we will look at modern film. Although we might not get to the bottom of who Jesus was, we might understand more fully how communities throughout history have thought about him. Intended as a course of interest to undergraduates in all colleges of the TC campus. Students of any, all, or no religious background are welcome.
RELS 3113 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3942/Jwst 3512/RelS 3113
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
History of Zionism/Israel. Arab-Jewish conflict, tensions between religious/secular Jews. Relationships between Mizrahi, Ashkenazi, Russian, Ethiopian, Arab citizens. Israeli cultural imagery. Newsreels, political posters, television shows, films, popular music.
HIST 3512 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3942/Jwst 3512/RelS 3113
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
History of Zionism/Israel. Arab-Jewish conflict, tensions between religious/secular Jews. Relationships between Mizrahi, Ashkenazi, Russian, Ethiopian, Arab citizens. Israeli cultural imagery. Newsreels, political posters, television shows, films, popular music.
RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
RELS 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
CNES 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
RELS 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3202/JwSt 3202/RelS 3202
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of Israelite prophets. Emphasizes Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Second Isaiah. Prophetic contributions to Israelite religion. Personality of prophets. Politics, prophetic reaction. Textual analysis, Biblical scholarship. Prophecy viewed cross-culturally. prereq: [RelS 1001] or [CNES 1201 or JWST 1201 or RELS 1201 or CNES 3201 or JWST 3201 or RELS 3201]
CNES 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3202/JwSt 3202/RelS 3202
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of Israelite prophets. Emphasizes Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Second Isaiah. Prophetic contributions to Israelite religion. Personality of prophets. Politics, prophetic reaction. Textual analysis, biblical scholarship. Prophecy viewed cross-culturally. prereq: [RelS 1001] or [CNES 1201 or JWST 1201 or RELS 1201 or CNES 3201 or JWST 3201 or RELS 3201]
RELS 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, women, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Read biblical texts from academic point of view.
CNES 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, woman, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Reading biblical texts from academic point of view.
JWST 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, women, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Read biblical texts from academic point of view.
RELS 3321 - American Indian Philosophies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3301/RelS 3321
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
World views of indigenous people of Americas. Topics include native medicines/healing practices, ceremonies/ritual, governance, ecology, humor, tribal histories, status of contemporary native people.
AMIN 3301 - American Indian Philosophies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3301/RelS 3321
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
World views of indigenous people of Americas. Topics include native medicines/healing practices, ceremonies/ritual, governance, ecology, humor, tribal histories, status of contemporary native people.
RELS 3371 - Buddhism (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AMES 3672/Rels 3371/RelS 5371
Typically offered: Summer Even Year
Historical and contemporary account of the Buddhist religion in Asia/world in terms of its rise, development, various schools, practices, philosophical concepts, and ethics. Current trends in the modern faith and the rise of "socially engaged" Buddhism.
AMES 3672 - Buddhism (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AMES 3672/Rels 3371/RelS 5371
Typically offered: Summer Even Year
Historical and contemporary account of the Buddhist religion in Asia/world in terms of its rise, development, various schools, practices, philosophical concepts, and ethics. Current trends in the modern faith and the rise of "socially engaged" Buddhism.
RELS 3373 - Religion and Society in Imperial China (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3373/Hist 3466/RelS 3373
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Varieties of religious experience in imperial China. Religion as lived practices. Textual traditions. Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, relations among them. Western missionary enterprise in China.
AMES 3373 - Religion and Society in Imperial China (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3373/Hist 3466/RelS 3373
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Varieties of religious experience in imperial China. Religion as lived practices. Textual traditions. Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, relations among them. Western missionary enterprise in China.
HIST 3466 - Religion and Society in Imperial China (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3373/Hist 3466/RelS 3373
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Varieties of religious experience in imperial China. Religion as lived practices. Textual traditions. Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, relations among them. Western missionary enterprise in China.
RELS 3374 - Introduction to Japanese Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3471/RelS 3374
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
An introduction to the development of different forms of religious practice in Japan over the past fourteen hundred years. A survey of Japanese religions and their development will be combined with specific examples (past and present) that demonstrate the way that religious belief has manifested itself in various forms of cultural practice.
