Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Global Studies Minor

Global Studies Department
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2016
  • Required credits in this minor: 17
The minor offers students the opportunity to study the interrelated processes shaping today's increasingly interdependent world. Students examine political, economic, cultural, and social processes of local communities, nation states, transnational businesses, and social movements across the globe.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
After completing GLOS 3144 and GLOS 3145, students declare a thematic and regional concentration and complete an additional 9 credits, including at least one theme breadth requirement, one region breadth requirement, and one elective course in their theme or region. Students may earn a BA or a minor in global studies, but not both.
Minor Courses
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 8 credit(s) from the following:
· GLOS 3144 - Knowledge, Power, and the Politics of Representation in Global Studies (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3144H - Honors: Knowledge, Power, and the Politics of Representation in Global Studies (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3145 - Global Modernity, the Nation-State, and Capitalism (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3145H - Honors: Global Modernity, the Nation-State, and Capitalism (3.0 cr)
Thematic Breadth Courses
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
Environment and Sustainable Development
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Global and Cultural Analysis
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· AMST 3114 - America in International Perspective [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3143 - Living in the Global [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3602 - In Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3605 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3705 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· Global Political Economy
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· POL 3833 - The United States and the Global Economy (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3219 - History of Capitalism: Uneven Development Since 1500 (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3419 - History of Capitalism: Uneven Development Since 1500 (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3417W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4221 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization Through Sociology [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4321 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology [GP] (3.0 cr)
· Human Rights and Justice
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GLOS 3401W - International Human Rights Law [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4485 {Inactive} [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3412 - What is Equality? [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 5412 - What is Equality? [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4104 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4104H {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4104 - Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4104H - Honors: Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
· Population, Migration, Identity
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3143 - Living in the Global [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3415 - Migrations in Modern Global History [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3797 - History of Population [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3701W {Inactive} [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3511 - World Population Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3511H - Honors: World Population Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
Regional Breadth Requirement
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
Africa
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· AFRO 3141 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
or HIST 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· East Asia
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· EAS 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age (3.0-4.0 cr)
or HIST 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age (3.0-4.0 cr)
· EAS 3462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
or EAS 3462H - Honors: From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia from 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
or HIST 3462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
or HIST 3462H - Honors: From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia from 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· Europe
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GLOS 3920 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3721 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the Turn of the Century to the End of World War II: 1900-45 (3.0 cr)
· POL 3451W - Politics and Society in the New Europe [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4461W - European Government and Politics [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3921 {Inactive} [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3161 - Europe: A Geographic Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4344 - Europe and its Margins (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 4344 - Europe and its Margins (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3422 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3722 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the End of World War II to the End of the Cold War: 1945-91 (3.0 cr)
· Islamic World
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GLOS 3643 - Islam and the West (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3546 - Islam and the West (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3714 - Islam and the West (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3716 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
· Latin America
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ECON 4311 - Economy of Latin America (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or LAS 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or LAS 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3512 - Modern Latin America (3.0 cr)
· Middle East
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 3505 - Survey of the Modern Middle East [GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4867W {Inactive} [GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· Russia
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 3637 - Modern Russia: From Peter the Great to the Present (3.0 cr)
· RUSS 3512 - Russian Art and Culture [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime (3.0 cr)
· South Asia
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GLOS 3961 - Culture and Society of India [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 3023 - Culture and Society of India [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or AMES 3676 {Inactive} [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3969 - 20th Century India (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3489 - 20th Century India (3.0 cr)
Elective
Students must take one elective course in either the theme or the region of concentration, chosen in consultation with a global studies adviser.
