Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Medieval Studies Minor

Medieval Studies, Center for
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2021
  • Required credits in this minor: 15
The medieval studies minor covers the period between 300 and 1500 B.C.E. It includes the history, art history, theater and music history, literature, and languages of the period, including Latin, French, Italian, English, Old English, Scandinavian, and German. The program allows students with an interest in the medieval period, or who are planning to pursue graduate work in one of the related areas, to concentrate their studies as a coherent whole.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
The minor is administered through the Center for Medieval Studies in the College of Liberal Arts. Students interested in the minor should make an appointment with the Center for Medieval Studies director (1030 Heller Hall, 612-626-0805, cmedst@umn.edu). Students may combine the Medieval Studies Minor with any other major or minor.
Electives
The following course list is not exhaustive. Students should consult the director of undergraduate studies for final approval on these, and other, course choices.
Take 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AMES 3832 - The Politics of Arabic Poetry [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5765 - Early Chinese Art (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3026 - Mediterranean Wanderings: Literature and History on the Borders of Three Continents [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 5110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies (3.0 cr)
· FREN 3111 - Medieval Stories (3.0 cr)
· FREN 3140 - Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Literature (3.0 cr)
· GER 3601 - German Medieval Literature [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GER 3641 - German Folklore [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GER 3702 - Beginning Middle High German (3.0 cr)
· GER 5711 - History of the German Language I (3.0 cr)
· GER 5721 - Introduction to Middle High German (3.0 cr)
· GER 5722 - Middle High German: Advanced Readings (3.0 cr)
· GER 5734 - Old Saxon (3.0 cr)
· GER 5740 - Topics in Germanic Medieval Studies (3.0 cr)
· GSD 3511W - Vikings, Knights, and Reformers: German and European Culture and Controversies to 1700 [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3454 - West African History: Early Times to 1800 [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3609 - Military History of Medieval Western Europe (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3618 - The Dark Ages Illumined: Medieval Europe to 1050 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3621 - Creating the Modern World in Medieval Europe: The Renaissance, 1200-1600 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3704W - Daily Life in Europe: 1300-1800 [HIS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3746 - Game of Thrones: Emperors, Knights and Witches in Central Europe [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5111 - Proseminar in the History of Medieval Europe (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5115 - Medieval Latin Historians (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5469 - Historiographies of China, 1000-1700 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5611 - New Directions in the Middle Ages, ca. 300-1100 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5612 - New Directions in the Middle Ages, ca. 1100-1500 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5614 - The Medieval Church (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5900 - Topics in European/Medieval History (1.0-4.0 cr)
· HIST 5962 - Bell Library Research Seminar in Comparative World History, ca. 1000-1800 CE (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3065 - Body, Soul, and Spirit in Medieval and Renaissance European Medicine (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3814 - Revolutions in Science: The Babylonians to Newton [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin (3.0 cr)
· MEST 3993 - Directed Studies in Medieval Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
· MEST 5993 - Directed Studies in Medieval Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
· MUS 3601W - History of Western Music I [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SCAN 3502 - Scandinavian Myths [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· SCAN 3503 - Scandinavian Folklore [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· SCAN 5502 - The Icelandic Saga (3.0 cr)
· SCAN 5701 - Old Norse Language and Literature (3.0 cr)
· SCAN 5703 - Old Norse Poetry (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3503 - Pre-modern Spanish Culture and Thought [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3703 - Origins and History of Spanish and Portuguese (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 5160 - Medieval Iberian Literatures and Cultures (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 5701 - History of Ibero-Romance (3.0 cr)
· TH 3171 - History of the Theatre: Ancient Greece Through Neo-Classicism (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3431 - Early Africa and Its Global Connections [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3431 - Early Africa and Its Global Connections [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3373 - Religion and Society in Imperial China [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3466 - Religion and Society in Imperial China [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3373 - Religion and Society in Imperial China [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3872 - The Cultures of the Silk Road (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3504 - The Cultures of the Silk Road (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3708 - The Cultures of the Silk Road (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3067W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARCH 3411W - Architectural History to 1750 [HIS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ARCH 3411V - Architectural History to 1750 [HIS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARCH 4423 - Gothic Architecture (3.0 cr)
or ARCH 5423 - Gothic Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750 (3.0 cr)
or CSCL 5281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750 (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750 (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750 (3.0 cr)
· EAS 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age (3.0-4.0 cr)
or HIST 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age (3.0-4.0 cr)
· FREN 3611 - Speaking of Love in Medieval France: Stories, Songs, and Letters [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
or FREN 3711 - Speaking of Love in Medieval France: Stories, Songs, and Letters [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3271 - The Viking World: Story, History, and Archaeology (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5271 - The Viking World: Story, History, and Archaeology (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3717 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3767 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3611 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3494W - Christ in Islamic Thought [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3718W - Christ in Islamic Thought [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3547 - The Ottoman Empire [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3722 - The Ottoman Empire [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· MEST 3001 - Introduction to Medieval History [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3101 - Introduction to Medieval History [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· MEST 3002 - Medieval Tales and their Modern Echoes [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3102 - Medieval Tales and their Modern Echoes [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· MEST 3009 - Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3009 - Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3609 -  Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