AMES 3471 - Introduction to Japanese Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
An introduction to the development of different forms of religious practice in Japan over the past fourteen hundred years. A survey of Japanese religions and their development will be combined with specific examples (past and present) that demonstrate the way that religious belief has manifested itself in various forms of cultural practice.
RELS 3377 - A Thousand Years of Buddhism in China: Beliefs, Practices, and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3377/RelS 3377
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Buddhism in China, 4th-15th centuries. Introduction of Buddhism to China. Relevance of Buddhist teaching to indigenous thought (e.g., Taoism, Confucianism). Major "schools": Tiantai, Huayan, Chan/Zen, etc.. Cultural activities of monks, nuns, and lay believers.
AMES 3377 - A Thousand Years of Buddhism in China: Beliefs, Practices, and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3377/RelS 3377
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Buddhism in China, 4th-15th centuries. Introduction of Buddhism to China. Relevance of Buddhist teaching to indigenous thought (e.g., Taoism, Confucianism). Major "schools": Tiantai, Huayan, Chan/Zen, etc.. Cultural activities of monks, nuns, and lay believers.
RELS 3415W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting, from prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to present.
ARTH 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
AMES 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNES 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
RELS 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3504/JwSt 3504/RelS 3504
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The rise of Hellenistic kingdoms in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East created a variety of responses from local, subjugated peoples, and some of the most documented cases are those of Jewish populations in Koele-Syria/Palestine. The main objective of this course is to analyze Jewish responses to imperial rule and military conflict during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods (c. 300 B.C.E. - 150 C.E.), but we will also spend time examining the broader picture of how local, ancestral groups fared under foreign rule. Along with discussing pertinent archaeological evidence, we will discuss Jewish literature and documentary material from this period, including, the sectarian documents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Book of Judith (a Jewish "novel"), the Books of Daniel and the Maccabees (all of which provide historical information about the Maccabean revolt and rise of the Hasmoneans), and the writings of Josephus (a Jewish writer who witnessed the Roman takeover of Palestine in the first century C.E.). This course will stay within the confines of the ancient evidence and not examine later interpretations when analyzing each historical period; it will begin with Ptolemaic control of the region and conclude with the Bar Kokhba revolt, its aftermath, and the resilience of Jewish populations in northern Palestine. Topics that will be examined in depth are messianism and apocalypticism, the Jerusalem Temple, Jewish ancestral traditions (which include "biblical" literature), and theoretical models used by scholars to analyze power relationships in antiquity.
CNES 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3504/JwSt 3504/RelS 3504
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The rise of Hellenistic kingdoms in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East created a variety of responses from local, subjugated peoples, and some of the most documented cases are those of Jewish populations in Koele-Syria/Palestine. The main objective of this course is to analyze Jewish responses to imperial rule and military conflict during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods (c. 300 B.C.E. ? 150 C.E.), but we will also spend time examining the broader picture of how local, ancestral groups fared under foreign rule. Along with discussing pertinent archaeological evidence, we will discuss Jewish literature and documentary material from this period, including, the sectarian documents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Book of Judith (a Jewish "novel"), the Books of Daniel and the Maccabees (all of which provide historical information about the Maccabean revolt and rise of the Hasmoneans), and the writings of Josephus (a Jewish writer who witnessed the Roman takeover of Palestine in the first century C.E.). This course will stay within the confines of the ancient evidence and not examine later interpretations when analyzing each historical period; it will begin with Ptolemaic control of the region and conclude with the Bar Kokhba revolt, its aftermath, and the resilience of Jewish populations in northern Palestine. Topics that will be examined in depth are messianism and apocalypticism, the Jerusalem Temple, Jewish ancestral traditions (which include biblical literature), and theoretical models used by scholars to analyze power relationships in antiquity.
