Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Political Science Minor

Political Science Department
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2019
  • Required credits in this minor: 16
Political scientists study topics, such as the exercise of power and influence; sources and resolution of conflicts; the relation of politics to the economy, culture, and other aspects of society; the adoption and implementation of public policies; and the development of political systems. These topics are studied at all levels, from local communities to the global community. The scope of the discipline is reflected in the main areas of specialization that make up the undergraduate curriculum: political theory, comparative government and politics, international relations, and American governmental systems and processes.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Political science minors who major in global studies must complete at least two upper-division courses outside of the comparative government and international relations subfields. Global studies majors must take at least two upper-division courses from political theory or American government. Students may earn a BA or a minor in political science, but not both.
Minor Courses
Take at least one course in two of the four subfields: political theory, American government, comparative government, and international relations.
Take 16 or more credit(s) from the following:
Lower-Division Courses
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· POL 1026 - U.S. Foreign Policy (3.0 cr)
· POL 1201 - Political Ideas [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· POL 1234 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· POL 19xx - Freshman Seminar
· POL 1001 - American Democracy in a Changing World [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
POL 1001H - Honors Course: American Democracy in a Changing World [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 1019 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 1002 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 1025 - Global Politics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or POL 1025H - Honors: Global Politics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 1054 - Puzzles in World Politics [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or POL 1054H - Honors: Puzzles in World Politics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
· Political Theory
Take 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· POL 3210 - Topics in Political Theory (3.0 cr)
· POL 3225 - American Political Thought [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3235W - Democracy and Citizenship [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3251W - Power, Virtue, and Vice: Ancient and Early Modern Political Theory [WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3252W - Revolution, Democracy, and Empire: Modern Political Thought [AH, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3265 - Ideas and Protest in French Postwar Thought [AH, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4210 - Topics in Political Theory (3.0 cr)
· POL 4253 {Inactive} (3.0-4.0 cr)
· POL 4275 - Domination, Exclusion, and Justice: Contemporary Political Thought (3.0 cr)
· POL 4280 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· POL 5210 - Topics in Political Theory (3.0 cr)
· POL 5280 - Topics in Political Theory (3.0-4.0 cr)
· Comparative Government
Take 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· POL 3410 - Topics in Comparative Politics (3.0 cr)
· POL 3431 - Politics of India [GP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3451W - Politics and Society in the New Europe [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3464 - Politics of Inequality (3.0 cr)
· POL 3474 - Russian Politics: From Soviet Empire to Post-Soviet State (3.0 cr)
· POL 3475 - Islamist Politics (3.0 cr)
· POL 3477 - Political Economy of Development [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3479 - Latin American Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3481H - Comparative Political Economy: Governments and Markets (3.0 cr)
· POL 3489W - Citizens, Consumers, and Corporations [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4410 - Topics in Comparative Politics (3.0 cr)
· POL 4463 - The Cuban Revolution Through the Words of Cuban Revolutionaries [GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4473W {Inactive} [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4481 - Comparative Political Economy: Governments and Markets (3.0 cr)
· POL 4487 - The Struggle for Democratization and Citizenship (4.0 cr)
· POL 4495 - Politics of Family, Sex, and Children [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· POL 5410 - Topics in Comparative Politics (1.0-3.0 cr)
· POL 4403W - Constitutions, Democracy, and Rights: Comparative Perspectives [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or POL 5403 - Constitutions, Democracy, and Rights: Comparative Perspectives (3.0 cr)
· POL 4461W - European Government and Politics [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or POL 5461 - European Government and Politics (4.0 cr)
· POL 4465 - Democracy and Dictatorship in Southeast Asia [GP] (3.0 cr)
or POL 5465 - Democracy and Dictatorship in Southeast Asia [GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4477 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
or POL 5477 - Struggles and Issues in the Middle East (4.0 cr)
· POL 4478W - Contemporary Politics in Africa and the Colonial Legacy [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 4478W - Contemporary Politics in Africa and the Colonial Legacy [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America (3.0 cr)
or POL 5492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America (3.0 cr)
· American Government
Take 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· POL 3308 - Congressional Politics and Institutions [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3309 - Justice in America (3.0 cr)
· POL 3310 - Topics in American Politics (3.0 cr)
· POL 3310H - Topics in American Politics (3.0 cr)
· POL 3317 - Food Politics: Actors, Arenas, and Agendas [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3319 - Education and the American Dream [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3321 - Issues in American Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· POL 3323 - Political Tolerance in the United States (3.0 cr)
· POL 3325 - U.S. Campaigns and Elections (3.0 cr)
· POL 3365 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· POL 3733 - From Suffragettes to Senators: Gender, Politics & Policy in the U.S. [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3739 - Politics of Race, Class, and Ethnicity (3.0 cr)
· POL 3766 - Political Psychology of Mass Behavior [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3767 - Political Psychology of Elite Behavior [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4310 - Topics in American Politics (3.0 cr)
· POL 4317 - Becoming Stupid: Anti-Science in American Politics (3.0 cr)
· POL 4501W - The Supreme Court and Constitutional Interpretation [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4766 - America, the Unusual?: American Political Culture in Comparative Context [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4771 - Race and Politics in America: Making Sense of Racial Attitudes in the United States [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4773W - Advocacy Organizations, Social Movements, and the Politics of Identity [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 5306 - Presidential Leadership and American Democracy (3.0 cr)
· POL 5310 - Topics in American Politics (3.0 cr)
· POL 5322 - Rethinking the Welfare State (3.0-4.0 cr)
· POL 5331 - Thinking Strategically in Domestic Politics (3.0-4.0 cr)
· POL 3327 - Suburbs, Stadiums, and Scandals: The Politics of American Cities (3.0 cr)
or POL 5327 - Politics of American Cities and Suburbs (3.0 cr)
· POL 3701 - American Indian Tribal Governments and Politics [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3501 - American Indian Tribal Governments and Politics [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3752 - Chicana/o Politics [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3852 - Chicana/o Politics [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3769 - Public Opinion and Voting Behavior [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or POL 5767 - Public Opinion and Voting Behavior (3.0 cr)
· POL 3785 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or POL 3785H - Persuasion and Political Propaganda (3.0 cr)
· POL 4315W - State Governments: Laboratories of Democracy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or POL 5315 - State Governments: Laboratories of Democracy (3.0 cr)
· POL 4502W - The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or POL 5502 - Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (3.0 cr)
· POL 4507 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4501 - Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights (3.0 cr)
· POL 4525W - Federal Indian Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or POL 5525 - Federal Indian Policy (3.0 cr)
· POL 4737W - American Political Parties [WI] (4.0 cr)
or POL 5737 - American Political Parties (3.0 cr)
· International Relations
Take 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· POL 3810 - Topics in International Relations and Foreign Policy (3.0 cr)
· POL 3835 - International Relations [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4810 - Topics in International Politics and Foreign Policy (3.0 cr)
· POL 4867W {Inactive} [GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· POL 4878W - Israeli-Palestinian Situation [GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· POL 4883W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4887 - Thinking Strategically in International Politics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
· POL 5810 - Topics in International Politics and Foreign Policy (3.0 cr)
· POL 3833 - The United States and the Global Economy (3.0 cr)
or POL 5833 - The United States in the Global EconomyUS For Econ Policy (3.0-4.0 cr)
· POL 4885W - International Conflict and Security [GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or POL 5885 - International Conflict and Security (3.0 cr)
· Additional Courses
Take 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· POL 3065 - Political Engagement Careers: Planning and Preparing For Your Future [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4010 - Topics in Methods (4.0 cr)
· POL 3085 - Quantitative Analysis in Political Science [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or POL 3085H - Honors Course: Quantitative Analysis in Political Science [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· Faculty-Supervised
POL 3070 & POL 4970 do not count toward the minor.
