Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Global Studies Minor

Global Studies Department
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits in this minor: 15
The minor offers students the opportunity to study the interrelated processes shaping today's increasingly interdependent world. Students examine political, economic, cultural, and social processes of local communities, nation states, transnational businesses, and social movements around the globe. The program requires students to integrate theoretical knowledge about broad global processes with regionally focused detailed knowledge of social and cultural systems and language. Students complete a common set of core courses providing a broad overview of issues and approaches to global studies. Each student then chooses a thematic and regional concentration. Coursework is completed by selecting from relevant courses offered by a broad range of departments.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Students declare a thematic and regional concentration with the Global Studies advisor. Students may earn a BA or a minor in global studies, but not both.
Core Courses
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 6 credit(s) from the following:
· GLOS 3144 - Knowledge, Power, and the Politics of Representation in Global Studies (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3144H - Honors: Knowledge, Power, and the Politics of Representation in Global Studies (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3145 - Global Modernity, the Nation-State, and Capitalism (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3145H - Honors: Global Modernity, the Nation-State, and Capitalism (3.0 cr)
Thematic Anchor Courses
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
Cultural Production and Everyday Practice
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· GLOS 3143 - Living in the Global [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3602 - Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3609 - Novels and Nations [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· Political Economy and Environmental Change
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· GLOS 3707 - Disposable People?: Surplus Value, Surplus Humanity (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3215 - Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3215 - Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3417W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Human Rights and Justice
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· GLOS 3401W - International Human Rights Law [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3412 - What is Equality? [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 5412 {Inactive} [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
· Global Health and Mobile Populations
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3205 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3705 - Migrations: People in Motion [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3505 - Migrations: People in Motion [GP] (3.0 cr)
Regional Breadth Requirement
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
Africa
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· AFRO 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
or HIST 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· AFRO 3433 - Economic Development in Contemporary Africa [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3061 - Economic Development in Contemporary Africa [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 4478W - Contemporary Politics in Africa and the Colonial Legacy [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or POL 4478W - Contemporary Politics in Africa and the Colonial Legacy [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· East Asia
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3211 - East Asia (3.0 cr)
· EAS 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age (3.0-4.0 cr)
or HIST 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age (3.0-4.0 cr)
· EAS 3462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
or EAS 3462H - Honors: From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia from 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
or HIST 3462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
or HIST 3462H - Honors: From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia from 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HIST 3478 - Tigers and Dragons: The Rise of the East Asian Economies, 1930-Present (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5478 - Tigers and Dragons: The Rise of the East Asian Economies, 1930-Present (3.0 cr)
· Europe
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3161 - Europe: A Geographic Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3721 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the Turn of the Century to the End of World War II: 1900-45 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3722 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the End of World War II to the End of the Cold War: 1945-91 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3451W - Politics and Society in the New Europe [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4461W - European Government and Politics [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or POL 5461 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· Islamic World
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· AMES 3871 - Islam: Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3493 - Islam: Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3712 - Islam: Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3145 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3711 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3716 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3546 - Islam and the West (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3714 - Islam and the West (3.0 cr)
· Latin America
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ECON 4311 - Economy of Latin America (3.0 cr)
· POL 3479 - Latin American Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3221 - Interpreting Colonial Latin America: Empire and Early Modernity (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3222 - Interpreting Modern and Contemporary Latin America (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3512 - Modern Latin America (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3401V - Honors Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or LAS 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or LAS 3401V - Honors Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or LAS 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· POL 4492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America (3.0 cr)
or POL 5492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America (3.0 cr)
· Middle East
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· HIST 3505 - Survey of the Modern Middle East [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3509 - Approaches to the Study of the Middle East (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3707W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5707W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Russia
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· HIST 3637 - Modern Russia: From Peter the Great to the Present (3.0 cr)
· POL 4474W - Russian Politics: From Soviet Empire to Post-Soviet State [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime (3.0 cr)
Elective
Students must take one elective course in either the theme or the region of concentration, chosen in consultation with a global studies advisor.
