Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature Minor

Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2019
  • Required credits in this minor: 17 to 18
The minor in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature (CSCL) is a flexible and multidisciplinary minor in the liberal arts. Our courses examine the ways global cultural and artistic practices reflect and transform modes of knowing, of feeling, of acting politically, and underpin conceptions of both individual and collective social identity. The CSCL curriculum covers a wide range of media and art forms, from literature, to cinema, popular culture, music, and the visual arts. The department places a particular focus on the power of ideas; we like to think about how abstract questions in philosophy and theory address concrete problems in our material world. CSCL strives for a broad, international scope, and ranges widely across history and geography. We aim to produce critical, thoughtful, and well-rounded citizens prepared to work in a wide range of careers from media and journalism to academia, law, politics, medicine, non-profit work in schools, libraries, archives, museums, and community organizations, to advertising, business, entertainment, and other creative fields. Many of our graduates are path-breaking intellectuals, artistic innovators, and committed participants in social struggles that will shape our collective future.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Students may earn a BA or a minor in cultural studies and comparative literature, but not both.
Introductory Courses
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
Lecture Courses
Introductory Lecture Courses are larger courses (50200 students) that give students a broad introduction to general topics studied in CSCL.
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· CSCL 1001W - Introduction to Cultural Studies [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1101W - Literature [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1201W - Cinema [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or SCMC 1201W - Cinema [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound [AH, TS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or SCMC 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound [AH, TS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· Introductory Seminars
Introductory seminars are smaller courses (2025 students) that provide students more one-on-one interaction with instructors and more detailed feedback on their thinking and writing. Lecturing is minimal and active class participation is expected.
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· CSCL 1301W - Reading Culture: Theory and Practice [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1401W - Reading Literature: Theory and Practice [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 1501W - Reading History: Theory and Practice [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
Electives
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CSCL 3005 - Seminar in Critical Thought (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3117 - Concepts of Literary Study [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3111W - Close Reading [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3120 - Poetry as Cultural Critique (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3122 - Movements and Manifestos [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3130W - Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures and Theory: 1700 to the Present [LITR, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3231 - Comedy: Media, Politics & Society [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3211 - Global and Transnational Cinemas [GP] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 3212W - Documentary Cinema: History and Politics [AH, CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 3221 - On Television [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3251 - Popular Music and Mass Culture [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3310W - The Rhetoric of Everyday Life [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3425W - Critical Theory and Social Change [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3323 - Science and Culture [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3334 - Monsters, Robots, Cyborgs [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3335 - Aliens: Science Fiction to Social Theory [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3351W - The Body and the Politics of Representation [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3352W - Queer Aesthetics & Queer Critique [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3405 - Marx for Today [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3412W - Psychoanalysis [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3413W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3910 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3910H {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· CSCL 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5305 - Vision and Visuality: An Intellectual History (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5331 - Discourse of the Novel (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5411 - Avant-Garde Cinema (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 5666 - Film Music: Theory, History, Practice (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 5833 - Marx, Freud, Nietzsche: Intellectual Foundations (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5910 - Topics in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature (3.0-4.0 cr)
· CSCL 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5555 - Introduction to Semiotics (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3210 - Cinema and Ideology [AH] (4.0 cr)
or SCMC 3210 - Cinema and Ideology [AH] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 3220W - Screen Cultures [AH, TS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SCMC 3220W - Screen Cultures [AH, TS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750 (3.0 cr)
or CSCL 5281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750 (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750 (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750 (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present (3.0 cr)
or CSCL 5282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period,1750-Present (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 5401 - Origins of Cultural Studies (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 5501 - Origins of Cultural Studies (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3350W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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· Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature Minor
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CSCL 1001W - Introduction to Cultural Studies (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Culture is a site of struggle, over meanings, values, history, and reality. This course introduces students to cultural studies as a conceptual, interpretive, and interdisciplinary approach to the role that culture plays in defining reality and to the possibilities for contesting those definitions. Through exploring the rituals and practices of culture that shape our perceptions of the world, often in ways we take for granted, the course seeks to develop a critical understanding of the relationships between individual and society, representation and reality, as well as theory and practice.
