Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Hebrew Minor

Classical and Near Eastern Religions and Cultures
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2023
  • Required credits in this minor: 17 to 27
Hebrew is one of the world’s oldest languages with a continuous history that remains spoken today. It allows students to read the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament in the original and opens a window into the literary and religious creativity of ancient Israel, as well as the exciting developments of the Dead Sea Scrolls and rabbinic Judaism. This vital tradition of Hebrew continues into the modern world, where it was reborn in the late nineteenth century in Europe and eventually became the living language of Israel, helping to unify a nation with many cultural and ethnic backgrounds. It has a tradition of beautiful poetry and literature (including a Nobel prize laureate). The Hebrew minor, which spans both the ancient and the modern languages, develops students’ command of reading, writing, speaking, and comprehension, and provides an excellent complement to many fields of major study.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 1 courses before admission to the program.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Beginning Hebrew or Beginning Biblical Hebrew
Take the Modern Hebrew or the Biblical Hebrew first year sequence below for 10 credits. In select cases, students with advanced proficiency may be exempt from taking some or all of these courses. See the Hebrew Language Coordinator for more information.
Take 0 - 2 course(s) totaling 0 - 10 credit(s) from the following:
Modern Hebrew
· HEBR 1001 - Beginning Hebrew I (5.0 cr)
HEBR 1002 - Beginning Hebrew II (5.0 cr)
· Biblical Hebrew
· HEBR 1101 - Beginning Biblical Hebrew I (5.0 cr)
HEBR 1102 - Beginning Biblical Hebrew II (5.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Related Non-language Introductory Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CNRC 1201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation, World of the Hebrew Bible. [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 1201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation, World of the Hebrew Bible [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 1201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation, World of the Hebrew Bible [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· JWST 1034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 1034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 1534 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures [HIS] (3.0 cr)
Minor Requirements
A given course may only count towards one minor requirement. Students may combine the minor in Hebrew with any other major or minor.
Upper-Division Hebrew Courses
Take 11 or more credit(s) from the following:
· HEBR 3011 - Intermediate Hebrew I (5.0 cr)
· HEBR 3012 - Intermediate Hebrew II (5.0 cr)
· HEBR 3090 - Advanced Modern Hebrew (3.0 cr)
· HEBR 3101 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I (4.0 cr)
· HEBR 3102 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II (4.0 cr)
· HEBR 3993 - Directed Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
· HEBR 5090 - Advanced Modern Hebrew (3.0 cr)
· HEBR 5200 - Advanced Classical Hebrew (3.0 cr)
· HEBR 5300 - Post-Biblical Hebrew: Second Temple Period (3.0 cr)
Electives
Courses taught by visiting professors from Israel may count as an elective. See department for final consent.
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CNRC 3506 - The Israeli Mossad in Film and Literature: History, Narrative, and Ethics [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HEBR 3011 - Intermediate Hebrew I (5.0 cr)
· HEBR 3012 - Intermediate Hebrew II (5.0 cr)
· HEBR 3090 - Advanced Modern Hebrew (3.0 cr)
· HEBR 3101 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I (4.0 cr)
· HEBR 3102 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II (4.0 cr)
· HEBR 5090 - Advanced Modern Hebrew (3.0 cr)
· HEBR 5200 - Advanced Classical Hebrew (3.0 cr)
· HEBR 5300 - Post-Biblical Hebrew: Second Temple Period (3.0 cr)
· JWST 3601 - Fleeing Hitler: German and Austrian Filmmakers Between Europe and Hollywood [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNRC 3016W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or CNRC 5016W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNRC 3074 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3704 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNRC 3115 - Midrash: Reading and Retelling the Hebrew Bible (3.0 cr)
or CNRC 5115 - Midrash: Reading and Retelling the Hebrew Bible (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3115 - Midrash: Reading and Retelling the Hebrew Bible (3.0 cr)
or JWST 5115 - Midrash: Reading and Retelling the Hebrew Bible (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3115 - Midrash: Reading and Retelling the Hebrew Bible (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5115 - Midrash: Reading and Retelling the Hebrew Bible (3.0 cr)
· CNRC 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation, World of the Hebrew Bible [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation, World of the Hebrew Bible [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3201 -  The Bible: Context and Interpretation, World of the Hebrew Bible [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· CNRC 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel (3.0 cr)
· CNRC 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNRC 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
· CNRC 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or CNRC 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNRC 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
· CNRC 3515 - Multiculturalism in Modern Israel: how communities, ideologies, and identities intersect [GP] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3515 - Multiculturalism in Modern Israel: how communities, ideologies, and identities intersect [GP] (3.0 cr)
· CNRC 5204 - The Dead Sea Scrolls (3.0 cr)
or JWST 5204 - The Dead Sea Scrolls (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5204 - The Dead Sea Scrolls (3.0 cr)
· JWST 3011 - Jewish American Literature: Religion, Culture, and the Immigrant Experience [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3628 - Jewish American Literature: Religion, Culture, and the Immigrant Experience [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3011 - Jewish American Literature: Religion, Culture, and the Immigrant Experience [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· JWST 3511 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3079 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3511 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· JWST 3512 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3113 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3512 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
· JWST 3520 - History of the Holocaust (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3520 - History of the Holocaust (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3727 - History of the Holocaust (3.0 cr)
· JWST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3717 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· JWST 3631 - Jewish and German Writing at the Margins: Multilingualism, Race, Memory (3.0 cr)
or CSCL 3123 - Jewish and German Writing at the Margins: Multilingualism, Race, Memory (3.0 cr)
or GER 3631 - Jewish and German Writing at the Margins: Multilingualism, Race, Memory (3.0 cr)
· JWST 3633 - The Holocaust: Memory, Narrative, History [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GER 3633 - The Holocaust: Memory, Narrative, History [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· JWST 3729 - Nazi Germany and Hitler's Europe (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3729 - Nazi Germany and Hitler's Europe (3.0 cr)
· FREN 3345 - The Holocaust in France: Literature, History, Testimony (3.0 cr)
· JWST 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
 
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HEBR 1001 - Beginning Hebrew I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 1001/Hebr 4001
Typically offered: Every Fall
For beginners whose goal is biblical or post-biblical Jewish studies or modern Israeli Hebrew. Leads to speaking, listening comprehension, and reading and writing Hebrew. Emphasizes communication proficiency. Cultural materials are incorporated.
HEBR 1002 - Beginning Hebrew II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 1002/Hebr 4002
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Continuation of 1001. Leads to speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing Hebrew. Emphasizes communication proficiency. Cultural materials. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in [1001 or 4001] or instr consent
HEBR 1101 - Beginning Biblical Hebrew I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 1101/Hebr 4104
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The Hebrew Bible is one of the most important literary texts in world history, and one of the most culturally and morally influential in the development of western civilization. Most of this influence, however, has been via translation. Have you ever wondered if you can trust the translation? Does the Adam and Eve story really say what you think it does? Does the Hebrew Bible really include all the strict moral pronouncements and prohibitions that are attributed to it? This course offers the tools you need to read simple narrative texts in the Bible for yourself, while also introducing you to multiple approaches in biblical scholarship. Biblical Hebrew also satisfies the CLA Language requirement.