JWST 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3504/JwSt 3504/RelS 3504
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The rise of Hellenistic kingdoms in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East created a variety of responses from local, subjugated peoples, and some of the most documented cases are those of Jewish populations in Koele-Syria/Palestine. The main objective of this course is to analyze Jewish responses to imperial rule and military conflict during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods (c. 300 B.C.E. - 150 C.E.), but we will also spend time examining the broader picture of how local, ancestral groups fared under foreign rule. Along with discussing pertinent archaeological evidence, we will discuss Jewish literature and documentary material from this period, including, the sectarian documents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Book of Judith (a Jewish "novel"), the Books of Daniel and the Maccabees (all of which provide historical information about the Maccabean revolt and rise of the Hasmoneans), and the writings of Josephus (a Jewish writer who witnessed the Roman takeover of Palestine in the first century C.E.). This course will stay within the confines of the ancient evidence and not examine later interpretations when analyzing each historical period; it will begin with Ptolemaic control of the region and conclude with the Bar Kokhba revolt, its aftermath, and the resilience of Jewish populations in northern Palestine. Topics that will be examined in depth are messianism and apocalypticism, the Jerusalem Temple, Jewish ancestral traditions (which include biblical literature), and theoretical models used by scholars to analyze power relationships in antiquity.
RELS 3520 - History of the Holocaust
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3727/JwSt 3520/RelS 3520
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of 1933-1945 extermination of six million Jews and others by Nazi Germany on basis of race. European anti-Semitism. Implications of social Darwinism and race theory. Perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resistance. Theological responses of Jews and Christians.
HIST 3727 - History of the Holocaust
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3727/JwSt 3520/RelS 3520
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of 1933-1945 extermination of six million Jews and others by Nazi Germany on basis of race. European anti-Semitism. Implications of social Darwinism and race theory. Perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resistance. Theological responses of Jews and Christians.
JWST 3520 - History of the Holocaust
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3727/JwSt 3520/RelS 3520
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of 1933-1945 extermination of six million Jews and others by Nazi Germany on basis of race. European anti-Semitism. Implications of social Darwinism and race theory. Perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resistance. Theological responses of Jews and Christians.
RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and afterlife found in cultures of ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and the afterlife found in the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
RELS 3543 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3617Hist/MeSt 3617/RelS
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Between classical and medieval, pagan and Christian, Roman and barbarian, the late antique world was a dynamic age. This course focuses on the Mediterranean region from the 2nd to the mid-7th century exploring such topics as the conversion of Constantine, the fall of Rome, barbarian invasions, the spread of Christianity, and the rise of Islam.
CNES 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3617Hist/MeSt 3617/RelS
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Between classical and medieval, pagan and Christian, Roman and barbarian, the late antique world was a dynamic age. This course will focus on the Mediterranean region from the 2nd to the mid-7th century exploring such topics as the conversion of Constantine, the fall of Rome, barbarian invasions, the spread of Christianity, and the rise of Islam.
MEST 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3617Hist/MeSt 3617/RelS
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Between classical and medieval, pagan and Christian, Roman and barbarian, the late antique world was a dynamic age. Course focuses on the Mediterranean region from the 2nd to the mid-7th century exploring such topics as the conversion of Constantine, the fall of Rome, barbarian invasions, the spread of Christianity, and the rise of Islam.
RELS 3544W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3081W/MeSt 1081/RelS 3544
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
This course surveys the history of Christianity from its status as a persecuted minority religion of the Roman Empire to its dominant role in medieval Europe and Byzantium. We study Christian traditions in Asia and Africa as well as Europe with special attention to the relationship between Christianity and culture in the ancient and medieval world.
HIST 3081W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3081W/MeSt 1081/RelS 3544
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
This course surveys the history of Christianity from its status as a persecuted minority religion of the Roman Empire to its dominant role in medieval Europe and Byzantium. We study Christian traditions in Asia and Africa as well as Europe with special attention to the relationship between Christianity and culture in the ancient and medieval world.
RELS 3545 - History of Christianity II: From the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3082/RelS 3545
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
The course examines the history of Christianity from the 13th century to the end of the 18th century. It begins with the Latin church at the height of its power before moving on to a consideration of the disastrous 14th century, the revolts of the 15th and the Reformations of the 16th centuries. The course closes by considering new challenges facing the church in an age of Enlightenment and Revolution.