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· Thematic/Regional Elective
 
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· Fall 2020
· Fall 2018
· Fall 2017


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· Global Studies Minor
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GLOS 3144 - Knowledge, Power, and the Politics of Representation in Global Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00749
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an introductory overview of core theories and concepts that prepare students for successful completion of the Global Studies curriculum. In this half of the Global Studies core course sequence, students will investigate questions pertaining to how representations of the modern world in popular media and academic writing contribute to, reaffirm, and often challenge relations of inequality and division tied to such categories as ethnicity, gender, and race. Drawing on a wide range of interdisciplinary sources including magazines, novels, films, and digital media, these questions may include: How do cultural representations of the Global South reinforce European imperial and colonial projects? What role do mass-market magazines and newspapers have in constructing difference and producing stereotypes that justify imperialist attitudes? How does the development of technologies, from railroads to the internet, affect collective experiences of time and space? How is 'fake news' and intentional misrepresentation a threat to democracy and to the ecological security of the Earth? Students will meet twice a week for lecture and attend a weekly recitation section, with assignments that include short writing exercises and/or weekly Canvas posts and a midterm and final examination. This course will show how the politics of representation and knowledge production relate to changing formations of power, while giving students the conceptual vocabulary and critical skills to prepare for subsequent Global Studies courses. Prereq: soph, jr, or sr
GLOS 3144H - Honors: Knowledge, Power, and the Politics of Representation in Global Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00749
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an introductory overview of core theories and concepts that prepare students for successful completion of the Global Studies curriculum. In this half of the Global Studies core course sequence, students will investigate questions pertaining to how representations of the modern world in popular media and academic writing contribute to, reaffirm, and often challenge relations of inequality and division tied to such categories as ethnicity, gender, and race. Drawing on a wide range of interdisciplinary sources including magazines, novels, films, and digital media, these questions may include: How do cultural representations of the Global South reinforce European imperial and colonial projects? What role do mass-market magazines and newspapers have in constructing difference and producing stereotypes that justify imperialist attitudes? How does the development of technologies, from railroads to the internet, affect collective experiences of time and space? How is 'fake news' and intentional misrepresentation a threat to democracy and to the ecological security of the Earth? Students will meet twice a week for lecture and attend a weekly recitation section with assignments that include short writing exercises and/or weekly Canvas posts and a midterm and final examination. This course will show how the politics of representation and knowledge production relate to changing formations of power, while giving students the conceptual vocabulary and critical skills to prepare for subsequent Global Studies courses. Prereq: Honors soph, jr, or sr
GLOS 3145 - Global Modernity, the Nation-State, and Capitalism
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00844
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides an introductory overview of core theories and concepts that prepare students for successful completion of the Global Studies curriculum. In this half of the Global Studies core course sequence, students will investigate questions pertaining to the emergence of global modernity, capitalism, and the nation-state, with particular focus on theoretical concepts and institutional forms. Drawing on a wide range of interdisciplinary sources including critical theory, philosophy, and texts from the social sciences, these questions may include: How did reason and culture emerge as key concepts in modernity, and how were they associated with transformations in time and space? How did the nation-state become a dominant political unit in the West, and how do postcolonial African states challenge its structure? What is the relationship between the Western liberal tradition, secularity, and violence? What are the histories and internal dynamics of the capitalist economy? Students will meet twice a week for lecture and attend a weekly recitation section, with assignments that include short writing exercises, a group project, and midterm and final examinations. This course will contextualize and trouble aspects of the global that are easily abstracted and taken for granted, while giving students the conceptual vocabulary and critical skills to prepare for subsequent Global Studies courses. Prereq: soph, jr, or sr Units: 3.00
GLOS 3145H - Honors: Global Modernity, the Nation-State, and Capitalism
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00844
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides an introductory overview of core theories and concepts that prepare students for successful completion of the Global Studies curriculum. In this half of the Global Studies core course sequence, students will investigate questions pertaining to the emergence of global modernity, capitalism, and the nation-state, with particular focus on theoretical concepts and institutional forms. Drawing on a wide range of interdisciplinary sources including critical theory, philosophy, and texts from the social sciences, these questions may include: How did reason and culture emerge as key concepts in modernity, and how were they associated with transformations in time and space? How did the nation-state become a dominant political unit in the West, and how do postcolonial African states challenge its structure? What is the relationship between the Western liberal tradition, secularity, and violence? What are the histories and internal dynamics of the capitalist economy? Students will meet twice a week for lecture and attend a weekly recitation section with assignments that include short writing exercises, a group project, and midterm and final examinations. This course will contextualize and trouble aspects of the global that are easily abstracted and taken for granted, while giving students the conceptual vocabulary and critical skills to prepare for subsequent Global Studies courses. Prereq: Honors soph, jr, or sr Units: 3.00
GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02573
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This class uses a social justice lens to explore the interrelations of scientific discoveries, unequal global economies, and commodification. We will look at practices, new technologies, and policies that are trenchant for the negative impacts they have on environments broadly defined, and for human and non-human populations. We will ask how these practices, technologies, and policies - and the social and economic contexts that produce them - variably impact the health, well being, and valuation of particular populations. In a series of interconnected themes, we will examine what factors produce food insecurity and for whom; where and why pollution of resources such as water happens; the history and current state of antibiotic resistance; climate change and its various effects; and how new technologies can be life-saving and life-denying according to the ways national and global policies determine who gains access and who does not. We will also look at the innovative ways grassroots movements tackle issues confronting particular groups, what constitutes positive social change and by whose definition, and potential ways forward. Prereq: soph or jr or sr
GLOS 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01182
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course introduces students to the theoretical and historical foundations of environmental racism and environmental inequality more broadly. We will examine and interrogate both the social scientific evidence concerning these phenomena and the efforts by community residents, activists, workers, and governments to combat it. We will consider the social forces that create environmental inequalities so that we may understand their causes, consequences, and the possibilities for achieving environmental justice prereq: SOC 1001 recommended
SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01182
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course introduces students to the theoretical and historical foundations of environmental racism and environmental inequality more broadly. We will examine and interrogate both the social scientific evidence concerning these phenomena and the efforts by community residents, activists, workers, and governments to combat it. We will consider the social forces that create environmental inequalities so that we may understand their causes, consequences, and the possibilities for achieving environmental justice prereq: SOC 1001 recommended
AMST 3114 - America in International Perspective (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The nature of international cultural exchange. The impact of U.S. cultures and society on other countries of the world as well as the impact of other cultures and societies on the United States.
GLOS 3143 - Living in the Global (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
'Living in the Global' is an interdisciplinary humanities course that examines human life and culture in and under globalization and asks students to consider how their own experiences, identities, and practices are embedded in systems of power. Topics vary, but have included: cultural foundations of social justice, humans and the environment, place, labor and capital, and forced migration. These themes are explored through poetry, novels, feature films, documentaries, visual art, philosophy, and critical theory.
GLOS 3602 - In Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
'Globalization' and 'Culture' are both terms that have been defined and understood in a variety of ways and the significance of which continues to be debated to the present, both inside and outside the academy. Globalization has been talked about both as an irresistible historical force, tending toward the creation of an increasingly interconnected, or, as is sometimes claimed, an increasingly homogeneous world, and as a set of processes, the outcome of which remains open-ended and uncertain, as likely to produce new kinds of differences as universal sameness. Culture meanwhile has been variously defined as that which distinguishes humans from other species (and which all humans therefore share) and as that which divides communities of humans from one another on the basis of different beliefs, customs, values etc. This course reflects on some of the possible meanings of both "Globalization" and "Culture" and asks what we can learn by considering them in relation to one another. How do the phenomena associated with globalization, such as increasing flows of people, capital, goods and information across increasing distances challenge our understandings of culture, including the idea that the world is composed of so many discrete and bounded "cultures"? At the same time, does culture and its associated expressive forms, including narrative fiction, poetry and film, furnish us with new possibilities for thinking about globalization? Does global interconnection produce a single, unified world, or multiple worlds? Are the movements of people, goods, ideas and information across distances associated with new developments caused by contemporary globalization, or have they been going on for centuries or even millennia? Might contemporary debates about climate change and environmental crisis compel us to consider these phenomena in new ways? The course addresses these questions as they have been discussed by scholars from a variety of disciplines and as they have been imagined by artists, poets, novelists and filmmakers. In doing so, it considers whether the distinctiveness of present day globalization is to be sought in part in the new forms of imagining and creative expression to which it has given rise.
POL 3833 - The United States and the Global Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
POL 3833 teaches students about the politics of the global economy with a focus on the role the United States plays within it. The class covers a variety of topics in international political economy, including international trade, international investment, and international finance. Students will learn about the factors that drive politicians' decision-making, interest-group stances, and citizens' preferences over such salient issues as tariffs and other forms of trade protection, trade and investment agreements, central banking, interest rates, international migration, and more. No background in economics is required or assumed.
GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development. Location of agriculture, industry, services. Agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth. International trade. Changing global development inequalities. Impact on nations, regions, cities.
GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development; location of agriculture, industry, services; geography of communications; agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth; international trade; changing global development inequalities; impact of globalizing production and finance on the welfare of nations, regions, and cities.
GLOS 3219 - History of Capitalism: Uneven Development Since 1500
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01963
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Causes of economic inequities in contemporary world. Long-term economic developments in cases taken from Africa, Asia, Europe, and North/South America. Various theoretical approaches to study of economic development. Introduction to key concepts.
HIST 3419 - History of Capitalism: Uneven Development Since 1500
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01963 - GloS 3219/Hist 3419
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Causes of economic inequities in contemporary world. Long-term economic developments in cases taken from Africa, Asia, Europe, and North/South America. Various theoretical approaches to study of economic development. Introduction to key concepts.
GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will introduce students to some of the world's most powerful global institutions -- such as the World Bank (IBRD), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Trade Organization (WTO), the United Nations, and affiliated agencies such as UNHCR (for refugee support). We will follow their efforts to promote a style of global development practices -- large-scale capital lending and global expertise building -- that has crystallized into a common understanding of how global north-south dynamics should progress. Cases pursued in class may include their lending and debt policies, dam building and energy projects, climate resilience and water loans, and the ways they mediate free trade agreements among competing countries. We will also hear from the multitude of voices, theories, and practices that offer alternative visions as to how peoples strive to produce a more just, socially equitable, and climate-safe world. We will use books, articles, films, in-class debates, case study exploration, small-group projects, and guest speakers to create a lively discussion-based classroom environment.
SOC 3417W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will introduce students to some of the world's most powerful global institutions -- such as the World Bank (IBRD), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Trade Organization (WTO), the United Nations, and affiliated agencies such as UNHCR (for refugee support). We will follow their efforts to promote a style of global development practices -- large-scale capital lending and global expertise building -- that has crystallized into a common understanding of how global north-south dynamics should progress. Cases pursued in class may include their lending and debt policies, dam building and energy projects, climate resilience and water loans, and the ways they mediate free trade agreements among competing countries. We will also hear from the multitude of voices, theories, and practices that offer alternative visions as to how people strive to produce a more just, socially equitable, and climate-safe world. We will use books, articles, films, in-class debates, case study exploration, small-group projects, and guest speakers to create a lively discussion-based classroom environment.
GLOS 4221 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization Through Sociology (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00847
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
From the city streets of Bangalore to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent, creating new and revitalizing old forms of power and opportunity, exploitation and politics, social organizing and social justice. This course offers an overview of the processes that are forcing and encouraging people?s lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4321 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00847
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
From the city streets of Bangalore to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent, creating new and revitalizing old forms of power and opportunity, exploitation and politics, social organizing and social justice. This course offers an overview of the processes that are forcing and encouraging people?s lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
GLOS 3401W - International Human Rights Law (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course presents an introductory overview of the idea of human rights, its social and legal foundations and contemporary global issues. In the class, students will learn about the laws and procedures designed to protect the human rights of individuals and groups, with a special focus on the United Nations system. The course explores the conceptual underpinnings of human rights such as who is eligible to have rights, where those rights come from and who is responsible for guaranteeing them. Students will learn about how international laws are made and interpreted, and will consider the geo-political context which shapes human rights laws and procedures. Because of the evolving nature of the laws and issues in this field, students are encouraged to think analytically and ethically about how to address the many human rights challenges in the world today. The course will cover current human rights issues, including the right to health care, housing and other economic and social rights; and the right to life, freedom from torture and other civil and political rights. The course is writing intensive. The required paper for the class is a model complaint to the United Nations about a country and issue of the student's choosing. The class invites discussion and uses class exercises to engage students in the course material by shaping arguments for various legal fora.
GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01513
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
GLOS 3412 - What is Equality? (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02296
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Course explores debates about equality. Equality has many dimensions--e.g.: economic, social, political. These forms cannot be reconciled. Liberal democracies affirm the principle of political equality but defend, even in principle, social and economic inequalities. Animal rights add another wrinkle: very few of those who fight for these rights would claim political equality for animals.
