Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

History Minor

History Department
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2023
  • Required credits in this minor: 14
A history minor is an excellent complement to every major. Students from a range of departments, especially political science, economics, sociology, psychology, global studies, journalism, education, biology, chemical engineering, and foreign languages, frequently minor in history. At this critical moment, there are no minors more important to understanding the past, navigating the present, or imagining the future than History. History minors make sense of the world through the study of ancient times, the recent past, and everything in between. Asking interesting questions about the past and examining a range of oral, written, visual, and material sources, history minors explore and explain how peoples across time and space have lived, loved, built community, warred, reconciled, and made sense of their worlds. As much as history is a window into the past, it also helps us understand ourselves, our identities, and how we have come to inhabit the moral, ethical, social, economic, political, religious, environmental, national, ethnic, racial, gender, and sexual communities we live in today. History helps us understand how our present and possible futures grow out of a very usable and interesting past. History minors develop all of the skills required to thrive in today’s world from an understanding of the engines of change, and an ability to assess and interpret conflicting evidence and interpretations, to the robust oral and written communication skills that will allow you to shape conversations in your chosen professions and communities. Regardless of your career path, a history minor will enable you to bring fresh and critical historical perspectives to the communities you live and work in. Historical thinking strengthens communities by encouraging them to think deeply about where they have come from and where they would like to go. This is a critical moment and an incredible time to declare a history minor.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Students may earn a BA or a minor in history, but not both.
Electives
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
Upper-Divsion
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
· HIST 3023 - Hands-On History: Methods Seminar (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3051 - Ancient Civilization: Near East and Egypt [HIS] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HIST 3052 - Ancient Civilization: Greece [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3053 - Ancient Civilization: Rome [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3082W - World Christianity, 1300-1800 Reformers, Radicals and Revolutionaries [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3151W - British History to the 17th Century [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3152 - British History From the Seventeenth Century [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3244 - History of Eastern Europe [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3283 - Marx, Capital, and History: An Introduction to Marxist Theory and History (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3284W - History through Memoir [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3287 - Seeing History through Comics: New Perspectives on the Contentious Past [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3348 - Women and Gender in Modern America (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HIST 3361W - World War I: A Global History [HIS, TS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3363 - Global History of the Cold War (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3412 - Soccer: Around the World with the Beautiful Game [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3413 - War in History: Preparing and Making War in World History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3416 - Imperialism and its Critics: Ethical Issues, Literary Representations [LITR, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3417W - Food in History [HIS, ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3418 - Drink in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3424 - Women and Gender in Latin American History [GP, HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3425 - History of Modern Mexico (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3454 - West African History: Early Times to 1800 [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3476 - War and Peace in Japan Through Popular Culture (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3477 - Samurai, Geisha, and How They Became Japanese (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3485 - History of Southeast Asia [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3487 - The Vietnam Wars: French Colonialism and U.S. Intervention in Indochina (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3505 - Survey of the Modern Middle East [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3507 - History of Modern Egypt (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3508W - Modern Turkey: From Empire to Republic [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3509 - Approaches to the Study of the Middle East (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3514W - Water and Oil: An Environmental History of the Middle East [HIS, ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3609 - Military History of Premodern Europe (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3615W - Women in European History: 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3621 - Creating the Modern World in Medieval Europe: The Renaissance, 1200-1600 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3623W - The Age of Reformation [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3637 - Modern Russia: From Peter the Great to the Present (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3652 - Early Modern Britain (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3681 - Irish History (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3691W - The British Empire [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3704W - Daily Life in Europe: 1300-1800 [HIS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3721 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the Turn of the Century to the End of World War II: 1900-45 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3722 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the End of World War II to the End of the Cold War: 1945-91 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3726W - The Century of Refugees: A Global History of Forced Migration, 1900s-2000s [HIS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3728 - The History of Human Rights (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3731 - Modern France and Its Empire: Identity, Citizenship and the State 1780 to the Present [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3746 - Game of Thrones: Emperors, Knights and Witches in Central Europe [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3797 - History of Population [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3809 - The Peoples of Revolutionary America (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3811 - Antebellum America: Slavery, Expansion and the Development of a Divided Nation (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3812 - The Civil War and Reconstruction (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3813W - Slavery and the Making of America [HIS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3821 - United States in the 20th Century to 1945 [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3822 - Making America Modern: 1945 to Present (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3834 - Law in American Life, Colonial Era to Civil War (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3835 - Law in American Life: 1865 to Present (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3853 - Black Protest in Twentieth Century America [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3854 - Race and Sport [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3857 - Race: The History of An Idea in North America [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3858 - The History of Policing & Surveillance in 20th Century United States [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3886 - The Age of Atlantic Revolutions, 1765-1830 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3980W - Supplemental Writing in History [WI] (1.0 cr)
· HIST 5053 - Doing Roman History: Sources, Methods, and Trends (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5547 - Empire and Nations in the Middle East (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5801 - Seminar in Early American History (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5802 - Readings in American History, 1848-Present (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5901 - Latin America Proseminar: Colonial (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5902 - Latin America Proseminar: Modern (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5910 - Topics in U.S. History (1.0-4.0 cr)
· HIST 3001 - Public History (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3001 - Public History (3.0 cr)
or AMST 3003 - Public History (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or CNRC 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3066 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilization [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 3009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3067W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 3027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3081W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3544W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or MEST 3081W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3101 - Introduction to Medieval History [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3001 - Introduction to Medieval History [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3102 - Medieval Tales and their Modern Echoes [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3002 - Medieval Tales and their Modern Echoes [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3211 - History of Sexuality in Europe (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3211 - History of Sexuality in Europe (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3212 - Dissident Sexualities in U.S. History (3.0 cr)
or AMST 3212 - Dissident Sexualities in U.S. History (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3212 - Dissident Sexualities in U.S. History (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3271 - The Viking World: Story, History, and Archaeology (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5271 - The Viking World: Story, History, and Archaeology (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present (3.0 cr)
or CSCL 3282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3285 - Magic and Medicine (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3625 - Magic and Medicine (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3286 - Galileo and the Beginnings of Modern Science (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5286 - Galileo and the Beginnings of Modern Science (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3349 - U.S. Women's Legal History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3549 - U.S. Women's Legal History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3401V - Honors Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or LAS 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or LAS 3401V - Honors Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or LAS 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3419 - History of Capitalism: Uneven Development Since 1500 (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3219 - History of Capitalism: Uneven Development Since 1500 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3423 - Central American Revolutions (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3423 - Central American Revolutions (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3429 - Latin American History in Film and Text [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or LAS 3429 - Latin American History in Film and Text [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3431 - Early Africa and Its Global Connections [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3431 - Early Africa and Its Global Connections [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
or AFRO 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HIST 3435 - History of South Africa from 1910: Anti-Racism, Youth Politics, Pandemics & Gender (Based Violence) [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3205 - History of South Africa from 1910: Anti-Racism, Youth Politics, Pandemics & Gender (Based Violence) [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3436 - Fighting for History:Historical Roots of Contemporary Crises in Africa (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3436 - Fighting for History:Historical Roots of Contemporary Crises in Africa (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3455 - West African History: 1800 to Present [GP] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3002 - West African History: 1800 to Present [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3456 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3120 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age (3.0-4.0 cr)
or EAS 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HIST 3462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
or HIST 3462H - Honors: From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia from 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
or EAS 3462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
or EAS 3462H - Honors: From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia from 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HIST 3466 - Religion and Society in Imperial China [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3373 - Religion and Society in Imperial China [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3373 - Religion and Society in Imperial China [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3468 - Social Change in Modern China (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5468 - Social Change in Modern China (3.0 cr)
or EAS 3468 - Social Change in Modern China (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3469 - History of Women and Family in China, 1600-2000 (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3372 - History of Women and Family in China, 1600-2000 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3471 - Modern Japan, Meiji to the Present (1868-2000) [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3478 - Modern Japan, Meiji to the Present (1868-2000) [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or EAS 3471 - Modern Japan, Meiji to the Present (1868-2000) [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3478 - Tigers and Dragons: The Rise of the East Asian Economies, 1930-Present (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5478 - Tigers and Dragons: The Rise of the East Asian Economies, 1930-Present (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3278 - Tigers and Dragons: The Rise of the East Asian Economies, 1930-Present (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3483 - Hmong History Across the Globe (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3483 - Hmong History Across the Globe (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3489 - Democracy and popular politics in India (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3969 - Democracy and popular politics in India (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3492 - Hinduism: Traditions, Texts, Politics [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3671 - Hinduism (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3671 - Hinduism (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3493 - Islam: Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3871 - Islam: Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3712 - Islam: Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3494W - Christ in Islamic Thought [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3718W - Christ in Islamic Thought [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or CNRC 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3504 - The Cultures of the Silk Road (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3872 - The Cultures of the Silk Road (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3708 - The Cultures of the Silk Road (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3511 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3511 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3079 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3512 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3512 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3113 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3513 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5513 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3721 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3534 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3546 - Islam and the West (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3643 - Islam and the West (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3714 - Islam and the West (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3547 - The Ottoman Empire [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3722 - The Ottoman Empire [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3717 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3611 - Medieval Cities of Europe: 500-1500 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3611 - Medieval Cities of Europe: 500-1500 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3613 - History of the Crusades [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3613 - History of the Crusades [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3715 - History of the Crusades [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3616 - The Hundred Years War: France and England in the Middle Ages [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3616 - The Hundred Years War: France and England in the Middle Ages [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or CNRC 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3543 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3708 -  The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3315 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5315 -  The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3727 - History of the Holocaust (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3520 - History of the Holocaust (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3520 - History of the Holocaust (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3729 - Nazi Germany and Hitler's Europe (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3729 - Nazi Germany and Hitler's Europe (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3767 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3611 - Stories, Bodies, Movements (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3611 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3802 - Religious Encounters in Early America (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3622 - Religious Encounters in Early America (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3804 - Religion and the American Culture Wars [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3623 - Religion and the American Culture Wars [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3856 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3864 - African American History: 1619-1865 [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3864 - African American History: 1619 to 1865 [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3865 - African American History, 1865 to Present (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3865 - African American History: 1865 to the Present (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3868W - Race, War, and Race Wars in American History [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3868W - Race, War, and Race Wars in American History [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3871 - American Indian History: Pre-Contact to 1830 [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3871 - American Indian History: Pre-Contact to 1830 [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3872 - American Indian History: 1830 to the Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3872 - American Indian History: 1830 to the Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in US History [HIS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History [HIS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3877 - Asian American History, 1850-Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3877 - Asian American History, 1850 to Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5831 - Cultural Fallout: The Cold War and Its Legacy: Readings (3.0 cr)
or AMST 8231 - Cultural Fallout: The Cold War and Its Legacy, Readings (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5932 - The Production of Knowledge, Negotiating the Past, and the Writing of African Histories (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 5932 - The Production of Knowledge, Negotiating the Past, and the Writing of African Histories (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3362 - Global History of World War II [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 1362 - Global History of World War II [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3426 - Piracy in the Mediterranean: The World of Merchants and Pirates [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3426 - Piracy in the Mediterranean: The World of Merchants and Pirates [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
 
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HIST 3023 - Hands-On History: Methods Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3020, 3021, 3022, 3023
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
HIST 3023 introduces history majors to the methods and practices of historical knowledge production and to a critical engagement with the philosophy/theory of history. Students will explore a range of the methods by which historians go about the work of producing historical knowledge: how they identify and analyze primary sources, engage with existing scholarship (secondary sources) on a particular line of inquiry, convey their findings, and argue for an original contribution to the historiography (the scholarly conversation about a topic). Students will learn about critical and philosophical assessments of history as a discipline and its epistemologies (or ways of knowing). What does it mean to study and teach history in particular social and political contexts? What are the possibilities and limits of the study of history? What is the historian?s task? How do historians know what they know? What methods and skills do historians use? This course introduces history majors (and non-majors) to the methods and practices of historical knowledge production and to the philosophy/theory of history. Put slightly differently, the course will introduce students to the work/craft of history as thought and methodology. It will also encourage students to think about history (as discipline, method) critically, to address questions such as: What is history for and what does the student of history/the historian do in research (as the detective and the archivist), in writing (as the storyteller and the analyst), and in (critical) thought (as the teacher and the philosopher)? What does it mean to teach/study history in a time of struggle? What are the possibilities and limits of history? In short, the course explores what historians do, and what history is for.