CSCL 1101W - Literature (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
What is literature? Today the term literature embraces all things printed, from fiction to nonfiction to advertising (yes, even your junk mail), from highbrow to low. This course will take a comparative view of the term literature as well as its ideas, practices, and forms. Given that literature historically has been tied to writing, to print, or to the book, what does it mean to study literature today?in an age when the book (and possibly print itself) may be vanishing?
CSCL 1201W - Cinema (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 1921W/CSCL 1201W/SCMC 120
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical study of the visual in modernity, presented through sustained analysis of the cinema and cinematic codes. Emphases on formal film analysis and major film movements and conventions in the international history of cinema. Students develop a vocabulary for formal visual analysis and explore major theories of the cinema. *Students will not receive credit for CSCL 1201W if they have already taken SCMC 1201W, CSCL 1201V, SCMC 1201V, ARTH 1921W, CSCL 1921W, CSCL 1201 or SCMC 1201
SCMC 1201W - Cinema (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 1921W/CSCL 1201W/SCMC 120
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical study of the visual in modernity, presented through sustained analysis of the cinema and cinematic codes. Emphases on formal film analysis and major film movements and conventions in the international history of cinema. Students develop a vocabulary for formal visual analysis and explore major theories of the cinema. *Students will not receive credit for CSCL 1201W if they have already taken SCMC 1201W, ARTH 1921W, CSCL 1921W, CSCL 1201 or SCMC 1201
CSCL 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound (AH, TS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 1202W/SCMC 1202W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical and theoretical study of media and technology from Aristotle to the modern world. The first half of the course emphasizes theoretical readings in dialogue with historical apparatuses (printing press, photography, radio, cinema, television) and various expressive objects (the bible, early film, ethnographic sound recordings). The second half turns to the modern culture industry since World War II, and introduces students to the critical study of mass culture, the concept of ideology, and of the relationship between corporate power and media conglomerates.
SCMC 1202W - Media: Word, Image, Sound (AH, TS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 1202W/SCMC 1202W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the critical and theoretical study of media and technology from Aristotle to the modern world. The first half of the course emphasizes theoretical readings in dialogue with historical apparatuses (printing press, photography, radio, cinema, television) and various expressive objects (the bible, early film, ethnographic sound recordings). The second half turns to the modern culture industry since World War II, and introduces students to the critical study of mass culture, the concept of ideology, and of the relationship between corporate power and media conglomerates.
CSCL 1301W - Reading Culture: Theory and Practice (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Culture and cultural conflict. Reading cultural theory/texts such as film, literature, music, fashion, commercial art, and built environment.
CSCL 1401W - Reading Literature: Theory and Practice (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How can we read/understand different ways that literature is meaningful? Emphasizes practice in reading a broad spectrum of world literature, literary theory.
CSCL 1501W - Reading History: Theory and Practice (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
What is history? How can we understand its meanings/uses? Emphasizes practice in reading cultural texts from various historical perspectives.
CSCL 3005 - Seminar in Critical Thought
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Exploration of concepts and problems foundational to the practice of critique. Focus on paradigmatic concerns and shifts underpinning humanistic inquiry, from the past to the present, such as representation, narrative, ideology, subjectivity, power and violence, and transformation. Groundwork for understanding the European critical tradition and key challenges from non-European sources.
