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Twin Cities Campus

History of Science, Technology, and Medicine Minor

CLA Dean's Office
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2017
  • Required credits in this minor: 14
The undergraduate minor in the history of science, technology, and medicine (HSTM) combines upper-division coursework in the history of science and technology (HSCI) with upper-division coursework in the history of medicine (HMED) to build a humanistic background to the basic applied sciences, technologies and/or healthcare professions. Students interested in the HSTM minor should consult with the director of undergraduate studies for the HSTM program and draw up a plan of study that represents a coherent theme within the history of sciences, technology, and medicine. Normally such a coherent program entails survey coursework in the history of science, the history of technology, or the history of medicine, along with more advanced historical work around a specific field (science, technology, or medicine) or theme (focus on a particular time period, geographical focus, type of history, etc.).
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Minor Courses
Take at least of 14 credits of the following. Note: No more than 3 credits of directed study may count towards the minor.
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
HSCI 1xxx
Any HSCI 1xxx course counts towards this requirement.
Take no more than 1 course(s) totaling 0 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· HSCI 1011 - Digital World [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 1212 - Life on Earth: Origins, Evolution & Ecology [HIS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· HSCI 1214W {Inactive} [HIS, ENV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HSCI 1714 - Stone Tools to Steam Engines: Technology and History to 1750 [HIS, TS] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HSCI 1715 - History of Modern Technology: Waterwheels to the Web [HIS, TS] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HSCI 1814 - Revolutions in Science: The Babylonians to Newton [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HSCI 1815 - Making Modern Science: Atoms, Genes and Quanta [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· 2xxx-5xxx
Any HSCI, HMED 2xxx-5xxx counts towards this requirement.
Take 10 - 14 credit(s) from the following:
· HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3055 - Women, Health, and History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3065 - Body, Soul, and Spirit in Medieval and Renaissance European Medicine (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 4965W -  Senior Research in Medical History (3.0 cr)
· HMED 5075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America (3.0 cr)
· HMED 5940 {Inactive} (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HSCI 2333V - Honors Course: A Century of Science in Modern America [HIS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3714 - Stone Tools to Steam Engines: Technology and History to 1750 [HIS, TS] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HSCI 3715 - History of Modern Technology: Waterwheels to the Web [HIS, TS] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HSCI 3814 - Revolutions in Science: The Babylonians to Newton [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HSCI 3815 - Making Modern Science: Atoms, Genes and Quanta [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HSCI 4060 - Special Topics in History of Technology (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 4121W - History of 20th-Century Physics [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 4455 - Women, Gender, and Science [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HSEM 2529H - "Elementary, Dr. Einstein:" Explanation and Evidence in Science (3.0 cr)
· HSEM 2530H {Inactive} (2.0-3.0 cr)
· HSEM 2539H {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3211 - Biology and Culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5211 - Biology and Culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3242 - Navigating a Darwinian World [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5242 - Navigating a Darwinian World (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5331 - Technology and American Culture (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3332 - Science in the Shaping of America [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5332 - Science in the Shaping of America (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5401 - Ethics in Science and Technology (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3421 - Engineering Ethics [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5421 - Engineering Ethics (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3611 - Enlightenment, Revolution, and the Rise of Modern Science [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5611 - Enlightenment, Revolution, and the Rise of Modern Science (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 4321 - History of Computing [TS, HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CSCI 4921 - History of Computing [TS, HIS] (3.0 cr)
· Directed and Independent Study
Take 0 - 3 credit(s) from the following:
· HSCI 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-15.0 cr)
· HSCI 5994 - Directed Research (1.0-15.0 cr)
· HMED 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
 
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· College of Liberal Arts
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· Fall 2018


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· History of Science, Technology, and Medicine Minor
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HSCI 1011 - Digital World (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Essential knowledge and critical perspective to understand today's Digital World. The history and social impact of the digital revolution, including security, surveillance, "virtual reality," and the future of the Internet.
