Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Public Health Minor

Geography, Environment, Society
Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Required credits in this minor: 14 to 16
Protecting the public's health requires addressing challenges that are influenced as much by individual and social behavior as they are by biology, chemistry, and physics. Biology, the environment, social and political systems, technology, and more intersect to describe the methods of protecting the health and well-being of the population. Liberal arts students, and students from other colleges who complement their major degree programs with a public health minor, will understand how to help society by improving health and preventing disease on a population level.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Transfer coursework from outside the UMN-TC must be reviewed and approved by the Public Health Advisory Board. Students may combine the minor in public health with any other major or minor.
Introduction to the Discipline
PUBH 3004 satisfies both Part I of this minor requirement and also the Applying Public Health Theory requirement.
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling 4 - 6 credit(s) from the following:
Part I
Note: PUBH 3004 is a 4-credit course that combines PUBH 3001 and PUBH 3003.
· PUBH 3001 - Personal and Community Health (2.0 cr)
or PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health (4.0 cr)
or PUBH 3202 - What is Public Health? (2.0 cr)
· Part II
· PUBH 3106 - Making Sense of Health Studies (2.0 cr)
or PUBH 3350 - Epidemiology: People, Places, and Disease (2.0 cr)
Understanding Health Issues From Varying Social Scientific Contexts
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3351W - The Body and the Politics of Representation [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science [TS, SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3218 - Politics of Reproduction (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3417 - Food in History [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3418 - Drink in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3757 - Principles of Health Communication Strategy (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5542 - Theory-based Health Message Design (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics (4.0 cr)
· POL 3317 - Food Politics: Actors, Arenas, and Agendas [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3206 - Introduction to Health Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3604 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3666 - Human Sexuality (3.0 cr)
· PSY 4016 - Behavior Analysis and Autism (4.0 cr)
· PSY 5205 - Applied Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3446 - Comparing Healthcare Systems [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3501 - Sociology of Families [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3405W - Humanistic Healthcare and Communication [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3350W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3246 - Diseases, Disasters & Other Killers [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 5246 - Disease, Disasters, and Other Killers [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3511 - World Population Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3511H - Honors: World Population Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4551 - Sociology of Sexualities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4551H - Honors: Sociology of Sexualities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
Applying Public Health Theory
PUBH 3004 satisfies both this minor requirement and also the Introduction to the Discipline requirement.
Take 2 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PUBH 3003 - Fundamentals of Alcohol and Drug Abuse (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health (4.0 cr)
· PUBH 3010 - Public Health Approaches to HIV/AIDS (2.0 cr)
· HSM 3040 - Dying and Death in Contemporary Society: Implications for Intervention (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 3102 - Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 3104 - Environmental Health Effects: Introduction to Toxicology (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 3415 - Introduction to Clinical Trials - Online (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 3801 - Health Economics and Policy (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 3905 - Nutrition for Public Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 3940 - Concepts and Controversies in Public Health Nutrition and Health Promotion (1.0 cr)
· PUBH 3950 - From Kid to Community: Personal, Social and Environmental Influences on Youth Obesity (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 4410 - Summer Institute in Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
Global Impact
Both Global Impact courses carry a prerequisite chosen from the "Introduction to the Discipline" course list above.
PUBH 3107 - Global Public Health and the Environment (2.0 cr)
or PUBH 3601 - Maternal and Child Health Global Public Health Issues (2.0 cr)
 
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PUBH 3001 - Personal and Community Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02195
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of health conservation and disease prevention.
PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01062 - PubH 3003/PubH 3004
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects of communicable and degenerative diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, and alcohol and drug problems. Role of education in health conservation, disease control, and drug abuse.
PUBH 3202 - What is Public Health?
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Overview of public health: what it is, its origins, evolution, how it is structured/administered in the U.S. Mission, concepts, principles, and practices of population-based public health. Case studies. Career opportunities.
PUBH 3106 - Making Sense of Health Studies
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02023
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How to critically evaluate health news (and the health research reports on which they are based) to make good, well informed decisions about your health and well-being.