CSCL 3117 - Concepts of Literary Study (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course begins by asking what this strange thing we call literature is, this six-thousand year old form of writing that brings into existence, each time a work is read, a world that did not previously exist. Sometimes that world is one in which we long to live, sometimes it is dark and foreboding, all death and despair; sometimes we seek it out as an escape from our daily lives, sometimes we enter it to be able to better understand those same lives, to come back to them refreshed, not just emotionally but intellectually -- for if literature does involve an immersion in the not-actually-existent, a departure from the everyday world, it does so by engaging us from within the world and in such a way that it is able to recast our everyday world and make us think it in new ways. And literature does all this with that most everyday of things, language. By attending to the ways authors and scholars mobilise language?s expressive, analytic and conceptual resources, with this course we shall learn various methods of critically appreciating and engaging complex literature, while gaining insight into how the practices of literary criticism and theory relate to, and help us understand, the world in which we live, how language shapes and forms that world and literature?s unique place and role in that world and its forming.
CSCL 3111W - Close Reading (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
History/theory of 'close reading' (i.e., the most intense encounter between reader and text) exemplified through critical texts. Students perform close readings of various texts.
CSCL 3120 - Poetry as Cultural Critique
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3012/CSCL 3174
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examines the status of "poetry" in several cultures of the Americas bringing together techniques of close reading and broad cultural inquiry.
CSCL 3122 - Movements and Manifestos (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Movements that emerge when a group of writers, filmmakers, artists, composers, or musicians puts forth a new definition of literature, film, art, or music?and sets in motion new relations (aesthetic and social) of word, image, sound. Manifestos?statements of position?that articulate or counter such definitions. Movements created by scholars or critics after the fact. Focuses on one or two related movements (e.g., romanticism and realism, surrealism and negritude, new wave and third cinema).
CSCL 3130W - Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures and Theory: 1700 to the Present (LITR, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Readings in colonial/postcolonial literatures/theory from at least two world regions: Africa, the Americas, the Arab world, Asia, Europe, and the Pacific. Cultural/psychological dynamics and political economy of world under empire, decolonization, pre- vs. post-coloniality, globalization.
CSCL 3231 - Comedy: Media, Politics & Society (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
What makes some jokes so funny? And why do we laugh? In this course, we will approach the topic of comedy from every angle. We will study theories and philosophies of humor, and will survey many different forms of the genre?film, television, viral web videos, internet memes, stand-up, improv, sketch comedy, absurdist theater, and political satire. And, of course, we will write and perform our own comedy in the classroom. By studying the history and formations of comedy, we will think about how jokes can help us change the rules of everyday life and imagine a new way forward.
CSCL 3211 - Global and Transnational Cinemas (GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3211/SCMC 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores Global and Transnational Cinemas as alternative traditions to the dominant Hollywood-centered accounts of film history. Students will grapple with the historical, social, and political motivations of cinematic projects that critique traditions of national cinema, or that resist the hegemonic force of neocolonial cultural centers. Italian Neo-realism and the French New Wave will be examined as movements that challenge politics and mass culture. Third Cinema in Latin America and pan-African cinematic movements will be examined through their struggles with both colonialism and the rise of post-colonial dictatorships. Indian and Japanese cinemas of the 50s & 60s will mark out new possibilities of filmmaking and distribution. Finally, counter-hegemonic and experimental movements in U.S.-based film, such as the L.A. Rebellion and Fluxus, will allow students to understand how opposition to Hollywood style could exist within the very centers of cultural power while also reaching out to larger global communities.
CSCL 3212W - Documentary Cinema: History and Politics (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3212W/SCMC 3212W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course explores the ethics and aesthetics of documentary cinema, arguably the very first genre of film. We will track the way documentary has widened from largely instructional and experimental uses early in its history to become a distinct genre among today?s familiar feature films. We will screen early documentaries, which may include shocking ethnographies (Nanook of the North, The Mad Masters). Over the course of the term, the syllabus makes its way to recent exemplars of the genre (films may include: Amy, American Teen, I Am Not Your Negro, A Jihad for Love, Generation Wealth, Fetish, Blackfish and so on). One of our aims will be to explore students? relations as viewers and documentarians themselves (via smartphones, Instagram, etc.) to this participatory, revelatory, and always controversial, politically fraught film practice. Documentary Cinema includes both full class lectures and discussions as well as small group discussion of films and readings, and may include the opportunity for students to create their own personal documentary. Intellectually, the course balances out a study of the grammar of documentary as an artistic practice with explorations of the ways the genre reflects broader currents of cinematic and cultural history. By the end of the semester, students should have a stronger understanding of the ways documentary cinema opens our senses to the world around us.