· MEST 3081W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3081W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3544W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· MEST 3101 - Survey of Medieval English Literature (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3101 - Survey of Medieval English Literature (3.0 cr)
· MEST 3102 - Chaucer (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3102 - Chaucer (3.0 cr)
· MEST 3611 - Medieval Cities of Europe: 500-1500 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3611 - Medieval Cities of Europe: 500-1500 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· MEST 3613 - History of the Crusades [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3613 - History of the Crusades [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3715 - History of the Crusades [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· MEST 3616 - France in the Middle Ages (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3616 - France in the Middle Ages (3.0 cr)
· MEST 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3543 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity (3.0 cr)
· MEST 4043 - Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings: Archaeology of Northern Europe (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 4043 - Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings: Archaeology of Northern Europe (3.0 cr)
· MEST 4612 - Old English I (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4612 - Old English I (3.0 cr)
· MEST 4613 - Old English II (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4613 - Old English II (3.0 cr)
 
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AMES 3832 - The Politics of Arabic Poetry (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course engages with Arabic poetry in its socio-political context. How have Arab poets from the pre-Islamic era till the present time used their verse as a tool to affirm the structure of their society, or to struggle with it? What roles did Arabic poetry play at the Abbasid imperial courts? How does Arabic poetry participate in the constitution and promulgation or subversion of political ideologies? And what presence has it had in Arab peoples' struggles for independence or reform, historically and today as part of the Arab Spring?
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Have you ever wondered how archaeologists interpret the vast amount of archaeological evidence from the British Isles, one of the most studied and best documented parts of the world? And how do archaeologists and governmental agencies protect the heritage of Britain, from major monuments such as Stonehenge, Roman forts, and Shakespeare?s theaters, to the minor products of craft industries such as personal ornaments and coins? This course teaches you about the archaeology of the British Isles, in all of its aspects. You learn how archaeologists study the changing societies of Britain and Ireland, from the first settlers about a million years ago to modern times. You learn about the strategies that public institutions employ to preserve and protect archaeological sites, and about the place of archaeology in tourism in the British Isles and in the formation of identities among the diverse peoples of modern Britain.
ARTH 5765 - Early Chinese Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Art/material culture of early China from Neolithic age (ca. 10000-2000 BCE) to early imperial period (221 BCE-906 CE).
ENGL 3026 - Mediterranean Wanderings: Literature and History on the Borders of Three Continents (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Situated between three continents and at the intersection of numerous ethnic and national cultures, the Mediterranean is like no other place on earth. A place of diverse languages, religions, economies, governments, and ways of daily life, it serves as a microcosm for the world itself imagined as an integrated global system. This course explores the history of the Mediterranean with particular emphasis on the literatures it has produced over the last three millennia. As the protagonists of these epic poems, religious texts, and novels travel from one shore to another, they experience the Mediterranean as a place of violence, cultural accommodation, hope, ethnic and linguistic bewilderment, and endless moral challenge. This course will place as much emphasis on the region's history as its cultural productions. With that in mind, reading may include David Abulafia's The Great Sea in addition to The Odyssey, The Aeneid, the biblical books of Joshua and Acts, Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata (an epic set during the first crusade), Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice and Antony and Cleopatra, Flaubert's Salammbo, Akli Tadjer's Les ANI du Tassali, A.b. Yehoshua's Mr. Mani, and Pamuk's The White Castle.
ENGL 5110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3110/EngL 5110
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major and representative works of the Middle Ages. Topics specified in the Class Schedule.
FREN 3111 - Medieval Stories
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading/discussion of major forms of medieval tale (comic, bawdy, moralizing, fantasy, historical) in modern French translation. Explores their relationship to development of French culture, especially urbanization, class relations, marriage, role of Church. prereq: 3101
FREN 3140 - Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Different aspects of French literature/culture of medieval/Renaissance periods (11th-16th century). Content varies depending on instructor. Literary, historical, or social problem. Period, author, genre, or topic of interest. Readings may be literary, critical, cultural, historical, political, etc. Specific content posted in department and in Course Guide. prereq: 3101
GER 3601 - German Medieval Literature (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Literary investigation of the greatest works of medieval German poetry. Readings in English. Majors will be required to write a paper with use of secondary sources in English and German. prereq: No knowledge of German required
GER 3641 - German Folklore (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Literary and cultural investigation of the main folklore genres: charms, legends, folktales, and ballads; their composition, origin, and role in society with a strong emphasis on their international character. Readings in English. Majors required to write a paper with use of secondary sources in English and German. prereq: No knowledge of German required; cr for major or minor by arrangement with instructor
GER 3702 - Beginning Middle High German
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Middle High German grammar. Selected literary texts. prereq: 1004
GER 5711 - History of the German Language I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical development of German, from beginnings to 1450. prereq: 3011
GER 5721 - Introduction to Middle High German
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduction to Middle High German language and literature. Study of grammar through formal description of Middle High German phonology, morphology, and syntax. Normalized MHG texts read.