HEBR 1102 - Beginning Biblical Hebrew II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 1102/Hebr 4105
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Progression to more sophisticated reading of narrative, prophetic, and legal texts. Presentation/discussion of multiple approaches to problems/issues in biblical scholarship. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in [1101 or 4104] or instr consent
CNRC 1201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation, World of the Hebrew Bible. (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNRC1201/3201,JWST1201/3201,RE
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Hebrew Bible and Old Testament are literary collections that modern Jewish and Christian traditions maintain as important, but these collections were initially produced by ancient Israelite scribes who composed and/or compiled the biblical texts at particular time periods in the ancient Near East. This course will introduce the academic study of biblical texts, which demands critical analysis of the literature and an openness to reading the literature from the perspective of ancient Israelite writers (who lived in a world far different from today). The course will spend considerable time on the literary (and scribal) composition of biblical prose texts; time will also be spent on the historical circumstances of biblical prophets and other writers of the biblical texts. This course will only address the ancient setting of the biblical texts and not re-interpretations in Jewish or Christian traditions. Given the scope of the course, modern interpretations of the biblical literature will not be discussed; we will only focus on this literature in its ancient setting. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
JWST 1201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation, World of the Hebrew Bible (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNRC1201/3201,JWST1201/3201,RE
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Hebrew Bible and Old Testament are literary collections that modern Jewish and Christian traditions maintain as important, but these collections were initially produced by ancient Israelite scribes who composed and/or compiled the biblical texts at particular time periods in the ancient Near East. This course will introduce the academic study of biblical texts, which demands critical analysis of the literature and an openness to reading the literature from the perspective of ancient Israelite writers (who lived in a world far different from today). The course will spend considerable time on the literary (and scribal) composition of biblical prose texts; time will also be spent on the historical circumstances of biblical prophets and other writers of the biblical texts. This course will only address the ancient setting of the biblical texts and not re-interpretations in Jewish or Christian traditions. Given the scope of the course, modern interpretations of the biblical literature will not be discussed; we will only focus on this literature in its ancient setting. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
RELS 1201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation, World of the Hebrew Bible (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNRC1201/3201,JWST1201/3201,RE
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Hebrew Bible and Old Testament are literary collections that modern Jewish and Christian traditions maintain as important, but these collections were initially produced by ancient Israelite scribes who composed and/or compiled the biblical texts at particular time periods in the ancient Near East. This course will introduce the academic study of biblical texts, which demands critical analysis of the literature and an openness to reading the literature from the perspective of ancient Israelite writers (who lived in a world far different from today). The course will spend considerable time on the literary (and scribal) composition of biblical prose texts; time will also be spent on the historical circumstances of biblical prophets and other writers of the biblical texts. This course will only address the ancient setting of the biblical texts and not re-interpretations in Jewish or Christian traditions. Given the scope of the course, modern interpretations of the biblical literature will not be discussed; we will only focus on this literature in its ancient setting. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
JWST 1034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1534/JwSt 1034/RelS1034
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the development of Judaism and Jewish civilizations from their beginnings to the present. With over three millennia as its subject, the course must of necessity be a general survey. Together we will explore the mythic structures, significant documents, historical experiences, narratives, practices, beliefs, and worldviews of the Jewish people. The course begins by examining the roots of Judaism in the Hebrew Bible and the history of ancient Israel but quickly focuses on the creative forces that developed within Judaism as a national narrative confronted the forces of history, especially in the forms of the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires. Rabbinic Judaism becomes the most dominant creative force and will receive our greatest attention, both in its formative years and as it encounters the rise of Christianity and Islam. After studying the Jewish experience in the medieval world, we will turn to Judaism?s encounter with the enlightenment and modernity. The historical survey concludes by attending to the transformations within Judaism and Jewish life of the last 150 years, including a confrontation with the experience of the Holocaust. Woven throughout this historical survey will be repeated engagements with core questions: ?Who is a Jew?? ?What do Jews believe?? ?What do Jews do?? ?What do we mean by ?religion??? ?How do Jews read texts within their tradition?? And perhaps most importantly, ?How many answers are there to a Jewish question?? Students in this course can expect to come away with some knowledge of the Bible in Judaism, rabbinic literature and law, Jewish mysticism and philosophy, Jewish nationalism and Zionism, Jewish culture, ritual, and worship in the synagogue, the home, and the community, and Jewish celebrations of life cycle events and the festivals.
RELS 1034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1534/JwSt 1034/RelS1034
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the development of Judaism and Jewish civilizations from their beginnings to the present. With over three millennia as its subject, the course must of necessity be a general survey. Together we will explore the mythic structures, significant documents, historical experiences, narratives, practices, beliefs, and worldviews of the Jewish people. The course begins by examining the roots of Judaism in the Hebrew Bible and the history of ancient Israel but quickly focuses on the creative forces that developed within Judaism as a national narrative confronted the forces of history, especially in the forms of the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires. Rabbinic Judaism becomes the most dominant creative force and will receive our greatest attention, both in its formative years and as it encounters the rise of Christianity and Islam. After studying the Jewish experience in the medieval world, we will turn to Judaism?s encounter with the enlightenment and modernity. The historical survey concludes by attending to the transformations within Judaism and Jewish life of the last 150 years, including a confrontation with the experience of the Holocaust. Woven throughout this historical survey will be repeated engagements with core questions: ?Who is a Jew?? ?What do Jews believe?? ?What do Jews do?? ?What do we mean by ?religion??? ?How do Jews read texts within their tradition?? And perhaps most importantly, ?How many answers are there to a Jewish question?? Students in this course can expect to come away with some knowledge of the Bible in Judaism, rabbinic literature and law, Jewish mysticism and philosophy, Jewish nationalism and Zionism, Jewish culture, ritual, and worship in the synagogue, the home, and the community, and Jewish celebrations of life cycle events and the festivals.