HSCI 1212 - Life on Earth: Origins, Evolution & Ecology (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01236
Typically offered: Every Spring
How have people explained where life came from and how it has developed over time? We examine controversies over life's origins, the Holocene extinction, human population growth, the Dust Bowl and soil conservation, DDT and falcon repatriation, and disease and responses to pandemics. Evolution, natural theology. Ecosystems.
HSCI 1714 - Stone Tools to Steam Engines: Technology and History to 1750 (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00986 - HSci 1714/HSci 3714
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Technology is an enormous force in our society, and has become so important that in many ways it seems to have a life of its own. This course uses historical case studies to demonstrate that technology is not autonomous, but a human activity, and that people and societies made choices about the technologies they developed and used. It asks how technological differences between nations influenced their different courses of development, and why some societies seemed to advance while others did not. We ask how technological choices can bring about consequences greater than people expected, and how we might use this knowledge in making our own technological choices. In particular, we explore the historical background, development, and character of the most widespread technological systems the world has known, from prehistoric stone tool societies, through Egypt and the pyramids, ancient Greece and Rome, the explosion of Islam, and the dynamic and often violent technologies of medieval Europe.
HSCI 1715 - History of Modern Technology: Waterwheels to the Web (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00420 - HSci 1715/3715
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores the many technological systems that have come to span our globe, alongside the widespread persistence of traditional technologies. We start with the earliest glimmerings of modernity and industrialization, and move on in time to the building of global technological networks. How have people changed their worlds through technologies like steam engines and electronics? Is it a paradox that many traditional agricultural and household technologies have persisted? How have technologies of war remade the global landscape? We ask how business and government have affected technological entrepreneurs, from railroads to technologies of global finance. We end by considering the tension between technologies that threaten our global environment and technologies that offer us hopes of a new world.
HSCI 1814 - Revolutions in Science: The Babylonians to Newton (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00978 - HSci 1814/HSci 3814
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Development and changing nature of sciences in their cultural context. Babylonian/Greek science. Decline/transmission of Greek science. Scientific Revolution (1500-1700) from Copernicus to Newton.
HSCI 1815 - Making Modern Science: Atoms, Genes and Quanta (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00979
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
How scientists like Darwin and Einstein taught us to think about nature; everything from space, time and matter to rocks, plants, and animals.
HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HMED 3001W/HMED 3001V
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care from classical antiquity through 18th century.
HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care in 19th/20th centuries.
HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Introduction to historical relationship of human health and the environment. How natural/human-induced environmental changes have, over time, altered our experiences with disease and our prospects for health.
HMED 3055 - Women, Health, and History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Women's historical roles as healers, patients, research subjects, health activists. Biological determinism, reproduction, mental health, nursing, women physicians, public health reformers, alternative practitioners. Gender disparities in diagnosis, treatment, research, careers. Assignments allow students to explore individual interests.
HMED 3065 - Body, Soul, and Spirit in Medieval and Renaissance European Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Body/soul in medieval theology/cosmology. Religious conceptions of body/soul. Medical conceptions in medieval world. Medieval/renaissance psychology. Medical astrology and its consequences. Medical normal/abnormal body. Medicine of reproduction and sexual identity. Death, burial, dissection, and resurrection in medical/religious perspective. Macrocosmic/microcosmic body. Limits to human power/authority over body. Anatomical/chemical body/spirit.
HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How technology came to medicine's center-stage. Impact on production of medical knowledge, professionalization, development of institutions/industry, health policy, and gender/race disparities in health care.