CSCL 3221 - On Television (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3221/SCMC 3221
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We will study writings on television and specific TV shows from a variety of angles to understand the rise of American broadcast technologies, how race and class are crafted on TV, representations of gender and the home, postmodernity and late capitalism, the rise and demise and of taste, global television and the public sphere, the production of ?reality? in our present historical moment, and changes in televisual technologies. Throughout the course, we will also consider what constitutes television?the technology, the form, and the content?and learn to read these three facets of it concurrently.
CSCL 3251 - Popular Music and Mass Culture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Close examination of widely varying musical forms and styles, "classical" and "popular," in relation to human subjectivity and configurations of culture, ideology, and power.
CSCL 3310W - The Rhetoric of Everyday Life (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How discourse reproduces consciousness and persuades us to accept that consciousness and the power supporting it. Literary language, advertising, electronic media; film, visual and musical arts, built environment, and performance. Techniques for analyzing language, material culture, and performance. (previously 3173W)
CSCL 3425W - Critical Theory and Social Change (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the tradition of Critical Theory, one of the most influential lineages of social philosophy in the modern era. Critical Theory challenges us to achieve critical awareness of the powerful systems, ideologies, and histories that condition our everyday lives. We will discuss topics ranging from racism, social exploitation, and environmental damage, to the borderless competition of the gig economy and the allegedly personal choice of a favorite book, album, or film. We begin with readings by Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud who staged revolutionary critiques of economic and moral norms. From here, the course turns to canonical works of the Frankfurt School (Adorno, Benjamin, Marcuse), before discussing midcentury critiques of gender and sex (de Beauvoir) and the psychology of race and colonialism (Fanon). In the second half, we turn to critiques of late modern consumerism and mass spectacle (Baudrillard), the arrival of Critical Race Theory and Critical Legal Studies in the 1980s, the advent of queer theory and post-/de-colonial theory during the 1990s, and the recent emergence of "fake critiques" and conspiracy theories advanced by right-wing populists.
CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Scientific and cultural theory concerning the organization of nature, human nature, and their significance for development of ethics, religion, political/economic philosophy, civics, and environmentalism in Western/other civilizations.
CSCL 3323 - Science and Culture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Science and technology engaged through historical and cultural manifestations from film, literature, and YouTube to scientific and philosophical essays. Relations among humanities, science, economics, politics, philosophy and history. Psychiatry and drugs, food and agriculture, sexuality, religion and science, climate change.
CSCL 3334 - Monsters, Robots, Cyborgs (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical/critical reading of figures (e.g., uncanny double, monstrous aberration, technological hybrid) in mythology, literature, and film, from classical epic to sci-fi, cyberpunk, and Web. (previously 3461)
CSCL 3335 - Aliens: Science Fiction to Social Theory (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In English, the word ?alien? designates both immigrants from other countries and beings from other worlds. Aliens of all sorts are everywhere; they tend to provoke fascination, fantasy, and for many, fear and anxiety. But the deeper philosophical significance of aliens says as much about us as it does about them. In this course, we will explore these questions through a range of novels, films, and artworks from the 1890s to the present day, with an emphasis on science fiction and American popular culture.
CSCL 3351W - The Body and the Politics of Representation (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Western representation of the human body, 1500 to present. Body's appearance as a site and sight for production of social and cultural difference (race, ethnicity, class, gender). Visual arts, literature, music, medical treatises, courtesy literature, erotica. (previously 3458W)
CSCL 3352W - Queer Aesthetics & Queer Critique (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Is there such a thing as global queer aesthetic? If so, how do various modes of representation and expression (novels, poetry, and sophisticated uses of language across film, television and video, digital media, pop music and punk) elaborate and enact queerness in particular material ways while also helping to create a larger, intermedial queer culture?