Take at most 3 credit(s) from the following:
· POL 3080 - Internship in Politics or Government (3.0-13.0 cr)
 
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POL 1026 - U.S. Foreign Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The United States is the most powerful country in the world. This makes the question of what the role in the U.S. is in the world and how the United States interacts with other countries, international organizations, and other actors in international politics a question of real importance. US foreign policy will play a crucial role in determining the world we live in four, ten, and fifty years time. As a result, we should all try to better understand how the United States behaves in international politics, why it behaves in that way, how it should behave, and how it has behaved in the past. These are the questions that this class tackles. For example, we'll ask: why does the United States play such an active role in world politics? Might this change in the future and how has US foreign policy varied in the past? What do past conflicts in which the United States has been involved tell us about current U.S. foreign policy? Why is the United States so often at war despite being so militarily secure? Does the rise of China pose a threat to the United States and if so, what should the United States do about it? How serious is the threat of cyber war? Why does the United States care so much about stopping other countries from getting nuclear weapons?
POL 1201 - Political Ideas (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course serves as an introduction to the study of political theory. Political theory analyzes the meaning and significance of fundamental concepts in politics. Starting from such basic concerns as the nature of politics, humans, power and justice, political theorists explore how these basic starting assumptions organize the norms, practices, and institutions of political and social order. To explore these topics, the field turns to key texts, as well as to political and social events and other media (film, historical documents, etc.). In this introductory course, students will investigate some of the basic texts in political theory, with the goal of learning how to read texts more analytically and to address fundamental questions in political theory. Among the topics that might be the nature of justice and injustice, political obligation and civil disobedience, democracy and other forms of governance. Students who complete this course will understand the deep issues about the nature of politics, will have learned to read and to analyze complex texts. They will also have had the opportunity to reflect upon their own ethical engagement in political life and upon the ways in which historically, political ideas change.
POL 1001 - American Democracy in a Changing World (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to politics/government in the United States. Constitutional origins/development, major institutions, parties, interest groups, elections, participation, public opinion. Ways of explaining politics, nature of political science. Emphasizes recent trends.
POL 1001H - Honors Course: American Democracy in a Changing World (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01246 - Pol 1001/Pol 1001H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to politics/government in the United States. Constitutional origins/development, major institutions, parties, interest groups, elections, participation, public opinion. Ways of explaining politics, nature of political science. Emphasizes recent trends.
POL 1019 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00283 - AmIn 1002/Pol 1019
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Colonial experiences of selected indigenous peoples in Americas, Euroasia, Pacific Rim.
AMIN 1002 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00283 - AmIn 1002/Pol 1019
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Colonial experiences of selected indigenous peoples in Americas, Euroasia, Pacific Rim.
POL 1025 - Global Politics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02151 - Pol 1025/Pol 1025H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study of international relations and issues in contemporary world affairs. Forms of state interaction from violent conflict to cooperation and integration; activities of international institutions; transnational relations involving non-state actors such as international businesses, human rights networks, and environmental movements.
POL 1025H - Honors: Global Politics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02151
Prerequisites: Honors student
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to international relations/issues in contemporary world affairs. War, peace, nuclear proliferation. Politics of humanitarian intervention. Global monetary/trading systems. Activities of international institutions/non-governmental organizations. prereq: Honors student
POL 1054 - Puzzles in World Politics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is an introduction to the study of politics in different countries around the world. It focuses on domestic politics within countries, as opposed to a course in international relations, which focuses on relations between countries. Some of the questions we tackle include: Why are some countries prone to violent conflict while others remain peaceful? Why do some countries grow rich while others remain poor? Why does democracy emerge in some countries, while dictators hold onto power elsewhere? How do attitudes about gender and sexuality influence politics? Do particular religions, or the strength of religious faith, strengthen or weaken democracy? The readings and assignments help you make sense of the complexity of world politics - to sift through and distill the avalanche of information available and learn how to develop your own arguments about pertinent global issues. Upon completion of this course you will be able to understand and provide examples of 1) the difference between strong and weak states; 2) the distinctions between democratic and non-democratic forms of government; 3) the various ways democracies are governed; 4) arguments explaining the origin of democracy and the persistence of non-democracy; 5) the significance of different forms of political identity such as ethnicity, religion, and gender; 6) why some countries are rich while others remain poor; and 7) why some countries tax and spend more than others. Assignments seek to develop your skills at developing arguments through logic and evidence and to give you the ability to distinguish between a persuasive argument about politics and simply stating an opinion.
POL 1054H - Honors: Puzzles in World Politics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01665
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Political life. Repression, democracy, rights, corruption, gender, political change. Guest lectures by political science professors who are experts on different parts of world. prereq: Honors student
POL 3210 - Topics in Political Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics courses provide students with the opportunity to study key concepts, thinkers, and themes in Political Theory not normally covered in the standard slate of course offerings. The specific content of these courses varies considerably from year to year. See the current class schedule for details.