HMED 4965W - Senior Research in Medical History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar. Reading/discussion, individual directed research project with oral presentation. Students meet in peer groups and with instructor. prereq: Sr, instr consent
HMED 5075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01625
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
How technology came to medicine?s center-stage. Impact on medical practice, institutions, consumers, production of medical knowledge, professionalization, health policy, gender/race disparities in health care. prereq: instr consent
HSCI 2333V - Honors Course: A Century of Science in Modern America (HIS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02283 - HSCI 2333V/3333V/3333W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Science and technology influence nearly every aspect of our daily lives as well as the communities in which we live, both locally and globally. How did science and technology become such ubiquitous and powerful aspects of American industry, government policy, public life, and international negotiation? What are the responsibilities of scientists and engineers who play a critical role in creating and maintaining these elements? How can the broader public position itself to provide encouragement, insight and critique of the research and applications of science and technology? This course is intended to examine these questions by exploring historical case studies that highlight ethical, political, and social issues that give meaning to, and in turn, are shaped by science and technology. Beginning with the role of scientists as professional experts in the Progressive era, we consider how ideals of scientific management impacted animal lives and workers = bodies. Ethical choices frame the application of expertise and require attention and specific decision-making. Using eugenics as an example, we will reflect upon the interplay between the often naïve understanding of heredity and public policy and continue discussion into the application of contemporary genetic testing. Ethics are framed in social and political settings, and we will follow sometimes surprisingly comparable developments in Russia and the United States, with particular attention to large-scale engineering projects in the 1920s and 1930s and the space race in the 1950s and 1960s in order to understand how these reflected, or failed to reflect, risk and human life. This course meets the Historical Perspectives, Civic Life and Ethics, and Writing Intensive requirements as defined by the Council on Liberal Education. Along with Student Learning Outcomes, these requirements will help you continue to build critical tools for your work at the university as well as ways to evaluate and create knowledge in and beyond your intended career area.
HSCI 3714 - Stone Tools to Steam Engines: Technology and History to 1750 (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00986 - HSci 1714/HSci 3714
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Technology is an enormous force in our society, and has become so important that in many ways it seems to have a life of its own. This course uses historical case studies to demonstrate that technology is not autonomous, but a human activity, and that people and societies made choices about the technologies they developed and used. It asks how technological differences between nations influenced their different courses of development, and why some societies seemed to advance while others did not. We ask how technological choices can bring about consequences greater than people expected, and how we might use this knowledge in making our own technological choices. In particular, we explore the historical background, development, and character of the most widespread technological systems the world has known, from prehistoric stone tool societies, through Egypt and the pyramids, ancient Greece and Rome, the explosion of Islam, and the dynamic and often violent technologies of medieval Europe.
HSCI 3715 - History of Modern Technology: Waterwheels to the Web (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00420 - HSci 1715/3715
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores the many technological systems that have come to span our globe, alongside the widespread persistence of traditional technologies. We start with the earliest glimmerings of modernity and industrialization, and move on in time to the building of global technological networks. How have people changed their worlds through technologies like steam engines and electronics? Is it a paradox that many traditional agricultural and household technologies have persisted? How have technologies of war remade the global landscape? We ask how business and government have affected technological entrepreneurs, from railroads to technologies of global finance. We end by considering the tension between technologies that threaten our global environment and technologies that offer us hopes of a new world.
HSCI 3814 - Revolutions in Science: The Babylonians to Newton (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00978 - HSci 1814/HSci 3814
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Development and changing nature of sciences in their cultural context. Babylonian/Greek science. Decline/transmission of Greek science. Scientific Revolution (1500-1700) from Copernicus to Newton.
HSCI 3815 - Making Modern Science: Atoms, Genes and Quanta (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00979
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
How scientists like Darwin and Einstein taught us to think about nature; everything from space, time and matter to rocks, plants, and animals.
HSCI 4060 - Special Topics in History of Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule
HSCI 4121W - History of 20th-Century Physics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00984 - HSci 4121/Phys 4121
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The transition from classical to modern physics (relativity, quantum) and its architects (from Planck and Einstein to Heisenberg and Schrödinger). The WWII bomb projects in the US and in Germany. Post-war developments (solid state, particle physics).
HSCI 4455 - Women, Gender, and Science (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Three intersecting themes analyzed from 1700s to the present: women in science, sexual and gendered concepts in modern sciences, and impact of science on conceptions of sexuality and gender in society.