HIST 1534 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1534/JwSt 1034/RelS1034
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the development of Judaism and Jewish civilizations from their beginnings to the present. With over three millennia as its subject, the course must of necessity be a general survey. Together we will explore the mythic structures, significant documents, historical experiences, narratives, practices, beliefs, and worldviews of the Jewish people. The course begins by examining the roots of Judaism in the Hebrew Bible and the history of ancient Israel but quickly focuses on the creative forces that developed within Judaism as a national narrative confronted the forces of history, especially in the forms of the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires. Rabbinic Judaism becomes the most dominant creative force and will receive our greatest attention, both in its formative years and as it encounters the rise of Christianity and Islam. After studying the Jewish experience in the medieval world, we will turn to Judaism?s encounter with the enlightenment and modernity. The historical survey concludes by attending to the transformations within Judaism and Jewish life of the last 150 years, including a confrontation with the experience of the Holocaust. Woven throughout this historical survey will be repeated engagements with core questions: ?Who is a Jew?? ?What do Jews believe?? ?What do Jews do?? ?What do we mean by ?religion??? ?How do Jews read texts within their tradition?? And perhaps most importantly, ?How many answers are there to a Jewish question?? Students in this course can expect to come away with some knowledge of the Bible in Judaism, rabbinic literature and law, Jewish mysticism and philosophy, Jewish nationalism and Zionism, Jewish culture, ritual, and worship in the synagogue, the home, and the community, and Jewish celebrations of life cycle events and the festivals.
HEBR 3011 - Intermediate Hebrew I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 3011/Hebr 4011
Typically offered: Every Fall
Prepares students for CLA language requirement. Speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of modern Hebrew. Students read/discuss prose, poetry, news, and film. Important features of biblical/classical Hebrew. Taught primarily in Hebrew. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in [1002 or 4002] or instr consent
HEBR 3012 - Intermediate Hebrew II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr3012/Hebr 4012
Typically offered: Every Spring
Extensive reading of simplified modern Hebrew prose selections. Students discuss poetry, newspaper, film, and TV in Hebrew. Israeli cultural experiences. Hone composition, listening comprehension, and speaking skills to prepare for proficiency exams. Biblical prose, simple poetic texts. Taught in Hebrew. Meets with 4012. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in in 3011 or instr consent
HEBR 3090 - Advanced Modern Hebrew
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Preparation to read various kinds of authentic Hebrew texts and to develop higher levels of comprehension/speaking. Conducted entirely in Hebrew. Emphasizes Modern Israeli Hebrew. Introduction to earlier genres. Grammar, widening vocabulary. Contemporary short fiction, essays, articles on cultural topics, films, Hebrew Internet sites, TV. prereq: 3012 or instr consent
HEBR 3101 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 3101/HEBR 4106
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Text of Hebrew Bible. Basic research tools/commentaries. Close reading of narrative biblical texts. Reading fluency, methods of research in biblical studies. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in [1102 or 4105] or instr consent
HEBR 3102 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 3102/Hebr 4107
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Text of Hebrew Bible, basic research tools and commentaries. Close reading of narrative biblical texts. Reading fluency, methods of research in biblical studies. Meets with 4107. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in 3101 or instr consent
HEBR 3993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. prereq: instr consent
HEBR 5090 - Advanced Modern Hebrew
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Various authentic Hebrew texts. Comprehension/speaking. Conducted entirely in Hebrew. Emphasizes Modern Israeli Hebrew. Grammar, widening vocabulary. Contemporary short fiction, essays, articles on cultural topics, films, Hebrew Internet sites, TV.
HEBR 5200 - Advanced Classical Hebrew
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In-depth reading, analysis, and discussion of classical Hebrew texts. Grammar, syntax. Introduction to text-criticism, history of scholarship, and scholarly tools. Format varies between survey of themes (e.g., law, wisdom, poetry) and extended concentration upon specific classical texts.
HEBR 5300 - Post-Biblical Hebrew: Second Temple Period
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Readings in late-/post-biblical Hebrew literature of Persian, Hellenistic, and early Roman periods (e.g., Chronicles, Ezra-Nehemiah, Ecclesiastes, Daniel, Dead Sea Scrolls, apocrypha, pseudepigrapha). Focuses on historical development of Hebrew language and literature in relation to earlier biblical sources. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
CNRC 3506 - The Israeli Mossad in Film and Literature: History, Narrative, and Ethics (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNRC/Jwst 3506/Hebr 5506
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course will look at Mossad?s activities and their perceptions in Israeli culture through lenses of collective memory and national identity. Students will examine primary and secondary sources to understand the historic background and the various narratives, shaping the Israeli culture. Students will conduct discussions pertaining to the place of Mossad in Israeli culture expressing opinions about the ethical component of Mossad?s activities.
HEBR 3011 - Intermediate Hebrew I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 3011/Hebr 4011
Typically offered: Every Fall
Prepares students for CLA language requirement. Speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of modern Hebrew. Students read/discuss prose, poetry, news, and film. Important features of biblical/classical Hebrew. Taught primarily in Hebrew. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in [1002 or 4002] or instr consent
HEBR 3012 - Intermediate Hebrew II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr3012/Hebr 4012
Typically offered: Every Spring
Extensive reading of simplified modern Hebrew prose selections. Students discuss poetry, newspaper, film, and TV in Hebrew. Israeli cultural experiences. Hone composition, listening comprehension, and speaking skills to prepare for proficiency exams. Biblical prose, simple poetic texts. Taught in Hebrew. Meets with 4012. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in in 3011 or instr consent
HEBR 3090 - Advanced Modern Hebrew
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Preparation to read various kinds of authentic Hebrew texts and to develop higher levels of comprehension/speaking. Conducted entirely in Hebrew. Emphasizes Modern Israeli Hebrew. Introduction to earlier genres. Grammar, widening vocabulary. Contemporary short fiction, essays, articles on cultural topics, films, Hebrew Internet sites, TV. prereq: 3012 or instr consent
HEBR 3101 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 3101/HEBR 4106
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Text of Hebrew Bible. Basic research tools/commentaries. Close reading of narrative biblical texts. Reading fluency, methods of research in biblical studies. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in [1102 or 4105] or instr consent
HEBR 3102 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 3102/Hebr 4107
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Text of Hebrew Bible, basic research tools and commentaries. Close reading of narrative biblical texts. Reading fluency, methods of research in biblical studies. Meets with 4107. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in 3101 or instr consent
HEBR 5090 - Advanced Modern Hebrew
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Various authentic Hebrew texts. Comprehension/speaking. Conducted entirely in Hebrew. Emphasizes Modern Israeli Hebrew. Grammar, widening vocabulary. Contemporary short fiction, essays, articles on cultural topics, films, Hebrew Internet sites, TV.
HEBR 5200 - Advanced Classical Hebrew
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In-depth reading, analysis, and discussion of classical Hebrew texts. Grammar, syntax. Introduction to text-criticism, history of scholarship, and scholarly tools. Format varies between survey of themes (e.g., law, wisdom, poetry) and extended concentration upon specific classical texts.