PUBH 3350 - Epidemiology: People, Places, and Disease
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How diseases are distributed among us. Epidemiology terminology, methods, critical thinking, and analysis. Intended for students interested in a health science career or in a career that may need to evaluate epidemiologic evidence such as health journalism or public policy or litigation. prereq: Undergrad statistics course is recommended
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Introduction to historically informed anthropology of healing practice. Shift to biologically based medicine in Europe, colonialist dissemination of biomedicine, political/cultural collisions between biomedicine and "ethnomedicines," traffic of healing practices in a transnationalist world.
CSCL 3351W - The Body and the Politics of Representation (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Western representation of the human body, 1500 to present. Body's appearance as a site and sight for production of social and cultural difference (race, ethnicity, class, gender). Visual arts, literature, music, medical treatises, courtesy literature, erotica. (previously 3458W)
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401/5401
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science (TS, SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ways in which modern biology has been site of conflict about race/gender. Race/gender demographics of scientific professions.
GWSS 3218 - Politics of Reproduction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We often think of reproduction solely in terms of physiological events like pregnancy, delivery, or menstruation that occur in (or to) individual female bodies. Additionally, physicians and demographers appear to be the primary professional experts when it comes to managing and quantifying such reproductive events. In contrast, this class grapples with reproduction as a social and biological set of meanings and processes through which racial, gender, sexual, and socio-economic inequalities have been amplified, reconfigured, and contested across time and space. We trace how control over reproduction has been critical to a variety of professional, economic and political endeavors, including the rise and consolidation of disciplines like obstetrics-gynecology and demography; the maintenance of white privilege in colonial spaces and the metropole; post-World War II techno-scientific projects of "development" in the global South; and the emergence of the welfare state. The course identifies inequalities along the lines of race, class, gender, sexuality, and nationality in reproductive experiences and outcomes in a wide range of countries, including Cameroon, China, Cuba, Sudan, Soviet Russia, Romania, Zimbabwe, India, Senegal, Burkina Faso, South Africa, Nigeria, and the US. We locate individually embodied reproductive meanings and practices related to pregnancy, delivery, abortion, post-abortion care, contraception, sterilization, surrogacy, and child care in regional, national and global political economies. In other words, we investigate continuities and disruptions in reproductive politics between the individual body and the social body; the past, present and future; and local and global arenas. By exploring how reproduction operates domestically and globally as a mechanism of governance and social and economic stratification, we also consider possibilities for reproductive justice.
HIST 3417 - Food in History (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Significance of food in society, from earliest times to present. Why we eat what we eat. How foods have been "globalized." Dietary effects of industrial modernity. Material culture, social beliefs. Examples from around world.
HIST 3418 - Drink in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Significance of alcohol and stimulating beverages. Interdisciplinary study of alcohol/prohibition regimes throughout history.
JOUR 3757 - Principles of Health Communication Strategy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Health information is in the news, nearly every corner of the internet, on your favorite television show, and advertising campaigns. Using principles of mass communication, public health, sociology, and psychology this course explores how mediated health content impacts students' lives at both micro- and macro-levels. We will explore questions such as: how do individuals use media to achieve health-related goals? What role does media and health literacy play in achieving these goals? What effect does health information in entertainment media or strategic public health campaigns, for example, effect your own health-related beliefs and behaviors? To what extent do media portrayals of health and illness impact society?s understanding of complex health issues such as mental health, substance use disorder, or cancers? What influence does news coverage of health issues have on health policy and health reform?
JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00291 - Jour 5541/PubH 6074
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an overview of theory and research that lies at the intersection of mass communication and public health. We examine the potential for media exposure to influence public health outcomes, both as a product of people's everyday interactions with media and the strategic use of media messages to accomplish public health goals. To this end, we will explore large-scale public health campaigns in the context of tobacco, obesity, and cancer screening. We also will explore news media coverage of controversial health issues, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, and health information in entertainment media, such as smoking in movies. This course seeks to understand whether media messages have had intended and/or unintended effects on public attitudes and behavior. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal, medical, and digital media sources will be considered as well.