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· Thematic/Regional Elective
 
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GLOS 3144 - Knowledge, Power, and the Politics of Representation in Global Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3144/GloS 3144H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an introductory overview of core theories and concepts that prepare students for successful completion of the Global Studies curriculum. In this half of the Global Studies core course sequence, students will investigate questions pertaining to how representations of the modern world in popular media and academic writing contribute to, reaffirm, and often challenge relations of inequality and division tied to such categories as ethnicity, gender, and race. Drawing on a wide range of interdisciplinary sources including magazines, novels, films, and digital media, these questions may include: How do cultural representations of the Global South reinforce European imperial and colonial projects? What role do mass-market magazines and newspapers have in constructing difference and producing stereotypes that justify imperialist attitudes? How does the development of technologies, from railroads to the internet, affect collective experiences of time and space? How is 'fake news' and intentional misrepresentation a threat to democracy and to the ecological security of the Earth? Students will meet twice a week for lecture and attend a weekly recitation section, with assignments that include short writing exercises and/or weekly Canvas posts and a midterm and final examination. This course will show how the politics of representation and knowledge production relate to changing formations of power, while giving students the conceptual vocabulary and critical skills to prepare for subsequent Global Studies courses. Prereq: soph, jr, or sr
GLOS 3144H - Honors: Knowledge, Power, and the Politics of Representation in Global Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3144/GloS 3144H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an introductory overview of core theories and concepts that prepare students for successful completion of the Global Studies curriculum. In this half of the Global Studies core course sequence, students will investigate questions pertaining to how representations of the modern world in popular media and academic writing contribute to, reaffirm, and often challenge relations of inequality and division tied to such categories as ethnicity, gender, and race. Drawing on a wide range of interdisciplinary sources including magazines, novels, films, and digital media, these questions may include: How do cultural representations of the Global South reinforce European imperial and colonial projects? What role do mass-market magazines and newspapers have in constructing difference and producing stereotypes that justify imperialist attitudes? How does the development of technologies, from railroads to the internet, affect collective experiences of time and space? How is 'fake news' and intentional misrepresentation a threat to democracy and to the ecological security of the Earth? Students will meet twice a week for lecture and attend a weekly recitation section with assignments that include short writing exercises and/or weekly Canvas posts and a midterm and final examination. This course will show how the politics of representation and knowledge production relate to changing formations of power, while giving students the conceptual vocabulary and critical skills to prepare for subsequent Global Studies courses. Prereq: Honors soph, jr, or sr
GLOS 3145 - Global Modernity, the Nation-State, and Capitalism
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3145/GloS 3415H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides an introductory overview of core theories and concepts that prepare students for successful completion of the Global Studies curriculum. In this half of the Global Studies core course sequence, students will investigate questions pertaining to the emergence of global modernity, capitalism, and the nation-state, with particular focus on theoretical concepts and institutional forms. Drawing on a wide range of interdisciplinary sources including critical theory, philosophy, and texts from the social sciences, these questions may include: How did reason and culture emerge as key concepts in modernity, and how were they associated with transformations in time and space? How did the nation-state become a dominant political unit in the West, and how do postcolonial African states challenge its structure? What is the relationship between the Western liberal tradition, secularity, and violence? What are the histories and internal dynamics of the capitalist economy? Students will meet twice a week for lecture and attend a weekly recitation section, with assignments that include short writing exercises, a group project, and midterm and final examinations. This course will contextualize and trouble aspects of the global that are easily abstracted and taken for granted, while giving students the conceptual vocabulary and critical skills to prepare for subsequent Global Studies courses. Prereq: soph, jr, or sr Units: 3.00
GLOS 3145H - Honors: Global Modernity, the Nation-State, and Capitalism
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3145/GloS 3415H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides an introductory overview of core theories and concepts that prepare students for successful completion of the Global Studies curriculum. In this half of the Global Studies core course sequence, students will investigate questions pertaining to the emergence of global modernity, capitalism, and the nation-state, with particular focus on theoretical concepts and institutional forms. Drawing on a wide range of interdisciplinary sources including critical theory, philosophy, and texts from the social sciences, these questions may include: How did reason and culture emerge as key concepts in modernity, and how were they associated with transformations in time and space? How did the nation-state become a dominant political unit in the West, and how do postcolonial African states challenge its structure? What is the relationship between the Western liberal tradition, secularity, and violence? What are the histories and internal dynamics of the capitalist economy? Students will meet twice a week for lecture and attend a weekly recitation section with assignments that include short writing exercises, a group project, and midterm and final examinations. This course will contextualize and trouble aspects of the global that are easily abstracted and taken for granted, while giving students the conceptual vocabulary and critical skills to prepare for subsequent Global Studies courses. Prereq: Honors soph, jr, or sr Units: 3.00
GLOS 3143 - Living in the Global (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
'Living in the Global' is an interdisciplinary humanities course that examines human life and culture in and under globalization and asks students to consider how their own experiences, identities, and practices are embedded in systems of power. Topics vary, but have included: cultural foundations of social justice, humans and the environment, place, labor and capital, and forced migration. These themes are explored through poetry, novels, feature films, documentaries, visual art, philosophy, and critical theory.