GER 5722 - Middle High German: Advanced Readings
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Acquisition of fluency in reading Middle High German normalized as well as non-normalized texts, both poetry and prose. prereq: 5721
GER 5734 - Old Saxon
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of the poetry of Old Saxon. Detailed investigation of Old Saxon in comparison with the other Old Germanic languages.
GER 5740 - Topics in Germanic Medieval Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
GSD 3511W - Vikings, Knights, and Reformers: German and European Culture and Controversies to 1700 (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of representative cultural-historical events in Europe (German-speaking countries, Scandinavian, the Netherlands) from early Germanic times to 1700.
HIST 3454 - West African History: Early Times to 1800 (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3001/Hist 3454
Typically offered: Every Fall
West Africa from late early times to establishment/histories of states. Relations with North African, Mediterranean, Asian, American worlds. Non-centralized political authority.
HIST 3609 - Military History of Medieval Western Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Concept and conduct of war in Western Europe in the Middle Ages and the relation between the military and society.
HIST 3618 - The Dark Ages Illumined: Medieval Europe to 1050
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Origins of medieval Europe, Germanic and Viking invasions, feudalism, manorialism, Islam, the papacy, monarchies, intellectual developments.
HIST 3621 - Creating the Modern World in Medieval Europe: The Renaissance, 1200-1600
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Political/cultural history of city-states of northern/central Italy, 1200-1550. Emphasizes Florence/Venice. Readings include Dante, Machiavelli. prereq: Intro course in European history before 1500 recommended
HIST 3704W - Daily Life in Europe: 1300-1800 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Living conditions and daily life in Europe before the Industrial Revolution. Topics include marriage and family, life at court, nobles, peasants, disease, farming, livestock-raising, urban life, the middle classes, manufacturing, trade, piracy, witchcraft, war, crime, and social deviance.
HIST 3746 - Game of Thrones: Emperors, Knights and Witches in Central Europe (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
This course traces the rise and fortunes of the Habsburg family from their emergence in the late 13th century to the end of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806. We use the family to explore key themes of the period including the Black Death, Hussite wars and peasant revolts, the new print culture, developments of the Reformation, European expansion and Enlightenment culture. prereq: None
HIST 5111 - Proseminar in the History of Medieval Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of basic scholarly bibliography for medieval Western European history. Aim is to help students to prepare for M.A. and Ph.D. examinations. prereq: Advanced undergrads of exceptional ability or grads, instr consent
HIST 5115 - Medieval Latin Historians
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Writing of history in Western Europe during the Middle Ages. Focus on idea of history, philosophy of various historians, techniques of research by medieval historians and chroniclers, history as literature, and value of medieval histories to modern research scholars. Latin texts only. prereq: Reading knowledge of Latin
HIST 5469 - Historiographies of China, 1000-1700
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Important recent English-language work on Chinese culture during the Song, Yuan, and Ming dynasties. Topics include religion, gender, family structures, ethnic identity, commerce/economics, and political structures/events. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
HIST 5611 - New Directions in the Middle Ages, ca. 300-1100
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Basic scholarly bibliography for medieval Western European history during early Middle Ages. Foundation for teaching courses in medieval history, preparing for general doctoral exam. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
HIST 5612 - New Directions in the Middle Ages, ca. 1100-1500
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Basic scholarly bibliography for medieval Western European history during central/later Middle Ages. Foundation for teaching courses in medieval history, preparing for general doctoral exam. prereq: [5611, grad student] or instr consent
HIST 5614 - The Medieval Church
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to history of western church in Middle Ages. Emphasizes church teachings and institutional structures, beliefs/practices of lay people, medieval Christian encounter with non-Christian world. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
HIST 5900 - Topics in European/Medieval History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected topics in European or medieval history not covered in regular courses; taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or [advanced undergrad with instr consent]
HIST 5962 - Bell Library Research Seminar in Comparative World History, ca. 1000-1800 CE
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Research proseminar on actions of Europeans in wider world, 1000-1800. Based on documents in James Ford Bell Library. prereq: Grad student, instr consent
HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HMED 3001W/HMED 3001V
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care from classical antiquity through 18th century.
HMED 3065 - Body, Soul, and Spirit in Medieval and Renaissance European Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Body/soul in medieval theology/cosmology. Religious conceptions of body/soul. Medical conceptions in medieval world. Medieval/renaissance psychology. Medical astrology and its consequences. Medical normal/abnormal body. Medicine of reproduction and sexual identity. Death, burial, dissection, and resurrection in medical/religious perspective. Macrocosmic/microcosmic body. Limits to human power/authority over body. Anatomical/chemical body/spirit.
HSCI 3814 - Revolutions in Science: The Babylonians to Newton (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 1814/HSci 3814
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Development and changing nature of sciences in their cultural context. Babylonian/Greek science. Decline/transmission of Greek science. Scientific Revolution (1500-1700) from Copernicus to Newton.
LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Authors of late antiquity, Middle Ages, Renaissance. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [LAT 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
MEST 3993 - Directed Studies in Medieval Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study with one of core faculty members of Medieval Studies program. prereq: Previous work in a medieval studies discipline, instr consent
MEST 5993 - Directed Studies in Medieval Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Directed study with one of the core faculty of medieval studies program. prereq: One yr work in some area of Middle Ages, reading knowledge of appropriate language, instr consent
MUS 3601W - History of Western Music I (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This is the first course in the undergraduate music history sequence. We will study music composed over a very broad time span, ca. 800 to 1700, looking at the works' musical structures within the larger contexts of musical style, social/political significance, and broad aesthetic and philosophical movements. In addition, as a writing intensive course, students will hone their writing skills, focusing in particular on listening to and analyzing early music. Pre-reqs: MUS 1501 and MUS 1511
SCAN 3502 - Scandinavian Myths (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Literary and cultural investigation of the popular beliefs, myths, and religion of the medieval Scandinavians; the interaction of paganism and Christianity; the reflection of myths in Old Scandinavian literature and art. All readings in English.
SCAN 3503 - Scandinavian Folklore (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Literary and folkloristic investigation of Scandinavian folktales and legends. Readings in translation for nonmajors.
SCAN 5502 - The Icelandic Saga
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of the sagas written in 13th-century Iceland. Discussion includes cultural and historical information about medieval Iceland and analysis of a selection of saga texts using contemporary critical approaches. All readings in translation.
SCAN 5701 - Old Norse Language and Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Acquisition of a reading knowledge of Old Norse; linguistic, philological and literary study of Old Norse language and literature.
SCAN 5703 - Old Norse Poetry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading and analysis of either eddic poetry from the Poetic Edda or skaldic poetry. Texts read in Old Norse.
SPAN 3503 - Pre-modern Spanish Culture and Thought (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Notions of nation, empire, and race precipitated by presence of Muslims, Jews, and Christians in Iberia in 12th and 13th centuries. Toledo as center of translation, technology, innovation, design, and philosophical inquiry for all of Europe. How Iberian literary works differed from those produced in the rest of Western Europe. Readings from Saint Isidore, Ibn Hazm, Averroes (Ibn Rushd), and Maimonides. prereq: A Grade of C- or better in SPAN 3104W or SPAN 3104V or TLDO 3104W or ARGN 3104W or SPAN 3105W or TLDO 3105W or SPAN 3105V
SPAN 3703 - Origins and History of Spanish and Portuguese
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of Spanish from its Latin roots. Phonetic, morphological, syntactic, and sociolinguistic aspects of language variations over time. prereq: A Grade of C- or better in Span 3107W or TLDO 3107W
SPAN 5160 - Medieval Iberian Literatures and Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The major literary genres developed in Spain from the Reconquest to 1502, with reference to the crucial transformations of the Middle Ages, including primitive lyric, epic, clerical narrative, storytelling, debates, collections, chronicles, "exempla," and the Celestina (1499-1502).
SPAN 5701 - History of Ibero-Romance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Origins and developments of Ibero-Romance languages; evolution of Spanish, Portuguese, and Catalan. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
TH 3171 - History of the Theatre: Ancient Greece Through Neo-Classicism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
History of Western theatre and drama; theatrical practices, staging conventions, and dramatic structure of plays. Ancient to mid-18th century. prereq: Th major or instr consent
AFRO 3431 - Early Africa and Its Global Connections (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3431/Hist 3431
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of African history from earliest times to 1800. Focuses on socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in pre-colonial Africa from ancient Egypt through the era of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.
HIST 3431 - Early Africa and Its Global Connections (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3431/Hist 3431
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of African history from earliest times to 1800. Focuses on socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in pre-colonial Africa from ancient Egypt through the era of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.
AMES 3373 - Religion and Society in Imperial China (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3373/Hist 3466/RelS 3373
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Varieties of religious experience in imperial China. Religion as lived practices. Textual traditions. Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, relations among them. Western missionary enterprise in China.
HIST 3466 - Religion and Society in Imperial China (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3373/Hist 3466/RelS 3373
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Varieties of religious experience in imperial China. Religion as lived practices. Textual traditions. Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, relations among them. Western missionary enterprise in China.
RELS 3373 - Religion and Society in Imperial China (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3373/Hist 3466/RelS 3373
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Varieties of religious experience in imperial China. Religion as lived practices. Textual traditions. Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, relations among them. Western missionary enterprise in China.
AMES 3872 - The Cultures of the Silk Road
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3872/Hist 3504/RelS 3708
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Past/present state of cultures that flourished in Central Asia (present-day CA republics, Iran, Afghanistan) after Alexander the Great. Decline with opening of sea routes.
HIST 3504 - The Cultures of the Silk Road
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3872/Hist 3504/RelS 3708
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Past/present state of the cultures that flourished in Central Asia (present-day CA republics, Iran, Afghanistan) after Alexander the Great and declined with opening of sea routes.
RELS 3708 - The Cultures of the Silk Road
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3872/Hist 3504/RelS 3708
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Past/present state of cultures that flourished in Central Asia (present-day CA republics, Iran, Afghanistan) after Alexander the Great. Decline with opening of sea routes.
ANTH 3027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman period.
ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists/historians analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman Period. Interpreting archaeological evidence from specific sites to understand broad trends in human past.
HIST 3067W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman period.
ARCH 3411W - Architectural History to 1750 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Arch 3411W/Arch 3411V
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Built environment as a tool to study the human past from ancient times to 1750. Major trends of style and form and the relationships, practices, beliefs that have shaped human behavior. prereq: Soph or above
ARCH 3411V - Architectural History to 1750 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Arch 3411W/Arch 3411V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
History of architecture/city planning from antiquity to 1750, as illustrated by major monuments from western/non-western cultures. prereq: Soph or above
ARCH 4423 - Gothic Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Arch 4423/Arch 5423
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
History of architecture and urban design in Western Europe, from 1150 to 1400. prereq: 3411 or instr consent
ARCH 5423 - Gothic Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Arch 4423/Arch 5423
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
History of architecture and urban design in Western Europe, from 1150 to 1400. prereq: MS Arch or M Arch major or instr consent
ARTH 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact. There are no prerequisites for this course.
ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
RELS 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact. There are no prerequisites for this course.
RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5787/CNES 5787
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evaluate critical perspectives from variety of interdisciplinary conversations. Framework for studying cross-cultural interaction among ancient visual cultures that integrates practical, cognitive, object oriented approaches. Cross-continental movement/selective appropriation of objects/motifs.
CNES 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5787/CNES 5787
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evaluate critical perspectives from variety of interdisciplinary conversations. Framework for studying cross-cultural interaction among ancient visual cultures that integrates practical, cognitive, object oriented approaches. Cross-continental movement/selective appropriation of objects/motifs.
CSCL 3281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3281/CSCL 528/1Hist 3281/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
First of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings from original sources.
CSCL 5281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3281/CSCL 528/1Hist 3281/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
First of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings from original sources.
HIST 3281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3281/CSCL 528/1Hist 3281/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
First of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings from original sources.
HIST 5281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3281/CSCL 528/1Hist 3281/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
First of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings from original sources. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
EAS 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3461/Hist 3461
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative survey of early history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam; early Chinese thought; diffusion of Confucianism, Buddhism, and other values throughout East Asia; political and social history of region to 1600.
HIST 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3461/Hist 3461
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comparative survey of early history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Early Chinese thought. Diffusion of Confucianism, Buddhism, and other values throughout East Asia. Political and social history of region to 1600.
FREN 3611 - Speaking of Love in Medieval France: Stories, Songs, and Letters (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fren 3611/Fren 3711
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
How did people talk about love in the Middle Ages? What songs did they sing about it? What stories did they tell? How did it define the self? In this course, we will study troubadour songs, short tales, romances, and letters composed in twelfth-century France and Anglo-Norman England. We will examine their historical context: the patronage of Eleanor of Aquitaine and her family, the broader context of medieval court life, and the erudite circles that formed during the rise of the Parisian schools. Because what people say is determined by the language, motifs, and forms that they have available to them, we will discuss the transmission of ideas about love and the interpretation of exemplary figures (Tristan and Iseut, Lancelot and Guinevere). We will also consider the literary form of these texts in relation to their meaning. But at the heart of our inquiry will be the notion of the self. How did "speaking of love" allow medieval writers to cultivate their own subjectivity or individuality? Texts will include troubadour songs, the Lais of Marie de France, the romances of Tristan and Iseut by Thomas of England and Béroul, Chrétien de Troyes's Arthurian romances, and the letters of Abelard and Heloise. We will also study a film about Eleanor of Aquitaine and her family (The Lion in Winter, 1968) and a contemporary opera about a troubadour and his lady, Kaija Saariaho's L'Amour de loin (2000). FREN 3611 and 3711 meet together. Both FREN 3611 and 3711 are taught in English. Reading and writing assignments for FREN 3611 are in modern French. FREN 3611 may count towards the major or minor in French Studies. Reading and writing assignments for FREN 3711 are in English. FREN 3711 does not count towards the major or minor in French Studies. prereq: FREN 3015
FREN 3711 - Speaking of Love in Medieval France: Stories, Songs, and Letters (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fren 3611/Fren 3711
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
How did people talk about love in the Middle Ages? What songs did they sing about it? What stories did they tell? How did it define the self? In this course, we will study troubadour songs, short tales, romances, and letters composed in twelfth-century France and Anglo-Norman England. We will examine their historical context: the patronage of Eleanor of Aquitaine and her family, the broader context of medieval court life, and the erudite circles that formed during the rise of the Parisian schools. Because what people say is determined by the language, motifs, and forms that they have available to them, we will discuss the transmission of ideas about love and the interpretation of exemplary figures (Tristan and Iseut, Lancelot and Guinevere). We will also consider the literary form of these texts in relation to their meaning. But at the heart of our inquiry will be the notion of the self. How did "speaking of love" allow medieval writers to cultivate their own subjectivity or individuality? Texts will include troubadour songs, the Lais of Marie de France, the romances of Tristan and Iseut by Thomas of England and Béroul, Chrétien de Troyes's Arthurian romances, and the letters of Abelard and Heloise. We will also study a film about Eleanor of Aquitaine and her family (The Lion in Winter, 1968) and a contemporary opera about a troubadour and his lady, Kaija Saariaho's L'Amour de loin (2000). FREN 3611 and 3711 meet together. Both FREN 3611 and 3711 are taught in English. Reading and writing assignments for FREN 3611 are in modern French. FREN 3611 may count towards the major or minor in French Studies. Reading and writing assignments for FREN 3711 are in English. FREN 3711 does not count towards the major or minor in French Studies.