JOUR 5542 - Theory-based Health Message Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to provide an overview of theory and research relevant for the design of health messages, and specifically focuses on how such theory and research informs message design. It builds on social and behavioral science approaches to public health communication and media effects with the primary objective to better understand issues and strategies related to the design of media health messages. Prerequisites: Jour 3005 or Jour 3757 or Jour 5541
PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Moral problems confronting physicians, patients, and others concerned with medical treatment, research, and public health policy. Topics include abortion, living wills, euthanasia, genetic engineering, informed consent, proxy decision-making, and allocation of medical resources.
POL 3317 - Food Politics: Actors, Arenas, and Agendas (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Food: Everyone eats it but we increasingly fight about how it is grown, transported, processed and consumed. This disagreements find their ways into politics, whether it is neighbors battling over backyard chicken ordinances, Members of Congress arguing over how best to protect the safety of the food supply, or countries engaging in trade wars to limit the importation of agricultural products. This course takes a broad, multi-disciplinary perspective on food politics drawing on concepts and ideas from political science, sociology, and economics to analyze several contemporary "food fights," including agricultural trade, U.S. farm bills, the National School Lunch Program, proposals for taxing sodas and fatty foods, and the labeling of genetically modified food. Take this course if you want to learn more about the various resources, arguments, evidence, and rules of engagement that structure contemporary food politics. This course satisfies the Social Science Core of the Liberal Education requirements and is an eligible elective for the public health minor in CLA and the Food Systems major in CFANS.
PSY 3206 - Introduction to Health Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02593 - Madr 3206/Psy 3206
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories/research in health psychology. Bi-directional relationships between psychological factors and physical health. Stress/coping, adjustment to chronic illness. Psychological factors in etiology/course of disease. Health behavior change. prereq: 1001
PSY 3604 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00083 - Madr 3604/Psy 3604/Psy 5604
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diagnosis, classification, etiologies of behavioral disorders. prereq: 1001
PSY 3666 - Human Sexuality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Overview of theories, research, and contemporary issues in human sexual behavior from an interdisciplinary perspective. Sexual anatomy/physiology, hormones/sexual differentiation, cross-cultural perspectives on sexual development, social/health issues, and sexual dysfunction/therapy. prereq: 1001
PSY 4016 - Behavior Analysis and Autism
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02583
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Psy 4016/5016: Behavior Analysis and Autism Fall Semester Only This practicum course is a special service-learning opportunity on current Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) interventions for children who suffer from the challenges of autism. In this practicum, students gain substantial experience working with children in off-campus settings under the supervision of Board Certified Behavior Analysts who are engaged in the direct application of ABA and behavior therapy. This field experience involves a minimum of 7 hours per week for 12 weeks. Each week, the students participate in two 3-hour, one-on-one therapy sessions at either a home-based or center-based ABA program site, plus one 1-hour clinical review meeting at that site. Students also attend one 1.5-hour lecture/discussion session and complete weekly reading assignments. Students are introduced to the principles and methods currently employed to help young children with autism acquire functional language and appropriate social behavior, and control autistic behavior. Issues of professional ethics, social responsibility, and scientific and moral philosophy pertaining to the treatment of children with autism are also addressed. Grading is based on appropriate participation in the service-learning activities, competency evaluations at the service-learning site, and performance on a final exam. The prerequisite for the course is either Psy 4011/5011: Applied Behavior Analysis, or a comparable course or experience. Students who have prior mastery of the technical vocabulary of ABA are given preference. prereq: Individual auto transportation, instr consent
PSY 5205 - Applied Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Applications of social psychology research/theory to domains such as physical/mental health, education, the media, desegregation, the legal system, energy conservation, public policy. prereq: 3201 or grad student or instr consent
SOC 3446 - Comparing Healthcare Systems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02690 - Soc 3446/Soc 5446
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of national health systems from an international comparative perspective, emphasizing social, organizational, political, economic, cultural, and ethical dimensions of healthcare policies and programs to deliver services and their impacts on the health of population groups. The comparative approach will enable students to acquire a better understanding of the problems and potential for reforming and improving US healthcare delivery. Pre-req: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3501 - Sociology of Families (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Family has long been a significant experience in human societies; much of what we understand ourselves to be, arises in family life. But family also varies widely in composition across time and place. We will learn how sociologists study and understand families theoretically, as social institutions, as well as sites and sources of social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course is an introduction to the importance of health and illness in people’s lives, how social structures impact who gets sick, how they are treated, and how the delivery of health care is organized. By the end of the course you will be familiar with the major issues in the sociology of health and illness, and understand that health and illness are not just biological processes, but profoundly shaped by the organization of society. prereq: One sociology course or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
WRIT 3405W - Humanistic Healthcare and Communication (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Relationships in art between communication, humanism in healthcare, empathy.
AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01213
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and the afterlife found in the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01213
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and afterlife found in cultures of ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
CSCL 3350W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01555 - CSCL 3456W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01555 - CSCL 3350W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064 - Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064 - Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis/explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production.
GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current Sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor.
SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the professor.
GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
GLOS 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01846
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the interaction between human society and the natural environment, focusing on the contemporary and global situation. Takes the perspective of environmental sociology concerning the short-range profit-driven and ideological causes of ecological destruction. Investigates how society is reacting to that increasing destruction. prereq: SOC 1001 or environmental course or instr consent
SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01846
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the interaction between human society and the natural environment, focusing on the contemporary and global situation. Takes the perspective of environmental sociology concerning the short-range profit-driven and ideological causes of ecological destruction. Investigates how society is reacting to that increasing destruction prereq: 1001 recommended or a course on the environment, soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3246 - Diseases, Disasters & Other Killers (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02540 - Soc 3246/Soc 5246
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course studies the social pattern of mortality, beginning with demographic transition theory. Students will study specific causes of death or theories of etiology, including theories about suicide, fundamental cause theory, and the role of early life conditions in mortality. Students learn tools for studying mortality, including cause of death classifications and life tables. Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
SOC 5246 - Disease, Disasters, and Other Killers (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02540 - Soc 3246/Soc 5246
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course studies the social pattern of mortality, beginning with demographic transition theory. Students will study specific causes of death or theories of etiology, including theories about suicide, fundamental cause theory, and the role of early life conditions in mortality. Students learn tools for studying mortality, including cause of death classifications and life tables. Grad student or instructor consent.
SOC 3511 - World Population Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02141 - Soc 3511/Soc 3511H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class is an introduction to the contemporary issues that accompany such dramatic population change, including fertility change, disease experiences, migration as opportunity and challenge and human-environment conflict. Further, we will examine the roles of global organizations, national governments, and culture in shaping and reshaping populations. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3511H - Honors: World Population Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02141 - Soc 3511/Soc 3511H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class is an introduction to the contemporary issues that accompany such dramatic population change, including fertility change, disease experiences, migration as opportunity and challenge and human-environment conflict. Further, we will examine the roles of global organizations, national governments, and culture in shaping and reshaping populations. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4551 - Sociology of Sexualities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02095 - Soc 4551/Soc 4551H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In this course we will examine social theories and sociological research on the topic of sexuality. We will explore the concept of sexuality as it intersects with race, gender, age, and class. This course is designed to give you a basic understanding of sociological implications of sexuality in the United States. This course is intended to help you develop your analytical and critical thinking skills. You will be asked to move beyond your own experience and perspectives to sociologically analyze and evaluate over-simplified explanations of past and contemporary issues as they appear in our course readings. prereq: Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4551H - Honors: Sociology of Sexualities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02095 - Soc 4551/Soc 4551H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In this course we will examine social theories and sociological research on the topic of sexuality. We will explore the concept of sexuality as it intersects with race, gender, age, and class. This course is designed to give you a basic understanding of sociological implications of sexuality in the United States. This course is intended to help you develop your analytical and critical thinking skills. You will be asked to move beyond your own experience and perspectives to sociologically analyze and evaluate over-simplified explanations of past and contemporary issues as they appear in our course readings. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: Honors
PUBH 3003 - Fundamentals of Alcohol and Drug Abuse
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01062
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects of alcohol and other drug abuse problems. Emphasizes incidence, high-risk populations, prevention, and intervention.
PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01062 - PubH 3003/PubH 3004
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects of communicable and degenerative diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, and alcohol and drug problems. Role of education in health conservation, disease control, and drug abuse.
PUBH 3010 - Public Health Approaches to HIV/AIDS
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00354 - PubH 3010/6010
Typically offered: Every Fall
Primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. Community responses to HIV/AIDS in Minnesota. Medical, social service, and political responses.