GLOS 5412 - What is Equality? (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02296
Prerequisites: prereq Grad or advanced undergrad with instr consent
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Course explores debates about equality. Equality has many dimensions--e.g.: economic, social, political. These forms cannot be reconciled. Liberal democracies affirm the principle of political equality but defend, even in principle, social and economic inequalities. Animal rights add another wrinkle: very few of those who fight for these rights would claim political equality for animals. prereq: prereq Grad or advanced undergrad with instr consent
SOC 4104 - Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01871
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: SOC 1001, at least one 3xxx SOC course recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4104H - Honors: Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01871
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on an LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class PowerPoint presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates to themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. prereq: SOC 1001, at least one 3xxx SOC course recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GLOS 3143 - Living in the Global (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
'Living in the Global' is an interdisciplinary humanities course that examines human life and culture in and under globalization and asks students to consider how their own experiences, identities, and practices are embedded in systems of power. Topics vary, but have included: cultural foundations of social justice, humans and the environment, place, labor and capital, and forced migration. These themes are explored through poetry, novels, feature films, documentaries, visual art, philosophy, and critical theory.
HIST 3415 - Migrations in Modern Global History (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Today¿s debates about immigration in historical/comparative perspective. Major migrations into, within, and out of Americas over 500 years. Lives/identities of U.S. immigrants compared with foreigners living/working in Latin America, Europe, and Asia. Words/voices of migrants.
HIST 3797 - History of Population (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02643 - Hist 3797/Hist 5797
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of births, deaths, migration, population size, and population characteristics. Evidence from Europe, the United States, and Latin America with comparative material from Africa and Asia. Methods of historical population analysis and research of historical population data.
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
SOC 3511 - World Population Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02141 - Soc 3511/Soc 3511H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class is an introduction to the contemporary issues that accompany such dramatic population change, including fertility change, disease experiences, migration as opportunity and challenge and human-environment conflict. Further, we will examine the roles of global organizations, national governments, and culture in shaping and reshaping populations. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3511H - Honors: World Population Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02141 - Soc 3511/Soc 3511H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class is an introduction to the contemporary issues that accompany such dramatic population change, including fertility change, disease experiences, migration as opportunity and challenge and human-environment conflict. Further, we will examine the roles of global organizations, national governments, and culture in shaping and reshaping populations. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
AFRO 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/Afro 3432
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in Africa, from abolition of trans-Atlantic slave trade through postcolonial era.
HIST 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/Afro 3432
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Survey of modern African history from early 19th century to present. Focuses on socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in Africa, from abolition of trans-Atlantic slave trade through postcolonial era.
EAS 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00603
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative survey of early history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam; early Chinese thought; diffusion of Confucianism, Buddhism, and other values throughout East Asia; political and social history of region to 1600.
HIST 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS/Hist 3461
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comparative survey of early history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Early Chinese thought. Diffusion of Confucianism, Buddhism, and other values throughout East Asia. Political and social history of region to 1600.
EAS 3462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00602 - ALL 3462/EAS 3462/Hist 3462
Typically offered: Every Spring
How Asian states, societies, economies, and cultures linked with one another and with European powers. How period's historical effects still resonate. Covers India, China, Japan, Korea, and Indochina.
EAS 3462H - Honors: From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia from 1500 to the Present (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00602 - EAS 3462/EAS 3462HHist 3462/HI
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
How Asian states, societies, economies, cultures linked with one another/European powers. Historical effects. Covers India, China, Japan, Korea, Indochina.
HIST 3462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00602
Typically offered: Every Spring
How Asian states, societies, economies, and cultures linked with one another and with European powers. How period's historical effects still resonate. Covers India, China, Japan, Korea, and Indochina.
HIST 3462H - Honors: From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia from 1500 to the Present (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00602
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
How Asian states, societies, economies, cultures linked with one another/European powers. Historical effects. Covers India, China, Japan, Korea, Indochina.
HIST 3721 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the Turn of the Century to the End of World War II: 1900-45
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3721/5721
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Social, political, and cultural changes/conflicts. Background to WWI, its impact. Revolution, failure of interwar stability. Fascism. WWII, its consequences.