HIST 3271 - The Viking World: Story, History, and Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3271/Hist 5271
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Viking society and expansion of Viking influence abroad. Viking impact on Western Europe; interactions with Slavic lands; settlement of North Atlantic islands; and Western Europe's impact on Scandinavian lands. Analyzes archaeological, historical, linguistic, and numismatic evidence.
HIST 5271 - The Viking World: Story, History, and Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3271/Hist 5271
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Viking society and expansion of Viking influence abroad. Viking impact on Western Europe, interactions with Slavic lands, settlement of North Atlantic islands, Western Europe's impact on Scandinavian lands. Analyzes archaeological, historical, linguistic, and numismatic evidence.
HIST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/JwSt/Mest3606/RelS3717
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A Pew Research survey of the global religious landscape in 2010 found 2.2 billion Christians (31.5% of the world?s population), 1.6 billion Muslims (23.2%), and 14 million Jews (.2%). In this class, we explore how the histories of these religious communities became deeply entangled in an age of diplomacy, trade, jihad, and crusade.
JWST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/JwSt/Mest3606/RelS3717
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A Pew Research survey of the global religious landscape in 2010 found 2.2 billion Christians (31.5% of the world's population), 1.6 billion Muslims (23.2%), and 14 million Jews (.2%). In this class, we explore how the histories of these religious communities became deeply entangled in an age of diplomacy, trade, jihad, and crusade.
RELS 3717 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/JwSt/Mest3606/RelS3717
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A Pew Research survey of the global religious landscape in 2010 found 2.2 billion Christians (31.5% of the world?s population), 1.6 billion Muslims (23.2%), and 14 million Jews (.2%). In this class, we explore how the histories of these religious communities became deeply entangled in an age of diplomacy, trade, jihad, and crusade.
HIST 3767 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3767/RelS 3611
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Development of the orthodox church in Byzantium, the Islamic Near East, the Slavic world and in the diaspora; impact of orthodoxy on political and cultural institutions, interaction with other Christian and non-Christian communities; orthodox spirituality and aesthetics.
RELS 3611 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3767/RelS 3611
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of orthodox church in Byzantium, Islamic Near East, Slavic world, and diaspora. Impact of orthodoxy on political/cultural institutions. Interaction with other Christian/non-Christian communities. Orthodox spirituality/aesthetics.
HIST 3494W - Christ in Islamic Thought (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3494W/RelS 3718W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Course examines the history of the figure of Christ in Islamic thought, from the beginnings of Islam in the Qur'an and the Hadith to the recent 2013 book by Reza Aslan, Zealot. The course is based on close reading of primary sources from regions extending from Spain to Iran, and in various languages (in translation): Arabic, Greek, French, Farsi, and Italian. Course demonstrates how much the interpretation of the figure of Christ in Islamic thought belonged to specific historical contexts. prereq: None
RELS 3718W - Christ in Islamic Thought (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3494W/RelS 3718W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Course examines the history of the figure of Christ in Islamic thought, from the beginnings of Islam in the Qur'an and the Hadith to the recent 2013 book by Reza Aslan, Zealot. The course is based on close reading of primary sources from regions extending from Spain to Iran, and in various languages (in translation): Arabic, Greek, French, Farsi, and Italian. Course demonstrates how much the interpretation of the figure of Christ in Islamic thought belonged to specific historical contexts.
HIST 3547 - The Ottoman Empire (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3547/RelS 3722
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of Islam's most successful empire, from its founding circa 1300 to its demise in 1923. Lands, institutions, peoples, historical legacy.
RELS 3722 - The Ottoman Empire (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3547/RelS 3722
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of Islam's most successful empire, from its founding circa 1300 to its demise in 1923. Lands, institutions, peoples, historical legacy.
MEST 3001 - Introduction to Medieval History (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3101/MeSt 3001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Europe from decline of Rome to early Renaissance. Politics, institutions, society, economy, and culture of Middle Ages.
HIST 3101 - Introduction to Medieval History (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3101/MeSt 3001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Europe from decline of Rome to early Renaissance. Politics, institutions, society, economy, and culture of Middle Ages.
MEST 3002 - Medieval Tales and their Modern Echoes (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1102/Hist 3102/MeSt 1002/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Knights of the Round Table, dragon-slayers, magic djinn, pilgrims in Hell. How these stories have been retold in modern fiction, film, and the arts. Texts from Europe and other regions of globe.
HIST 3102 - Medieval Tales and their Modern Echoes (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1102/Hist 3102/MeSt 1002/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Knights of Round Table, dragon-slayers, magic djinn, pilgrims in Hell. How stories have been retold in modern fiction, film, arts. Texts from Europe/other regions of globe.