HIST 3051 - Ancient Civilization: Near East and Egypt (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
A broad survey of ancient Near Eastern and Egyptian history and culture from the prehistoric to the rise of Persia around 550 B.C.
HIST 3052 - Ancient Civilization: Greece (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A broad survey of ancient Greek culture and history from the third millennium B.C. to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C.
HIST 3053 - Ancient Civilization: Rome (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
A broad survey of the culture and history of Rome from its origins to the decline and fall of the Roman Empire in the third and fourth centuries A.D.
HIST 3082W - World Christianity, 1300-1800 Reformers, Radicals and Revolutionaries (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3082W/RelS 3545W
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This course, which requires no prerequisite, examines developments in the history of Christianity from the beginning of the fourteenth century to the end of the eighteenth. We will start our investigation by considering the Latin church with its headquarters in Rome at the height of its power and influence. We will then trace its development through the crises of the fourteenth century and its subsequent transformation during the Reformation and the Confessional era. We will close by considering new challenges facing the church in an age of Enlightenment and Revolution. Though our geographic center of gravity will be in Europe, we will follow the expansion of Christianity into the Asian, African and American worlds and how developments here changed the nature of the church back in Europe. We will study religion as a phenomenon that affects human activity in a broad spectrum of area and activities. Though we will investigate formal matters of belief, significant attention will be given to Christianity as a ?lived experience,? how faith affected the everyday life of men and women in the premodern world.
HIST 3151W - British History to the 17th Century (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The making of the English nation: Anglo-Saxons and Normans; development of English law and Parliament; Reformation and constitutional crisis; early Wales, Scotland, and Ireland.
HIST 3152 - British History From the Seventeenth Century (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Civil War, Revolution, and constitutional settlement. Industrialization and growth of democracy. Rise/decline of British Empire.
HIST 3244 - History of Eastern Europe (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
History of the peoples of the region from their origins to modern times, culture and society in the Middle Ages; Golden Age of Eastern Europe; loss of independence; nationalism and formation of national states; fascism and World War II, Jews in Eastern Europe; communist and post-communist periods.
HIST 3281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3281/CSCL 528/1Hist 3281/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
First of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings from original sources.
HIST 3283 - Marx, Capital, and History: An Introduction to Marxist Theory and History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3283/Hist 5283
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Explore Marx's understanding of capitalism/its history. Marx's argument regarding historical specificity of capitalism as economic/social condition.
HIST 3284W - History through Memoir (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Memoirs--non-fictional life stories--offer an intriguing lens into the past. Memoirs vividly portray a person's experiences, but they also raise questions about the reliability of the narrator. What kinds of histories are memoirs? We will read memoirs about experiences of race, class, gender in America. Students write their own short memoir.
HIST 3287 - Seeing History through Comics: New Perspectives on the Contentious Past (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Comic-form histories offer new perspectives on the past. Focusing on cases of contentious history, this course will examine how varying perspectives (shaped by class, gender, race, or geo-political position) appear in comic histories. We will compare comic accounts with more traditional forms of historical analysis of select contentious events of modern U.S., European, African and East Asian history.
HIST 3348 - Women and Gender in Modern America
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: GWSS 3408/Hist 3348
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course covers how gender and gender inequality have mattered to the US economy, politics, and cultural life. Themes include: femininity and masculinity as disciplining people, the intersection of gender with whiteness and race, the significance of paid and unpaid labor in women?s lives, and diversity within the category of women.
HIST 3361W - World War I: A Global History (HIS, TS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1361W/Hist 3361W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This class takes a global approach to the examination of the causes and consequences of World War I. We will look at how the war unfolded in Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. We will also explore the war's impact on North America and Australasia, areas drawn into the conflict because of their unique relationships with Britain and France. We will consider the special role played by the U.S. in restoring world peace and analyze the lasting social and political cleavages occasioned by the war. We will get at the heart of how the war was fought and how it is remembered for all of its triumphs and tragedies.
HIST 3363 - Global History of the Cold War
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course examines the origins, unfolding, and end of the Cold War, with emphasis on both geopolitical conflict and its social and cultural expressions. It begins with an examination of the ideological tensions between the USSR and USA and then turns to the end of European hegemony and de-colonization across Asia and Africa. It examines the expansion of the American empire and the appearance of new communist nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. While we will spend time on wars, insurgencies, and alliances, we will also examine how competing blocs and their members bound themselves through trade and economic interdependencies and how they represented themselves, their ideals, and the cold war itself in the sports, music, literature and film. The course ends with the collapse of the Soviet Union and a survey of Cold War traces in the fields of geopolitics and culture.
HIST 3412 - Soccer: Around the World with the Beautiful Game (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How did a kicking game played in a few English schools in the mid-nineteenth century go on to become the most popular organized pastime the world has ever known? In this class, we chart soccer's unlikely rise to global prominence and explore what it can tell us about people, games, and ethics all around the world today.
HIST 3413 - War in History: Preparing and Making War in World History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
War has been a standard tool for organizing societies, settling disputes, and securing resources. The means and meaning of war have changed in important ways over time and we see very different historical outcomes across different societies. This course exams differences in war making across many societies in Europe, Asia, the Americas, and Africa from 10,000 BC to now.
HIST 3416 - Imperialism and its Critics: Ethical Issues, Literary Representations (LITR, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Significant episodes of several imperial nations to underscore themes of ethics/literature.
HIST 3417W - Food in History (HIS, ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Significance of food in society, from earliest times to present. Why we eat what we eat. How foods have been "globalized." Dietary effects of industrial modernity. Material culture, social beliefs. Examples from around world.
HIST 3418 - Drink in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Significance of alcohol and stimulating beverages. Interdisciplinary study of alcohol/prohibition regimes throughout history.
HIST 3424 - Women and Gender in Latin American History (GP, HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3934/GWSS 3413/Hist 3424
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Changing gender norms in Latin America over time as compared with lives of women and men of diverse classes and ethnic groups. How women responded to their position in society, on a continuum from accommodation to resistance.
HIST 3425 - History of Modern Mexico
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3425/Hist 3425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Mexico from independence to the present: struggles for land, liberty, and equality; ethnicity, gender, and class; economic growth, nationalism, and globalization; urbanization, immigration, demographic transition. Issues of race, religion, and national identity; the US-Mexico War, the 1910 Mexican Revolution, urbanization, migration, free trade agreements, and the War on Drugs.
HIST 3454 - West African History: Early Times to 1800 (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3001/Hist 3454
Typically offered: Every Fall
West Africa from late early times to establishment/histories of states. Relations with North African, Mediterranean, Asian, American worlds. Non-centralized political authority.
HIST 3476 - War and Peace in Japan Through Popular Culture
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3457/HIST 3476
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
War-related issues in Japan. Animation films, comics from 1940s to 1990s. Mobilization of culture for WWII. Conflict between constitutional pacifism and national security. Japan's role in cold war and post-cold war worlds.
HIST 3477 - Samurai, Geisha, and How They Became Japanese
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
How samurai, geisha, and Zen Buddhism came to be considered as the quintessential Japanese tradition in 20th century. Modernity, nationalism, orientalism, international politics, globalization.
HIST 3485 - History of Southeast Asia (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Origins of civilization/indigenous states. impact of world religions and Western colonialism on gender, social, political, and economic structures. Nationalism. Establishment of Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines.
HIST 3487 - The Vietnam Wars: French Colonialism and U.S. Intervention in Indochina
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3487/Hist 3487
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
French conquest. Colonial bureaucratic/economic transformations. Nationalist responses. First Indochina War. Emergence of nation-state. U.S. intervention. Impact of Vietnam War on current politics of Laos, Cambodia, and Thailand, and on Southeast Asia.
HIST 3505 - Survey of the Modern Middle East (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3876/Arab 3505/Arab 5505/H
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political history of Middle East in modern era. Socio-economic/intellectual issues. Decline of Ottoman Empire. Imperialism. Nationalism, rise/development of states. Political Islam.
HIST 3507 - History of Modern Egypt
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Main political events. Underlying social, economic, and intellectual issues. Impact of Egypt on region. Developments in Egypt compared with those of other leading Arab states.
HIST 3508W - Modern Turkey: From Empire to Republic (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of modern Turkey, from 1774 to the present day. Teaches students about major historical events and notable political actors that shaped the late Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey. Helps students develop analytical skills in understanding and contrasting different primary and secondary source perspectives on and methodological approaches to the past.
HIST 3509 - Approaches to the Study of the Middle East
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Intensive reading/discussion course. Ways in which historians/social scientists have studied Middle East. Problems they have encountered. Paradigms, issues, and debates in Middle Eastern Studies.
HIST 3514W - Water and Oil: An Environmental History of the Middle East (HIS, ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Water and Oil focuses on the far?reaching impacts of environmental change upon Middle Eastern societies, culture, politics, economic development or underdevelopment, and violence. It offers a narrative of the Middle Eastern past that is not framed by a specific place, ethnic group, religion, or intellectual tradition. The course is designed to enable students to think deeply about technology and the environment across the Middle East, and the region?s development as shaped by local practices, global politics, economic interests, and the struggle for resource management.
HIST 3609 - Military History of Premodern Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How changes in European warfare shaped society from the late Roman Empire to the Military Revolution and rise of the nation-state, 300-1800 CE. Topics include styles of warfare and perceptions of war; the relationship between war and society; the roles of religious belief and technology in the practice of war. What produces a military revolution?
HIST 3615W - Women in European History: 1500 to the Present (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GWSS 3615W/Hist 3615W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
History of women in Western Europe from early modern period to present. Changes crucial to women's lives. Family/kinship structure, control over property, organization of work, religious ideas/practices, education, politics, beliefs/attitudes about female body.
HIST 3621 - Creating the Modern World in Medieval Europe: The Renaissance, 1200-1600
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Political/cultural history of city-states of northern/central Italy, 1200-1550. Emphasizes Florence/Venice. Readings include Dante, Machiavelli. prereq: Intro course in European history before 1500 recommended
HIST 3623W - The Age of Reformation (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course will examine the great religious convulsion that gripped Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Chronologically, however, we will begin in the late medieval period as we consider important changes that were occurring in European culture and society culminating with Europe's first Reformation, not in Germany but in Bohemia. Geographically, we begin with Europe but our scope eventually widens out to consider developments also in Asia and the Americas. We conclude by considering the relaxation of religious tensions in the late seventeenth century and concurrent growth of toleration and skepticism. Throughout the course we will consider religion as a dynamic that has had a broad impact on society affecting not only personal belief but also the politics, social patterns, and intellectual and cultural production of the early modern world.
HIST 3637 - Modern Russia: From Peter the Great to the Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political, social, and cultural forces which have shaped modern Russia. Emphasis will be on modernization, attempts at reforms in the imperial and Soviet period, and the dissolution of empires.