POL 3451W - Politics and Society in the New Europe (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
The devastation of Europe through two World Wars put the deadly results of ultra-nationalism on full display. To avoid such destruction again, a group of European technocrats and leaders embarked on a mission of incrementally deepening economic and later, social partnerships between an ever-expanding number of European countries. These efforts culminated in the birth of the European Union in the late 20th Century. From its inception, the Union has found obstacles in the forms of a weak institutional structure and authority, deep skepticism of a central European authority, financial crisis, ethnic anxiety, and resurgent nationalism. Yet, the continuation and strengthening of the Union is seen as the antidote to the rise of anti-democratic and authoritarian tendencies on the continent. Some of the key questions that we will engage in are: What are the ideological and historical roots of the European Union? What are the structural flaws of the Union? What are the obstacles to a stronger Union? Is the Union still or even more essential than ever? What are the ways the Union could collapse from within and from the intervention of outside forces?
POL 4461W - European Government and Politics (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00862
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
This course will introduce you to three major topics that shape European social and political life today: 1) the struggle over what makes for a national/European identity: how contested national identities matter to European democratic politics and to the new populist movements, and the historical role of Islam in shaping European identities 2) the role of institutions in shaping popular representation and citizen agency; 3) European Union policies: dealing with immigration, the single currency and foreign and security policy especially in regard to Eastern/Central Europe and Russia. Each section will conclude with a comparative class debate, led by students, on the way contested historical interpretations and identities, institutions and policies matter also to US political and civic life. This is a writing intensive course and you will be asked to write a 12-15 page research essay on a European country of your choice. Several assignments, preceded by a writing workshop, will help you complete your final essay. The course will consist of lectures with PPTs, class discussions and group work, and at least one guest lecturer working in a local business connected with Europe. Indeed this course aims at preparing you to live and work in a deeply interconnected world, with special attention to the historical, social, political and economic ties between the US and Europe. Small changes will be made to the syllabus if current events or unexpected class needs require it, but the main themes, most readings and the assignments will remain as indicated in the syllabus. prereq: 1054 or 3051 or non-pol sci grad or instr consent
GEOG 3161 - Europe: A Geographic Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00849
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Comparative analysis and explanation of Europe's physical, demographic, ethnic/cultural, economic, political, and urban landscapes. European integration--the European Union. Transformation of Eastern Europe.
GLOS 4344 - Europe and its Margins
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01953
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course explores some of the forms of human imagining (literary, artistic, political, social scientific) engendered by the notoriously hard to define entity known as "Europe." It does so by focusing on regions and populations that have been thought of at various times as marking Europe's inner and outer cultural and/or geographical limits. Topics addressed include: the relationship between physical geography, cultural memory, and the formation (or subversion) of identity claims; the reconfigured political landscapes of post-socialism and European integration; immigration, refugee flows, and the rise of far-right ethno-nationalisms; and the effects of pandemics past and present. prereq: One course in [ANTH or GLOS]
ANTH 4344 - Europe and its Margins
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01953
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course explores some of the forms of human imagining (literary, artistic, political, social scientific) engendered by the notoriously hard to define entity known as "Europe." It does so by focusing on regions and populations that have been thought of at various times as marking Europe's inner and outer cultural and/or geographical limits. Topics addressed include: the relationship between physical geography, cultural memory, and the formation (or subversion) of identity claims; the reconfigured political landscapes of post-socialism and European integration; immigration, refugee flows, and the rise of far-right ethno-nationalisms; and the effects of pandemics past and present. prereq: One course in [ANTH or GLOS]
HIST 3722 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the End of World War II to the End of the Cold War: 1945-91
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01511
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Social, economic, political, and cultural impacts of WWII upon Europe. Division of Europe. Communist regimes in Eastern Europe, cooperation in Western Europe. Impacts of modernization. End of Cold War.
GLOS 3643 - Islam and the West
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CAS/MELC 3533/GloS 3643
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Cultural/intellectual trends that have defined fundamental differences between Islam and the West. Development of historical, philosophical, and intellectual mindset of both spheres. Factors that have contributed and continue to contribute to tension, anxiety, and hatred between the Muslim world and Europe and the United States.