HEBR 5300 - Post-Biblical Hebrew: Second Temple Period
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Readings in late-/post-biblical Hebrew literature of Persian, Hellenistic, and early Roman periods (e.g., Chronicles, Ezra-Nehemiah, Ecclesiastes, Daniel, Dead Sea Scrolls, apocrypha, pseudepigrapha). Focuses on historical development of Hebrew language and literature in relation to earlier biblical sources. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
JWST 3601 - Fleeing Hitler: German and Austrian Filmmakers Between Europe and Hollywood (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ger 1601/Ger 1601H/JwSt 3601
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
German/American films by famous directors who left Europe in Nazi period. Analysis of films by Fritz Lang, Max Ophuls, Robert Siodmak, Otto Preminger, Billy Wilder, Douglas Sirk, and others. Films as art works and as cultural products of particular social, political, and historical moments.
CNRC 3016W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
CNRC 5016W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
JWST 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
JWST 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
RELS 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course. Old: Significance of religious law in Judaism. Babylonian background of biblical law. Biblical creation of the person as a legal category. Rabbinic transformations of biblical norms. Covenant in Christianity/Islam. Contemporary Jewish literature/philosophy.
RELS 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
CNRC 3074 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3074/RelS 3704
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores the contents of the Quran and probes its place in the history of human civilization. Students will learn about, and critically reflect on, the following subjects: 1) the Quran's core ideas, stories, laws, parables, and arguments, 2) the historical context in which the Quran was first promulgated and codified, 3) the relationship between the Quran and the preceding literary traditions of the ancient world, in particular, the Bible and post-biblical Jewish and Christian writings, 4) Muslim utilization of the Quran towards intellectual, social, religious, cultural, and political ends, and 5) the pre-modern and modern scholarly traditions of interpreting the Quran.
RELS 3704 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3074/RelS 3704
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores the contents of the Quran and probes its place in the history of human civilization. Students will learn about, and critically reflect on, the following subjects: 1) the Quran's core ideas, stories, laws, parables, and arguments, 2) the historical context in which the Quran was first promulgated and codified, 3) the relationship between the Quran and the preceding literary traditions of the ancient world, in particular, the Bible and post-biblical Jewish and Christian writings, 4) Muslim utilization of the Quran towards intellectual, social, religious, cultural, and political ends, and 5) the pre-modern and modern scholarly traditions of interpreting the Quran.
CNRC 3115 - Midrash: Reading and Retelling the Hebrew Bible
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3115/JwSt 3115/RelS 3115
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How did the Jews of the first seven centuries of the common era read and understand the Hebrew Bible? What were the problems they faced -- interpretive, historical, theological -- in trying to apply their holy scriptures? This course explores key issues that led to the development of a new form of Judaism in late antiquity, rabbinic Judaism, and its methods of scriptural interpretation. The course?s study will focus on the forms and practices of rabbinic scriptural interpretation (midrash) as it developed in Roman Palestine and Sasanian Babylonia, focusing on key narrative and legal passages in the Five Books of Moses (Torah). A main focus of the course will be on the ways the rabbis adapted the Hebrew Bible to express their own core concerns.
CNRC 5115 - Midrash: Reading and Retelling the Hebrew Bible
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3115/JwSt 3115/RelS 3115
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How did the Jews of the first seven centuries of the common era read and understand the Hebrew Bible? What were the problems they faced -- interpretive, historical, theological -- in trying to apply their holy scriptures? This course explores key issues that led to the development of a new form of Judaism in late antiquity, rabbinic Judaism, and its methods of scriptural interpretation. The course's study will focus on the forms and practices of rabbinic scriptural interpretation (midrash) as it developed in Roman Palestine and Sasanian Babylonia, focusing on key narrative and legal passages in the Five Books of Moses (Torah). A main focus of the course will be on the ways the rabbis adapted the Hebrew Bible to express their own core concerns.
JWST 3115 - Midrash: Reading and Retelling the Hebrew Bible
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3115/JwSt 3115/RelS 3115
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How did the Jews of the first seven centuries of the common era read and understand the Hebrew Bible? What were the problems they faced -- interpretive, historical, theological -- in trying to apply their holy scriptures? This course explores key issues that led to the development of a new form of Judaism in late antiquity, rabbinic Judaism, and its methods of scriptural interpretation. The course's study will focus on the forms and practices of rabbinic scriptural interpretation (midrash) as it developed in Roman Palestine and Sasanian Babylonia, focusing on key narrative and legal passages in the Five Books of Moses (Torah). A main focus of the course will be on the ways the rabbis adapted the Hebrew Bible to express their own core concerns.
JWST 5115 - Midrash: Reading and Retelling the Hebrew Bible
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3115/JwSt 3115/RelS 3115
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How did the Jews of the first seven centuries of the common era read and understand the Hebrew Bible? What were the problems they faced -- interpretive, historical, theological -- in trying to apply their holy scriptures? This course explores key issues that led to the development of a new form of Judaism in late antiquity, rabbinic Judaism, and its methods of scriptural interpretation. The course?s study will focus on the forms and practices of rabbinic scriptural interpretation (midrash) as it developed in Roman Palestine and Sasanian Babylonia, focusing on key narrative and legal passages in the Five Books of Moses (Torah). A main focus of the course will be on the ways the rabbis adapted the Hebrew Bible to express their own core concerns.
RELS 3115 - Midrash: Reading and Retelling the Hebrew Bible
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3115/JwSt 3115/RelS 3115
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How did the Jews of the first seven centuries of the common era read and understand the Hebrew Bible? What were the problems they faced -- interpretive, historical, theological -- in trying to apply their holy scriptures? This course explores key issues that led to the development of a new form of Judaism in late antiquity, rabbinic Judaism, and its methods of scriptural interpretation. The course's study will focus on the forms and practices of rabbinic scriptural interpretation (midrash) as it developed in Roman Palestine and Sasanian Babylonia, focusing on key narrative and legal passages in the Five Books of Moses (Torah). A main focus of the course will be on the ways the rabbis adapted the Hebrew Bible to express their own core concerns.
RELS 5115 - Midrash: Reading and Retelling the Hebrew Bible
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3115/JwSt 3115/RelS 3115
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How did the Jews of the first seven centuries of the common era read and understand the Hebrew Bible? What were the problems they faced -- interpretive, historical, theological -- in trying to apply their holy scriptures? This course explores key issues that led to the development of a new form of Judaism in late antiquity, rabbinic Judaism, and its methods of scriptural interpretation. The course?s study will focus on the forms and practices of rabbinic scriptural interpretation (midrash) as it developed in Roman Palestine and Sasanian Babylonia, focusing on key narrative and legal passages in the Five Books of Moses (Torah). A main focus of the course will be on the ways the rabbis adapted the Hebrew Bible to express their own core concerns.