HIST 3652 - Early Modern Britain
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
British society/culture during early modern era, especially 16th and 17th centuries. May include themes related to political developments, economy/social structure, gender, religion, literature, or interaction with other world regions.
HIST 3681 - Irish History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
History of Ireland, primarily modern, with emphasis on politics and Anglo-Irish relations.
HIST 3691W - The British Empire (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Gain/loss of colonies in Ireland, America, India, Africa. Development of racism, multicultural composition of British society, debates about economic motives for empire, resistance of colonized peoples to conquest/domination.
HIST 3704W - Daily Life in Europe: 1300-1800 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Living conditions and daily life in Europe before the Industrial Revolution. Topics include marriage and family, life at court, nobles, peasants, disease, farming, livestock-raising, urban life, the middle classes, manufacturing, trade, piracy, witchcraft, war, crime, and social deviance.
HIST 3721 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the Turn of the Century to the End of World War II: 1900-45
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3721/5721
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Social, political, and cultural changes/conflicts. Background to WWI, its impact. Revolution, failure of interwar stability. Fascism. WWII, its consequences.
HIST 3722 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the End of World War II to the End of the Cold War: 1945-91 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3422/Hist 3722
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Social, economic, political, and cultural impacts of WWII upon Europe. Division of Europe. Communist regimes in Eastern Europe, cooperation in Western Europe. Impacts of modernization. End of Cold War.
HIST 3726W - The Century of Refugees: A Global History of Forced Migration, 1900s-2000s (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the world-historical events that structured global flows of refugees in the Twentieth Century (and beyond), the evolution of refugee protection systems that emerged in response, and the rise of the ?refugee? as a legal/political/cultural subject and as an agent of historical change.
HIST 3728 - The History of Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3728 / HIST 5728
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
What are human rights? How and when did they originate? How were such rights promoted, protected, and contested at different historical junctures, and by whom? In this course, we will examine the historical processes through which human rights have been conceptualized, codified, violated, and vindicated. Throughout the semester, we will travel across the globe and trace events that span from the eighteenth century to the present day. Our search will take us through the multiple histories that have shaped what we nowadays recognize as the human rights framework ? its institutions, products, and norms. Integrating perspectives and readings from the humanities, social sciences and legal studies, this course explores how meanings of human rights have fluctuated in response to historical developments, and how human rights have come to gain their prominent role in contemporary politics, law, and culture.
HIST 3731 - Modern France and Its Empire: Identity, Citizenship and the State 1780 to the Present (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
History of citizen/state in France from French Revolution to present.
HIST 3746 - Game of Thrones: Emperors, Knights and Witches in Central Europe (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
This course traces the rise and fortunes of the Habsburg family from their emergence in the late 13th century to the end of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806. We use the family to explore key themes of the period including the Black Death, Hussite wars and peasant revolts, the new print culture, developments of the Reformation, European expansion and Enlightenment culture. prereq: None
HIST 3797 - History of Population (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3797/Hist 5797
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of births, deaths, migration, population size, and population characteristics. Evidence from Europe, the United States, and Latin America with comparative material from Africa and Asia. Methods of historical population analysis and research of historical population data.
HIST 3809 - The Peoples of Revolutionary America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Culture/structure of late colonial politics. Regionalism. Connections between society and politics. Imperial crisis and independence. Military history of the Revolution. Origins of national politics and the constitution.
HIST 3811 - Antebellum America: Slavery, Expansion and the Development of a Divided Nation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the history of the U.S. between the War of 1812 and the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861. We will examine the dramatic expansion in population and territory; violent growth of slavery; onset of transportation, communications, and industrial revolutions; forced removal of Native Americans; movements for social reform; transformations in popular culture, family life, and religious experience; maturation of political parties; and the coming of the Civil War.
HIST 3812 - The Civil War and Reconstruction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
United States from 1848 to 1877. Causes of sectional crisis; Southern secession; Lincoln and emancipation; military history; impact of war North and South; Reconstruction efforts to change the Southern life and transform the status of African Americans.
HIST 3813W - Slavery and the Making of America (HIS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines American racial slavery and its centrality to U.S. history. The course teaches students to consider the experiences of enslaved people, observe how the institution of slavery operated, and understand its far-reaching influence across social, political, cultural, economic, legal, environmental, and intellectual domains.
HIST 3821 - United States in the 20th Century to 1945 (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
American politics and society in the progressive era, the 1920's, the Great Depression and World War II. Economic reform at home, the challenges of world war abroad, and social change affecting the status of women and racial minorities.
HIST 3822 - Making America Modern: 1945 to Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
American politics and society in the postwar era, the diplomacy of the Cold War, the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, cultural clashes in the 1960's, Watergate, the conservative resurgence, and the end of the Cold War.
HIST 3834 - Law in American Life, Colonial Era to Civil War
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Understandings of law/property held by colonists, Indians. Conceptions of relationships among family, community, state held in colonial America; conceptions held today. Law of slavery in colonial era. American Revolution/Constitution. Law, industrialization. Legal legitimacy, federalism, Civil War as constitutional crisis.
HIST 3835 - Law in American Life: 1865 to Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Centralization of state power, rise of individual rights. Constitutionalization of American law. Passage, promise, abrogation, rediscovery of 13th, 14th, 15th Amendments. Expansion of federal administrative state. Origins of civil liberties. Law and the welfare state. Civil Rights Revolution of 1950s, '60s, '70s. Product liability law. Second half of two-semester survey. May be taken independently.
HIST 3853 - Black Protest in Twentieth Century America (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course gets at the heart of why/how African Americans have been fighting for social and political equality throughout the 20th Century. We explore various ways that African Americans have articulated their political demands and affirmed their citizenship rights using youth and grassroots organizations, workers' rights, feminism, education, the courts and laws as tools for political advancement.
HIST 3854 - Race and Sport (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This class examines how race, gender, and sport intersect as sites of resistance and reform in twentieth century American life. With the intensification of Jim Crow coinciding with the professionalization and commercialization of sports, athletes of color became central to American debates about science, citizenship, class, ethnicity, sexuality, social mobility, belonging, culture, and entitlement. This seminar will be particularly interested in how athletes of color forced a place for themselves in sports like baseball, boxing, football, golf, and basketball by exercising different models of political protest, citing an urgent need for social justice reforms that spread beyond the realm of sport.
HIST 3857 - Race: The History of An Idea in North America (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This seminar explores the roots and rationales presented when constructing and upholding the idea of race. This class examines processes of racial formation in science, law, history, immigration policy, education, leisure, adoption, marriage, and medicine. We will look at how race has been used to pathologize, eroticize, criminalize, vilify, and medicalize purported ?problem people,? like immigrants, the poor, and the sick. Using memoirs, legal cases, history of medicine, laws, photographs, oral histories, and secondary source readings, this class traces the history of America?s fascination with race and how race came to define so many aspects of American life during the twentieth century.
HIST 3858 - The History of Policing & Surveillance in 20th Century United States (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course explores how policing and surveillance changed, evolved, and adapted throughout the twentieth century in the United States. We will trace the trajectory of police power & legitimacy as well as examine how the institution of policing responded to ongoing racial justice movements.
HIST 3886 - The Age of Atlantic Revolutions, 1765-1830
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Thinking about the rebellions that rocked the Atlantic world during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, we will compare and contrast the diverse political, economic, and social elements surrounding the following conflicts: the American Revolution, the French Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, and the Latin American Wars of Independence.
HIST 3980W - Supplemental Writing in History (WI)
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
May be attached, by agreement of instructor and students, to any 3xxx or 5xxx course to make a writing-intensive experience. prereq: instr consent; must take a 3-cr 3xxx or 5xxx course taken concurrently
HIST 5053 - Doing Roman History: Sources, Methods, and Trends
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Survey of major scholarship in field of Roman history since Mommsen. Political, cultural, social, military, and economic history. Focuses on methodological problems posed by evidence. Ways in which these issues shape research. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
HIST 5547 - Empire and Nations in the Middle East
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Modernity in non-Western imperial context. Identity, ideology, economy, environment, language. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
HIST 5801 - Seminar in Early American History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 5801/Hist 8801
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to literature of early American history. Readings selected from some of best scholarship in field. Questions of colonial historians. Theories, methods, sources used in pursuit of those questions.
HIST 5802 - Readings in American History, 1848-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 5802/Hist 8802
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings-intensive course. U.S. history from Mexican-American War to present.
HIST 5901 - Latin America Proseminar: Colonial
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduces beginning graduate and advanced undergraduate students to major historical writings on various Latin American themes. prereq: instr consent
HIST 5902 - Latin America Proseminar: Modern
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduces beginning graduate and advanced undergraduate students to major historical writings on various Latin American themes. prereq: instr consent
HIST 5910 - Topics in U.S. History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
HIST 3001 - Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3001/AmSt 3003/Hist 3001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Interpretations of collective past as produced in public venues, including museum exhibitions, films, theme parks, websites. Intellectual and political issues in history produced for public audiences. Career opportunities.
AMIN 3001 - Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3001/AmSt 3003/Hist 3001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Interpretations of collective past as produced in public venues, including museum exhibitions, films, theme parks, and websites. Intellectual and political issues in history produced for public audiences. Career opportunities.
AMST 3003 - Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3001/AmSt 3003/Hist 3001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Interpretations of collective past as produced in public venues, including museum exhibitions, films, theme parks, websites. Intellectual and political issues in history produced for public audiences. Career opportunities.
HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
CNRC 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
HIST 3066 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilization (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3009/Anth 8009/Hist 3066
Typically offered: Every Spring
How did complex urban societies first develop? This course addresses this question in ten regions of the world, including Maya Mesoamerica, Inca South America, Sumerian Near East, Shang Civilization in East Asia and early Greece and Rome.
ANTH 3009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3009/Anth 8009/Hist 3066
Typically offered: Every Spring
How did complex urban societies first develop? This course addresses this question in ten regions of the world including Maya Mesoamerica, Inca South America, Sumerian Near East, Shang Civilization in East Asia, and early Greece and Rome.
HIST 3067W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman period.
ANTH 3027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman period.
ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists/historians analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman Period. Interpreting archaeological evidence from specific sites to understand broad trends in human past.
HIST 3081W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3081W/MeSt 1081/RelS 3544
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
This course surveys the history of Christianity from its status as a persecuted minority religion of the Roman Empire to its dominant role in medieval Europe and Byzantium. We study Christian traditions in Asia and Africa as well as Europe with special attention to the relationship between Christianity and culture in the ancient and medieval world.
RELS 3544W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3081W/MeSt 1081/RelS 3544
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
This course surveys the history of Christianity from its status as a persecuted minority religion of the Roman Empire to its dominant role in medieval Europe and Byzantium. We study Christian traditions in Asia and Africa as well as Europe with special attention to the relationship between Christianity and culture in the ancient and medieval world.
MEST 3081W - Martyrs, Monks, Crusaders: World Christianity, 100-1400 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3081W/MeSt 1081/RelS 3544
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
This course surveys the history of Christianity from its status as a persecuted minority religion of the Roman Empire to its dominant role in medieval Europe and Byzantium. We study Christian traditions in Asia and Africa as well as Europe with special attention to the relationship between Christianity and culture in the ancient and medieval world.
HIST 3101 - Introduction to Medieval History (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3101/MeSt 3001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Europe from decline of Rome to early Renaissance. Politics, institutions, society, economy, and culture of Middle Ages.
MEST 3001 - Introduction to Medieval History (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3101/MeSt 3001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Europe from decline of Rome to early Renaissance. Politics, institutions, society, economy, and culture of Middle Ages.