HSEM 2529H - "Elementary, Dr. Einstein:" Explanation and Evidence in Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Sherlock Holmes, in solving his cases, is relying on a pattern of reasoning called Inference to the Best Explanation (acronym: IBE; so named in 1965 by philosopher of science Gilbert Harman). Holmes's explanation of how the crime was committed is so utterly convincing that it counts as evidence that the crime was actually committed in just that way. Although our use of it is hardly ever as clever as Sherlock Holmes's, we rely on this same pattern of reasoning all the time in everyday life. When I run for my bus in the morning and see that there is still a group of people waiting at my stop, I take that as clear evidence that the bus has not shown up yet, because that is the best explanation for there still being people at the stop. If I see a bunch of dejected Gopher fans filing out of TCF Bank Stadium, I take that as clear evidence that the Gophers just lost the game, because that's the best explanation for why their fans look so miserable. In science, this pattern of reasoning tends to be less reliable. Just because a theory explains a range of phenomena does not mean that that theory is true. In other words, we cannot simply take a theory's explanatory power as evidence for it. Yet, scientists tend to put great emphasis on their theory's explanatory power if they want to convince others of it. Which raises the question: What exactly is the relation between explanation and evidence in science? In this class, we will examine this relation, both in examples taken from everyday and not so everyday life (such as the cases investigated by Sherlock Holmes) and in examples taken from the history of science, such as Copernicus's proposal that the earth orbits the sun, Newton's proposal that the force that keeps the moon and planets in orbit is the same as the force that makes apples fall from trees, Darwin's proposal that different species are descended from a common ancestor, or Einstein's proposal that gravity and acceleration are two sides of the same coin. We will contrast the account of how we obtain evidence for some proposition or theory (i.e., increase our degree of belief it it) based on Inference to the Best Explanation (IBE) with an account based on probability theory known as Bayesianism (after the Reverend Thomas Bayes who in the 18th century came up with the formula in probability theory central to the account).
HSCI 3211 - Biology and Culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3211/5211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Changing conceptions of life and aims and methods of biology; changing relationships between biology and the physical and social sciences; broader intellectual and cultural dimensions of developments in biology.
HSCI 5211 - Biology and Culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3211/5211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Changing conceptions of life and aims and methods of biology; changing relationships between biology and the physical and social sciences; broader intellectual and cultural dimensions of developments in biology.
HSCI 3242 - Navigating a Darwinian World (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00995 - HSci 3242/HSci 5242
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course we grapple with the impact of Darwin's theory of evolution in the scientific community and beyond. We'll examine and engage the controversies that have surrounded this theory from its inception in the 19th century through its applications in the 21st. What made Darwin a Victorian celebrity, a religious scourge, an economic sage and a scientific hero? We'll look closely at the early intellectual influences on theory development; study the changing and dynamic relationship between science and religion; and critically analyze the application of Darwin's theory to questions of human nature and behavior.
HSCI 5242 - Navigating a Darwinian World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00995 - HSci 3242/HSci 5242
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course we grapple with the impact of Darwin's theory of evolution in the scientific community and beyond. We'll examine and engage the controversies that have surrounded this theory from its inception in the 19th century through its applications in the 21st. What made Darwin a Victorian celebrity, a religious scourge, an economic sage and a scientific hero? We'll look closely at the early intellectual influences on theory development; study the changing and dynamic relationship between science and religion; and critically analyze the application of Darwin's theory to questions of human nature and behavior.
HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00421 - HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
HSCI 5244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00421 - HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3331/5331
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
American culture(s) and technology, pre-Columbian times to present. Artisanal, biological, chemical, communications, energy, environment, electronic, industrial, military, space and transportation technologies explained in terms of economic, social, political and scientific causes/effects.
HSCI 5331 - Technology and American Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3331/5331
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of American technology in its cultural/intellectual context from 1790 to present. Transfer of technology to America. Establishment of an infrastructure promoting economic growth. Social response to technological developments.
HSCI 3332 - Science in the Shaping of America (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00145
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Science played a central role in taking scattered imperial colonies in North America to world power in just four centuries. This course investigates people, policies, and knowledge-making in a culture whose diversity was a critical part of its expanding capacities. It begins by examining the differences in ways of knowing as well as shared knowledge between Native Americans and Europeans and concludes by discussing how a powerful nation's science and technology shaped international relations. Class, race, ethnicity, and gender provided for a range of perspectives that contributed to science alongside social and economic developments. Online assignments, films and images, along with primary and secondary source readings provide the basis for class discussion.