CNRC 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation, World of the Hebrew Bible (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNRC1201/3201,JWST1201/3201,RE
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Hebrew Bible and Old Testament are literary collections that modern Jewish and Christian traditions maintain as important, but these collections were initially produced by ancient Israelite scribes who composed and/or compiled the biblical texts at particular time periods in the ancient Near East. This course will introduce the academic study of biblical texts, which demands critical analysis of the literature and an openness to reading the literature from the perspective of ancient Israelite writers (who lived in a world far different from today). The course will spend considerable time on the literary (and scribal) composition of biblical prose texts; time will also be spent on the historical circumstances of biblical prophets and other writers of the biblical texts. This course will only address the ancient setting of the biblical texts and not re-interpretations in Jewish or Christian traditions. Given the scope of the course, modern interpretations of the biblical literature will not be discussed; we will only focus on this literature in its ancient setting. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation, World of the Hebrew Bible (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNRC1201/3201,JWST1201/3201,RE
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Hebrew Bible and Old Testament are literary collections that modern Jewish and Christian traditions maintain as important, but these collections were initially produced by ancient Israelite scribes who composed and/or compiled the biblical texts at particular time periods in the ancient Near East. This course will introduce the academic study of biblical texts, which demands critical analysis of the literature and an openness to reading the literature from the perspective of ancient Israelite writers (who lived in a world far different from today). The course will spend considerable time on the literary (and scribal) composition of biblical prose texts; time will also be spent on the historical circumstances of biblical prophets and other writers of the biblical texts. This course will only address the ancient setting of the biblical texts and not re-interpretations in Jewish or Christian traditions. Given the scope of the course, modern interpretations of the biblical literature will not be discussed; we will only focus on this literature in its ancient setting. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
RELS 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation, World of the Hebrew Bible (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNRC1201/3201,JWST1201/3201,RE
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Hebrew Bible and Old Testament are literary collections that modern Jewish and Christian traditions maintain as important, but these collections were initially produced by ancient Israelite scribes who composed and/or compiled the biblical texts at particular time periods in the ancient Near East. This course will introduce the academic study of biblical texts, which demands critical analysis of the literature and an openness to reading the literature from the perspective of ancient Israelite writers (who lived in a world far different from today). The course will spend considerable time on the literary (and scribal) composition of biblical prose texts; time will also be spent on the historical circumstances of biblical prophets and other writers of the biblical texts. This course will only address the ancient setting of the biblical texts and not re-interpretations in Jewish or Christian traditions. Given the scope of the course, modern interpretations of the biblical literature will not be discussed; we will only focus on this literature in its ancient setting. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
CNRC 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3202/JwSt 3202/RelS 3202
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of Israelite prophets. Emphasizes Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Second Isaiah. Prophetic contributions to Israelite religion. Personality of prophets. Politics, prophetic reaction. Textual analysis, biblical scholarship. Prophecy viewed cross-culturally. prereq: [RelS 1001] or [CNES 1201 or JWST 1201 or RELS 1201 or CNES 3201 or JWST 3201 or RELS 3201]
RELS 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3202/JwSt 3202/RelS 3202
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of Israelite prophets. Emphasizes Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Second Isaiah. Prophetic contributions to Israelite religion. Personality of prophets. Politics, prophetic reaction. Textual analysis, Biblical scholarship. Prophecy viewed cross-culturally. prereq: [RelS 1001] or [CNES 1201 or JWST 1201 or RELS 1201 or CNES 3201 or JWST 3201 or RELS 3201]
CNRC 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, woman, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Reading biblical texts from academic point of view.
JWST 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, women, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Read biblical texts from academic point of view.
RELS 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, women, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Read biblical texts from academic point of view.
CNRC 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
JWST 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Typically offered: Every Spring
Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
ANTH 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: an Analysis of the Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and bodies to perceived pollutions cause by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to anceint Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
CNRC 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNRC 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNRC 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3504/JwSt 3504/RelS 3504
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The rise of Hellenistic kingdoms in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East created a variety of responses from local, subjugated peoples, and some of the most documented cases are those of Jewish populations in Koele-Syria/Palestine. The main objective of this course is to analyze Jewish responses to imperial rule and military conflict during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods (c. 300 B.C.E. ? 150 C.E.), but we will also spend time examining the broader picture of how local, ancestral groups fared under foreign rule. Along with discussing pertinent archaeological evidence, we will discuss Jewish literature and documentary material from this period, including, the sectarian documents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Book of Judith (a Jewish "novel"), the Books of Daniel and the Maccabees (all of which provide historical information about the Maccabean revolt and rise of the Hasmoneans), and the writings of Josephus (a Jewish writer who witnessed the Roman takeover of Palestine in the first century C.E.). This course will stay within the confines of the ancient evidence and not examine later interpretations when analyzing each historical period; it will begin with Ptolemaic control of the region and conclude with the Bar Kokhba revolt, its aftermath, and the resilience of Jewish populations in northern Palestine. Topics that will be examined in depth are messianism and apocalypticism, the Jerusalem Temple, Jewish ancestral traditions (which include biblical literature), and theoretical models used by scholars to analyze power relationships in antiquity.
JWST 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3504/JwSt 3504/RelS 3504
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The rise of Hellenistic kingdoms in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East created a variety of responses from local, subjugated peoples, and some of the most documented cases are those of Jewish populations in Koele-Syria/Palestine. The main objective of this course is to analyze Jewish responses to imperial rule and military conflict during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods (c. 300 B.C.E. - 150 C.E.), but we will also spend time examining the broader picture of how local, ancestral groups fared under foreign rule. Along with discussing pertinent archaeological evidence, we will discuss Jewish literature and documentary material from this period, including, the sectarian documents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Book of Judith (a Jewish "novel"), the Books of Daniel and the Maccabees (all of which provide historical information about the Maccabean revolt and rise of the Hasmoneans), and the writings of Josephus (a Jewish writer who witnessed the Roman takeover of Palestine in the first century C.E.). This course will stay within the confines of the ancient evidence and not examine later interpretations when analyzing each historical period; it will begin with Ptolemaic control of the region and conclude with the Bar Kokhba revolt, its aftermath, and the resilience of Jewish populations in northern Palestine. Topics that will be examined in depth are messianism and apocalypticism, the Jerusalem Temple, Jewish ancestral traditions (which include biblical literature), and theoretical models used by scholars to analyze power relationships in antiquity.
RELS 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3504/JwSt 3504/RelS 3504
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The rise of Hellenistic kingdoms in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East created a variety of responses from local, subjugated peoples, and some of the most documented cases are those of Jewish populations in Koele-Syria/Palestine. The main objective of this course is to analyze Jewish responses to imperial rule and military conflict during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods (c. 300 B.C.E. - 150 C.E.), but we will also spend time examining the broader picture of how local, ancestral groups fared under foreign rule. Along with discussing pertinent archaeological evidence, we will discuss Jewish literature and documentary material from this period, including, the sectarian documents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Book of Judith (a Jewish "novel"), the Books of Daniel and the Maccabees (all of which provide historical information about the Maccabean revolt and rise of the Hasmoneans), and the writings of Josephus (a Jewish writer who witnessed the Roman takeover of Palestine in the first century C.E.). This course will stay within the confines of the ancient evidence and not examine later interpretations when analyzing each historical period; it will begin with Ptolemaic control of the region and conclude with the Bar Kokhba revolt, its aftermath, and the resilience of Jewish populations in northern Palestine. Topics that will be examined in depth are messianism and apocalypticism, the Jerusalem Temple, Jewish ancestral traditions (which include "biblical" literature), and theoretical models used by scholars to analyze power relationships in antiquity.