HIST 3102 - Medieval Tales and their Modern Echoes (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1102/Hist 3102/MeSt 1002/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Knights of Round Table, dragon-slayers, magic djinn, pilgrims in Hell. How stories have been retold in modern fiction, film, arts. Texts from Europe/other regions of globe.
MEST 3002 - Medieval Tales and their Modern Echoes (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1102/Hist 3102/MeSt 1002/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Knights of the Round Table, dragon-slayers, magic djinn, pilgrims in Hell. How these stories have been retold in modern fiction, film, and the arts. Texts from Europe and other regions of globe.
HIST 3211 - History of Sexuality in Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GLBT 3211/Hist 3211
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of sexuality in Europe, from ancient Greece to present. Plato's philosophy of love, St. Augustine's conception of sin, prostitution in 15th century, sexual science of Enlightenment. Industrial revolution and homosexual subcultures. Rape scares and imperialism. Eugenics and Nazi Germany.
GLBT 3211 - History of Sexuality in Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GLBT 3211/Hist 3211
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of sexuality in Europe, from ancient Greece to present. Plato's philosophy of love, St. Augustine's conception of sin, prostitution in 15th century, sexual science of Enlightenment. Industrial revolution and homosexual subcultures. Rape scares and imperialism. Eugenics and Nazi Germany.
HIST 3212 - Dissident Sexualities in U.S. History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmSt 3212/GLBT 3212/Hist 3212
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
History of sexuality in United States. Emphasizes sexualities that have challenged dominant social/cultural norms. Development of transgender, bisexual, lesbian, gay identities/communities. Politics of sex across lines of race/ethnicity. Historical debates over controversial practices, including sex work.
AMST 3212 - Dissident Sexualities in U.S. History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmSt 3212/GLBT 3212/Hist 3212
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
History of sexuality in United States. Emphasizes sexualities that have challenged dominant social/cultural norms. Development of transgender, bisexual, lesbian, gay identities/communities. Politics of sex across lines of race/ethnicity. Historical debates over controversial practices, including sex work.
GLBT 3212 - Dissident Sexualities in U.S. History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmSt 3212/GLBT 3212/Hist 3212
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
History of sexuality in United States. Emphasizes sexualities that have challenged dominant social/cultural norms. Development of transgender, bisexual, lesbian, gay identities/communities. Politics of sex across lines of race/ethnicity. Historical debates over controversial practices, including sex work.
HIST 3264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3264/Hist 5264
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interaction with Europe/Asia. Attempts at modernization/ reform. Emancipation of serfs/rise of revolutionary movements.
HIST 5264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3264/Hist 5264
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interaction with Europe and Asia; attempts at modernization and reform; emancipation of the serfs and rise of revolutionary movements.
HIST 3265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3265/Hist 5265
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of factors that led to collapse of tsarist regime. 1917 revolution. Evolution of Soviet regime/collapse of Soviet communism. Emphasis on role of nationalities/rise of Commonwealth of independent states.
HIST 5265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3265/Hist 5265
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of the factors that led to the collapse of the tsarist regime; discussion of the 1917 revolution, the evolution of the Soviet regime and the collapse of Soviet communism. Emphasis on the role of nationalities and the rise of the Commonwealth of independent states.
HIST 3271 - The Viking World: Story, History, and Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3271/5271/MEST3271/ 5271
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Viking society and expansion of Viking influence abroad. Viking impact on Western Europe; interactions with Slavic lands; settlement of North Atlantic islands; and Western Europe's impact on Scandinavian lands. Analyzes archaeological, historical, linguistic, and numismatic evidence.
HIST 5271 - The Viking World: Story, History, and Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3271/5271/MEST3271/ 5271
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Viking society and expansion of Viking influence abroad. Viking impact on Western Europe, interactions with Slavic lands, settlement of North Atlantic islands, Western Europe's impact on Scandinavian lands. Analyzes archaeological, historical, linguistic, and numismatic evidence.
HIST 3282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3282/CSCL 5282/Hist 3282/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Second of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings are from original sources.
CSCL 3282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3282/CSCL 5282/Hist 3282/
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Second of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings are from original sources.
HIST 3285 - Magic and Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3285/RelS 3625
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course examines how the line between magic and medicine has changed over time. From accusations of witchcraft to proclamations of scientific breakthrough, we will examine the relationship between the supernatural and the natural from the early modern period to today. Specific topics include the practice of exorcism, the concept of the "four humors,"¯ the persecution of witches, the development of "voodoo,"¯ the effectiveness of placebos, and the professionalization of medicine. Throughout, we will ask how gender, class, and race have affected the construction of "magic" and "medicine."
RELS 3625 - Magic and Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3285/RelS 3625
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course examines how the line between magic and medicine has changed over time. From accusations of witchcraft to proclamations of scientific breakthrough, we will examine the relationship between the supernatural and the natural from the early modern period to today. Specific topics include the practice of exorcism, the concept of the "four humors,"¯ the persecution of witches, the development of "voodoo,"¯ the effectiveness of placebos, and the professionalization of medicine. Throughout, we will ask how gender, class, and race have affected the construction of "magic" and "medicine."
HIST 3286 - Galileo and the Beginnings of Modern Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3286/Hist 5286
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The life and work of Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), often called the "founder of modern science." Topics: the Renaissance Italian context for Galileo's work; the arrangements of authoritative knowledge that prevailed in 16th-century Tuscany and Venice, the role that universities, the Catholic church, learned academies, and the state played in disciplining knowledge. We consider the episodes of Galileo's career and read his seminal texts with secondary commentaries upon them. Topics: his telescopic observations of 1609-10; his battles with Aristotelian natural philosophy; his experiments and arguments on behalf of experimental and mathematical physics; his defense of Copernican "heliocentric" cosmology and his trial and condemnation by the Roman Catholic Church for heresy; and his work in mathematics and mathematical physics that paved the way for Newton and Einstein. The goal will be to understand the achievements of Galileo in their specific historical and cultural context and to use these reflections for thinking about the nature of the modern science that he helped to initiate.
HIST 5286 - Galileo and the Beginnings of Modern Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3286/Hist 5286
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The life and work of Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), often called the “founder of modern science.” Topics: the Renaissance Italian context for Galileo’s work; the arrangements of authoritative knowledge that prevailed in 16th-century Tuscany and Venice; the role that universities, the Catholic church, learned academies, and the state played in disciplining knowledge. We consider the episodes of Galileo’s career and read his seminal texts with secondary commentaries upon them. His telescopic observations of 1609-10; his battles with Aristotelian natural philosophy; his experiments and arguments on behalf of experimental and mathematical physics; his defense of Copernican “heliocentric” cosmology and his trial and condemnation by the Roman Catholic Church for heresy; and his work in mathematics and mathematical physics that paved the way for Newton and Einstein. The goal will be to understand the achievements of Galileo in their specific historical and cultural context and to use these reflections for thinking about the nature of the modern science that he helped to initiate.
HIST 3349 - U.S. Women's Legal History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GWSS 3549/Hist 3349
Prerequisites: Soph or jr or sr
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Women's legal status, from colonial era through 20th century. Women's citizenship, civil rights. Marriage, divorce, and child custody. Reproductive/physical autonomy/integrity. Economic/educational equality. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GWSS 3549 - U.S. Women's Legal History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GWSS 3549/Hist 3349
Prerequisites: Soph or jr or sr
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Women's legal status, from colonial era through 20th century. Women's citizenship, civil rights. Marriage, divorce, and child custody. Reproductive/physical autonomy/integrity. Economic/educational equality. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
HIST 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3401W/HIST 3401V/LAS 3401
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Societies of Americas, Spain, and Portugal before contact. Interactions among Native Americans, African slaves, and Europeans, from colonization through independence. Religion, resistance, labor, gender, race. Primary sources, historical scholarship.
HIST 3401V - Honors Early Latin America to 1825 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3401W/HIST 3401V/LAS 3401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Societies of Americas, Spain, and Portugal before contact. Interactions among Native Americans, African slaves, and Europeans, from colonization through independence. Religion, resistance, labor, gender, race. Primary sources, historical scholarship.
LAS 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3401W/HIST 3401V/LAS 3401
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Societies of Americas, Spain, and Portugal before contact. Interactions among Native Americans, African slaves, and Europeans, from colonization through independence. Religion, resistance, labor, gender, race. Primary sources, historical scholarship.
LAS 3401V - Honors Early Latin America to 1825 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3401W/HIST 3401V/LAS 3401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Societies of Americas, Spain, and Portugal before contact. Interactions among Native Americans, African slaves, and Europeans, from colonization through independence. Religion, resistance, labor, gender, race. Primary sources, historical scholarship.
HIST 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3402W/LAS 3402W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
National and contemporary period 1825 to present, with emphasis on social, cultural, political, and economic change.
LAS 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3402W/LAS 3402W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
National and contemporary period 1825 to present. Social, cultural, political, and economic change.
HIST 3419 - History of Capitalism: Uneven Development Since 1500
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3219/Hist 3419
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Causes of economic inequities in contemporary world. Long-term economic developments in cases taken from Africa, Asia, Europe, and North/South America. Various theoretical approaches to study of economic development. Introduction to key concepts.
GLOS 3219 - History of Capitalism: Uneven Development Since 1500
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3219/Hist 3419
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Causes of economic inequities in contemporary world. Long-term economic developments in cases taken from Africa, Asia, Europe, and North/South America. Various theoretical approaches to study of economic development. Introduction to key concepts.
HIST 3423 - Central American Revolutions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3423/Hist 3423
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Social, political and economic issues that have shaped Central American history for nearly two centuries. Focuses on influences of colonial histories, capitalist development, ethnic/racial conflict, foreign intervention, Catholic Church, civil war throughout region. Readings cover events in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama.
CHIC 3423 - Central American Revolutions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3423/Hist 3423
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Social, political, and economic issues that have shaped Central American history for nearly two centuries. Colonial histories, capitalist development, ethnic/racial conflict, foreign intervention, Catholic Church, civil war throughout region. Readings/discussions cover events in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama.
HIST 3429 - Latin American History in Film and Text (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3429/LAS 3429
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Cinematic representations of Latin America in context of other historical/literary narratives. Experiences of Latinos in Hollywood. U.S. films compared with those produced in Latin America. Themes vary (e.g., women, revolution, colonialism).
LAS 3429 - Latin American History in Film and Text (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3429/LAS 3429
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Cinematic representations of Latin America in the context of other historical and literary narratives. Experiences of Latinos in Hollywood. Compare U.S. films with those produced in Latin America. Specific themes vary by term (e.g., women, revolution, colonialism).
HIST 3431 - Early Africa and Its Global Connections (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3431/Hist 3431
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of African history from earliest times to 1800. Focuses on socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in pre-colonial Africa from ancient Egypt through the era of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.
AFRO 3431 - Early Africa and Its Global Connections (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3431/Hist 3431
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of African history from earliest times to 1800. Focuses on socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in pre-colonial Africa from ancient Egypt through the era of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.
HIST 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3432/Afro 3432
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Survey of modern African history from early 19th century to present. Focuses on socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in Africa, from abolition of trans-Atlantic slave trade through postcolonial era.
AFRO 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3432/Afro 3432
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in Africa, from abolition of trans-Atlantic slave trade through postcolonial era.