HIST 3082 - History of Christianity II: From the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3082/RelS 3545
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
The course examines the history of Christianity from the 13th century to the end of the 18th century. It begins with the Latin church at the height of its power before moving on to a consideration of the disastrous 14th century, the revolts of the 15th and the Reformations of the 16th centuries. The course closes by considering new challenges facing the church in an age of Enlightenment and Revolution.
RELS 3611 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3767/RelS 3611
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of orthodox church in Byzantium, Islamic Near East, Slavic world, and diaspora. Impact of orthodoxy on political/cultural institutions. Interaction with other Christian/non-Christian communities. Orthodox spirituality/aesthetics.
HIST 3767 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3767/RelS 3611
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Development of the orthodox church in Byzantium, the Islamic Near East, the Slavic world and in the diaspora; impact of orthodoxy on political and cultural institutions, interaction with other Christian and non-Christian communities; orthodox spirituality and aesthetics.
RELS 3612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
RELS 5612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
ARTH 3335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
ARTH 5335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
RELS 3622 - 'Sinners, Saints, and Savages': Religion in Early America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3802/RelS 3622
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Native American, Euro-American, and African American cosmologies. Perceptions of religious differences. Notions of us/them, civility, savagery. How religious beliefs shaped responses to colonization, enslavement, and revolution. prereq: Non-fr or instr consent
HIST 3802 - "Sinners, Saints, and Savages": Religion in Early America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3802/RelS 3622
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Native American, Euro-American, and African American cosmologies. Perceptions of religious differences. Notions us/them, civility, and savagery. How religious beliefs shaped responses to colonization, enslavement, and revolution. prereq: Non-fr or instr consent
RELS 3623 - Religion and the American Culture Wars (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3804 / HIST 3804H / RELS
Typically offered: Every Fall
Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, James Madison, Thomas Paine, George Washington, and John Adams on religion, faith, and religion in politics. Deism. Enlightenment-era discussions about rational religion. Rise of evangelicalism. Separation of church/state, framers' original intent for first amendment. Religious Right.
HIST 3804 - Religion and the American Culture Wars (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3804 / HIST 3804H / RELS
Typically offered: Every Fall
Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, James Madison, Thomas Paine, George Washington, and John Adams on religion, faith, and religion in politics. Deism. Enlightenment-era discussions about rational religion. Rise of evangelicalism. Separation of church/state, framers' original intent for first amendment. Religious Right.
RELS 3624 - Atheists as ?Other?: Religious and Nonreligious Outsiders in the US (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3309/RelS 3624
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
What does it mean to be an atheist in the United States today? Atheists comprise a small percentage of the American population, but one with an increasingly visible presence in popular culture, political discourse, & everyday life. How do atheists organize into groups oriented toward identity-formation, social connection, and political action? prereq: 1001 recommended
SOC 3309 - Atheists as ?Other?: Religious & Nonreligious Outsiders in the US (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3309/RelS 3624
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
What does it mean to be an atheist in the United States today? Atheists comprise a small percentage of the American population, but one with an increasingly visible presence in popular culture, political discourse, & everyday life. How do atheists organize into groups oriented toward identity-formation, social connection, and political action? prereq: 1001 recommended
RELS 3625 - Magic and Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3285/RelS 3625
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course examines how the line between magic and medicine has changed over time. From accusations of witchcraft to proclamations of scientific breakthrough, we will examine the relationship between the supernatural and the natural from the early modern period to today. Specific topics include the practice of exorcism, the concept of the "four humors," the persecution of witches, the development of "voodoo," the effectiveness of placebos, and the professionalization of medicine. Throughout, we will ask how gender, class, and race have affected the construction of "magic" and "medicine."
HIST 3285 - Magic and Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3285/RelS 3625
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course examines how the line between magic and medicine has changed over time. From accusations of witchcraft to proclamations of scientific breakthrough, we will examine the relationship between the supernatural and the natural from the early modern period to today. Specific topics include the practice of exorcism, the concept of the "four humors," the persecution of witches, the development of "voodoo," the effectiveness of placebos, and the professionalization of medicine. Throughout, we will ask how gender, class, and race have affected the construction of "magic" and "medicine."