POL 3225 - American Political Thought (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Puritans, American Revolution, Constitution, pro- and anti-slavery arguments, civil war/reconstruction, industrialism, westward expansion, Native Americans, immigration, populism, socialism, social Darwinism, women's suffrage, red scares, Great Depression, free speech, pluralism, multiculturalism. prereq: Suggested prerequisite POL 1201
POL 3235W - Democracy and Citizenship (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course considers the nature of contemporary democracy and the role that members of the political community do, can, and should play. While approaches in teaching the class vary, students can expect to read historical and contemporary texts, see films and videos, to approach questions about the nature of democracy, justifications for democracy, and challenges faced by contemporary democracy. Topics will include such questions as the role of civil society in democratic life, deliberative democracy, as well as questions about how members of political communities can best participate in democratic life. Students will write a longer essay that allows them to demonstrate their capacities to understand and explain complex ideas and to make a theoretically compelling argument, using appropriate supporting evidence. prereq: Suggested prerequisite 1201
POL 3251W - Power, Virtue, and Vice: Ancient and Early Modern Political Theory (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00857
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Key concepts of contemporary political life such as ‘democracy’, ‘tyranny’, ‘authority’— and indeed ‘politics’ itself— derive from ancient sources. This course offers students an opportunity to return to the foundations of this vocabulary by delving into work by such major thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, and Machiavelli. Lectures and discussion shall consider the endurance of certain basic questions of political life, such as: What is justice? What is the best regime? What is the relationship between human nature and political order? Can politics be virtuous and, if so, in what way? The course will also consider the radically diverse responses to these essential questions through examination of a wide range of historical periods and the unique terms of political order each offered. Previous iterations of the course have included examination of the Classical Greek city-state system and its fragile experiments with democracy; the rise and fall of the Roman empire; the establishment of Western Christendom; the Renaissance, so-called ‘discovery’ of the New World, and dawn of the modern era. Students will gain a glimpse into worlds preoccupied by matters of truth, virtue and nobility, but also widely populated by slavery, imperialism, violence, and religious strife. In this way, the study of ancient theory is intended to serve as both supplement and challenge to the terms of contemporary political life.
POL 3252W - Revolution, Democracy, and Empire: Modern Political Thought (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Thinkers, discourses, events that craft understanding of revolution, democracy, empire. Emergence of democracy/democratic institutions alongside problems of religious zealotry, political hierarchy/exclusion, market economies, cultural marginalization. prereq: Suggested prerequisite 1201
POL 3265 - Ideas and Protest in French Postwar Thought (AH, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examine events, political/ethical challenges, intellectuals who shaped France in its century of politics/protest. Historical documents, cultural media, philosophical texts. Thinkers range from film-maker Gillo Pontecorvo to philosopher-playwright Jean-Paul Sartre to philosopher Michel Foucault.
POL 4210 - Topics in Political Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics courses provide students with the opportunity to study key concepts, thinkers, and themes in Political Theory not normally covered in the standard slate of course offerings. The specific content of these courses varies considerably from year to year. See the current class schedule for details.
POL 4275 - Domination, Exclusion, and Justice: Contemporary Political Thought
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Contemporary Political Theory systematically analyzes the meaning and significance of concepts central to current politics: domination, exclusion, and justice. Starting from basic concerns about the nature of politics, humans, power and justice, this course will explore how these basic starting assumptions organize the norms, practices, and institutions of political and social order. To explore these topics, the field turns to key texts, as well as to political and social events and other media (film, historical documents, etc.). Through this course, students will also be introduced to different interpretive approaches, ranging from democratic theory, feminist, queer and critical race theories, as well as ethics and moral philosophy. Organized around the politics of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, the course will pursue a range of questions about democratic legitimation, the exclusion of historically marginalized communities, systematic inequalities of different kinds, as well as ideals of democracy and justice. It will range from theoretical inquiry to practical questions of implementing different political projects. Through this course, students will develop skills in critical thinking, careful reading and clear writing, as well as recognizing and constructing arguments. These skills are basic for the critical, lifelong role that all of us play as members of political community. prereq: 1201 recommended
POL 5210 - Topics in Political Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics specified in the Class Schedule.
POL 5280 - Topics in Political Theory
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02218
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics in historical, analytical, or normative political theory. Topics vary, see Class Schedule. prereq: grad student
POL 3410 - Topics in Comparative Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics of current analytical or policy importance to comparative politics. Topics vary, as specified in Class Schedule.
POL 3431 - Politics of India (GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course introduces students to the politics of India; a non-Western, parliamentary political system that stands out as a bastion of democracy in the developing world, despite underdevelopment & significant ethno-religious divisions. By focusing on India, we offer an understanding of the problems of democratization, underdevelopment, governance & political violence. We examine India’s political institutions & challenges confronting the institutions such as socio-economic inequalities, social exclusion, social divisions, ethno-religious & ideological insurgencies, criminalization of politics & rampant corruption. The course enables students to answer important questions: Why did democracy endure in post-colonial India when much of the developing world endured authoritarian regimes? What accounts for the persistence of ethno-religious conflict & violence? What determines a country’s approach to socio-economic development? What accounts for India’s economic development over the last few decades? How do we explain the existence of political democracy and rampant corruption?
POL 3451W - Politics and Society in the New Europe (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
The devastation of Europe through two World Wars put the deadly results of ultra-nationalism on full display. To avoid such destruction again, a group of European technocrats and leaders embarked on a mission of incrementally deepening economic and later, social partnerships between an ever-expanding number of European countries. These efforts culminated in the birth of the European Union in the late 20th Century. From its inception, the Union has found obstacles in the forms of a weak institutional structure and authority, deep skepticism of a central European authority, financial crisis, ethnic anxiety, and resurgent nationalism. Yet, the continuation and strengthening of the Union is seen as the antidote to the rise of anti-democratic and authoritarian tendencies on the continent. Some of the key questions that we will engage in are: What are the ideological and historical roots of the European Union? What are the structural flaws of the Union? What are the obstacles to a stronger Union? Is the Union still or even more essential than ever? What are the ways the Union could collapse from within and from the intervention of outside forces?
POL 3464 - Politics of Inequality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Causes/consequences of economic inequality in the USA and Europe. America and European countries in contrast to one another. What differences there are and whether they matter.
POL 3474 - Russian Politics: From Soviet Empire to Post-Soviet State
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Twenty five years ago, Russia appeared to be democratizing and was even on friendly relations with the US and NATO. Now Vladimir Putin runs the state with the FSB (KGB), and US-Russian relations are at their worst point since the 1970s. This course examines major themes and periods in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian politics. It begins with the Russian Revolution of 1917, and continues with a study of the creation of the USSR and Soviet rule under Lenin, Stalin, and later decades. We look in depth at the economic and political system set up by the Communist Party, and at the causes of its collapse in 1991, which has had profound legacies for the post-Soviet development of Russia. Then in the second half of the course we turn to themes of political, economic, social and civic development under Yeltsin and Putin. We will pose the following questions: Why does democratization begin and why does it fail? How is economic reform undermined? What type of state and regime is Russia now? What caused the Chechen wars and the massive bloodshed in the Caucasus during this period? Is Putin trying to recreate the Soviet Union and retake control of its neighbors? Are US-Russian relations improving as a result of Obama's "Reset," or are we now in an era of a new Cold War? What is Russia's goal in Syria, Iran, or Central Asia? Is Putin rebuilding Russia, or driving it to disaster, and how will this impact the West?