HIST 3435 - History of South Africa from 1910: Anti-Racism, Youth Politics, Pandemics & Gender (Based Violence) (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3205/Hist 3435
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
We are all living in extraordinary times. But what does that mean? In South Africa, we have seen the COVID-19 pandemic and the measures implemented to control it causing massive social upheaval and personal distress. It has forced the people in the country to confront issues that life prior to the pandemic had made easy to turn away from. Misogyny, gender based violence and sexual violence ? a long-standing emergency in the south of Africa ? have been forced into our vision once again. It was not the pandemic that created this violence. Nor was it the first time people had been outraged by a lack of action to address it. In the years approaching 2020, calls, protests and demonstrations were increasingly demanding the culture of impunity in gender based violence be ended; sometime with violent outcomes against the protestors themselves. Over those same years, nationwide protests have rocked South Africa?s university campuses. The student movements known as #RhodesMustFall, #FeesMustFall and #RUReferenceList highlight the contrasts and disappointments of the recent past in South Africa, confront the legacy of racism and misogyny in its institutions and knowledge systems, and resonate with a history of anti-racism and struggle that now, in turn, similarly fuel the on-going Black Lives Matter and #MeToo movements worldwide.
AFRO 3205 - History of South Africa from 1910: Anti-Racism, Youth Politics, Pandemics & Gender (Based Violence) (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3205/Hist 3435
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
We are all living in extraordinary times. But what does that mean? In South Africa, we have seen the COVID-19 pandemic and the measures implemented to control it causing massive social upheaval and personal distress. It has forced the people in the country to confront issues that life prior to the pandemic had made easy to turn away from. Misogyny, gender based violence, and sexual violence, a long-standing emergency in the south of Africa, have been forced into our vision once again. It was not the pandemic that created this violence. Nor was it the first time people had been outraged by a lack of action to address it. In the years approaching 2020, calls, protests and demonstrations were increasingly demanding the culture of impunity in gender based violence be ended; sometime with violent outcomes against the protestors themselves. Over those same years, nationwide protests have rocked South Africa's university campuses. The student movements known as #RhodesMustFall, #FeesMustFall and #RUReferenceList highlight the contrasts and disappointments of the recent past in South Africa, confront the legacy of racism and misogyny in its institutions and knowledge systems, and resonate with a history of anti-racism and struggle that now, in turn, similarly fuel the on-going Black Lives Matter and #MeToo movements worldwide.
HIST 3436 - Fighting for History:Historical Roots of Contemporary Crises in Africa
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3436/Hist 3436
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Open any newspaper and there is almost certain to be one or more articles about crises or chaos in Africa. Journalistic accounts highlight famines, ?tribalism,? failed states, ethnic cleansing, the plight of refugees and the AIDS pandemic. There rarely, if ever, is a serious discussion of the underlying causes of this instability. Instead, it is implicitly assumed that this is the natural order of events in the ?Dark Continent.? This course challenges the racially inspired cultural arrogance which underlies assumptions about Africa and explores it with the long-term structural and historical roots of the crises which confront many parts of Africa. It is a course about Africans and how they responded to the challenges and legacies that date back to the colonial period and before. Throughout this course we will be concerned with African initiatives in a rapidly changing political, economic, social, and ideological context and the changing ways that the Global North has represented Africa. In doing so we will be fight for a more accurate history of Africa.
AFRO 3436 - Fighting for History:Historical Roots of Contemporary Crises in Africa
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3436/Hist 3436
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Open any newspaper and there is almost certain to be one or more articles about crises or chaos in Africa. Journalistic accounts highlight famines, tribalism, failed states, ethnic cleansing, the plight of refugees, and the AIDS pandemic. There rarely, if ever, is a serious discussion of the underlying causes of this instability. Instead, it is implicitly assumed that this is the natural order of events in the Dark Continent. This course challenges the racially inspired cultural arrogance which underlies assumptions about Africa and explores it with the long-term structural and historical roots of the crises which confront many parts of Africa. It is a course about Africans and how they responded to the challenges and legacies that date back to the colonial period and before. Throughout this course we will be concerned with African initiatives in a rapidly changing political, economic, social, and ideological context and the changing ways that the Global North has represented Africa. In doing so we will be fight for a more accurate history of Africa.
HIST 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3446/Hist 3446
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in U.S. Notions of citizenship from WWII. Chicano civil rights movement. Impact of immigration patterns/legislation. Cultural wars, demographics. Social, economic, political changes. Meaning of racialized "Mexican" identity. How different groups of Mexicans have understood their relationships to other Americans/other Latino groups.
CHIC 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3446/Hist 3446
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in the U.S. Notions of citizenship from WWII. Chicano civil rights movement. Impact of immigration patterns/legislation. Cultural wars, changing demographics. Social, economic, and political changes that influenced day-to-day life of Mexican Americans. Meaning of racialized "Mexican" identity. How different groups of Mexicans have understood their relationships to other Americans and other Latino groups.
HIST 3455 - West African History: 1800 to Present (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3002/Hist 3455
Typically offered: Every Spring
West African history from late-18th century to present. Themes include study of continuities with past. Profound changes including new 19th century state formation, European colonialism, post-colonial issues.
AFRO 3002 - West African History: 1800 to Present (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3002/Hist 3455
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
West African history from late 18th century to present. Past/profound changes including new 19th century state formation, European colonialism, post-colonial issues.
HIST 3456 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3120/Afro 5120/Hist 3456
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political, cultural, historical linkages between Africans, African-Americans, African-Caribbeans. Socio-political movements/radical intellectual trends in late 19th/20th centuries within African Diaspora. Resistance in Suriname, Guyana, Caribbean. Protest organizations, intellectual discourses, radical movements in United States/Europe.
AFRO 3120 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3120/Afro 5120/Hist 3456
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political, cultural, historical linkages between Africans, African-Americans, African-Caribbean. Black socio-political movements/radical intellectual trends in late 19th/20th centuries. Colonialism/racism. Protest organizations, radical movements in United States/Europe.
HIST 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3461/Hist 3461
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comparative survey of early history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Early Chinese thought. Diffusion of Confucianism, Buddhism, and other values throughout East Asia. Political and social history of region to 1600.
EAS 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3461/Hist 3461
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative survey of early history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam; early Chinese thought; diffusion of Confucianism, Buddhism, and other values throughout East Asia; political and social history of region to 1600.
HIST 3462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3462/EAS 3462H/HIST 3462/H
Typically offered: Every Spring
How Asian states, societies, economies, and cultures linked with one another and with European powers. How period's historical effects still resonate. Covers India, China, Japan, Korea, and Indochina.
HIST 3462H - Honors: From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia from 1500 to the Present (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3462/EAS 3462H/HIST 3462/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
How Asian states, societies, economies, cultures linked with one another/European powers. Historical effects. Covers India, China, Japan, Korea, Indochina.
EAS 3462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3462/EAS 3462H/HIST 3462/H
Typically offered: Every Spring
How Asian states, societies, economies, and cultures linked with one another and with European powers. How period's historical effects still resonate. Covers India, China, Japan, Korea, and Indochina.
EAS 3462H - Honors: From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia from 1500 to the Present (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3462/EAS 3462H/HIST 3462/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
How Asian states, societies, economies, cultures linked with one another/European powers. Historical effects. Covers India, China, Japan, Korea, Indochina.
HIST 3466 - Religion and Society in Imperial China (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3373/Hist 3466/RelS 3373
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Varieties of religious experience in imperial China. Religion as lived practices. Textual traditions. Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, relations among them. Western missionary enterprise in China.
AMES 3373 - Religion and Society in Imperial China (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3373/Hist 3466/RelS 3373
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Varieties of religious experience in imperial China. Religion as lived practices. Textual traditions. Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, relations among them. Western missionary enterprise in China.
RELS 3373 - Religion and Society in Imperial China (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3373/Hist 3466/RelS 3373
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Varieties of religious experience in imperial China. Religion as lived practices. Textual traditions. Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, relations among them. Western missionary enterprise in China.
HIST 3468 - Social Change in Modern China
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3468W/Hist 3468W/5468
Typically offered: Every Fall
Opium War and opening of Treaty Ports in 19th century. Missionary activity and cultural influence. Changes in education system. Women's movement. Early industrialization. Socialism/collectivization after 1949. Industrialization of Taiwan. PRC's entry into world trading system.
HIST 5468 - Social Change in Modern China
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3468W/Hist 3468W/5468
Typically offered: Every Fall
Opium War and opening of Treaty Ports in 19th century; missionary activity and cultural influence; changes in education system; women's movement; early industrialization; socialism and collectivization after 1949; industrialization of Taiwan; PRC's entry into the world trading system.
EAS 3468 - Social Change in Modern China
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3468W/Hist 3468W/5468
Typically offered: Every Fall
Opium War and opening of Treaty Ports in 19th century; missionary activity and cultural influence; changes in education system; women's movement; early industrialization; socialism and collectivization after 1949; industrialization of Taiwan; PRC's entry into the world trading system.
HIST 3469 - History of Women and Family in China, 1600-2000
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3372/Hist 3469
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Marriage/family life, foot binding, cult of women's chastity. Women in nationalist/communist revolutions. Gender relations in post-socialist China. Effect of ideologies (Confucianism, nationalism, socialism) on women/family life. Differences between ideology/social practice.
AMES 3372 - History of Women and Family in China, 1600-2000
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3372/Hist 3469
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Marriage/family life, foot binding, cult of women's chastity. Women in nationalist/communist revolutions. Gender relations in post-socialist China. Effect of ideologies (Confucianism, nationalism, socialism) on women/family life. Differences between ideology and social practice.
HIST 3471 - Modern Japan, Meiji to the Present (1868-2000) (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3478/EAS 3471/Hist 3471
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Japan's early development as industrial/imperial power after Meiji Restoration of 1868. Political developments in Taisho years: social, cultural, economic trends that supported them. Militarization/mobilization for war in 1930s. Japan's war with China, Pacific War with the United States. American Occupation. Postwar economic recovery, high growth. Changing political/popular culture of 1980s, '90s.
AMES 3478 - Modern Japan, Meiji to the Present (1868-2000) (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3478/EAS 3471/Hist 3471
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Japan's development as industrial/imperial power after Meiji Restoration of 1868. Political developments in Taisho years. Militarization/mobilization for war in 1930s. Japan's war with China, Pacific War with US. American Occupation. Postwar economic recovery, high growth. Changing political/popular culture of 1980s, '90s.
EAS 3471 - Modern Japan, Meiji to the Present (1868-2000) (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3478/EAS 3471/Hist 3471
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Japan's early development as industrial/imperial power after Meiji Restoration of 1868. Political developments in Taisho years: social, cultural, economic trends that supported them. Militarization/mobilization for war in 1930s. Japan's war with China, Pacific War with the United States. American occupation. Postwar economic recovery, high growth. Changing political/popular culture of 1980s, '90s.
HIST 3478 - Tigers and Dragons: The Rise of the East Asian Economies, 1930-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3278/Hist 3478/Hist 5478
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Rise of East Asian Economies, 1930-Present.
HIST 5478 - Tigers and Dragons: The Rise of the East Asian Economies, 1930-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3278/Hist 3478/Hist 5478
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Rise of East Asian Economies, 1930-Present. prereq: Grad student
GLOS 3278 - Tigers and Dragons: The Rise of the East Asian Economies, 1930-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3278/Hist 3478/Hist 5478
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Rise of East Asian Economies, 1930-Present.
HIST 3483 - Hmong History Across the Globe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3483//ALL 3776/Hist 3483
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Hmong interaction with lowland Southeast Asian states (Laos, Vietnam) and Western colonial powers (French, American) since 19th century. Changes to religious, social, political, and gender institutions. Aspirations for political autonomy.
AAS 3483 - Hmong History Across the Globe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3483//ALL 3776/Hist 3483
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Hmong interaction with lowland Southeast Asian states (Laos, Vietnam) and Western colonial powers (French, American) since 19th century. Changes to religious, social, political, and gender institutions. Aspirations for political autonomy.