GLOS 3602 - Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
'Globalization' and 'Culture' are both terms that have been defined and understood in a variety of ways and the significance of which continues to be debated to the present, both inside and outside the academy. Globalization has been talked about both as an irresistible historical force, tending toward the creation of an increasingly interconnected, or, as is sometimes claimed, an increasingly homogeneous world, and as a set of processes, the outcome of which remains open-ended and uncertain, as likely to produce new kinds of differences as universal sameness. Culture meanwhile has been variously defined as that which distinguishes humans from other species (and which all humans therefore share) and as that which divides communities of humans from one another on the basis of different beliefs, customs, values etc. This course reflects on some of the possible meanings of both "Globalization" and "Culture" and asks what we can learn by considering them in relation to one another. How do the phenomena associated with globalization, such as increasing flows of people, capital, goods and information across increasing distances challenge our understandings of culture, including the idea that the world is composed of so many discrete and bounded "cultures"? At the same time, does culture and its associated expressive forms, including narrative fiction, poetry and film, furnish us with new possibilities for thinking about globalization? Does global interconnection produce a single, unified world, or multiple worlds? Are the movements of people, goods, ideas and information across distances associated with new developments caused by contemporary globalization, or have they been going on for centuries or even millennia? Might contemporary debates about climate change and environmental crisis compel us to consider these phenomena in new ways? The course addresses these questions as they have been discussed by scholars from a variety of disciplines and as they have been imagined by artists, poets, novelists and filmmakers. In doing so, it considers whether the distinctiveness of present day globalization is to be sought in part in the new forms of imagining and creative expression to which it has given rise.
GLOS 3609 - Novels and Nations (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3609/GWSS 3304
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
How do emerging and postcolonial nations enlist fiction in their claims to sovereignty and autonomy? How do the novel's literary techniques and strategies perform a unique brand of political and social critique vis a vis nations and nationalisms? We will focus on novels from a variety of national contexts from the Global North and South to show how literary analysis can be a companion to the social sciences in illuminating the historical and social contexts of the nation-state. In addition, we will consider the function of literature in allowing stateless nations to imagine a shared connection. We will also focus on the inner workings of the novel in order to understand the conventions and mechanisms of the genre and how it interconnects with related forms such as cinema, performance, and the visual arts.
GLOS 3707 - Disposable People?: Surplus Value, Surplus Humanity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
How do economic and social arrangements generate marginalized populations that are considered "surplus"? What is distinctive about "surplus populations" in the present global age? Have certain segments of humanity -- remaindered lives as it were -- become "disposable" within the existing order of things? In what ways does capitalism's drive for productivity and profit contribute to the rise of superfluous populations? How do states "manage" surplus populations? Who is considered "deserving" and who is not? What kinds of political and ethical questions does the existence "surplus humanity" force us to confront? Our course will address these urgent issues, and others beside by bringing together theoretical and empirical writings on the themes of work, precarity, automation, race, poverty, law, social movements, rights, and politics. Class sessions will be a combination of lectures, student-led discussions, debates, and analysis of audio-visual materials.
GLOS 3215 - Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3215/Soc 3215
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Far-reaching transformations of the global economy over the last seventy years in the realms of labor, consumption and the environment. The movement away from regulated national economies to a more fully integrated global economy; changing patterns and organization of production, employment, consumption, and waste disposal; rise of supercapitalism: a new culture of market rule over society and nature.
SOC 3215 - Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3215/Soc 3215
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Far-reaching transformations of the global economy over the last seventy years in the realms of labor, consumption and the environment. The movement away from regulated national economies to a more fully integrated global economy; changing patterns and organization of production, employment, consumption, and waste disposal; rise of supercapitalism: a new culture of market rule over society and nature.
GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3415W/ Soc 3417W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will introduce students to some of the world's most powerful global institutions -- such as the World Bank (IBRD), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Trade Organization (WTO), the United Nations, and affiliated agencies such as UNHCR (for refugee support). We will follow their efforts to promote a style of global development practices -- large-scale capital lending and global expertise building -- that has crystallized into a common understanding of how global north-south dynamics should progress. Cases pursued in class may include their lending and debt policies, dam building and energy projects, climate resilience and water loans, and the ways they mediate free trade agreements among competing countries. We will also hear from the multitude of voices, theories, and practices that offer alternative visions as to how peoples strive to produce a more just, socially equitable, and climate-safe world. We will use books, articles, films, in-class debates, case study exploration, small-group projects, and guest speakers to create a lively discussion-based classroom environment.