CNRC 3515 - Multiculturalism in Modern Israel: how communities, ideologies, and identities intersect (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNRC/JwSt 3515/Hebr5515
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course focuses on the way various cultural groups in Israel attempt to achieve cultural recognition. Students will learn how various ethnic and religious groups shape their identities through process of acculturation and struggle. Students will learn about several Israeli cultures by reading literature, book chapters and case-studies, and watching movies, all of which center on these debates. Students will examine various case studies centered on these multicultural issues in Israel and will discuss and reflect on the implications of the issues raised by the course material for the international community, the United States, and for their own lives.
JWST 3515 - Multiculturalism in Modern Israel: how communities, ideologies, and identities intersect (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNRC/JwSt 3515/Hebr5515
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course focuses on the way various cultural groups in Israel attempt to achieve cultural recognition. Students will learn how various ethnic and religious groups shape their identities through process of acculturation and struggle. Students will learn about several Israeli cultures by reading literature, book chapters and case-studies, and watching movies, all of which center on these debates. Students will examine various case studies centered on these multicultural issues in Israel and will discuss and reflect on the implications of the issues raised by the course material for the international community, the United States, and for their own lives.
CNRC 5204 - The Dead Sea Scrolls
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3204/RelS5204/JwSt 3204/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to Dead Sea Scrolls and Qumran. Contents of Dead Sea Scrolls, significance for development of Bible. Background of Judaism and Christianity. Archaeological site of Qumran. Open to graduate students across the college; knowledge of classical Hebrew will not be required. The course is open to upper level undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.
JWST 5204 - The Dead Sea Scrolls
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3204/RelS5204/JwSt 3204/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to Dead Sea Scrolls and Qumran. Contents of Dead Sea Scrolls, significance for understanding development of the Bible. Background of Judaism and Christianity. Archaeological site of Qumran. Open to graduate students across the college; knowledge of classical Hebrew will not be required. The course is open to upper level undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.
RELS 5204 - The Dead Sea Scrolls
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3204/RelS5204/JwSt 3204/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to Dead Sea Scrolls and Qumran. Contents of Dead Sea Scrolls, significance for development of Bible. Background of Judaism and Christianity. Archaeological site of Qumran. The course will focus on the material in translation and academic scholarship on the literature and archaeological site. Open to graduate students across the college; knowledge of classical Hebrew will not be required. The course is open to upper level undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.
JWST 3011 - Jewish American Literature: Religion, Culture, and the Immigrant Experience (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3011/JwSt 3011/RelS 3628
Typically offered: Every Spring
Immigrant? Jewish? American? What do these labels mean, why are they applied, and do they ever cease to be applicable? Can we distinguish religion from culture, and what are the implications when we try? Why is it frequently asked whether Saul Bellow was ?really? a Jewish writer, but it is impossible to read Philip Roth as anything other than that? How does Grace Paley?s ?Jewishness? come through even when she is writing about non-Jewish characters? We will address these issues and others as we explore the literature growing out of the Jewish immigrant experience in America, as well as the literature by Jewish writers more firmly, though still sometimes anxiously, rooted in American soil. In this course we will engage in a highly contextualized and historicized study of Jewish American literature from the 19th century to today. We will discover in these texts how inherited Jewish culture and literary imaginings, developed over centuries of interaction between Jewish communities and the ?outside world,? get reexamined, questioned, rejected, reimagined, reintegrated, and transformed within the crucible of American experience. The discussions that ensue will also provide a framework for engaging with the creative energies and cultural productivity of more recent immigrant communities in the United States and beyond. Immigration and the experience of immigrant communities continues to be at the forefront of American consciousness, as immigrants work to create new meanings and new narratives for their lives, and as those who immigrated before them provide contested meanings for the impact of immigration on their own narratives. This course, though grounded in Jewish narratives, will therefore provide students with an expanded vocabulary and perspective for engaging in this central and very current debate within the American experience.
RELS 3628 - Jewish American Literature: Religion, Culture, and the Immigrant Experience (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3011/JwSt 3011/RelS 3628
Typically offered: Every Spring
Immigrant? Jewish? American? What do these labels mean, why are they applied, and do they ever cease to be applicable? Can we distinguish religion from culture, and what are the implications when we try? Why is it frequently asked whether Saul Bellow was ?really? a Jewish writer, but it is impossible to read Philip Roth as anything other than that? How does Grace Paley?s ?Jewishness? come through even when she is writing about non-Jewish characters? We will address these issues and others as we explore the literature growing out of the Jewish immigrant experience in America, as well as the literature by Jewish writers more firmly, though still sometimes anxiously, rooted in American soil. In this course we will engage in a highly contextualized and historicized study of Jewish American literature from the 19th century to today. We will discover in these texts how inherited Jewish culture and literary imaginings, developed over centuries of interaction between Jewish communities and the ?outside world,? get reexamined, questioned, rejected, reimagined, reintegrated, and transformed within the crucible of American experience. The discussions that ensue will also provide a framework for engaging with the creative energies and cultural productivity of more recent immigrant communities in the United States and beyond. Immigration and the experience of immigrant communities continues to be at the forefront of American consciousness, as immigrants work to create new meanings and new narratives for their lives, and as those who immigrated before them provide contested meanings for the impact of immigration on their own narratives. This course, though grounded in Jewish narratives, will therefore provide students with an expanded vocabulary and perspective for engaging in this central and very current debate within the American experience.
ENGL 3011 - Jewish American Literature: Religion, Culture, and the Immigrant Experience (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3011/JwSt 3011/RelS 3628
Typically offered: Every Spring
Immigrant? Jewish? American? What do these labels mean, why are they applied, and do they ever cease to be applicable? Can we distinguish religion from culture, and what are the implications when we try? Why is it frequently asked whether Saul Bellow was "really" a Jewish writer, but it is impossible to read Philip Roth as anything other than that? How does Grace Paley's "Jewishness" come through even when she is writing about non-Jewish characters? We will address these issues and others as we explore the literature growing out of the Jewish immigrant experience in America, as well as the literature by Jewish writers more firmly, though still sometimes anxiously, rooted in American soil. In this course we will engage in a highly contextualized and historicized study of Jewish American literature from the 19th century to today. We will discover in these texts how inherited Jewish culture and literary imaginings, developed over centuries of interaction between Jewish communities and the "outside world," get reexamined, questioned, rejected, reimagined, reintegrated, and transformed within the crucible of American experience. The discussions that ensue will also provide a framework for engaging with the creative energies and cultural productivity of more recent immigrant communities in the United States and beyond. Immigration and the experience of immigrant communities continues to be at the forefront of American consciousness, as immigrants work to create new meanings and new narratives for their lives, and as those who immigrated before them provide contested meanings for the impact of immigration on their own narratives. This course, though grounded in Jewish narratives, will therefore provide students with an expanded vocabulary and perspective for engaging in this central and very current debate within the American experience.