HIST 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3486/Hist 3486
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Socio-economic, political, gender, cultural/religious changes in Hmong American community during last three decades. How Hmong are racialized in American society. Impact to first/second generations.
AAS 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3486/Hist 3486
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Socio-economic, political, gender, cultural/religious changes in Hmong American community during last three decades. How Hmong are racialized in American society. Impact to first/second generations.
HIST 3489 - Democracy and popular politics in India
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3489/GloS 3969
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Democracy is not only a political order; it is also a popular culture and politics. This course explores three tumultuous moments of this politics and culture in India: the pluralist nationalism which characterized Gandhian nonviolence and the Indian constitution, the majoritarianism that was often this pluralism?s undertow, and Hindutva or Hindu supremacism, the now dominant populist ideology.
GLOS 3969 - Democracy and popular politics in India
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3489/GloS 3969
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Democracy is not only a political order; it is also a popular culture and politics. This course explores three tumultuous moments of this politics and culture in India: the pluralist nationalism which characterized Gandhian nonviolence and the Indian constitution, the majoritarianism that was often this pluralism's undertow, and Hindutva or Hindu supremacism, the now dominant populist ideology.
HIST 3492 - Hinduism: Traditions, Texts, Politics (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3671/Hist 3492/RelS 3671/R
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of Hinduism focusing on sectarian trends, modern religious practices, myths/rituals, pilgrimage patterns/ religious festivals. Interrelationship between Indian social structure/Hinduism.
AMES 3671 - Hinduism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3671/Hist 3492/RelS 3671/R
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of Hinduism focusing on sectarian trends, modern religious practices, myths/rituals, pilgrimage patterns/ religious festivals. Interrelationship between Indian social structure/Hinduism.
RELS 3671 - Hinduism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3671/Hist 3492/RelS 3671/R
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of Hinduism focusing on sectarian trends, modern religious practices, myths/rituals, pilgrimage patterns/ religious festivals. Interrelationship between Indian social structure/Hinduism.
HIST 3493 - Islam: Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3871/Arab 3036/RelS 3715/H
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a brief survey of the religion and civilization of Islam. It introduces students to 1) Islamic history from its inception in the seventh century CE to the present, with emphasis on the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the early Caliphate; 2) The authoritative texts of Islam, i.e. the Quran and Prophetic traditions (Hadith); 3) The institutions and discourses characteristic of Islamic civilization; and 4) The transformation of Muslim life and thought in the modern period. By taking this course, students become familiar with the chief ideas, characters, narratives, rites, localities, and movements associated with Islam. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
AMES 3871 - Islam: Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3871/Arab 3036/RelS 3715/H
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a brief survey of the religion and civilization of Islam. It introduces students to 1) Islamic history from its inception in the seventh century CE to the present, with emphasis on the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the early Caliphate; 2) The authoritative texts of Islam, i.e. the Quran and Prophetic traditions (Hadith); 3) The institutions and discourses characteristic of Islamic civilization; and 4) The transformation of Muslim life and thought in the modern period. By taking this course, students become familiar with the chief ideas, characters, narratives, rites, localities, and movements associated with Islam. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
RELS 3712 - Islam: Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3871/Arab 3036/RelS 3715/H
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a brief survey of the religion and civilization of Islam. It introduces students to 1) Islamic history from its inception in the seventh century CE to the present, with emphasis on the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the early Caliphate; 2) The authoritative texts of Islam, i.e. the Quran and Prophetic traditions (Hadith); 3) The institutions and discourses characteristic of Islamic civilization; and 4) The transformation of Muslim life and thought in the modern period. By taking this course, students become familiar with the chief ideas, characters, narratives, rites, localities, and movements associated with Islam. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
HIST 3494W - Christ in Islamic Thought (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3494W/RelS 3718W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Course examines the history of the figure of Christ in Islamic thought, from the beginnings of Islam in the Qur'an and the Hadith to the recent 2013 book by Reza Aslan, Zealot. The course is based on close reading of primary sources from regions extending from Spain to Iran, and in various languages (in translation): Arabic, Greek, French, Farsi, and Italian. Course demonstrates how much the interpretation of the figure of Christ in Islamic thought belonged to specific historical contexts. prereq: None
RELS 3718W - Christ in Islamic Thought (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3494W/RelS 3718W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Course examines the history of the figure of Christ in Islamic thought, from the beginnings of Islam in the Qur'an and the Hadith to the recent 2013 book by Reza Aslan, Zealot. The course is based on close reading of primary sources from regions extending from Spain to Iran, and in various languages (in translation): Arabic, Greek, French, Farsi, and Italian. Course demonstrates how much the interpretation of the figure of Christ in Islamic thought belonged to specific historical contexts.
HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNRC 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
HIST 3504 - The Cultures of the Silk Road
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3872/Hist 3504/RelS 3708
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Past/present state of the cultures that flourished in Central Asia (present-day CA republics, Iran, Afghanistan) after Alexander the Great and declined with opening of sea routes.
AMES 3872 - The Cultures of the Silk Road
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3872/Hist 3504/RelS 3708
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Past/present state of cultures that flourished in Central Asia (present-day CA republics, Iran, Afghanistan) after Alexander the Great. Decline with opening of sea routes.
RELS 3708 - The Cultures of the Silk Road
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3872/Hist 3504/RelS 3708
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Past/present state of cultures that flourished in Central Asia (present-day CA republics, Iran, Afghanistan) after Alexander the Great. Decline with opening of sea routes.
HIST 3511 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3511/JwSt 3511/RelS 3079
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Diversity of social/cultural interactions between Muslims and Jews and between Islam and Judaism since 1700. What enabled the two religious communities to peacefully coexist? What were causes of conflict? Why is history of Muslim-Jewish relations such a contested issue?
JWST 3511 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3511/JwSt 3511/RelS 3079
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Diversity of social/cultural interactions between Muslims and Jews and between Islam and Judaism since 1700. What enabled the two religious communities to peacefully coexist? What were causes of conflict? Why is history of Muslim-Jewish relations such a contested issue?
RELS 3079 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3511/JwSt 3511/RelS 3079
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Diversity of social/cultural interactions between Muslims and Jews and between Islam and Judaism since 1700. What enabled the two religious communities to peacefully coexist? What were causes of conflict? Why is history of Muslim-Jewish relations such a contested issue?
HIST 3512 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3942/Jwst 3512/RelS 3113
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
History of Zionism/Israel. Arab-Jewish conflict, tensions between religious/secular Jews. Relationships between Mizrahi, Ashkenazi, Russian, Ethiopian, Arab citizens. Israeli cultural imagery. Newsreels, political posters, television shows, films, popular music.
JWST 3512 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3942/Jwst 3512/RelS 3113
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
History of Zionism/Israel. Arab-Jewish conflict, tensions between religious/Jews. Relationships between Mizrahi, Ashkenazi, Russian, Ethiopian, Arab citizens. Israeli cultural imagery. Newsreels, political posters, television shows, films, popular music.
RELS 3113 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3942/Jwst 3512/RelS 3113
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
History of Zionism/Israel. Arab-Jewish conflict, tensions between religious/secular Jews. Relationships between Mizrahi, Ashkenazi, Russian, Ethiopian, Arab citizens. Israeli cultural imagery. Newsreels, political posters, television shows, films, popular music.
HIST 3513 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3513Hist 5513 /RelS 3721/
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
History of Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, disputed territories of Western Sahara) from time of Ottoman expansion/Sharifian dynasties (Sa'dian/'Alawid) in 16th/17th Centuries to end of 20th century. Focus on encounter of Islamic cultures/societies of Maghrib with Africa/Europe.
HIST 5513 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3513Hist 5513 /RelS 3721/
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
History of the Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and disputed territories of Western Sahara from time of Ottoman expansion/Sharifian dynasties [Sa'dian/'Alawid]) in 16th/17th Centuries to end of 20th century. Focus on encounter of Islamic cultures/societies of Maghrib and Africa/Europe
RELS 3721 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3513Hist 5513 /RelS 3721/
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
History of Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, disputed territories of Western Sahara) from time of Ottoman expansion/Sharifian dynasties (Sa'dian/'Alawid) in 16th/17th Centuries to end of 20th century. Focus on encounter of Islamic cultures/societies of Maghrib with Africa/Europe.
HIST 3534 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1534/JwSt 1034/RelS1034
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the development of Judaism and Jewish civilizations from their beginnings to the present. With over three millennia as its subject, the course must of necessity be a general survey. Together we will explore the mythic structures, significant documents, historical experiences, narratives, practices, beliefs, and worldviews of the Jewish people. The course begins by examining the roots of Judaism in the Hebrew Bible and the history of ancient Israel but quickly focuses on the creative forces that developed within Judaism as a national narrative confronted the forces of history, especially in the forms of the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires. Rabbinic Judaism becomes the most dominant creative force and will receive our greatest attention, both in its formative years and as it encounters the rise of Christianity and Islam. After studying the Jewish experience in the medieval world, we will turn to Judaism?s encounter with the enlightenment and modernity. The historical survey concludes by attending to the transformations within Judaism and Jewish life of the last 150 years, including a confrontation with the experience of the Holocaust. Woven throughout this historical survey will be repeated engagements with core questions: ?Who is a Jew?? ?What do Jews believe?? ?What do Jews do?? ?What do we mean by ?religion??? ?How do Jews read texts within their tradition?? And perhaps most importantly, ?How many answers are there to a Jewish question?? Students in this course can expect to come away with some knowledge of the Bible in Judaism, rabbinic literature and law, Jewish mysticism and philosophy, Jewish nationalism and Zionism, Jewish culture, ritual, and worship in the synagogue, the home, and the community, and Jewish celebrations of life cycle events and the festivals.
JWST 3034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1534/JwSt 1034/RelS1034
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the development of Judaism and Jewish civilizations from their beginnings to the present. With over three millennia as its subject, the course must of necessity be a general survey. Together we will explore the mythic structures, significant documents, historical experiences, narratives, practices, beliefs, and worldviews of the Jewish people. The course begins by examining the roots of Judaism in the Hebrew Bible and the history of ancient Israel but quickly focuses on the creative forces that developed within Judaism as a national narrative confronted the forces of history, especially in the forms of the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires. Rabbinic Judaism becomes the most dominant creative force and will receive our greatest attention, both in its formative years and as it encounters the rise of Christianity and Islam. After studying the Jewish experience in the medieval world, we will turn to Judaism?s encounter with the enlightenment and modernity. The historical survey concludes by attending to the transformations within Judaism and Jewish life of the last 150 years, including a confrontation with the experience of the Holocaust. Woven throughout this historical survey will be repeated engagements with core questions: ?Who is a Jew?? ?What do Jews believe?? ?What do Jews do?? ?What do we mean by ?religion??? ?How do Jews read texts within their tradition?? And perhaps most importantly, ?How many answers are there to a Jewish question?? Students in this course can expect to come away with some knowledge of the Bible in Judaism, rabbinic literature and law, Jewish mysticism and philosophy, Jewish nationalism and Zionism, Jewish culture, ritual, and worship in the synagogue, the home, and the community, and Jewish celebrations of life cycle events and the festivals.