MEST 3009 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
ARTH 3009 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
RELS 3609 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
MEST 3081W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3081W/MeSt 1081/RelS 3544
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
This course surveys the history of Christianity from its status as a persecuted minority religion of the Roman Empire to its dominant role in medieval Europe and Byzantium. We study Christian traditions in Asia and Africa as well as Europe with special attention to the relationship between Christianity and culture in the ancient and medieval world.
HIST 3081W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3081W/MeSt 1081/RelS 3544
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
This course surveys the history of Christianity from its status as a persecuted minority religion of the Roman Empire to its dominant role in medieval Europe and Byzantium. We study Christian traditions in Asia and Africa as well as Europe with special attention to the relationship between Christianity and culture in the ancient and medieval world.
RELS 3544W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3081W/MeSt 1081/RelS 3544
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
This course surveys the history of Christianity from its status as a persecuted minority religion of the Roman Empire to its dominant role in medieval Europe and Byzantium. We study Christian traditions in Asia and Africa as well as Europe with special attention to the relationship between Christianity and culture in the ancient and medieval world.
MEST 3101 - Survey of Medieval English Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3101/MeSt 3101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major/representative Medieval English works, including Sir Gawain the Green Knight, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Piers Plowman, Book of Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich's Revelations, and Malory's Morte D'Arthur.
ENGL 3101 - Survey of Medieval English Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3101/MeSt 3101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major/representative Medieval English works, including Sir Gawain the Green Knight, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Piers Plowman, Book of Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich's Revelations, and Malory's Morte D'Arthur.
MEST 3102 - Chaucer
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3102/MeSt 3102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major/representative works written by Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and the dream visions. Historical, intellectual, and cultural background of the poems. Language, poetic theory, form.
ENGL 3102 - Chaucer
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3102/MeSt 3102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major/representative works written by Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and the dream visions. Historical, intellectual, and cultural background of the poems. Language, poetic theory, form.
MEST 3611 - Medieval Cities of Europe: 500-1500 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3611/MeSt 3611
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Evolution of Western European cities from the late Roman town to the early Renaissance city-state.
HIST 3611 - Medieval Cities of Europe: 500-1500 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3611/MeSt 3611
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Evolution of Western European cities from the late Roman town to the early Renaissance city-state.
MEST 3613 - History of the Crusades (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3613MeSt 3613//RelS 3715
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Crusading spirit in Europe. Results of classic medieval crusades ca 1095-1285. States established by crusaders in Near East. Internal European crusades. Chronological prolongation of crusading phenomenon.
HIST 3613 - History of the Crusades (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3613MeSt 3613//RelS 3715
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Crusading spirit in Europe. Results of classic medieval crusades ca 1095-1285. States established by crusaders in Near East. Internal European crusades. Chronological prolongation of crusading phenomenon.
RELS 3715 - History of the Crusades (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3613MeSt 3613//RelS 3715
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Crusading spirit in Europe. Results of classic medieval crusades ca 1095-1285. States established by crusaders in Near East. Internal European crusades. Chronological prolongation of crusading phenomenon.
MEST 3616 - France in the Middle Ages
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3616/Hist 3616W/MeSt 3616
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Politics, society and culture in medieval France from the end of the Carolingians to the end of the Hundred Years War.
HIST 3616 - France in the Middle Ages
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3616/Hist 3616W/MeSt 3616
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Politics, society, and culture in medieval France from the end of the Carolingians to the end of the Hundred Years War.
MEST 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3617Hist/MeSt 3617/RelS
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Between classical and medieval, pagan and Christian, Roman and barbarian, the late antique world was a dynamic age. Course focuses on the Mediterranean region from the 2nd to the mid-7th century exploring such topics as the conversion of Constantine, the fall of Rome, barbarian invasions, the spread of Christianity, and the rise of Islam.
CNES 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3617Hist/MeSt 3617/RelS
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Between classical and medieval, pagan and Christian, Roman and barbarian, the late antique world was a dynamic age. This course will focus on the Mediterranean region from the 2nd to the mid-7th century exploring such topics as the conversion of Constantine, the fall of Rome, barbarian invasions, the spread of Christianity, and the rise of Islam.
HIST 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3617Hist/MeSt 3617/RelS
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Between classical and medieval, pagan and Christian, Roman and barbarian, the late antique world was a dynamic age. This course will focus on the Mediterranean region from the 2nd to the mid-7th century exploring such topics as the conversion of Constantine, the fall of Rome, barbarian invasions, the spread of Christianity, and the rise of Islam.
RELS 3543 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3617Hist/MeSt 3617/RelS
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Between classical and medieval, pagan and Christian, Roman and barbarian, the late antique world was a dynamic age. This course focuses on the Mediterranean region from the 2nd to the mid-7th century exploring such topics as the conversion of Constantine, the fall of Rome, barbarian invasions, the spread of Christianity, and the rise of Islam.