JWST 3511 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3511/JwSt 3511/RelS 3079
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Diversity of social/cultural interactions between Muslims and Jews and between Islam and Judaism since 1700. What enabled the two religious communities to peacefully coexist? What were causes of conflict? Why is history of Muslim-Jewish relations such a contested issue?
RELS 3079 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3511/JwSt 3511/RelS 3079
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Diversity of social/cultural interactions between Muslims and Jews and between Islam and Judaism since 1700. What enabled the two religious communities to peacefully coexist? What were causes of conflict? Why is history of Muslim-Jewish relations such a contested issue?
HIST 3511 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3511/JwSt 3511/RelS 3079
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Diversity of social/cultural interactions between Muslims and Jews and between Islam and Judaism since 1700. What enabled the two religious communities to peacefully coexist? What were causes of conflict? Why is history of Muslim-Jewish relations such a contested issue?
JWST 3512 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3942/Jwst 3512/RelS 3113
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
History of Zionism/Israel. Arab-Jewish conflict, tensions between religious/Jews. Relationships between Mizrahi, Ashkenazi, Russian, Ethiopian, Arab citizens. Israeli cultural imagery. Newsreels, political posters, television shows, films, popular music.
RELS 3113 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3942/Jwst 3512/RelS 3113
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
History of Zionism/Israel. Arab-Jewish conflict, tensions between religious/secular Jews. Relationships between Mizrahi, Ashkenazi, Russian, Ethiopian, Arab citizens. Israeli cultural imagery. Newsreels, political posters, television shows, films, popular music.
HIST 3512 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3942/Jwst 3512/RelS 3113
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
History of Zionism/Israel. Arab-Jewish conflict, tensions between religious/secular Jews. Relationships between Mizrahi, Ashkenazi, Russian, Ethiopian, Arab citizens. Israeli cultural imagery. Newsreels, political posters, television shows, films, popular music.
JWST 3520 - History of the Holocaust
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3727/JwSt 3520/RelS 3520
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of 1933-1945 extermination of six million Jews and others by Nazi Germany on basis of race. European anti-Semitism. Implications of social Darwinism and race theory. Perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resistance. Theological responses of Jews and Christians.
RELS 3520 - History of the Holocaust
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3727/JwSt 3520/RelS 3520
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of 1933-1945 extermination of six million Jews and others by Nazi Germany on basis of race. European anti-Semitism. Implications of social Darwinism and race theory. Perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resistance. Theological responses of Jews and Christians.
HIST 3727 - History of the Holocaust
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3727/JwSt 3520/RelS 3520
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of 1933-1945 extermination of six million Jews and others by Nazi Germany on basis of race. European anti-Semitism. Implications of social Darwinism and race theory. Perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resistance. Theological responses of Jews and Christians.
JWST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/JwSt/Mest3606/RelS3717
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A Pew Research survey of the global religious landscape in 2010 found 2.2 billion Christians (31.5% of the world's population), 1.6 billion Muslims (23.2%), and 14 million Jews (.2%). In this class, we explore how the histories of these religious communities became deeply entangled in an age of diplomacy, trade, jihad, and crusade.
RELS 3717 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/JwSt/Mest3606/RelS3717
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A Pew Research survey of the global religious landscape in 2010 found 2.2 billion Christians (31.5% of the world?s population), 1.6 billion Muslims (23.2%), and 14 million Jews (.2%). In this class, we explore how the histories of these religious communities became deeply entangled in an age of diplomacy, trade, jihad, and crusade.
HIST 3606 - Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/JwSt/Mest3606/RelS3717
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A Pew Research survey of the global religious landscape in 2010 found 2.2 billion Christians (31.5% of the world?s population), 1.6 billion Muslims (23.2%), and 14 million Jews (.2%). In this class, we explore how the histories of these religious communities became deeply entangled in an age of diplomacy, trade, jihad, and crusade.
JWST 3631 - Jewish and German Writing at the Margins: Multilingualism, Race, Memory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3123/Ger 3631/JwSt 3631
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How are minority stories, novels, and poems constructed at the margins of a majority culture's language? This course addresses this question by exploring the complexity of Jewish culture in modernity, with a focus on 20th and 21st century German and American literature. We will first tackle the open-ended and endlessly productive question of what is meant by Jewish culture. What is a Jewish writer and is there such a thing as Jewish writing? What makes a text "Jewish"? How do Jewish authors challenge the assumptions of majority culture in their work? What role do multilingualism and translation play in the formation of Jewish cultures at the margins? We will trace the lines of affinity between the U.S. and Europe to explore the entangled histories of Germans and Jews, and between German Jews and Turkish Germans, as we look at works that challenge and expand the definition of Jewishness in the 20th century. Additional topics to be considered include how the legacies of American slavery and European colonialism shape our understandings of the Nazi genocide of the Jews, and whether Jewish writing should be understood under the rubric of "whiteness." Moving beyond the approach to German Jewish literary studies anchored in Weimar Germany, we will explore the circulation of Jewish memory between Europe and the U.S. in the aftermath of the Holocaust. We will read works by, among others, Franz Kafka, Paul Celan, Gershon Scholem, Hannah Arendt, Benjamin Stein, Walter Benjamin, Barbara Honigmann, Hélène Cixous, Raymond Federman, W.G. Sebald, Allen Ginsberg, Adeena Karasick, Alfred Kazin, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, Bernard Malamud, Avram Sutzkever, Zafer Senocak. prereq: No knowledge of German required; some work in German must be done in order to count this course toward a German minor or a German, Scandinavian, Dutch major.