SOC 3417W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3415W/ Soc 3417W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will introduce students to some of the world's most powerful global institutions -- such as the World Bank (IBRD), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Trade Organization (WTO), the United Nations, and affiliated agencies such as UNHCR (for refugee support). We will follow their efforts to promote a style of global development practices -- large-scale capital lending and global expertise building -- that has crystallized into a common understanding of how global north-south dynamics should progress. Cases pursued in class may include their lending and debt policies, dam building and energy projects, climate resilience and water loans, and the ways they mediate free trade agreements among competing countries. We will also hear from the multitude of voices, theories, and practices that offer alternative visions as to how people strive to produce a more just, socially equitable, and climate-safe world. We will use books, articles, films, in-class debates, case study exploration, small-group projects, and guest speakers to create a lively discussion-based classroom environment.
GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production.
GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current Sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor.
SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the professor.
GLOS 3401W - International Human Rights Law (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course presents an introductory overview of the idea of human rights, its social and legal foundations and contemporary global issues. In the class, students will learn about the laws and procedures designed to protect the human rights of individuals and groups, with a special focus on the United Nations system. The course explores the conceptual underpinnings of human rights such as who is eligible to have rights, where those rights come from and who is responsible for guaranteeing them. Students will learn about how international laws are made and interpreted, and will consider the geo-political context which shapes human rights laws and procedures. Because of the evolving nature of the laws and issues in this field, students are encouraged to think analytically and ethically about how to address the many human rights challenges in the world today. The course will cover current human rights issues, including the right to health care, housing and other economic and social rights; and the right to life, freedom from torture and other civil and political rights. The course is writing intensive. The required paper for the class is a model complaint to the United Nations about a country and issue of the student's choosing. The class invites discussion and uses class exercises to engage students in the course material by shaping arguments for various legal fora.
GLOS 3412 - What is Equality? (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3412/GloS 5412
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Course explores debates about equality. Equality has many dimensions--e.g.: economic, social, political. These forms cannot be reconciled. Liberal democracies affirm the principle of political equality but defend, even in principle, social and economic inequalities. Animal rights add another wrinkle: very few of those who fight for these rights would claim political equality for animals.
GLOS 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
JWST 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
SOC 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3305/GWSS 3205
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This class uses a social justice lens to explore the interrelations of scientific discoveries, unequal global economies, and commodification. We will look at practices, new technologies, and policies that are trenchant for the negative impacts they have on environments broadly defined, and for human and non-human populations. We will ask how these practices, technologies, and policies - and the social and economic contexts that produce them - variably impact the health, well being, and valuation of particular populations. In a series of interconnected themes, we will examine what factors produce food insecurity and for whom; where and why pollution of resources such as water happens; the history and current state of antibiotic resistance; climate change and its various effects; and how new technologies can be life-saving and life-denying according to the ways national and global policies determine who gains access and who does not. We will also look at the innovative ways grassroots movements tackle issues confronting particular groups, what constitutes positive social change and by whose definition, and potential ways forward. Prereq: soph or jr or sr
GLOS 3705 - Migrations: People in Motion (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3705/Soc 3505
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will tackle debates related to migration from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and will compare and connect diverse migration trends around the world (Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America). Students will critically engage with various paradigms on the geopolitical, racial, and gender power dynamics that anchor migration processes and outcomes. Why would the movement of individuals from some parts of the world (often from the least developed regions to the highly developed Western nations) create such strong and highly charged debates? How are cross border social and economic relations of individuals and households maintained and perpetuated? What are particular governments doing to either encourage or hinder these movements? How are current migrations different from earlier eras? Is this gendered, and if so, how and why? The objective of this course is to explore the above questions through academic and policy published literature. prereq: soph, jr, or sr
SOC 3505 - Migrations: People in Motion (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3705/Soc 3505
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will tackle debates related to migration from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and will compare and connect diverse migration trends around the world (Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America). Students will critically engage with various paradigms on the geopolitical, racial, and gender power dynamics that anchor migration processes and outcomes. Why would the movement of individuals from some parts of the world (often from the least developed regions to the highly developed Western nations) create such strong and highly charged debates? How are cross border social and economic relations of individuals and households maintained and perpetuated? What are particular governments doing to either encourage or hinder these movements? How are current migrations different from earlier eras? Is this gendered, and if so, how and why? The objective of this course is to explore the above questions through academic and policy published literature. prereq: Soph, jr, or sr
AFRO 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3432/Afro 3432
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in Africa, from abolition of trans-Atlantic slave trade through postcolonial era.