RELS 3627 - The End of the World in Literature and History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3025/RelS 3627
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
For at least two and a half millennia, prophets, politicians, and poets have crafted terrifying accounts about the end of the world. This comparatist seminar examines the way different cultures have imagined a final apocalypse with particular attention to the political and social consequences of their visions. Students will read texts that focus on pandemic, extraterrestrial attack, nuclear holocaust, prophecy, cybernetic revolt, divine judgment, resource depletion, meteoric impact, or one of the many other ways in which humans write of their demise. They will use literary analysis to explore the many historical and contemporary wastelands they will encounter. They will write short papers and give in-class presentations on different kinds of apocalypse.
ENGL 3025 - The End of the World in Literature and History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3025/RelS 3627
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
For at least two and a half millennia, prophets, politicians, and poets have crafted terrifying accounts about the end of the world. This comparatist seminar examines the way different cultures have imagined a final apocalypse with particular attention to the political and social consequences of their visions. Students will read texts that focus on pandemic, extraterrestrial attack, nuclear holocaust, prophecy, cybernetic revolt, divine judgment, resource depletion, meteoric impact, or one of the many other ways in which humans write of their demise. They will use literary analysis to explore the many historical and contemporary wastelands they will encounter. They will write short papers and give in-class presentations on different kinds of apocalypse.
RELS 3671 - Hinduism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3671/Hist 3492/RelS 3671/R
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of Hinduism focusing on sectarian trends, modern religious practices, myths/rituals, pilgrimage patterns/ religious festivals. Interrelationship between Indian social structure/Hinduism.
AMES 3671 - Hinduism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3671/Hist 3492/RelS 3671/R
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of Hinduism focusing on sectarian trends, modern religious practices, myths/rituals, pilgrimage patterns/ religious festivals. Interrelationship between Indian social structure/Hinduism.
RELS 3706W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
RELS 3707W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
RELS 5707W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
RELS 3708 - The Cultures of the Silk Road
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3872/Hist 3504/RelS 3708
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Past/present state of cultures that flourished in Central Asia (present-day CA republics, Iran, Afghanistan) after Alexander the Great. Decline with opening of sea routes.
AMES 3872 - The Cultures of the Silk Road
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3872/Hist 3504/RelS 3708
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Past/present state of cultures that flourished in Central Asia (present-day CA republics, Iran, Afghanistan) after Alexander the Great. Decline with opening of sea routes.
HIST 3504 - The Cultures of the Silk Road
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3872/Hist 3504/RelS 3708
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Past/present state of the cultures that flourished in Central Asia (present-day CA republics, Iran, Afghanistan) after Alexander the Great and declined with opening of sea routes.
RELS 3711 - The Islamic World (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3145/GloS 3645/RelS 3711
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundation of Islam in Arabian Peninsula, its spread to Asia and Africa. Islamic civilization, influence on Europe. Rise of capitalism, colonization. Islamic resurgence. State-society and development. Culture/conflict in Moslem societies. Gender and Islam. Islam and the West. Case studies.
GEOG 3145 - The Islamic World (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3145/GloS 3645/RelS 3711
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundation of Islam in Arabian Peninsula, its spread to Asia and Africa. Islamic civilization, influence on Europe before rise of capitalism. Rise of Capitalist Europe, colonization of Islamic World Islamic resurgence and post-colonial world. State-society and development. Culture/conflict in Moslem societies. Gender and Islam. Islamic World and the West. Moslems in North America and Europe. Case studies.
GLOS 3645 - Islamic World (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3145/GloS 3645/RelS 3711
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundation of Islam in Arabian Peninsula, its spread to Asia and Africa. Islamic civilization, influence on Europe before rise of capitalism. Rise of Capitalist Europe, colonization of Islamic World Islamic resurgence and post-colonial World. State-society and development. Culture/conflict in Moslem societies. Gender and Islam. Islamic World and the West. Moslems in North America and Europe. Case studies.