HSCI 5332 - Science in the Shaping of America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00145
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The British colonies of North America were founded in precisely the same centuries as a revolution in European’s understanding of nature, transformed by the ideas of Galileo, Newton, and Linnaeus and by the technologies of the industrial revolution. Native Americans and African Americans had their own knowledge of nature, and their close understanding intersected with the increasingly scientific techniques brought with European settlers and enhanced the survival and intellectual capacities of the newcomers. By demonstrating the diversity of scientists in the ever changing demographics of an immigrant nation, the course argues that this diversity and the capacities of newcomers contributed to the national success in science and engineering. The engagement with science at points were used to try to limit access by women or African-Americans, but sciences was also used to discredit false theories through ever expanding emphasis on empiricism as well as attention to the social and economic consequences of innovation. The goal is to demonstrate those historical linkages in particular places and institutions as they influenced and reinforced specific scientific work, while, at the same time, being attentive to how scientific ideas and practices were shaped by American culture.
HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00422 - HSci 3401/5401
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In addition to examining the idea of ethics itself, this course will examine the ethical questions embodied in specific historical events, technological systems, and scientific enterprises. Commonly, technology is assumed to be the best engineered solution for a particular goal and (good) science is supposed to be objective; however, this is never truly the case, values and moral choices underlie all of our systems for understanding and interacting with the world around us. These values and choices are almost always contentious. Through a series of historical case studies we will grapple with the big issues of right and wrong and the role of morality in a technological world. Our goal will be to learn to question and think critically about the things we create, the tools we use, and the ideology and practice of science.
HSCI 5401 - Ethics in Science and Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3401/5401
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical issues involving ethics in science. Ethical problems posed by modern science/technology, including nuclear energy, chemical industry, and information technologies.
HSCI 3421 - Engineering Ethics (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01851 - HSci 3421/HSci 5421
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ethical issues in engineering research and engineers' public responsibility/practice, using historical cases; historical development of engineering as a vocation/profession; ethical implications of advanced engineering systems such as nuclear weaponry and networked communications.
HSCI 5421 - Engineering Ethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01851
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Engineering ethics in historical context, including the rise of professional engineering societies; ethical problems in engineering research and engineers' public responsibility; ethical implications of advanced engineering systems such as the production of nuclear weapons; development of codes of ethics in engineering.
HSCI 3611 - Enlightenment, Revolution, and the Rise of Modern Science (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02072 - HSci 3611/HSci 5611
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Understanding the origins of our own culture of Modern Science in the Enlightenment of the eighteenth century. Newton's ambiguous legacy; science as wonder and spectacle; automata and monsters; early theories of sex and gender; empire and scientific expeditions; reshaping the environment; inventing human sciences; Frankenstein and the limits of science and reason.
HSCI 5611 - Enlightenment, Revolution, and the Rise of Modern Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02072 - HSci 3611/HSci 5611
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Understanding the origins of our own culture of Modern Science in the Enlightenment of the eighteenth century. Newton's ambiguous legacy; science as wonder and spectacle; automata and monsters; early theories of sex and gender; empire and scientific expeditions; reshaping the environment; inventing human sciences; Frankenstein and the limits of science and reason.
HSCI 4321 - History of Computing (TS, HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00497 - CSci 4921/HSci 4321
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Developments in the last 150 years; evolution of hardware and software; growth of computer and semiconductor industries and their relation to other business areas; changing relationships resulting from new data-gathering and analysis techniques; automation; social and ethical issues.
CSCI 4921 - History of Computing (TS, HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00497 - CSci 4921/HSci 4321
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Developments in last 150 years; evolution of hardware and software; growth of computer and semiconductor industries and their relation to other businesses; changing relationships resulting from new data-gathering and analysis techniques; automation; social and ethical issues.
HSCI 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -15.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. prereq: instr consent
HSCI 5994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -15.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
TBD prereq: instr consent
HMED 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study.