HIST 3546 - Islam and the West
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00779
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cultural/intellectual trends that have defined fundamental differences between Islam and the West. Development of historical, philosophical, and intellectual mindset of both spheres. Factors in tension, anxiety, and hatred between Muslim world and Europe and the United States.
RELS 3714 - Islam and the West
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00779
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cultural/intellectual trends that have defined differences between Islam and the West. Development of historical, philosophical, and intellectual mindset of both spheres. Factors in tension, anxiety, and hatred between Muslim world and Europe and the United States.
GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
RELS 3716 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
ECON 4311 - Economy of Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic evolution in Latin America since 1950. Trade liberalization, poverty, inflation, development strategies in selected Latin American countries. Theory/applications of important issues. prereq: [1101, 1102] or equiv
HIST 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00969 - Hist 3401W/LAS 3401W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Societies of Americas, Spain, and Portugal before contact. Interactions among Native Americans, African slaves, and Europeans, from colonization through independence. Religion, resistance, labor, gender, race. Primary sources, historical scholarship.
LAS 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00969 - Hist 3401W/LAS 3401W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Societies of Americas, Spain, and Portugal before contact. Interactions among Native Americans, African slaves, and Europeans, from colonization through independence. Religion, resistance, labor, gender, race. Primary sources, historical scholarship.
HIST 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00971 - Hist 3402W/LAS 3402W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
National and contemporary period 1825 to present, with emphasis on social, cultural, political, and economic change.
LAS 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00971 - Hist 3402W/LAS 3402W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
National and contemporary period 1825 to present. Social, cultural, political, and economic change.
SPAN 3512 - Modern Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Impact of various forms of modernization on cultural production in Latin American racial, ethnic, class relations, institutional, and ideological structures. prereq: A C- or better in SPAN 3104W or SPAN 3104V or TLDO 3104W or ARGN 3104W or SPAN 3105W or TLDO 3105W or SPAN 3105V
HIST 3505 - Survey of the Modern Middle East (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00661
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political history of Middle East in modern era. Socio-economic/intellectual issues. Decline of Ottoman Empire. Imperialism. Nationalism, rise/development of states. Political Islam.
HIST 3637 - Modern Russia: From Peter the Great to the Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political, social, and cultural forces which have shaped modern Russia. Emphasis will be on modernization, attempts at reforms in the imperial and Soviet period, and the dissolution of empires.
RUSS 3512 - Russian Art and Culture (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Major trends in Russian visual arts in context of social, political, and ideological questions.
HIST 3264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02018
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interaction with Europe/Asia. Attempts at modernization/ reform. Emancipation of serfs/rise of revolutionary movements.
HIST 5264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02018 - Hist 3264/Hist 5264
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interaction with Europe and Asia; attempts at modernization and reform; emancipation of the serfs and rise of revolutionary movements.
HIST 3265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02082
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of factors that led to collapse of tsarist regime. 1917 revolution. Evolution of Soviet regime/collapse of Soviet communism. Emphasis on role of nationalities/rise of Commonwealth of independent states.
HIST 5265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02082 - Hist 3265/Hist 5265
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of the factors that led to the collapse of the tsarist regime; discussion of the 1917 revolution, the evolution of the Soviet regime and the collapse of Soviet communism. Emphasis on the role of nationalities and the rise of the Commonwealth of independent states.
GLOS 3961 - Culture and Society of India (GP, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3023/GloS 3961
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Contemporary society and culture in South Asia from an anthropological perspective with reference to nationalism; postcolonial identities; media and public culture; gender, kinship and politics; religion; ethnicity; and the Indian diaspora.
ANTH 3023 - Culture and Society of India (GP, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3023/GloS 3961
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Contemporary society and culture in South Asia from an anthropological perspective with reference to nationalism; postcolonial identities; media and public culture; gender, kinship and politics; religion; ethnicity; and the Indian diaspora.
GLOS 3969 - 20th Century India
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02007
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
India under British hegemony in 1914 through Mahatma Gandhi/nationalist movement. World War II. British departure, creation of India/Pakistan. Nehru. Indira, Rajiv Gandhi.
HIST 3489 - 20th Century India
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02007
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
India under British hegemony in 1914 through Mahatma Gandhi and his nationalist movement; World War II; the British departure; creation of India and Pakistan; Nehru; Indira and Rajiv Gandhi.