HIST 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3432/Afro 3432
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Survey of modern African history from early 19th century to present. Focuses on socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in Africa, from abolition of trans-Atlantic slave trade through postcolonial era.
AFRO 3433 - Economic Development in Contemporary Africa (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3433/ApEc 3061
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major socio-economic challenges that confront post-independence sub-Saharan African countries in quest for sustainable economic development/growth. Causes of persistent poverty/inequality, role of institutions/multinational agencies. Growth in 21st century. prereq: APEC 1101 or ECON 1101
APEC 3061 - Economic Development in Contemporary Africa (GP, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3433/ApEc 3061
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major socio-economic challenges that confront post-independence sub-Saharan African countries in quest for sustainable economic development/growth. Causes of persistent poverty/inequality, role of institutions/multinational agencies. Growth in 21st century. prereq: 1101 or ECON 1101
AFRO 4478W - Contemporary Politics in Africa and the Colonial Legacy (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 4478W/Afro 5478/Pol 4478W
Typically offered: Every Spring
At the core, this class is about the interaction between the assertion of and challenge to political authority in Africa. Who should have the right to make decisions that structure people's lives? To what extent is "might" an important source of political authority? How, in turn, do people respond to these different means of establishing political authority? Using these questions as a springboard, this class will examine some broader themes relating to colonialism, state building, conflict and development in Africa. Politics in Africa, just as in any other place in the world, is complex and for that reason, the objective of the class is not to give you answers, but to have you think critically about the issues we cover. Towards this end, this class will draw on different sources ranging from novels to manifestos so as to illustrate both the mundane and extraordinary events that have helped shape the political landscape of the continent.
POL 4478W - Contemporary Politics in Africa and the Colonial Legacy (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 4478W/Afro 5478/Pol 4478W
Typically offered: Every Spring
At the core, this class is about the interaction between the assertion of and challenge to political authority in Africa. Who should have the right to make decisions that structure people?s lives? To what extent is ?might? an important source of political authority? How, in turn, do people respond to these different means of establishing political authority? Using these questions as a springboard, this class will examine some broader themes relating to colonialism, state building, conflict and development in Africa. Politics in Africa, just as in any other place in the world, is complex and for that reason, the objective of the class is not to give you answers, but to have you think critically about the issues we cover. Towards this end, this class will draw on different sources ranging from novels to manifestos so as to illustrate both the mundane and extraordinary events that have helped shape the political landscape of the continent.
GEOG 3211 - East Asia
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3211/3215/5211/5215
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical and human geography of Japan, mainland China and Taiwan, North and South Korea; population pressure, economic and urban development, and international relations.
EAS 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3461/Hist 3461
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative survey of early history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam; early Chinese thought; diffusion of Confucianism, Buddhism, and other values throughout East Asia; political and social history of region to 1600.
HIST 3461 - Introduction to East Asia I: The Imperial Age
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3461/Hist 3461
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comparative survey of early history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Early Chinese thought. Diffusion of Confucianism, Buddhism, and other values throughout East Asia. Political and social history of region to 1600.
EAS 3462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3462/EAS 3462H/HIST 3462/H
Typically offered: Every Spring
How Asian states, societies, economies, and cultures linked with one another and with European powers. How period's historical effects still resonate. Covers India, China, Japan, Korea, and Indochina.
EAS 3462H - Honors: From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia from 1500 to the Present (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3462/EAS 3462H/HIST 3462/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
How Asian states, societies, economies, cultures linked with one another/European powers. Historical effects. Covers India, China, Japan, Korea, Indochina.
HIST 3462 - From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia From 1500 to the Present (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3462/EAS 3462H/HIST 3462/H
Typically offered: Every Spring
How Asian states, societies, economies, and cultures linked with one another and with European powers. How period's historical effects still resonate. Covers India, China, Japan, Korea, and Indochina.
HIST 3462H - Honors: From Subjects to Citizens: The History of East Asia from 1500 to the Present (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EAS 3462/EAS 3462H/HIST 3462/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
How Asian states, societies, economies, cultures linked with one another/European powers. Historical effects. Covers India, China, Japan, Korea, Indochina.
HIST 3478 - Tigers and Dragons: The Rise of the East Asian Economies, 1930-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3278/Hist 3478/Hist 5478
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Rise of East Asian Economies, 1930-Present.