POL 3475 - Islamist Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Islamic faith and its historical relationship to politics. Rise of Islamist politics in the Middle East and North Africa and south central Asia from the 1950s-80s. Failure of many Islamist revolutions. Spread/rebirth of Islam in less traditional areas of the Muslim world. Rise of global jihadists. New jihad being waged in Iraq, implications for Middle East. Possibility of synthesizing Islam and democracy.
POL 3477 - Political Economy of Development (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How can the vast disparities of wealth between countries be explained? Why have some countries in the post-colonial world, in particular, those of East Asia, experienced stunning economic growth, while those in others parts have not? We will explore inequality among nations through an engagement with competing explanations from multiple disciplines. Do free markets, the legacies of colonialism, state power, culture, or geography offer the most persuasive account of current patterns of global inequality? The course also examines what we mean by "development" and exposes students to cutting-edge debates in contemporary development studies. By the end of the course, students will have a better understanding of the causes of and possible solutions to global inequality.
POL 3479 - Latin American Politics (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: LAS 4479/Pol 4479/5479
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Latin American politics/political economy. Authoritarianism, human rights, redemocratization. Development/economic policy. Social movements. Ethnicity, race, religion. Revolution. U.S.-Latin American relations.
POL 3481H - Comparative Political Economy: Governments and Markets
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02294 - Pol 3481H/Pol 4481
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course analyzes the compatibility of democracy and markets-whether democratic institutions undermine (enhance) the workings of market institutions and vice versa. Competing theoretical perspectives in political economy are critically evaluated. And the experiences of countries with different forms of democratic market systems are studied. Among the topics singled out for in-depth investigation are the economics of voting, producer group politics, the politics of monetary and fiscal policy, political business cycles, and trade politics.
POL 3489W - Citizens, Consumers, and Corporations (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Corporations are among the most powerful actors in the global political economy. They employ millions of people, produce a variety of goods, and have massive effects on the ecological and social environments in which they do business. How do ordinary people act in order to hold corporations accountable for the effects that their activities have on communities and individuals? This course focuses on two ways that people have mobilized to counter corporate power--as citizens and as consumers. When people mobilize as citizens, they put pressure on corporations through the political system--e.g. through mass protests, lobbying politicians, and pursuing claims through the courts. When people mobilize as consumers, they use the power of their purchasing decisions to encourage corporations to change their behavior. We will explore these different modes of action through an examination of corporate social responsibility/sweatshops, the industrial food system in the US, and the privatization of life (e.g. genes), water, and war.
POL 4410 - Topics in Comparative Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics of current analytical or policy importance to comparative politics. Topics vary, as specified in Class Schedule.
POL 4463 - The Cuban Revolution Through the Words of Cuban Revolutionaries (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cuban Revolution. Leadership/strategy. Perspectives of Cubans/leaders. prereq: 1025 or 1054 or equiv
POL 4481 - Comparative Political Economy: Governments and Markets
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02294 - Pol 3481H/Pol 4481
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course analyzes the compatibility of democracy and markets - whether democratic institutions undermine (enhance) the workings of market institutions and vice versa. Competing theoretical perspectives in political economy are critically evaluated. And the experiences of countries with different forms of democratic market systems are studied. Among the topics singled out for in-depth investigation are the economics of voting, producer group politics, the politics of monetary and fiscal policy, political business cycles, and trade politics.
POL 4487 - The Struggle for Democratization and Citizenship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Origins of democratic process. Emphasizes how disenfranchised fought to become included. History of democratic movement from its earliest moments to present. Attempts to draw a balance sheet.
POL 4495 - Politics of Family, Sex, and Children (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Political fights over volatile issues of family, sex, and children. Diversity of family life in the United States as a source of disharmony and inequality. Same-sex couples, interracial families, polygamous communities, reproductive equality for people with disabilities, targeting of immigrant children, teen sex & pregnancy, working mothers, âżżchildfreeâżť advocates. Citizen efforts aimed at reconciling communities with harshly clashing beliefs.
POL 5410 - Topics in Comparative Politics
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics of current analytical or policy importance. Topics vary, see Class Schedule. prereq: grad student
POL 4403W - Constitutions, Democracy, and Rights: Comparative Perspectives (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02505
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Theory/practice of constitutionalism in different countries. Conceptual/normative inquiry between constitutionalism, rule of law, and democracy. Origins/role of constitutions. Relevance of courts with constitutional review powers: U.S., Germany, Japan, Hungary, Russia, South Africa, Nigeria.
POL 5403 - Constitutions, Democracy, and Rights: Comparative Perspectives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02505
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Theory/practice of constitutionalism in different countries. Conceptual/normative inquiry between constitutionalism, rule of law, and democracy. Origins/role of constitutions. Relevance of courts with constitutional review powers: U.S., Germany, Japan, Hungary, Russia, South Africa, Nigeria.
POL 4461W - European Government and Politics (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00862
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
This course will introduce you to three major topics that shape European social and political life today: 1) the struggle over what makes for a national/European identity: how contested national identities matter to European democratic politics and to the new populist movements, and the historical role of Islam in shaping European identities 2) the role of institutions in shaping popular representation and citizen agency; 3) European Union policies: dealing with immigration, the single currency and foreign and security policy especially in regard to Eastern/Central Europe and Russia. Each section will conclude with a comparative class debate, led by students, on the way contested historical interpretations and identities, institutions and policies matter also to US political and civic life. This is a writing intensive course and you will be asked to write a 12-15 page research essay on a European country of your choice. Several assignments, preceded by a writing workshop, will help you complete your final essay. The course will consist of lectures with PPTs, class discussions and group work, and at least one guest lecturer working in a local business connected with Europe. Indeed this course aims at preparing you to live and work in a deeply interconnected world, with special attention to the historical, social, political and economic ties between the US and Europe. Small changes will be made to the syllabus if current events or unexpected class needs require it, but the main themes, most readings and the assignments will remain as indicated in the syllabus. prereq: 1054 or 3051 or non-pol sci grad or instr consent
POL 5461 - European Government and Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4461W/5461
Typically offered: Every Spring
European political institutions in their social settings. Power and responsibility. Governmental stability. Political decision making. Government and economic order. prereq: grad student or instr consent
POL 4465 - Democracy and Dictatorship in Southeast Asia (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02436 - Pol 4465/Pol 5465
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
A fundamental question of politics is why some regimes endure for many years while others do not. This course examines the "menu of manipulation" through which dictators and democrats claim and retain power, and the conditions under which average citizens mobilize to challenge their governments, despite the risks and in the face of what may seem to be insurmountable odds. We will explore these political dynamics in Southeast Asia, one of the most culturally and politically diverse regions of the globe. Composed of eleven countries, Southeast Asia covers a wide geographical region stretching from India to China. With a rich endowment of natural resources, a dynamic manufacturing base, and a strategic location on China's southern flank, the region has come to play an increasingly important role in the political and economic affairs of the globe. Culturally and ethnically diverse, hundreds of languages are spoken, and the religions practiced include Buddhism, Catholicism, Hinduism, and Islam. The region is similarly diverse in its political systems, which range from democratic to semi-democratic to fully authoritarian.