CSCL 3405 - Marx for Today (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides students with an introduction to Marxist theory, with particular attention to its relevance for the contemporary world. The course will focus on Marx's writings themselves as well as a range of applications and case studies as they relate to gender, race, ethnicity, and social inequality. Among the many topics to be considered include topics like modes of production, labor, profit and surplus value, slavery and race, gender and domestic labor, finance capital and crisis, and environmental sustainability. Students will be required to take two exams, in addition to completing a final paper. It is a discussion-based course, and active participation, close reading, and analytical writing will be expected.
CSCL 3412W - Psychoanalysis (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The work of Sigmund Freud has withstood years of controversy to install itself as foundational to the way we understand the relationship between individual desires, social structures, and cultural practices. This is in part because Freud?s writings were not restricted to the domain of psychology. His writings also renewed grand philosophical questions in ways that dramatically transformed them. He asked: What is a human subject? What are the causes of her actions? What are the nature and motivations of her engagement with others? In the many decades since his early publications, Freud?s key concepts like the ego, the superego, the id, the unconscious, and the significance of dreams and jokes have had an enduring influence in Western culture. This course introduces students to a range of psychoanalytic writings from Freud?s early theories of mental structure and human development to contemporary applications, re-workings, and critiques of psychoanalysis. We will discuss concepts like the unconscious, sexuality, disavowal, repression, neurosis, melancholia, the pleasure principle and the death drive. By the end of the course, we will have developed a sense of the uses and limitations of psychoanalysis for understanding pressing global issues such as sexual identification and its formation, racism, neo-fascism, extreme political division, war and nationalism, climate change, and the destruction of democratic ideals. Authors read may include Melanie Klein, Franz Fanon, Jacques Lacan, Julia Kristeva, David Eng, Slavoj Zizek, Henry Stack Sullivan, Kalpana Sheshadri- Crooks and Margaret Mahler. Readings will be complemented with short stories, literary excerpts, film clips, as well as discussion of current political issues.
CSCL 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
CSCL 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual study.
CSCL 5305 - Vision and Visuality: An Intellectual History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CL 5305/CSCL 5305/CSDS 5305
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Central role of vision/visuality in modernity. Modern age as scopic regime. Ways that ideas/ideologies of perception have shaped aesthetic experience within social existence.
CSCL 5331 - Discourse of the Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CLit 5331/CSCL 5331
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Comparative study of the novel, 18th century to present. Its relations to ordinary language practices, emergent reading publics, technologies of cultural dissemination, problems of subjectivity, and its role in articulating international cultural relations.
CSCL 5411 - Avant-Garde Cinema
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
In 1939, the art critic Clement Greenberg defined avant-garde art in opposition to the ?kitsch? of mass-produced culture. To what extent does this conception of the avant-garde apply to the cinema?an institution and art form that supposedly requires machines and industrial modes of production? This course introduces students to key works of avant-garde and experimental film made by artists working on the margins of commercial film and mainstream art institutions. From the first half of the twentieth century, we will consider influential films made under the banners of Futurism, Constructivism, Surrealism, and Dada, and discuss their complex relation to Hollywood commodities. In the postwar period, we will explore a range of increasingly global experimental film practices, from the queer underground cinema in Latin America to the use of film projection in avant-garde performance. We will examine these practices in light of larger debates about medium specificity as well as the aesthetics and politics of the personal vs. the structural. In the final unit, we will reflect on the way contemporary artists, scholars, and curators have assembled a tradition of avant-garde cinema in the age of new media, and contemplate new directions we want it to take.