HIST 5478 - Tigers and Dragons: The Rise of the East Asian Economies, 1930-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3278/Hist 3478/Hist 5478
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Rise of East Asian Economies, 1930-Present. prereq: Grad student
GEOG 3161 - Europe: A Geographic Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3161/GLoS 3921
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Comparative analysis and explanation of Europe's physical, demographic, ethnic/cultural, economic, political, and urban landscapes. European integration--the European Union. Transformation of Eastern Europe.
HIST 3721 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the Turn of the Century to the End of World War II: 1900-45
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3721/5721
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Social, political, and cultural changes/conflicts. Background to WWI, its impact. Revolution, failure of interwar stability. Fascism. WWII, its consequences.
HIST 3722 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the End of World War II to the End of the Cold War: 1945-91 (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3422/Hist 3722
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Social, economic, political, and cultural impacts of WWII upon Europe. Division of Europe. Communist regimes in Eastern Europe, cooperation in Western Europe. Impacts of modernization. End of Cold War.
POL 3451W - Politics and Society in the New Europe (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
The devastation of Europe through two World Wars put the deadly results of ultra-nationalism on full display. To avoid such destruction again, a group of European technocrats and leaders embarked on a mission of incrementally deepening economic and later, social partnerships between an ever-expanding number of European countries. These efforts culminated in the birth of the European Union in the late 20th Century. From its inception, the Union has found obstacles in the forms of a weak institutional structure and authority, deep skepticism of a central European authority, financial crisis, ethnic anxiety, and resurgent nationalism. Yet, the continuation and strengthening of the Union is seen as the antidote to the rise of anti-democratic and authoritarian tendencies on the continent. Some of the key questions that we will engage in are: What are the ideological and historical roots of the European Union? What are the structural flaws of the Union? What are the obstacles to a stronger Union? Is the Union still or even more essential than ever? What are the ways the Union could collapse from within and from the intervention of outside forces?
POL 4461W - European Government and Politics (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4461W/5461
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
This course will introduce you to three major topics that shape European social and political life today: 1) the struggle over what makes for a national/European identity: how contested national identities matter to European democratic politics and to the new populist movements, and the historical role of Islam in shaping European identities 2) the role of institutions in shaping popular representation and citizen agency; 3) European Union policies: dealing with immigration, the single currency and foreign and security policy especially in regard to Eastern/Central Europe and Russia. Each section will conclude with a comparative class debate, led by students, on the way contested historical interpretations and identities, institutions and policies matter also to US political and civic life. This is a writing intensive course and you will be asked to write a 12-15 page research essay on a European country of your choice. Several assignments, preceded by a writing workshop, will help you complete your final essay. The course will consist of lectures with PPTs, class discussions and group work, and at least one guest lecturer working in a local business connected with Europe. Indeed this course aims at preparing you to live and work in a deeply interconnected world, with special attention to the historical, social, political and economic ties between the US and Europe. Small changes will be made to the syllabus if current events or unexpected class needs require it, but the main themes, most readings and the assignments will remain as indicated in the syllabus. prereq: 1054 or 3051 or non-pol sci grad or instr consent
AMES 3871 - Islam: Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3871/Arab 3036/RelS 3715/H
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a brief survey of the religion and civilization of Islam. It introduces students to 1) Islamic history from its inception in the seventh century CE to the present, with emphasis on the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the early Caliphate; 2) The authoritative texts of Islam, i.e. the Quran and Prophetic traditions (Hadith); 3) The institutions and discourses characteristic of Islamic civilization; and 4) The transformation of Muslim life and thought in the modern period. By taking this course, students become familiar with the chief ideas, characters, narratives, rites, localities, and movements associated with Islam. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
HIST 3493 - Islam: Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3871/Arab 3036/RelS 3715/H
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a brief survey of the religion and civilization of Islam. It introduces students to 1) Islamic history from its inception in the seventh century CE to the present, with emphasis on the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the early Caliphate; 2) The authoritative texts of Islam, i.e. the Quran and Prophetic traditions (Hadith); 3) The institutions and discourses characteristic of Islamic civilization; and 4) The transformation of Muslim life and thought in the modern period. By taking this course, students become familiar with the chief ideas, characters, narratives, rites, localities, and movements associated with Islam. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
RELS 3712 - Islam: Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3871/Arab 3036/RelS 3715/H
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a brief survey of the religion and civilization of Islam. It introduces students to 1) Islamic history from its inception in the seventh century CE to the present, with emphasis on the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the early Caliphate; 2) The authoritative texts of Islam, i.e. the Quran and Prophetic traditions (Hadith); 3) The institutions and discourses characteristic of Islamic civilization; and 4) The transformation of Muslim life and thought in the modern period. By taking this course, students become familiar with the chief ideas, characters, narratives, rites, localities, and movements associated with Islam. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3145 - The Islamic World (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3145/GloS 3645/RelS 3711
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundation of Islam in Arabian Peninsula, its spread to Asia and Africa. Islamic civilization, influence on Europe before rise of capitalism. Rise of Capitalist Europe, colonization of Islamic World Islamic resurgence and post-colonial world. State-society and development. Culture/conflict in Moslem societies. Gender and Islam. Islamic World and the West. Moslems in North America and Europe. Case studies.