POL 5465 - Democracy and Dictatorship in Southeast Asia (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02436 - Pol 4465/Pol 5465
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
A fundamental question of politics is why some regimes endure for many years while others do not. This course examines the "menu of manipulation" through which dictators and democrats claim and retain power, and the conditions under which average citizens mobilize to challenge their governments, despite the risks and in the face of what may seem to be insurmountable odds. We will explore these political dynamics in Southeast Asia, one of the most culturally and politically diverse regions of the globe. Composed of eleven countries, Southeast Asia covers a wide geographical region stretching from India to China. With a rich endowment of natural resources, a dynamic manufacturing base, and a strategic location on China's southern flank, the region has come to play an increasingly important role in the political and economic affairs of the globe. Culturally and ethnically diverse, hundreds of languages are spoken, and the religions practiced include Buddhism, Catholicism, Hinduism, and Islam. The region is similarly diverse in its political systems, which range from democratic to semi-democratic to fully authoritarian.
POL 5477 - Struggles and Issues in the Middle East
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Turkey, Iran, Israel, and selected Arab states. Domestic politics of religious/secular, ethnic, economic, environmental, and other policy/identity issues. Regional politics of water access, Israeli/Palestinian/Arab world relationships, oil and Persian/Arabian Gulf, human rights. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: : 4477; 1054 or 3051 or non-pol sci grad student or instr consent
POL 4478W - Contemporary Politics in Africa and the Colonial Legacy (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00707 - Afro 4478W/Afro 5478/Pol 4478W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examines how current politics in mainly, though not exclusively, sub-Saharan Africa have been shaped by the pre-colonial and colonial processes. Reality of independence; recurrent political and economic crises, global context and prospects for effective democracy. prereq: 1054 or 3051 or non-pol sci grad or instr consent
AFRO 4478W - Contemporary Politics in Africa and the Colonial Legacy (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00707 - Afro 4478W/Afro 5478/Pol 4478W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examines how current politics in mainly, though not exclusively, sub-Saharan Africa have been shaped by the pre-colonial and colonial processes. Reality of independence; recurrent political and economic crises, global context, and prospects for effective democracy. prereq: POL 1054 or POL 3051 or non-pol sci grad or instr consent
POL 4492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02449
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
How law and justice function in contemporary Latin America. Similarities/differences within/between countries and issue areas. Causes behind varied outcomes. Effectiveness of different reform efforts. Transitional justice, judicial review, judicial independence, access to justice, criminal justice (police, courts, and prisons), corruption, non-state alternatives. Issues of class, race/ethnicity, and gender.
POL 5492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02449
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
How law and justice function in contemporary Latin America. Similarities/differences within/between countries and issue areas. Causes behind varied outcomes. Effectiveness of different reform efforts. Transitional justice, judicial review, judicial independence, access to justice, criminal justice (police, courts, and prisons), corruption, non-state alternatives. Issues of class, race/ethnicity, and gender.
POL 3308 - Congressional Politics and Institutions (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00860 - Pol 4308/5308
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Origin/development of U.S. congressional institutions, parties, committees, leaders, lobbying/elections, and relations between Congress/executive branch. Relationship of campaigning/governing, nature of representation, biases of institutional arrangements.
POL 3309 - Justice in America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01344 - Pol 3309/Pol 4309/Pol 5309
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
American judiciary. Selection of judges. How/why these individuals/institutions behave as they do. What influences judicial decisions. What impact decisions have. Why people comply with them. prereq: 1001 or 1002 or instr consent
POL 3310 - Topics in American Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topic in American politics, as specified in Class Schedule.
POL 3310H - Topics in American Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics in American politics.
POL 3317 - Food Politics: Actors, Arenas, and Agendas (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Food: Everyone eats it but we increasingly fight about how it is grown, transported, processed and consumed. This disagreements find their ways into politics, whether it is neighbors battling over backyard chicken ordinances, Members of Congress arguing over how best to protect the safety of the food supply, or countries engaging in trade wars to limit the importation of agricultural products. This course takes a broad, multi-disciplinary perspective on food politics drawing on concepts and ideas from political science, sociology, and economics to analyze several contemporary "food fights," including agricultural trade, U.S. farm bills, the National School Lunch Program, proposals for taxing sodas and fatty foods, and the labeling of genetically modified food. Take this course if you want to learn more about the various resources, arguments, evidence, and rules of engagement that structure contemporary food politics. This course satisfies the Social Science Core of the Liberal Education requirements and is an eligible elective for the public health minor in CLA and the Food Systems major in CFANS.
POL 3319 - Education and the American Dream (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
What role does education play in American democracy? What role should it play? Does American education, particularly public education, live up to its citizens’ hopes and expectations? And, perhaps most importantly, what do we mean by a “good education”? This is a question with deep historical roots in this country, one that is the subject of current policy debates and one that cannot be separated from questions of discrimination and inequality. The over-arching theme of the course is to wrestle with what it means to be an educated citizen in the context of historical struggles to achieve that vision in the face of multiple and inter-related inequalities and competing visions about how to make the American dream a reality in the field of public education. No one political perspective will be offered or favored. No magic powder will be revealed on the last day of the course. The fact is that the underlying issues are really complicated, often seemingly intractable, and very, very political. This course is intended as introduction to education politics and policy in the United States. It will focus on K-12 education, especially in the public system. It is designed for any student who might have an interest in exploring education, public policy, or American government. Topics will include equality of educational opportunity, educating democratic citizens, school finance, the role of political institutions in making educational policy, and efforts to reform and remake American education, including charter schools, private school vouchers, and standardized testing. By the end of the course, students should have a basic understanding of the provision of public education in the United States, including the ways in which education is governed and the institutions involved in that governance. Students should be able to critically reflect on the degree to which American education fulfills the sometimes-competing goals Americans have for their schools. This course fulfills the Social Sciences Core of the University liberal education requirements. In this course students will act as policy analysts, with all of the complexity that such a task entails in the field of American public education. This course also fulfills the Diversity and Social Justice in the United States theme of the University liberal education requirements.