MEST 4043 - Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings: Archaeology of Northern Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4043/MeSt 4043
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Archaeology of the British Isles, Scandinavia, and northern continental Europe, from the Romans through the Viking period. Themes to be examined include social and political organization, cross-cultural interactions, art and symbolism, and religion and rituals.
ANTH 4043 - Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings: Archaeology of Northern Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4043/MeSt 4043
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Archaeology of the British Isles, Scandinavia, and northern continental Europe, from the Romans through the Viking Period. Themes to be examined include social and political organization, cross-cultural interaction, art and symbolism, and religion and ritual.
MEST 4612 - Old English I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 4612/EngL 5612/MeSt 4612
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
"I am learning Anglo-Saxon and it is a vastly superior thing to what we have now" (Gerard Manley Hopkins, letter to fellow poet Robert Bridges, 1882). This course is an introduction to the rich language and literature of Anglo-Saxon England (ca. 500-1100). "Old English," or as it is sometimes known, "Anglo-Saxon," is the earliest form of the English language; therefore, the primary course goal will be to acquire the ability to read Old English texts in the original. No previous experience with Old English or any other language is necessary or expected; undergraduates and graduate students from all departments are welcome. For graduate students in English, Old English I may count for the rhetoric/language/literacy distribution area. This course also fulfills the literary theory/linguistic requirement for the undergraduate English major. A knowledge of Old English will allow you to touch the most ancient literary sensibilities in the English tradition; these sensibilities are familiar and strange at the same time, as we sense our deep cultural connection to these texts across the centuries, yet also find that the past is a strange place indeed. The power of Old English literature has profoundly influenced authors such as Tennyson, Pound, Graves, Wilbur, Hopkins, Gunn, Auden, Seamus Heaney, C.S. Lewis, and of course, J.R.R. Tolkien.
ENGL 4612 - Old English I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 4612/EngL 5612/MeSt 4612
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
"I am learning Anglo-Saxon and it is a vastly superior thing to what we have now" (Gerard Manley Hopkins, letter to fellow poet Robert Bridges, 1882). This course is an introduction to the rich language and literature of Anglo-Saxon England (ca. 500-1100). "Old English," or as it is sometimes known, "Anglo-Saxon," is the earliest form of the English language; therefore, the primary course goal will be to acquire the ability to read Old English texts in the original. No previous experience with Old English or any other language is necessary or expected; undergraduates and graduate students from all departments are welcome. For graduate students in English, Old English I may count for the rhetoric/language/literacy distribution area. This course also fulfills the literary theory/linguistic requirement for the undergraduate English major. A knowledge of Old English will allow you to touch the most ancient literary sensibilities in the English tradition; these sensibilities are familiar and strange at the same time, as we sense our deep cultural connection to these texts across the centuries, yet also find that the past is a strange place indeed. The power of Old English literature has profoundly influenced authors such as Tennyson, Pound, Graves, Wilbur, Hopkins, Gunn, Auden, Seamus Heaney, C.S. Lewis, and of course, J.R.R. Tolkien.
MEST 4613 - Old English II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 4613/MeSt 4613
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The second semester of Old English is devoted to a full translation and study of the great Anglo-Saxon epic "Beowulf." J.R.R. Tolkien wrote of the poem that "its maker was telling of things already old and weighted with regret, and he expended his art in making keen that touch upon the heart which sorrows have that are both poignant and remote." "Beowulf" is an exciting tale of strife and heroism; but it is also a subtle meditation upon the character of humanity as it struggles to understand the hazards of a harsh world, the inscrutability of fate, and the nature of history itself. "Beowulf" is not only important for a detailed understanding of Anglo-Saxon culture, but it is also a significant and moving poetic achievement in the context of world literature. We will read and translate the poem in the original Old English; thus ENGL 4612 (or a similar course resulting in a basic reading knowledge of Old English) is a prerequisite. "Beowulf" has been the object of intensive scholarly study; we will delve into the debates over the poem's date, genesis, manuscript and historical context and critical interpretation. Spending an entire semester studying one complex work can be an invaluable experience. Please contact the instructor for any questions concerning the prerequisite.
ENGL 4613 - Old English II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 4613/MeSt 4613
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The second semester of Old English is devoted to a full translation and study of the great Anglo-Saxon epic "Beowulf." J.R.R. Tolkien wrote of the poem that "its maker was telling of things already old and weighted with regret, and he expended his art in making keen that touch upon the heart which sorrows have that are both poignant and remote." "Beowulf" is an exciting tale of strife and heroism; but it is also a subtle meditation upon the character of humanity as it struggles to understand the hazards of a harsh world, the inscrutability of fate, and the nature of history itself. "Beowulf" is not only important for a detailed understanding of Anglo-Saxon culture, but it is also a significant and moving poetic achievement in the context of world literature. We will read and translate the poem in the original Old English; thus ENGL 4612 (or a similar course resulting in a basic reading knowledge of Old English) is a prerequisite. "Beowulf" has been the object of intensive scholarly study; we will delve into the debates over the poem's date, genesis, manuscript and historical context and critical interpretation. Spending an entire semester studying one complex work can be an invaluable experience. Please contact the instructor for any questions concerning the prerequisite.