RELS 3034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1534/JwSt 1034/RelS1034
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the development of Judaism and Jewish civilizations from their beginnings to the present. With over three millennia as its subject, the course must of necessity be a general survey. Together we will explore the mythic structures, significant documents, historical experiences, narratives, practices, beliefs, and worldviews of the Jewish people. The course begins by examining the roots of Judaism in the Hebrew Bible and the history of ancient Israel but quickly focuses on the creative forces that developed within Judaism as a national narrative confronted the forces of history, especially in the forms of the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires. Rabbinic Judaism becomes the most dominant creative force and will receive our greatest attention, both in its formative years and as it encounters the rise of Christianity and Islam. After studying the Jewish experience in the medieval world, we will turn to Judaism?s encounter with the enlightenment and modernity. The historical survey concludes by attending to the transformations within Judaism and Jewish life of the last 150 years, including a confrontation with the experience of the Holocaust. Woven throughout this historical survey will be repeated engagements with core questions: ?Who is a Jew?? ?What do Jews believe?? ?What do Jews do?? ?What do we mean by ?religion??? ?How do Jews read texts within their tradition?? And perhaps most importantly, ?How many answers are there to a Jewish question?? Students in this course can expect to come away with some knowledge of the Bible in Judaism, rabbinic literature and law, Jewish mysticism and philosophy, Jewish nationalism and Zionism, Jewish culture, ritual, and worship in the synagogue, the home, and the community, and Jewish celebrations of life cycle events and the festivals.
HIST 3546 - Islam and the West
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3643/Hist 3546/RelS 3714
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cultural/intellectual trends that have defined fundamental differences between Islam and the West. Development of historical, philosophical, and intellectual mindset of both spheres. Factors in tension, anxiety, and hatred between Muslim world and Europe and the United States.
GLOS 3643 - Islam and the West
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3643/Hist 3546/RelS 3714
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Cultural/intellectual trends that have defined fundamental differences between Islam and the West. Development of historical, philosophical, and intellectual mindset of both spheres. Factors that have contributed and continue to contribute to tension, anxiety, and hatred between the Muslim world and Europe and the United States.
RELS 3714 - Islam and the West
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3643/Hist 3546/RelS 3714
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cultural/intellectual trends that have defined differences between Islam and the West. Development of historical, philosophical, and intellectual mindset of both spheres. Factors in tension, anxiety, and hatred between Muslim world and Europe and the United States.
HIST 3547 - The Ottoman Empire (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3547/RelS 3722
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of Islam's most successful empire, from its founding circa 1300 to its demise in 1923. Lands, institutions, peoples, historical legacy.
RELS 3722 - The Ottoman Empire (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3547/RelS 3722
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of Islam's most successful empire, from its founding circa 1300 to its demise in 1923. Lands, institutions, peoples, historical legacy.
HIST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/JwSt/Mest3606/RelS3717
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A Pew Research survey of the global religious landscape in 2010 found 2.2 billion Christians (31.5% of the world?s population), 1.6 billion Muslims (23.2%), and 14 million Jews (.2%). In this class, we explore how the histories of these religious communities became deeply entangled in an age of diplomacy, trade, jihad, and crusade.
JWST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/JwSt/Mest3606/RelS3717
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A Pew Research survey of the global religious landscape in 2010 found 2.2 billion Christians (31.5% of the world's population), 1.6 billion Muslims (23.2%), and 14 million Jews (.2%). In this class, we explore how the histories of these religious communities became deeply entangled in an age of diplomacy, trade, jihad, and crusade.
RELS 3717 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/JwSt/Mest3606/RelS3717
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A Pew Research survey of the global religious landscape in 2010 found 2.2 billion Christians (31.5% of the world?s population), 1.6 billion Muslims (23.2%), and 14 million Jews (.2%). In this class, we explore how the histories of these religious communities became deeply entangled in an age of diplomacy, trade, jihad, and crusade.
HIST 3611 - Medieval Cities of Europe: 500-1500 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3611/MeSt 3611
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
European cities changed from Roman times through the urban nadir of the Early Middle Ages to the flowering of cities in the High and Late Middle Ages.  We explore planned towns, ad hoc developments, revived Roman sites, and economic, political, cultural, and sensory elements of city life.  Students design a medieval city using Arc.GIS and StoryMap. Contact the instructor for more information.
MEST 3611 - Medieval Cities of Europe: 500-1500 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3611/MeSt 3611
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
European cities changed from Roman times through the urban nadir of the Early Middle Ages to the flowering of cities in the High and Late Middle Ages. We explore planned towns, ad hoc developments, revived Roman sites, and economic, political, cultural, and sensory elements of city life. Students design a medieval city using Arc.GIS and StoryMap. Contact the instructor for more information.
HIST 3613 - History of the Crusades (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3613MeSt 3613//RelS 3715
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Crusading spirit in Europe. Results of classic medieval crusades ca 1095-1285. States established by crusaders in Near East. Internal European crusades. Chronological prolongation of crusading phenomenon.
MEST 3613 - History of the Crusades (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3613MeSt 3613//RelS 3715
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Crusading spirit in Europe. Results of classic medieval crusades ca 1095-1285. States established by crusaders in Near East. Internal European crusades. Chronological prolongation of crusading phenomenon.
RELS 3715 - History of the Crusades (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3613MeSt 3613//RelS 3715
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Crusading spirit in Europe. Results of classic medieval crusades ca 1095-1285. States established by crusaders in Near East. Internal European crusades. Chronological prolongation of crusading phenomenon.
HIST 3616 - The Hundred Years War: France and England in the Middle Ages (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3616/Hist 3616W/MeSt 3616
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Politics, society, and culture in medieval France from the end of the Carolingians to the end of the Hundred Years War.
MEST 3616 - The Hundred Years War: France and England in the Middle Ages (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3616/Hist 3616W/MeSt 3616
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Politics, society, and culture in medieval France from the end of the Carolingians to the end of the Hundred Years War.
HIST 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3617Hist/MeSt 3617/RelS
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Between classical and medieval, pagan and Christian, Roman and barbarian, the late antique world was a dynamic age. This course will focus on the Mediterranean region from the 2nd to the mid-7th century exploring such topics as the conversion of Constantine, the fall of Rome, barbarian invasions, the spread of Christianity, and the rise of Islam.
CNRC 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3617Hist/MeSt 3617/RelS
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Between classical and medieval, pagan and Christian, Roman and barbarian, the late antique world was a dynamic age. This course will focus on the Mediterranean region from the 2nd to the mid-7th century exploring such topics as the conversion of Constantine, the fall of Rome, barbarian invasions, the spread of Christianity, and the rise of Islam.
MEST 3617 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3617Hist/MeSt 3617/RelS
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Between classical and medieval, pagan and Christian, Roman and barbarian, the late antique world was a dynamic age. Course focuses on the Mediterranean region from the 2nd to the mid-7th century exploring such topics as the conversion of Constantine, the fall of Rome, barbarian invasions, the spread of Christianity, and the rise of Islam.
RELS 3543 - Pagans, Christians, Barbarians: The World of Late Antiquity (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3617Hist/MeSt 3617/RelS
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Between classical and medieval, pagan and Christian, Roman and barbarian, the late antique world was a dynamic age. This course focuses on the Mediterranean region from the 2nd to the mid-7th century exploring such topics as the conversion of Constantine, the fall of Rome, barbarian invasions, the spread of Christianity, and the rise of Islam.
HIST 3708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
HIST 5708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
ARTH 3315 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
ARTH 5315 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
HIST 3727 - History of the Holocaust
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3727/JwSt 3520/RelS 3520
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of 1933-1945 extermination of six million Jews and others by Nazi Germany on basis of race. European anti-Semitism. Implications of social Darwinism and race theory. Perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resistance. Theological responses of Jews and Christians.
JWST 3520 - History of the Holocaust
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3727/JwSt 3520/RelS 3520
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of 1933-1945 extermination of six million Jews and others by Nazi Germany on basis of race. European anti-Semitism. Implications of social Darwinism and race theory. Perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resistance. Theological responses of Jews and Christians.
RELS 3520 - History of the Holocaust
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3727/JwSt 3520/RelS 3520
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of 1933-1945 extermination of six million Jews and others by Nazi Germany on basis of race. European anti-Semitism. Implications of social Darwinism and race theory. Perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resistance. Theological responses of Jews and Christians.
HIST 3729 - Nazi Germany and Hitler's Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3729/JwSt 3729
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comprehensive exploration of Third Reich. Students will examine How the Nazis came to power, transformations of 1930s, imposition of racial politics against Jews/others, nature of total war. Students read historical accounts, memoirs, state documents, view films.
JWST 3729 - Nazi Germany and Hitler's Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3729/JwSt 3729
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comprehensive exploration of Third Reich. How Nazis came to power, transformations of 1930s, imposition of racial politics against Jews/others, nature of total war. Historical accounts, memoirs, state documents, view films.
HIST 3767 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3767/RelS 3611
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Development of the orthodox church in Byzantium, the Islamic Near East, the Slavic world and in the diaspora; impact of orthodoxy on political and cultural institutions, interaction with other Christian and non-Christian communities; orthodox spirituality and aesthetics.
GLOS 3611 - Stories, Bodies, Movements
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3611/GloS 5611/GWSS 3611
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
For most of us, stories seem to simply 'happen.' We listen to stories, we tell stories, we are moved by stories, and we retell stories. However, every act of telling stories involves making decisions or moves, and each re-telling of a familiar story may either give birth to new meanings, nuances, and affects, or, it may erase their possibility. Thus, each storyteller can be seen as a translator of stories with a responsibility to retell stories ethically. It is precisely through these translational acts that all politics become politics of storytelling. In this course, we will consider the ways in which the politics of the global and the intimate derive their meanings, effects, and affects from the circulation, transaction, and re-tellings of stories within and across borders. We will ask how a praxis of ethical engagement with politics can be imagined as a praxis of receiving and retelling stories. By immersing ourselves in the process of remembering, telling, listening, trimming, interweaving, distilling, and performing stories, we will consider how ethical receiving and retelling of stories involves continuous revising, repositioning, and re-theorizing of such vexed and entangled terrains and terminologies as identity, community, rights, and justice, as well as the contingent meanings of knowledge, truth, and ethics. This course engages this terrain through a mode of active learning in which all the participants will read and reflect, listen and discuss, tell and retell, watch and play, move and perform collectively. By becoming aware of the ways in which our minds-bodies-souls are inserted in the receiving and translation of stories, we will grapple together with the ways in which our bodies--as our embodiments--help to relationally shape not only our own performances but also our responses to the performances of other living and moving bodies around us. We will learn from writings, film, songs, and plays by writers, artists, activists, and thinkers from a range of historical and contemporary locations and struggles. These include: Marie Lily Cerat, W. E. B. Du Bois, Suheir Hammad, Sterlin Harjo, Naeem Inayatullah, June Jordan, AnaLouise Keating, Kauanui, J. Kehaulani, Audre Lorde, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Middle East Research and Information Project, Alok Rai, Nina Simone, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Sangtin Writers, Standing Rock Collective, Eve Tuck, Patrick Wolfe, and K. Wayne Yang. Many of the 'Acts' in this course will be co-facilitated with local or international artists and writers. Grading Basis: A/F. The course requires all the participants to do sustained work and deep reflections, enjoy the process of imagining and creating with peers in a non-competitive environment. prereq: GLOS 3611 is for jr or sr only. People from all kinds of locations and journeys are invited to join us in this collective exploration. For further information, email: nagar@umn.edu.
RELS 3611 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3767/RelS 3611
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of orthodox church in Byzantium, Islamic Near East, Slavic world, and diaspora. Impact of orthodoxy on political/cultural institutions. Interaction with other Christian/non-Christian communities. Orthodox spirituality/aesthetics.