POL 3321 - Issues in American Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course examines the politics of social policy in the United States. Recent controversies over Social Security reform, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (?Obamacare?), and the No Child Left Behind Act and Common Core showcase the profound political and substantive impact of this topic. The first half of the course places the United States in comparative perspective. Scholars typically describe the United States as a ?laggard? where social policies developed relatively late, grew relatively slowly, and are less generous than are corresponding policies in other advanced industrial democracies. Is this an accurate portrayal of American social policy? Recent scholarship challenges the conventional wisdom, suggesting that the United States does not necessarily do less in terms of social policy but that it relies on an unusual set of policy tools to pursue objectives like poverty alleviation. What explains the distinctive shape of American social policy? This course investigates the impact of political culture, the relative power of various interest groups, the American constitutional system, and other factors. The second half of the course examines recent trends in American social policy, focusing on four specific policy areas: pensions, health care, education, and income support. It examines both the historical origins of contemporary American policies and recent reform proposals. A major theme of the course is that it is impossible to understand the contemporary shape of social policy, and the positions of specific stakeholders, without understanding the long-term historical processes that have shaped, and that continue to shape, the present political terrain of preferences and actors. New generations of leaders do not have the opportunity to build social policy from scratch. Rather, they have to react to what already exists. Some reforms will seem like logical extensions of what is already in place, while existing programs might make other alternatives difficult if not impossible to pursue. By understanding the roots of contemporary American social policy it becomes possible to devise a political strategy for major policy change.
POL 3323 - Political Tolerance in the United States
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Political importance of civil liberties in American society. Tolerance as a political phenomenon. Issues such as free speech, privacy, religion, race, gender.
POL 3325 - U.S. Campaigns and Elections
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Presidential/congressional campaigns/elections in the United States. How political scientists study electoral politics. Theoretical generalizations about candidates, voters, parties, and the media. Ways electoral context and "rules of the game" matter.
POL 3733 - From Suffragettes to Senators: Gender, Politics & Policy in the U.S. (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Overview to field of gender/politics. Examine role women play in U.S. policy process. How public policies are "gendered." How policies compare to feminist thinking about related issue area. Theories of role(s) gender plays in various aspects of politics.
POL 3739 - Politics of Race, Class, and Ethnicity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How race/ethnicity/class interact in political process. Political conflict through comparative analysis of United States, South Africa, Brazil.
POL 3766 - Political Psychology of Mass Behavior (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How political behavior of citizens and political elites is shaped by psychological factors, including personality, attitudes, values, emotions, and cognitive sophistication. Political activism/apathy, leadership charisma, mass media, group identifications, political culture.
POL 3767 - Political Psychology of Elite Behavior (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Intersections of politics, personality, and social psychology. Focuses on political leaders and elites. Usefulness of psychological theories for conducting political analysis. Role of individual, of group processes, of political/social cognition, and of context in political decision-making.
POL 4310 - Topics in American Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
See Class Schedule for description. prereq: 1001 or equiv or instr consent
POL 4317 - Becoming Stupid: Anti-Science in American Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
(1) Political attacks on basic science, including climatology & global warming, vaccines, the Big Bang, evolution, human reproduction, sexuality, and much more. (2) Pseudoscience and anti-intellectualism in American political culture. (3) Money, political interests, and propaganda that drive attacks on science.
POL 4501W - The Supreme Court and Constitutional Interpretation (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This Course is designed to introduce students to constitutional law, with an emphasis on the U.S. Supreme Court?s interpretation of Articles I, II, and III. This means that we will discuss how the nation?s Court of last resort has helped shape the powers of and constraints on the three branches of our federal government. We will also discuss and analyze the development of law surrounding the separation of powers, the structure of federalism, congressional power over the commerce clause, and the creation and demise of the concept of substantive due process. Successful completion of this course will satisfy the liberal education requirement of Civic Life and Ethics. Effective citizenship in the 21st century requires an understanding of our how government was created, is structured, and has been interpreted by the Supreme Court over the past two centuries. This course is premised on the notion that such an understanding is best achieved by reading the primary sources that led to these goals ? the opinions handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court.
POL 4766 - America, the Unusual?: American Political Culture in Comparative Context (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02216
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Empirical analysis of basic political values. Individualism, freedom, equality. Democratic principles, materialism, capitalism, citizenship, patriotism, heroism. prereq: suggested 1001 or equiv
POL 4771 - Race and Politics in America: Making Sense of Racial Attitudes in the United States (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Race continues to be one of the defining fault lines in American politics. Most obviously, the existence of racial inequality has enormous consequences for any given individual's social and economic standing. However, it also has had an enormous impact on the pattern of attitudes and beliefs which have served as the backdrop for many of society's most pressing political debates and conflicts. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to how political scientists have studied racial attitudes and the larger problem of inter-ethnic conflict in American society. We will begin with a look at the historical circumstances which have given rise to the major research questions in the area. From there, we'll look at the major research perspectives in the area, and see how well they actually explain public opinion on matters of race. In doing so, we'll also get a look at some of the major controversies in this area of study, particularly the issues of whether the "old-fashioned racism" of the pre-civil-rights era has been replaced by new forms of racism; and the degree to which debates over policy matters with no apparent link to race - such as crime and social welfare - may actually have a lot to do with racial attitudes. Finally, we will conclude by taking an informed look at racial attitudes in recent American history, focusing on how racial attitudes and their political consequences of have changed - and not changed - over the course of the Obama presidency and the tumultuous 2016 election.
POL 4773W - Advocacy Organizations, Social Movements, and the Politics of Identity (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advocacy organizations/social movements as agents of democratic representation/political change in American politics/policy-making. Organizations/movements that represent racial/ethnic minorities, women, religious conservatives, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender people, low-income people.
POL 5306 - Presidential Leadership and American Democracy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4306/5306
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examines whether president's political and constitutional powers are sufficient to satisfy citizens' high expectations and whether president should be expected to dominate American politics. prereq: grad student or instr consent
POL 5310 - Topics in American Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
See Class Schedule for description.