RELS 3712 - Islam: Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3871/Arab 3036/RelS 3715/H
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a brief survey of the religion and civilization of Islam. It introduces students to 1) Islamic history from its inception in the seventh century CE to the present, with emphasis on the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the early Caliphate; 2) The authoritative texts of Islam, i.e. the Quran and Prophetic traditions (Hadith); 3) The institutions and discourses characteristic of Islamic civilization; and 4) The transformation of Muslim life and thought in the modern period. By taking this course, students become familiar with the chief ideas, characters, narratives, rites, localities, and movements associated with Islam. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
HIST 3493 - Islam: Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3871/Arab 3036/RelS 3715/H
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a brief survey of the religion and civilization of Islam. It introduces students to 1) Islamic history from its inception in the seventh century CE to the present, with emphasis on the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the early Caliphate; 2) The authoritative texts of Islam, i.e. the Quran and Prophetic traditions (Hadith); 3) The institutions and discourses characteristic of Islamic civilization; and 4) The transformation of Muslim life and thought in the modern period. By taking this course, students become familiar with the chief ideas, characters, narratives, rites, localities, and movements associated with Islam. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
AMES 3871 - Islam: Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3871/Arab 3036/RelS 3715/H
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a brief survey of the religion and civilization of Islam. It introduces students to 1) Islamic history from its inception in the seventh century CE to the present, with emphasis on the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the early Caliphate; 2) The authoritative texts of Islam, i.e. the Quran and Prophetic traditions (Hadith); 3) The institutions and discourses characteristic of Islamic civilization; and 4) The transformation of Muslim life and thought in the modern period. By taking this course, students become familiar with the chief ideas, characters, narratives, rites, localities, and movements associated with Islam. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
RELS 3714 - Islam and the West
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3643/Hist 3546/RelS 3714
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cultural/intellectual trends that have defined differences between Islam and the West. Development of historical, philosophical, and intellectual mindset of both spheres. Factors in tension, anxiety, and hatred between Muslim world and Europe and the United States.
HIST 3546 - Islam and the West
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3643/Hist 3546/RelS 3714
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cultural/intellectual trends that have defined fundamental differences between Islam and the West. Development of historical, philosophical, and intellectual mindset of both spheres. Factors in tension, anxiety, and hatred between Muslim world and Europe and the United States.
GLOS 3643 - Islam and the West
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3643/Hist 3546/RelS 3714
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Cultural/intellectual trends that have defined fundamental differences between Islam and the West. Development of historical, philosophical, and intellectual mindset of both spheres. Factors that have contributed and continue to contribute to tension, anxiety, and hatred between the Muslim world and Europe and the United States.
RELS 3715 - History of the Crusades (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3613MeSt 3613//RelS 3715
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Crusading spirit in Europe. Results of classic medieval crusades ca 1095-1285. States established by crusaders in Near East. Internal European crusades. Chronological prolongation of crusading phenomenon.
HIST 3613 - History of the Crusades (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3613MeSt 3613//RelS 3715
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Crusading spirit in Europe. Results of classic medieval crusades ca 1095-1285. States established by crusaders in Near East. Internal European crusades. Chronological prolongation of crusading phenomenon.
MEST 3613 - History of the Crusades (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3613MeSt 3613//RelS 3715
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Crusading spirit in Europe. Results of classic medieval crusades ca 1095-1285. States established by crusaders in Near East. Internal European crusades. Chronological prolongation of crusading phenomenon.
RELS 3716 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3681/GWSS 3681/RelS 3716/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3681/GWSS 3681/RelS 3716/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3681/GWSS 3681/RelS 3716/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3681/GWSS 3681/RelS 3716/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
RELS 3717 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/JwSt/Mest3606/RelS3717
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A Pew Research survey of the global religious landscape in 2010 found 2.2 billion Christians (31.5% of the world?s population), 1.6 billion Muslims (23.2%), and 14 million Jews (.2%). In this class, we explore how the histories of these religious communities became deeply entangled in an age of diplomacy, trade, jihad, and crusade.
HIST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/JwSt/Mest3606/RelS3717
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A Pew Research survey of the global religious landscape in 2010 found 2.2 billion Christians (31.5% of the world?s population), 1.6 billion Muslims (23.2%), and 14 million Jews (.2%). In this class, we explore how the histories of these religious communities became deeply entangled in an age of diplomacy, trade, jihad, and crusade.