CSCL 5666 - Film Music: Theory, History, Practice
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Role of music in American/European film from early 20th century silent cinema to near present. Narrative features, shorts, documentary, horror, thriller, science fiction, comedy, cartoon. Film music as social/cultural practice and as part of political economy within culture industry.
CSCL 5833 - Marx, Freud, Nietzsche: Intellectual Foundations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Three thinkers who defined modernity: Marx, Freud, and Nietzsche. Central tenets of their thought/terms associated with their theories. Their careers portrayed against the background of their times; their place in intellectual history.
CSCL 5910 - Topics in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 32.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
CSCL 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 5993/CSDS 5993
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
CSCL 5555 - Introduction to Semiotics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CL 5555/CSCL 5555/CSDS 5555
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Problems of the nature of the sign; sign function; sign production; signifying systems as articulated in philosophy, linguistics, anthropology, psychoanalysis, and art theory. Application of semiotics to various signifying practices (literature, cinema, daily life).
CSCL 3210 - Cinema and Ideology (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3210/SCMC 3210
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The cinema as a social institution with emphasis on the complex relations it maintains with the ideological practices that define both the form and the content of its products. Specific films used to study how mass culture contributes to the process of shaping beliefs and identities of citizens.
SCMC 3210 - Cinema and Ideology (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3210/SCMC 3210
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The cinema as a social institution with emphasis on the complex relations it maintains with the ideological practices that define both the form and the content of its products. Specific films used to study how mass culture contributes to the process of shaping beliefs and identities of citizens.
CSCL 3220W - Screen Cultures (AH, TS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3220W/SCMC 3220W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Screens increasingly define the ways that we communicate with one another and how we encounter the world. This course will offer a critical, historical approach to the emergence of ?screen cultures? from the beginning of photography and cinema to our own age of ubiquitous touch screen displays. We will pay a great deal of attention to the ways that such technologies drive our patterns of consumption and production as well as how they create and define our social environments.
SCMC 3220W - Screen Cultures (AH, TS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3220W/SCMC 3220W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Screens increasingly define the ways that we communicate with one another and how we encounter the world. This course will offer a critical, historical approach to the emergence of ?screen cultures? from the beginning of photography and cinema to our own age of ubiquitous touch screen displays. We will pay a great deal of attention to the ways that such technologies drive our patterns of consumption and production as well as how they create and define our social environments.
CSCL 3281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3281/CSCL 528/1Hist 3281/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
First of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings from original sources.
CSCL 5281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3281/CSCL 528/1Hist 3281/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
First of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings from original sources.
HIST 3281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3281/CSCL 528/1Hist 3281/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
First of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings from original sources.
HIST 5281 - European Intellectual History: The Early Modern Period, Antiquity to 1750
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3281/CSCL 528/1Hist 3281/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
First of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings from original sources. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
CSCL 3282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3282/CSCL 5282/Hist 3282/
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Second of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings are from original sources.
CSCL 5282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3282/CSCL 5282/Hist 3282/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Second of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings are from original sources.
HIST 3282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period, 1750-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3282/CSCL 5282/Hist 3282/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Second of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings are from original sources.
HIST 5282 - European Intellectual History: The Modern Period,1750-Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3282/CSCL 5282/Hist 3282/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Second of a two-semester course. European thought in its historical/cultural context. Emphasizes development of philosophical/scientific thought, its relation to thinking about the individual and the community. Readings are from original sources. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
CSCL 5401 - Origins of Cultural Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CL 5401/CSDS 5401/CSCL 5401/En
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Intellectual map of the creation of cultural studies as a unique approach to studying social meanings. Key figures and concepts, including nineteenth- and early twentieth century precursors.
ENGL 5501 - Origins of Cultural Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CL 5401/CSDS 5401/CSCL 5401/En
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Intellectual map of the creation of cultural studies as a unique approach to studying social meanings. Key figures and concepts, including nineteenth- and early twentieth century precursors.
CSCL 3350W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3350W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3350W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.