POL 5322 - Rethinking the Welfare State
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Competing arguments about welfare states in advanced industrial countries. Whether welfare states result from sectional interests, class relations, or citizenship rights. Compares American social policy with policies in other western countries. prereq: grad student
POL 5331 - Thinking Strategically in Domestic Politics
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Applications of rational-choice and game theories to important features of domestic politics in the United States and elsewhere. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: : 4331; grad student
POL 3327 - Suburbs, Stadiums, and Scandals: The Politics of American Cities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1001, non-pol sci grad major or equiv or #
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of politics and policy in the contemporary American city; role of local government in a federal system; evolution of cities in the United States; forms and structures of local government; local politics and patterns of power and influence; special topics in Minnesota local politics. prereq: 1001, non-pol sci grad major or equiv or instr consent
POL 5327 - Politics of American Cities and Suburbs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Development/role of American local government. Forms and structures. Relationships with states and federal government. Local politics and patterns of power/influence. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: : 4327; [[1001 or 1002], [non-pol sci grad major or equiv]] or instr consent
POL 3701 - American Indian Tribal Governments and Politics (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3501/Pol 3701
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
History, development, structure, politics of American Indian Governments. North American indigenous societies from pre-colonial times to present. Evolution of aboriginal governments confronted/affected by colonizing forces of European/Euro-American states. Bearing of dual citizenship on nature/powers of tribal governments in relation to states and federal government.
AMIN 3501 - American Indian Tribal Governments and Politics (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3501/Pol 3701
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
History, development, structure, politics of American Indian Governments. North American indigenous societies from pre-colonial times to present. Evolution of aboriginal governments confronted/affected by colonizing forces of European/Euro-American states. Bearing of dual citizenship on nature/powers of tribal governments in relation to states, federal government.
POL 3752 - Chicana/o Politics (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01223 - Chic 3852/Pol 3752
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory/practice of Chicana/o politics through analysis of Mexican American experience, social agency. Response to larger political systems/behaviors using social science methods of inquiry. Unequal power relations, social justice, political economy.
CHIC 3852 - Chicana/o Politics (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01223 - Chic 3852/Pol 3752
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory/practice of Chicana/o politics through an analysis of Mexican American experience, social agency, and response to larger political systems and behaviors using social science methods of inquiry. Unequal power relations, social justice, and the political economy.
POL 3769 - Public Opinion and Voting Behavior (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4767/5767
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major factors influencing electoral decisions/political attitude formation/change.
POL 5767 - Public Opinion and Voting Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4767/5767
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major factors influencing electoral decisions. Political attitude formation/change. Data analysis lab required. prereq: grad student or instr consent
POL 3785H - Persuasion and Political Propaganda
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01925
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Persuasion theories relevant to designing effective political propaganda. Applying theories to analyze WWI/WWII propaganda posters, films, and political campaign commercials. Use of fiction as propaganda tool.
POL 4315W - State Governments: Laboratories of Democracy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00861
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
State governments are rarely at the forefront of the minds of the American public, but in recent years they have made critical decisions about issues like education, health care, climate change, and same-sex marriage. State governments perform a host of vital services, and they regulate and tax a wide array of business activities. Moreover, the states have adopted a very wide range of approaches in addressing these and other policy issues. This course examines the institutional and political changes that sparked the recent ?resurgence of the states,? and it investigates why state policies differ so dramatically from one another. In addition to playing a central and increasingly important role in the U.S. political system, the American states provide an unusually advantageous venue in which to conduct research about political behavior and policymaking. They are broadly similar in many ways, but they also offer significant variation across a range of social, political, economic, and institutional characteristics that are central to theories about politics. As a result, it becomes possible for scholars to evaluate hypotheses about cause-and-effect relationships in a valid way. This course pursues two related objectives. Its first goal is to give students a better understanding of American state governments? substantive significance. Its second goal is to use the states as an analytical venue in which students can hone their research and writing skills. Students will design and complete an original research paper on an aspect of state politics of their choosing. They will develop a research question, gather and critically evaluate appropriate and relevant evidence, and discuss the implications of their research. prereq: 1001 or equiv, non-pol sci grad major or instr consent
POL 5315 - State Governments: Laboratories of Democracy
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00861
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
State governments are rarely at the forefront of the minds of the American public, but in recent years they have made critical decisions about issues like education, health care, climate change, and same-sex marriage. State governments perform a host of vital services, and they regulate and tax a wide array of business activities. Moreover, the states have adopted a very wide range of approaches in addressing these and other policy issues. This course examines the institutional and political changes that sparked the recent ?resurgence of the states,? and it investigates why state policies differ so dramatically from one another. In addition to playing a central and increasingly important role in the U.S. political system, the American states provide an unusually advantageous venue in which to conduct research about political behavior and policymaking. They are broadly similar in many ways, but they also offer significant variation across a range of social, political, economic, and institutional characteristics that are central to theories about politics. As a result, it becomes possible for scholars to evaluate hypotheses about cause-and-effect relationships in a valid way. This course pursues two related objectives. Its first goal is to give students a better understanding of American state governments? substantive significance. Its second goal is to use the states as an analytical venue in which students can hone their research and writing skills. Students will design and complete an original research paper on an aspect of state politics of their choosing. They will develop a research question, gather and critically evaluate appropriate and relevant evidence, and discuss the implications of their research. prereq: grad student or instr consent
POL 4502W - The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Supreme Court's interpretation of Bill of Rights, 14th amendment. Freedom of speech, press, religion; crime/punishment; segregation/desegregation, affirmative action; abortion/privacy.
POL 5502 - Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Supreme Court's interpretation of Bill of Rights, 14th amendment. Freedom of speech, press, religion. Crime/punishment. Segregation/desegregation, affirmative action. Abortion/privacy. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: : 4502; 1001 or 1002 or equiv or non-pol sci grad student or instr consent
AMIN 4501 - Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01844 - AmIn 4501/Pol 4507
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
History of American Indian law and the post-contact effects of colonial and U.S. law on American Indians through the 20th century. prereq: 1001
POL 4525W - Federal Indian Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00285
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Formulation, implementation, evolution, comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial times to self-governance of new millennium. Theoretical approaches to federal Indian policy. Major federal Indian policies. Views/attitudes of policy-makers, reactions of indigenous nations to policies. Effect of bodies of literature on policies.
AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00285
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Formulation, implementation, evolution, comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial times to self-governance new millennium. Theoretical approaches to federal Indian policy. Major federal Indian policies. Views/attitudes of policy-makers, reactions of indigenous nations to policies. Effect of bodies of literature related to policies.