RELS 3718W - Christ in Islamic Thought (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3494W/RelS 3718W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Course examines the history of the figure of Christ in Islamic thought, from the beginnings of Islam in the Qur'an and the Hadith to the recent 2013 book by Reza Aslan, Zealot. The course is based on close reading of primary sources from regions extending from Spain to Iran, and in various languages (in translation): Arabic, Greek, French, Farsi, and Italian. Course demonstrates how much the interpretation of the figure of Christ in Islamic thought belonged to specific historical contexts.
HIST 3494W - Christ in Islamic Thought (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3494W/RelS 3718W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Course examines the history of the figure of Christ in Islamic thought, from the beginnings of Islam in the Qur'an and the Hadith to the recent 2013 book by Reza Aslan, Zealot. The course is based on close reading of primary sources from regions extending from Spain to Iran, and in various languages (in translation): Arabic, Greek, French, Farsi, and Italian. Course demonstrates how much the interpretation of the figure of Christ in Islamic thought belonged to specific historical contexts. prereq: None
RELS 3721 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3513Hist 5513 /RelS 3721/
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
History of Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, disputed territories of Western Sahara) from time of Ottoman expansion/Sharifian dynasties (Sa'dian/'Alawid) in 16th/17th Centuries to end of 20th century. Focus on encounter of Islamic cultures/societies of Maghrib with Africa/Europe.
RELS 5721 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3513Hist 5513 /RelS 3721/
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
History of Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, disputed territories of Western Sahara) from time of Ottoman expansion/Sharifian dynasties (Sa'dian/'Alawid) in 16th/17th Centuries to end of 20th century. Focus on encounter of Islamic cultures/societies of Maghrib with Africa/Europe.
HIST 3513 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3513Hist 5513 /RelS 3721/
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
History of Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, disputed territories of Western Sahara) from time of Ottoman expansion/Sharifian dynasties (Sa'dian/'Alawid) in 16th/17th Centuries to end of 20th century. Focus on encounter of Islamic cultures/societies of Maghrib with Africa/Europe.
HIST 5513 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3513Hist 5513 /RelS 3721/
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
History of the Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and disputed territories of Western Sahara from time of Ottoman expansion/Sharifian dynasties [Sa'dian/'Alawid]) in 16th/17th Centuries to end of 20th century. Focus on encounter of Islamic cultures/societies of Maghrib and Africa/Europe
RELS 3722 - The Ottoman Empire (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3547/RelS 3722
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of Islam's most successful empire, from its founding circa 1300 to its demise in 1923. Lands, institutions, peoples, historical legacy.
HIST 3547 - The Ottoman Empire (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3547/RelS 3722
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of Islam's most successful empire, from its founding circa 1300 to its demise in 1923. Lands, institutions, peoples, historical legacy.
RELS 4049 - Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4049/RelS 4049
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Religious beliefs and world views cross-culturally. Religious dimensions of human life through theories of origins, functions, and forms (e.g. myth, ritual, symbolism) of religion in society. prereq: ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1005 or instr consent
ANTH 4049 - Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4049/RelS 4049
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Religious beliefs and world views cross-culturally. Religious dimensions of human life through theories of origins, functions, and forms (e.g. myth, ritual, symbolism) of religion in society. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or instr consent
RELS 4309 - Religion in American Public Life: Culture, Politics, and Communities (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: RelS 4309/Soc 4309/Soc 4309H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How diversity/vitality of American religion shape public life. How religious groups engage in political action, foster understandings of democracy/styles of civic participation. Volunteering/service activities. Race, poverty, the family, sexuality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4309 - Religion in American Public Life: Culture, Politics, & Communities (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: RelS 4309/Soc 4309/Soc 4309H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How diversity/vitality of American religion shape public life. How religious groups engage in political action, foster understandings of democracy/styles of civic participation. Volunteering/service activities. Race, poverty, the family, sexuality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
RELS 3704 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3074/RelS 3704
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores the contents of the Quran and probes its place in the history of human civilization. Students will learn about, and critically reflect on, the following subjects: 1) the Quran's core ideas, stories, laws, parables, and arguments, 2) the historical context in which the Quran was first promulgated and codified, 3) the relationship between the Quran and the preceding literary traditions of the ancient world, in particular, the Bible and post-biblical Jewish and Christian writings, 4) Muslim utilization of the Quran towards intellectual, social, religious, cultural, and political ends, and 5) the pre-modern and modern scholarly traditions of interpreting the Quran.