RELS 3711 - The Islamic World (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3145/GloS 3645/RelS 3711
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundation of Islam in Arabian Peninsula, its spread to Asia and Africa. Islamic civilization, influence on Europe. Rise of capitalism, colonization. Islamic resurgence. State-society and development. Culture/conflict in Moslem societies. Gender and Islam. Islam and the West. Case studies.
GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3681/GWSS 3681/RelS 3716/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3681/GWSS 3681/RelS 3716/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
RELS 3716 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3681/GWSS 3681/RelS 3716/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3681/GWSS 3681/RelS 3716/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
HIST 3546 - Islam and the West
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3643/Hist 3546/RelS 3714
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cultural/intellectual trends that have defined fundamental differences between Islam and the West. Development of historical, philosophical, and intellectual mindset of both spheres. Factors in tension, anxiety, and hatred between Muslim world and Europe and the United States.
RELS 3714 - Islam and the West
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3643/Hist 3546/RelS 3714
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cultural/intellectual trends that have defined differences between Islam and the West. Development of historical, philosophical, and intellectual mindset of both spheres. Factors in tension, anxiety, and hatred between Muslim world and Europe and the United States.
ECON 4311 - Economy of Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic evolution in Latin America since 1950. Trade liberalization, poverty, inflation, development strategies in selected Latin American countries. Theory/applications of important issues. prereq: [1101, 1102] or equiv
POL 3479 - Latin American Politics (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: LAS 4479/Pol 3479/Pol 5479
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course offers an introduction to the political history and contemporary politics of Latin America, along with some of the main concepts and theories used by social scientists to explain the region?s political dynamics. Through a comparative, historical approach, the course aims to help students understand the continued challenges faced by countries in the region-- to the establishment of security, the rule of law and rights protection, to the stability and quality of democracy, and to sustainable and equitable economic growth?and how these interact. The objective of the course is not only to help students understand the similarities and differences in outcomes in Latin America over time, but also to reflect on what the region?s experiences can teach us about the requirements of and barriers to meaningful democracy and sustainable and equitable development around the world, including ?north of the border.? In other words, the course seeks not just to provide students? knowledge about Latin America, but to help them learn from Latin America.
SPAN 3221 - Interpreting Colonial Latin America: Empire and Early Modernity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Span 3221/Tldo 3002
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Conquest, colonization, and forms of resistance in Latin America. prereq: A C- or better in SPAN 3104W or SPAN 3104V or TLDO 3104W or ARGN 3104W or SPAN 3105W or TLDO 3105W or SPAN 3105V
SPAN 3222 - Interpreting Modern and Contemporary Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Span 3222/Tldo 3222
Typically offered: Every Spring
Late modern and contemporary discourses in literature, popular culture, mass media, and film. prereq: A C- or better in SPAN 3104W or SPAN 3104V or TLDO 3104W or ARGN 3104W or SPAN 3105W or TLDO 3105W or SPAN 3105V
SPAN 3512 - Modern Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Impact of various forms of modernization on cultural production in Latin American racial, ethnic, class relations, institutional, and ideological structures. prereq: A C- or better in SPAN 3104W or SPAN 3104V or TLDO 3104W or ARGN 3104W or SPAN 3105W or TLDO 3105W or SPAN 3105V
HIST 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3401W/HIST 3401V/LAS 3401
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Societies of Americas, Spain, and Portugal before contact. Interactions among Native Americans, African slaves, and Europeans, from colonization through independence. Religion, resistance, labor, gender, race. Primary sources, historical scholarship.
HIST 3401V - Honors Early Latin America to 1825 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3401W/HIST 3401V/LAS 3401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Societies of Americas, Spain, and Portugal before contact. Interactions among Native Americans, African slaves, and Europeans, from colonization through independence. Religion, resistance, labor, gender, race. Primary sources, historical scholarship.