POL 5525 - Federal Indian Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Formulation, implementation, evolution, comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial times to self-governance of new millennium. Theoretical approaches to federal Indian policy. Major federal Indian policies. Views/attitudes of policy-makers, reactions of indigenous nations to policies. Effect of bodies of literature on policies. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: : 4525, AmIn 4525; grad student
POL 4737W - American Political Parties (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4737/5737
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
The American two-party system; party influence in legislatures and executives; decline of parties and their future. prereq: 1001 or equiv or instr consent
POL 5737 - American Political Parties
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4737/5737
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
American two-party system. Party influence in legislatures/executives. Decline of parties, their future. prereq: grad student or instr consent
POL 3810 - Topics in International Relations and Foreign Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics courses delve in depth into important issues in contemporary international politics. They aim to give students the theoretical, conceptual, and historical understanding, and/or empirical tools needed to understand the complexity of international politics today. Topics courses vary substantially from year to year as specified in the class schedule, but recent topics courses have included: 'Technology and War', International Law', 'Drones, Detention and Torture: The Laws of War', and ‘The Consequences of War.’
POL 3835 - International Relations (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Why do countries go to war? Are individuals, organizations, and states driven by their interests or their ideas? What role does power play in international relations and is there any role for justice in global politics? Do international laws and transnational advocacy groups matter in a world dominated by powerful states? Whose interests are served by a globalizing world economy? These questions are central to the study of international relations, yet different theoretical approaches have been developed in an attempt to answer them. Often these approaches disagree with one another, leading to markedly different policy prescriptions and predictions for future events. This course provides the conceptual and theoretical means for analyzing these issues, processes, and events in international politics. By the end of this class, you will be able to understand the assumptions, the logics, and the implications of major theories and concepts of international relations. These include realism and neorealism, liberalism and liberal institutionalism, constructivism, feminism, Marxism, and critical theory. A special effort is made to relate the course material to world events, developments, or conflicts in the past decade or so.
POL 4810 - Topics in International Politics and Foreign Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics courses delve in depth into important issues in contemporary international politics. They aim to give students the theoretical, conceptual, and historical understanding, and/or empirical tools needed to understand the complexity of international politics today. Topics courses vary substantially from year to year as specified in the class schedule, but recent topics courses have included: 'Technology and War', International Law', 'Drones, Detention and Torture: The Laws of War', and ?The Consequences of War.?
POL 4878W - Israeli-Palestinian Situation (GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02163
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Situation as clash of two communities. History, politics, respective narratives of each community. Divisions within each community that are consequential for reconciliation. Examples of reconciliation literature from both communities.
POL 4887 - Thinking Strategically in International Politics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02215
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
The purpose of this class is threefold: First, to introduce students to the use and value of formal models of strategic interaction (game theoretic models) in international relations. Second, to impart some basic tools of such modeling to students. And third, to examine the contribution of theoretical models to substantive areas in international relations. In keeping with these three goals, the course is divided into three sections. The first two weeks will devoted to such questions as: What is a theoretical model? What are rational choice and game theory? How are game theoretic models employed in international relations and what have been seminal contributions to the literature? The next portion of the class will introduce students to the basic tools employed in game theoretic analysis. The readings will illustrate the use of the tools introduced in class. And five problem sets will be administered, requiring students to make use of these tools. The final portion of the class will examine substantive questions in international relations through the lens of game theory. The topics to be presented include: Domestic Politics and War, International Agreements and Treaties, International Finance and Trade, Conditionality, Terrorism, and Human Rights.
POL 5810 - Topics in International Politics and Foreign Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected issues in contemporary international relations. Topics vary, see Class Schedule.
POL 3833 - The United States and the Global Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
POL 3833 teaches students about the politics of the global economy with a focus on the role the United States plays within it. The class covers a variety of topics in international political economy, including international trade, international investment, and international finance. Students will learn about the factors that drive politicians' decision-making, interest-group stances, and citizens' preferences over such salient issues as tariffs and other forms of trade protection, trade and investment agreements, central banking, interest rates, international migration, and more. No background in economics is required or assumed.
POL 5833 - The United States in the Global EconomyUS For Econ Policy
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Domestic/international politics of United States. Foreign economic policy (trade, aid, investment, monetary, migration policies). Effects of policies and international economic relations on U.S. economy/politics. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: : 4833; grad student; 3835 recommended
POL 4885W - International Conflict and Security (GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4885/5885
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
An examination of alternative theories of the sources of militarized international conflict. Apply these theories to one or more past conflicts and discuss their relevance to the present.
POL 5885 - International Conflict and Security
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4885/5885
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Alternative theories of sources of militarized international conflict. Theories applied to past conflicts. Theories' relevance to present. prereq: grad student
POL 3065 - Political Engagement Careers: Planning and Preparing For Your Future (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Exploration of careers in public service or political engagement; theories of political engagement; case studies of challenges and opportunities in public service careers; ethics of political engagement; development of resume, cover letter, informational interview, and networking skills; development of individual public service career plan.
POL 4010 - Topics in Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced undergraduate course is statistical methods for political research. Topics vary as specified in class search. It is recommended students take POL 3085 or equivalent before enrolling in POL 4010.
POL 3085 - Quantitative Analysis in Political Science (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
POL 3085 teaches students how to study politics scientifically and introduces them to how to use quantitative analysis to answer political questions. The first part of the class covers how to formulate a theory (a possible answer to a question), specify testable hypotheses (what you would see if the theory is correct or incorrect), and set up a research design to test those hypotheses. In the second part of the class, we cover quantitative data analysis, beginning from preliminary statistical analysis to multivariate linear regression. There is no mathematical or statistical background required for this course. By the end of the class, students should be able to ask and answer political questions using quantitative data and fluently evaluate statistical analyses of political phenomena in the media and many academic articles.
POL 3085H - Honors Course: Quantitative Analysis in Political Science (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
POL 3085 teaches students how to study politics scientifically and introduces them to how to use quantitative analysis to answer political questions. The first part of the class covers how to formulate a theory (a possible answer to a question), specify testable hypotheses (what you would see if the theory is correct or incorrect), and set up a research design to test those hypotheses. In the second part of the class, we cover quantitative data analysis, beginning from preliminary statistical analysis to multivariate linear regression. There is no mathematical or statistical background required for this course. By the end of the class, students should be able to ask and answer political questions using quantitative data and fluently evaluate statistical analyses of political phenomena in the media and many academic articles. prereq: Honors student
POL 3080 - Internship in Politics or Government
Credits: 3.0 -13.0 [max 15.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02701
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Internship with government or community organizations arranged by the department and awarded competitively each spring semester. prereq: instr consent, dept consent