CNES 3074 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3074/RelS 3704
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores the contents of the Quran and probes its place in the history of human civilization. Students will learn about, and critically reflect on, the following subjects: 1) the Quran's core ideas, stories, laws, parables, and arguments, 2) the historical context in which the Quran was first promulgated and codified, 3) the relationship between the Quran and the preceding literary traditions of the ancient world, in particular, the Bible and post-biblical Jewish and Christian writings, 4) Muslim utilization of the Quran towards intellectual, social, religious, cultural, and political ends, and 5) the pre-modern and modern scholarly traditions of interpreting the Quran.
RELS 3628 - Jewish American Literature: Religion, Culture, and the Immigrant Experience (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3011/JwSt 3011/RelS 3628
Typically offered: Every Spring
Immigrant? Jewish? American? What do these labels mean, why are they applied, and do they ever cease to be applicable? Can we distinguish religion from culture, and what are the implications when we try? Why is it frequently asked whether Saul Bellow was ?really? a Jewish writer, but it is impossible to read Philip Roth as anything other than that? How does Grace Paley?s ?Jewishness? come through even when she is writing about non-Jewish characters? We will address these issues and others as we explore the literature growing out of the Jewish immigrant experience in America, as well as the literature by Jewish writers more firmly, though still sometimes anxiously, rooted in American soil. In this course we will engage in a highly contextualized and historicized study of Jewish American literature from the 19th century to today. We will discover in these texts how inherited Jewish culture and literary imaginings, developed over centuries of interaction between Jewish communities and the ?outside world,? get reexamined, questioned, rejected, reimagined, reintegrated, and transformed within the crucible of American experience. The discussions that ensue will also provide a framework for engaging with the creative energies and cultural productivity of more recent immigrant communities in the United States and beyond. Immigration and the experience of immigrant communities continues to be at the forefront of American consciousness, as immigrants work to create new meanings and new narratives for their lives, and as those who immigrated before them provide contested meanings for the impact of immigration on their own narratives. This course, though grounded in Jewish narratives, will therefore provide students with an expanded vocabulary and perspective for engaging in this central and very current debate within the American experience.
JWST 3011 - Jewish American Literature: Religion, Culture, and the Immigrant Experience (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3011/JwSt 3011/RelS 3628
Typically offered: Every Spring
Immigrant? Jewish? American? What do these labels mean, why are they applied, and do they ever cease to be applicable? Can we distinguish religion from culture, and what are the implications when we try? Why is it frequently asked whether Saul Bellow was ?really? a Jewish writer, but it is impossible to read Philip Roth as anything other than that? How does Grace Paley?s ?Jewishness? come through even when she is writing about non-Jewish characters? We will address these issues and others as we explore the literature growing out of the Jewish immigrant experience in America, as well as the literature by Jewish writers more firmly, though still sometimes anxiously, rooted in American soil. In this course we will engage in a highly contextualized and historicized study of Jewish American literature from the 19th century to today. We will discover in these texts how inherited Jewish culture and literary imaginings, developed over centuries of interaction between Jewish communities and the ?outside world,? get reexamined, questioned, rejected, reimagined, reintegrated, and transformed within the crucible of American experience. The discussions that ensue will also provide a framework for engaging with the creative energies and cultural productivity of more recent immigrant communities in the United States and beyond. Immigration and the experience of immigrant communities continues to be at the forefront of American consciousness, as immigrants work to create new meanings and new narratives for their lives, and as those who immigrated before them provide contested meanings for the impact of immigration on their own narratives. This course, though grounded in Jewish narratives, will therefore provide students with an expanded vocabulary and perspective for engaging in this central and very current debate within the American experience.
RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Typically offered: Every Spring
Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
CNES 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).