LAS 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3401W/HIST 3401V/LAS 3401
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Societies of Americas, Spain, and Portugal before contact. Interactions among Native Americans, African slaves, and Europeans, from colonization through independence. Religion, resistance, labor, gender, race. Primary sources, historical scholarship.
LAS 3401V - Honors Early Latin America to 1825 (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3401W/HIST 3401V/LAS 3401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Societies of Americas, Spain, and Portugal before contact. Interactions among Native Americans, African slaves, and Europeans, from colonization through independence. Religion, resistance, labor, gender, race. Primary sources, historical scholarship.
HIST 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3402W/LAS 3402W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
National and contemporary period 1825 to present, with emphasis on social, cultural, political, and economic change.
LAS 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present (HIS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3402W/LAS 3402W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
National and contemporary period 1825 to present. Social, cultural, political, and economic change.
POL 4492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4492/Pol 5492
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
How law and justice function in contemporary Latin America. Similarities/differences within/between countries and issue areas. Causes behind varied outcomes. Effectiveness of different reform efforts. Transitional justice, judicial review, judicial independence, access to justice, criminal justice (police, courts, and prisons), corruption, non-state alternatives. Issues of class, race/ethnicity, and gender.
POL 5492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4492/Pol 5492
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
How law and justice function in contemporary Latin America. Similarities/differences within/between countries and issue areas. Causes behind varied outcomes. Effectiveness of different reform efforts. Transitional justice, judicial review, judicial independence, access to justice, criminal justice (police, courts, and prisons), corruption, non-state alternatives. Issues of class, race/ethnicity, and gender.
HIST 3505 - Survey of the Modern Middle East (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3876/Arab 3505/Arab 5505/H
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political history of Middle East in modern era. Socio-economic/intellectual issues. Decline of Ottoman Empire. Imperialism. Nationalism, rise/development of states. Political Islam.
HIST 3509 - Approaches to the Study of the Middle East
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Intensive reading/discussion course. Ways in which historians/social scientists have studied Middle East. Problems they have encountered. Paradigms, issues, and debates in Middle Eastern Studies.
ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
RELS 3707W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
RELS 5707W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
HIST 3637 - Modern Russia: From Peter the Great to the Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political, social, and cultural forces which have shaped modern Russia. Emphasis will be on modernization, attempts at reforms in the imperial and Soviet period, and the dissolution of empires.
POL 4474W - Russian Politics: From Soviet Empire to Post-Soviet State (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Twenty five years ago, Russia appeared to be democratizing and was even on friendly relations with the US and NATO. Now Vladimir Putin runs the state with the FSB (KGB), and US-Russian relations are at their worst point since the 1970s. This course examines major themes and periods in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian politics. It begins with the Russian Revolution of 1917, and continues with a study of the creation of the USSR and Soviet rule under Lenin, Stalin, and later decades. We look in depth at the economic and political system set up by the Communist Party, and at the causes of its collapse in 1991, which has had profound legacies for the post-Soviet development of Russia. Then in the second half of the course we turn to themes of political, economic, social and civic development under Yeltsin and Putin. We will pose the following questions: Why does democratization begin and why does it fail? How is economic reform undermined? What type of state and regime is Russia now? What caused the Chechen wars and the massive bloodshed in the Caucasus during this period? Is Putin trying to recreate the Soviet Union and retake control of its neighbors? Are US-Russian relations improving as a result of Obama's "Reset," or are we now in an era of a new Cold War? What is Russia's goal in Syria, Iran, or Central Asia? Is Putin rebuilding Russia, or driving it to disaster, and how will this impact the West?
HIST 3264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3264/Hist 5264
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interaction with Europe/Asia. Attempts at modernization/ reform. Emancipation of serfs/rise of revolutionary movements.
HIST 5264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3264/Hist 5264
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interaction with Europe and Asia; attempts at modernization and reform; emancipation of the serfs and rise of revolutionary movements.
HIST 3265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3265/Hist 5265
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of factors that led to collapse of tsarist regime. 1917 revolution. Evolution of Soviet regime/collapse of Soviet communism. Emphasis on role of nationalities/rise of Commonwealth of independent states.
HIST 5265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3265/Hist 5265
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of the factors that led to the collapse of the tsarist regime; discussion of the 1917 revolution, the evolution of the Soviet regime and the collapse of Soviet communism. Emphasis on the role of nationalities and the rise of the Commonwealth of independent states.