HSM 3040 - Dying and Death in Contemporary Society: Implications for Intervention
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00355
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides basic background information on concepts, attitudes, ethics, and lifestyle management related to dying, death, grief, and bereavement. The emphasis is on preparing teachers, community health professionals, and other helping professionals for educational activities in this area. Prerequisite: sophomore
PUBH 3102 - Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to the field of Environmental and Occupational Health (EOH), the impact of environmental and occupational hazards on individuals and communities, the approaches taken to address EOH issues at the community level,and the challenges that must be overcome to ensure success in dealing with EOH issues. Students will review scientific literature to learn about interventions for environmental health problems, and practice identifying environmental health problems and interventions in their communities. The focus of this course will be on the interaction between humans and the environment and how this interaction affects human health. Online Course.
PUBH 3104 - Environmental Health Effects: Introduction to Toxicology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01528
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed for students who are interested in public health and environmental issues. Toxicology is a multidisciplinary experimental science that combines chemistry, biology, and physiology to determine whether substances we are exposed to in the environment are likely to harm our health. Students will learn how toxicology is used to understand how humans respond to chemicals in the environment. In addition, students will learn how toxicology is applied to protect human health through safety evaluation. prereq: Previous coursework in biology and chemistry; biochemistry is recommended. Ability to analyze data, and understand the basic functions of DNA, enzymes and other proteins, and lipids.
PUBH 3415 - Introduction to Clinical Trials - Online
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Phases of trials, hypotheses/endpoints, choice of intervention/control, ethical considerations, blinding/randomization, data collection/monitoring, sample size, analysis strategies. Protocol development/implementation, interactive discussion boards. prereq: PUBH 3415 enrollees must have one semester of undergraduate level introductory biostatistics or statistics (STAT 3011, EPSY 3264, SOC 3811, BIOL 3272, or instr consent) AND junior or senior standing or instr consent.
PUBH 3801 - Health Economics and Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 3801/PubH 3801
Typically offered: Every Spring
Economics of health care markets. Problems faced by consumers/health care services. Builds on principles of supply/demand for health, health care/insurance, and role of government. Theoretical/empirical models/applications. prereq: Course on microeconomics, course on basic statistics
PUBH 3905 - Nutrition for Public Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00887 - PubH 3905/PubH 5905
Typically offered: Every Fall
Topics of contemporary interest. Concepts/facts about science of human nutrition discussed in relation to personal/community nutrition problems/concerns. Applied introductory course with labs. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
PUBH 3940 - Concepts and Controversies in Public Health Nutrition and Health Promotion
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Societal issues around public health nutrition and health promotion. Socioecological framework. Levels of influence on dietary intake, food choices, related health outcomes. Policy initiatives related to public health nutrition, health promotion and disease prevention. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
PUBH 3950 - From Kid to Community: Personal, Social and Environmental Influences on Youth Obesity
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Public health strategies for prevention of pediatric obesity. Includes overview of epidemiology of child/adolescent obesity focusing on social-ecological risk factors. Discussion of implications of risk factors for developing environmentally-focused interventions/programs. prereq: Students should have completed one basic, introductory nutrition course or equivalent or permission by instructor
PUBH 4410 - Summer Institute in Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to biostatistics for undergraduate students. Meets every weekday, all day, for six weeks summer between junior or senior year. Fundamentals of biostatistics/epidemiology, statistical computing in R/SAS, clinical trials/statistical genetics. prereq: Student participant in Division of Biostatistics SIBS (summer Institute for Training in Biostatistics) research program
PUBH 3107 - Global Public Health and the Environment
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental determinants of health and or well-being of populations. Role of environment in public health. Population burden of disease. Variation of environmental public health determinants across globe. Interconnectedness of activities and actions of people in different countries. prereq: public health minor, instr consent
PUBH 3601 - Maternal and Child Health Global Public Health Issues
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to global health. Health of mothers, infants, children, adolescents. History of MCH, global burden of disease/premature death. Effect of globalization. Programmatic/policy efforts to address health needs of MCH populations. prereq: Public Health minor requirements or instr consent, [3202 or 3001 or 3004], [3350 or 3106]