CSCL 3123 - Jewish and German Writing at the Margins: Multilingualism, Race, Memory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3123/Ger 3631/JwSt 3631
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
How are minority stories, novels, and poems constructed at the margins of a majority culture's language? This course addresses this question by exploring the complexity of Jewish culture in modernity, with a focus on 20th and 21st century German and American literature. We will first tackle the open-ended and endlessly productive question of what is meant by Jewish culture. What is a Jewish writer and is there such a thing as Jewish writing? What makes a text ? How do Jewish authors challenge the assumptions of majority culture in their work? What role do multilingualism and translation play in the formation of Jewish cultures at the margins? We will trace the lines of affinity between the U.S. and Europe to explore the entangled histories of Germans and Jews, and between German Jews and Turkish Germans, as we look at works that challenge and expand the definition of Jewishness in the 20th century. Additional topics to be considered include how the legacies of American slavery and European colonialism shape our understandings of the Nazi genocide of the Jews, and whether Jewish writing should be understood under the rubric of whiteness? Moving beyond the approach to German Jewish literary studies anchored in Weimar Germany, we will explore the circulation of Jewish memory between Europe and the U.S. in the aftermath of the Holocaust. We will read works by, among others, Franz Kafka, Paul Celan, Gershon Scholem, Hannah Arendt, Benjamin Stein, Walter Benjamin, Barbara Honigmann, Hélène Cixous, Raymond Federman, W.G. Sebald, Allen Ginsberg, Adeena Karasick, Alfred Kazin, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, Bernard Malamud, Avram Sutzkever, Zafer Senocak. prereq: No knowledge of German required; some work in German must be done in order to count this course toward a German minor or a German, Scandinavian, Dutch major.
GER 3631 - Jewish and German Writing at the Margins: Multilingualism, Race, Memory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3123/Ger 3631/JwSt 3631
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How are minority stories, novels, and poems constructed at the margins of a majority culture?s language? This course addresses this question by exploring the complexity of Jewish culture in modernity, with a focus on 20th and 21st century German and American literature. We will first tackle the open-ended and endlessly productive question of what is meant by Jewish culture. What is a Jewish writer and is there such a thing as Jewish writing? What makes a text "Jewish"? How do Jewish authors challenge the assumptions of majority culture in their work? What role do multilingualism and translation play in the formation of Jewish cultures at the margins? We will trace the lines of affinity between the U.S. and Europe to explore the entangled histories of Germans and Jews, and between German Jews and Turkish Germans, as we look at works that challenge and expand the definition of Jewishness in the 20th century. Additional topics to be considered include how the legacies of American slavery and European colonialism shape our understandings of the Nazi genocide of the Jews, and whether Jewish writing should be understood under the rubric of "whiteness." Moving beyond the approach to German Jewish literary studies anchored in Weimar Germany, we will explore the circulation of Jewish memory between Europe and the U.S. in the aftermath of the Holocaust. We will read works by, among others, Franz Kafka, Paul Celan, Gershon Scholem, Hannah Arendt, Benjamin Stein, Walter Benjamin, Barbara Honigmann, Hélène Cixous, Raymond Federman, W.G. Sebald, Allen Ginsberg, Adeena Karasick, Alfred Kazin, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, Bernard Malamud, Avram Sutzkever, Zafer ?enocak. prereq: No knowledge of German required; some work in German must be done in order to count this course toward a German minor or a German, Scandinavian, Dutch major.
JWST 3633 - The Holocaust: Memory, Narrative, History (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ger 3633/JwSt 3633
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Decades after the end of the second world war, the Holocaust continues to play a formative role in public discourse about the past in Germany and Austria. As the event itself recedes into the past, our knowledge about the Holocaust has become increasingly shaped by literary and filmic representations of it. This course has several objectives: first, to deepen students' historical knowledge of the events and experiences of the Holocaust, and at the same time to introduce critical models for examining the relationship between personal experience, historical events, and forms of representation. This class will introduce students to the debates about the politics of memory and the artistic representation of the Holocaust, with special focus on public debates about the complex ways in which Holocaust memory surfaces in contemporary Germany and Austria, and by the accrual of layers of text and discourse about the Holocaust. We will explore the controversies and debates about public Holocaust memorialization in Germany, Austria, and the U.S. We will also explore the complex interplay between documentary and fictional accounts of the Holocaust, with attention paid to literary and film texts that challenge and "remediate" the limits of Holocaust representation. Additional topics will include Holocaust testimony; Holocaust memoirs, and 2nd and 3rd generation Holocaust literature, the Historians' Debate of the 1980s. No knowledge of German required.
GER 3633 - The Holocaust: Memory, Narrative, History (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ger 3633/JwSt 3633
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Decades after the end of the second world war, the Holocaust continues to play a formative role in public discourse about the past in Germany and Austria. As the event itself recedes into the past, our knowledge about the Holocaust has become increasingly shaped by literary and filmic representations of it. This course has several objectives: first, to deepen students' historical knowledge of the events and experiences of the Holocaust, and at the same time to introduce critical models for examining the relationship between personal experience, historical events, and forms of representation. This class will introduce students to the debates about the politics of memory and the artistic representation of the Holocaust, with special focus on public debates about the complex ways in which Holocaust memory surfaces in contemporary Germany and Austria, and by the accrual of layers of text and discourse about the Holocaust. We will explore the controversies and debates about public Holocaust memorialization in Germany, Austria, and the U.S. We will also explore the complex interplay between documentary and fictional accounts of the Holocaust, with attention paid to literary and film texts that challenge and "remediate" the limits of Holocaust representation. Additional topics will include Holocaust testimony; Holocaust memoirs, and 2nd and 3rd generation Holocaust literature, the Historians' Debate of the 1980s. No knowledge of German required.
JWST 3729 - Nazi Germany and Hitler's Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3729/JwSt 3729
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comprehensive exploration of Third Reich. How Nazis came to power, transformations of 1930s, imposition of racial politics against Jews/others, nature of total war. Historical accounts, memoirs, state documents, view films.
HIST 3729 - Nazi Germany and Hitler's Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3729/JwSt 3729
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comprehensive exploration of Third Reich. Students will examine How the Nazis came to power, transformations of 1930s, imposition of racial politics against Jews/others, nature of total war. Students read historical accounts, memoirs, state documents, view films.
FREN 3345 - The Holocaust in France: Literature, History, Testimony
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fren 3345/Fren 3745/JwSt 3745
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the event of the Holocaust (which we call "Shoah" in France since the 80s and especially since the film of the same name by Claude Lanzmann) in literature, film, and archives. France has a complex relationship with Jews since the Middle Ages. During the French Revolution (1789), then under the Empire (Napoleon Bonaparte, 1800-1815), the Jews benefitted from political emancipation. The Republic defended the equality of Jews before the law as French citizens. But France was also the country of political anti-Semitism and of the Dreyfus Affair (there were in the nineteenth century some very virulent anti-Semitic propaganda writers, for example Edouard Drumont, author of Jewish France, in 1880, just before the Dreyfus Affair). This history of the Jews in France culminates with the Vichy regime, the policy of collaboration with Nazi Germany, antisemitic writings and propaganda emanating from important writers such as Louis-Ferdinand Celine and politicians, and the deportation of part of the Jewish population to the extermination camps. How does this story affect fictional writing, and debates on how to represent this event? More than a course on the Holocaust, we explore the story of its reminiscence in French culture. It is not a history class, but a class in culture, literature, memory and testimony. prereq: FREN 3015; it is recommended that students have taken, or take concurrently, FREN 3101W.
JWST 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
GLOS 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
SOC 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.