HIST 3802 - Religious Encounters in Early America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3802/RelS 3622
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The United States is home to an astonishing array of religious beliefs and institutions, yet mutual toleration has historically been harder to achieve. This upper-level course, which is run as a discussion seminar, uses case studies to investigates how people of differing faiths perceived, reacted to, and changed each other, between the arrival of Jesuits and Puritans in the early 17th century and the US-Dakota War of 1862. People who hailed from North America, Europe, and Africa had divergent ideas about the divine and its presence on Earth, about life and life after death, about religious rituals and relations of authority. Their struggles with one another were partly struggles over religiously inflected ways of being in the world. The course explores how religion shaped people?s responses to European colonization, the growing slave-labor system, industrialization, immigration, and westward expansion. A religious lens onto American history reveals religion as an element of struggle and shows that freedom of conscience has been continually contested rather than easily assured. prereq: Non-fr or instr consent
RELS 3622 - Religious Encounters in Early America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3802/RelS 3622
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The United States is home to an astonishing array of religious beliefs and institutions, yet mutual toleration has historically been harder to achieve. This upper-level course, which is run as a discussion seminar, uses case studies to investigates how people of differing faiths perceived, reacted to, and changed each other, between the arrival of Jesuits and Puritans in the early 17th century and the US-Dakota War of 1862. People who hailed from North America, Europe, and Africa had divergent ideas about the divine and its presence on Earth, about life and life after death, about religious rituals and relations of authority. Their struggles with one another were partly struggles over religiously inflected ways of being in the world. The course explores how religion shaped people?s responses to European colonization, the growing slave-labor system, industrialization, immigration, and westward expansion. A religious lens onto American history reveals religion as an element of struggle and shows that freedom of conscience has been continually contested rather than easily assured. prereq: Non-fr or instr consent
HIST 3804 - Religion and the American Culture Wars (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3804 / HIST 3804H / RELS
Typically offered: Every Fall
Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, James Madison, Thomas Paine, George Washington, and John Adams on religion, faith, and religion in politics. Deism. Enlightenment-era discussions about rational religion. Rise of evangelicalism. Separation of church/state, framers' original intent for first amendment. Religious Right.
RELS 3623 - Religion and the American Culture Wars (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3804 / HIST 3804H / RELS
Typically offered: Every Fall
Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, James Madison, Thomas Paine, George Washington, and John Adams on religion, faith, and religion in politics. Deism. Enlightenment-era discussions about rational religion. Rise of evangelicalism. Separation of church/state, framers' original intent for first amendment. Religious Right.
HIST 3856 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/Afro 5866/Hist 3856
Typically offered: Every Fall
Modern black civil rights struggle in U.S. Second reconstruction. Failure of reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Assault on white supremacy via courts, state, grassroots southern movement in 1950s/1960s. Black struggle in north/west.
AFRO 3866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/Afro 5866/Hist 3856
Typically offered: Every Fall
Modern black civil rights struggle in the U.S., i.e., the second reconstruction. Failure of reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Assault on white supremacy via courts, state, and grass roots southern movement in 1950s and 1960s. Black struggle in north and west. New emphasis on Black Power, by new organizations. Ascendancy of Ronald Reagan, conservative assault on the movement.
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/Afro 5866/Hist 3856
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The "second reconstruction." Failure of Reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Post-1945 assault on white supremacy via courts/state, grass-roots southern movement in 1950s/1960s. Black struggle in north and west, emphasis on Black Power by new organizations/ideologies/leaders. Ascendancy of Reagan, conservative assault on movement.
HIST 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3862/Chic 3862/Hist 3862
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19nth century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
AAS 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3862/Chic 3862/Hist 3862
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3862/Chic 3862/Hist 3862
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin American, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
HIST 3864 - African American History: 1619-1865 (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3864/Hist 3864
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Importance of dynamics of class, gender, region, and political ideology. Changing nature of race/racism.
AFRO 3864 - African American History: 1619 to 1865 (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3864/Hist 3864
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Importance of dynamics of class, gender, region, and political ideology. Changing nature of race/racism.
HIST 3865 - African American History, 1865 to Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3865/Hist 3865
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
History of African American men and women from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Discussion of internal migrations, industrialization and unionization, The Great Depression, world wars, and large scale movements for social and political change.
AFRO 3865 - African American History: 1865 to the Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3865/Hist 3865
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
History of African American men and women from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Discussion of internal migrations, industrialization and unionization, The Great Depression, world wars, and large scale movements for social and political change.
HIST 3868W - Race, War, and Race Wars in American History (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3868/Hist 3868
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Role that race has played in American war history. Impact that wars have had on race and race relations in the United States and the world. Literature, film.
AFRO 3868W - Race, War, and Race Wars in American History (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3868/Hist 3868
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Role that race has played in American war history. Impact that wars have had on race and race relations in the United States and the world. Literature and film.
HIST 3871 - American Indian History: Pre-Contact to 1830 (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn/Hist 3871
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to American Indian history from ancient native America to the removal era. Focuses on the social, cultural, political, and economic diversity of Native American peoples and Native American experiences with European colonialism.
AMIN 3871 - American Indian History: Pre-Contact to 1830 (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn/Hist 3871
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
American Indian history from the era of ancient Native America to the removal era. Social, cultural, political, and economic diversity of Native American peoples and Native American experiences with European colonialism.
HIST 3872 - American Indian History: 1830 to the Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn/Hist 3872
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Focus on the impact of federal Indian policy on American Indian cultures and societies, and on American Indian culture change.
AMIN 3872 - American Indian History: 1830 to the Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn/Hist 3872
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Focus on the impact of federal Indian policy on American Indian cultures and societies, and on American Indian culture change.
HIST 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in US History (HIS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3875W/Hist 3875W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This writing-intensive course examines the racial history of modern America to learn from and engage with what historians enmeshed in ethnic studies do. These historians examine the systematic and coordinated exercises of power called race in the American past and make legible how racially aggrieved groups responded to this shaping power. Thus, throughout, we ask, "What did racial subjects do with what was done to them by the American system forged out of settler colonialism, slavery, racism, and other forms of injustice, exclusion, and violence?" This question issues an intellectual challenge to do all that needs to be done to capture community life, the politics of difference, and the dynamism of social identities in all their richness, fullness, and complexity. In other words, we study and write about the racial history of modern America, including its ugly past and arc of justice, to consider what it would take to transcend this racial past.
AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History (HIS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3875W/Hist 3875W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This writing-intensive course examines the racial history of modern America. The focus is placed on how American Indians, African Americans, and immigrants from Europe, Asia, and Latin America struggle over identity, place, and meanings of these categories in society where racial hierarchy not only determined every aspect of how they lived, but also functioned as a lever to reconstitute a new nation and empire in the aftermath of the Civil War. We are interested in studying how these diverse groups experienced racialization not in the same way but in various and distinct ways in relation to each other.
HIST 3877 - Asian American History, 1850-Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3877/HIST 3877
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Asian American history and contemporary issues, from 1850 to the present. Immigration, labor, anti-Asian movements, women/families, impact of World War Two, new immigrant/refugee communities, civil rights, Asian American identity/culture.
AAS 3877 - Asian American History, 1850 to Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3877/HIST 3877
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Asian American history and contemporary issues, from 1850 to present. Immigration, labor, anti-Asian movements, women/families, impact of World War Two, new immigrant/refugee communities, civil rights, Asian American identity/culture.
HIST 5831 - Cultural Fallout: The Cold War and Its Legacy: Readings
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmSt 8231/Hist 5831
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Culture of the Cold War, its legacy. How it affected/reflected domestic politics, public policies, civic life, gender expectations, sexuality, class relations, racial justice, and civil rights. Impact of domestic anti-communism and of American cultural politics abroad.
AMST 8231 - Cultural Fallout: The Cold War and Its Legacy, Readings
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Culture of Cold War, its legacy. How it affected/reflected domestic politics, public policies, civic life, gender expectations, sexuality, class relations, racial justice, and civil rights. Impact of domestic anti-communism and of American cultural politics abroad.
HIST 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5890/Hist 5890
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will read recently published scholarship in American Indian and Indigenous history that takes up pressing research questions, promises to push inquiry in new directions, and that theorizes important interventions in our thinking to understand where the field is situated and moving. Reflecting the instinctively interdisciplinary nature of American Indian and Indigenous history, readings will be drawn not just from the discipline of history but across other disciplines such as Anthropology, American Studies, Geography, Literature, Political Science, and Legal Studies. As well, readings will include scholarship that reaches out to embrace the Global Indigenous studies turn. prereq: Advanced undergrad with instr consent or grad student
AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5890/Hist 5890
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will read recently published scholarship in American Indian and Indigenous history that takes up pressing research questions, promises to push inquiry in new directions, and that theorizes important interventions in our thinking to understand where the field is situated and moving. Reflecting the instinctively interdisciplinary nature of American Indian and Indigenous history, readings will be drawn not just from the discipline of history but across other disciplines such as Anthropology, American Studies, Geography, Literature, Political Science, and Legal Studies. As well, readings will include scholarship that reaches out to embrace the Global Indigenous studies turn. prereq: Advanced undergrad with instr consent or grad student
HIST 5932 - The Production of Knowledge, Negotiating the Past, and the Writing of African Histories
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5932/Hist 5932
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Recent scholarship on social history of Africa. Focuses on new literature on daily lives of ordinary people in their workplaces, communities, households.
AFRO 5932 - The Production of Knowledge, Negotiating the Past, and the Writing of African Histories
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5932/Hist 5932
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Recent scholarship on social history of Africa. Focuses on new literature on daily lives of ordinary people in their workplaces, communities, households. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ARTH 3335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
ARTH 5335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
RELS 3612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
RELS 5612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
HIST 3362 - Global History of World War II (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1362/Hist 3362
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course examines 1) how different countries remember World War II and how memories of the war have been shaped by domestic and international contexts of each country, and 2) how WWII changed the world in areas of human rights, the government-society relations, and ethical use of science and technology. Various faculty members with different geographical and thematic expertise come to the class as guest lecturers throughout the semester.
HIST 1362 - Global History of World War II (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1362/Hist 3362
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course examines 1) how different countries remember WWII and how memories of the war have been shaped by domestic and international contexts of each country and 2) how WWII changed the world in areas of human rights, the government-society relations, and ethical use of science and technology. Various faculty members with different geographical and thematic expertise come to the class as guest lecturers throughout the semester.
HIST 3426 - Piracy in the Mediterranean: The World of Merchants and Pirates (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3426/MEST 3426
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This course will use the vehicle of piracy and privateering in the Mediterranean world to explore issues of cross-cultural interaction, global connections, and identity from earliest times when people took to the sea to the Middle Ages through the early modern era, 500-1800. Wherever there was trade, wherever there was movement on the seas, there was piracy. Recent scholarship on the Mediterranean has focused on connectivities, micro-environments, the uniqueness of islands, and various climatic spheres in a geographic tradition that follows the path-breaking work of Fernand Braudel. This course will consider the urban and rural dimensions of the Mediterranean region as they relate to the history of merchants and pirates. Finally, the political and military aspects of Mediterranean history will be examined. There was a continuum from piracy to privateering to war. Students should gain a deeper understanding of a region that continues to fascinate us today.
MEST 3426 - Piracy in the Mediterranean: The World of Merchants and Pirates (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3426/MEST 3426
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This course will use the vehicle of piracy and privateering in the Mediterranean world to explore issues of cross-cultural interaction, global connections, and identity from earliest times when people took to the sea to the Middle Ages through the early modern era, 500-1800. Wherever there was trade, wherever there was movement on the seas, there was piracy. Recent scholarship on the Mediterranean has focused on connectivities, micro-environments, the uniqueness of islands, and various climatic spheres in a geographic tradition that follows the path-breaking work of Fernand Braudel. This course will consider the urban and rural dimensions of the Mediterranean region as they relate to the history of merchants and pirates. Finally, the political and military aspects of Mediterranean history will be examined. There was a continuum from piracy to privateering to war. Students should gain a deeper understanding of a region that continues to fascinate us today.