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Twin Cities Campus

Developmental Psychology Minor

CLA Dean's Office
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Required credits in this minor: 16 to 17
Developmental psychology studies behavioral development across the lifespan. Complete coursework in topic areas including social and emotional development, cognitive development, language development, emotional and behavioral disorders, and biological development.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
An Introduction to Child Psychology course (CPSY 2301 or 3301) must be in progress or completed in order to declare the minor.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Introduction to Child Psychology
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· CPSY 2301 - Introduction to Child Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or CPSY 3301 - Introduction to Child Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
Minor Requirements
Students may earn no more than one undergraduate degree in Developmental Psychology: a BA, a BS, or a minor. Students may combine the Developmental Psychology minor with the BA or the BS in Psychology.
Core Content Area
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
Biological Development
· CPSY 4329 - Biological Foundations of Development (3.0 cr)
· Cognitive Development
· CPSY 4341 - Perceptual Development (3.0 cr)
or CPSY 4343 - Cognitive Development (3.0 cr)
or CPSY 4345 - Language Development and Communication (3.0 cr)
· Social Development
· CPSY 4331 - Social and Personality Development (3.0 cr)
or CPSY 4336 - Development and Interpersonal Relationships (3.0 cr)
Electives
No single course may count as both a Core and Elective requirement.
Take 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CPSY 1301 - Nature-Based Learning in Early Childhood (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 1334 - Global Issues on Children and Youth in Society [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 2310 - Special Topics in Child Development (1.0-4.0 cr)
· CPSY 3308W - Introduction to Research Methods in Child Psychology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CPSY 3601 - Introduction to Child Life Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 4302 - Infant Development (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 4303 - Adolescent Psychology (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 4310 - Special Topics in Child Development (1.0-4.0 cr)
· CPSY 4311 - Behavioral and Emotional Problems of Children (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 4313W - Disabilities and Development [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CPSY 4329 - Biological Foundations of Development (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 4331 - Social and Personality Development (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 4336 - Development and Interpersonal Relationships (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 4341 - Perceptual Development (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 4343 - Cognitive Development (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 4345 - Language Development and Communication (3.0 cr)
· Take at most 3 credit(s) from the following:
· CPSY 3896 - Internship in Child Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)
· CPSY 4994 - Directed Research in Child Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)
 
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CPSY 2301 - Introduction to Child Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01677 - CPsy 2301/CPsy 3301
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will examine normative physical, social, and cognitive development from the prenatal period through adolescence. The major goals include fostering an understanding of the usefulness of a developmental approach to psychological issues, familiarizing students with current research and methodology in child psychology, and engaging students in the experiences of developmental psychology through observation and analysis of child behavior. PSY majors should take the cross-listed course CPSY 3301.
CPSY 3301 - Introduction to Child Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01677 - CPsy 2301/CPsy 3301
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will examine normative physical, social, and cognitive development from the prenatal period through adolescence. The major goals include fostering an understanding of the usefulness of a developmental approach to psychological issues, familiarizing students with current research and methodology in child psychology, and engaging students in the experiences of developmental psychology through observation and analysis of child behavior. This course is intended for non-Child Psychology/Early Childhood majors. Those majors should take the cross-listed course CPSY 2301.
CPSY 4329 - Biological Foundations of Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evolutionary theory and behavioral genetics applied to understanding of development of human behavior; formation of species-typical adaptive behavior and individual differences in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. prereq: CPSY 2301 / 3301 or equiv
CPSY 4341 - Perceptual Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study how children learn to perceive and experience the world. Explore different approaches to studying brain function and the development of the sensory and perceptual systems and processes with focus on infant perception and the neurobiology of how the senses work. Cover a variety of developmental disorders of sensation and perception: learn about normal brain function by studying abnormal brain function. prereq: CPSY 2301 / 3301 or equiv
CPSY 4343 - Cognitive Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the scientific study of cognitive development (children's thinking) from infancy through adolescence. Focus on research and practical applications. Specific topic areas include infant perception and cognition, attention and memory development, language and symbolic thinking, social cognition, executive function. prereq: CPSY 2301 or 3301 or equivalent
CPSY 4345 - Language Development and Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How do children acquire language? Learn about acquisition of phonology (the sound system of the language), semantics (the meaning of units in the language), syntax (the structure of sentences), morphology (the structure of words, phrases, and sentences), and pragmatics (language use). Study English learning along with the acquisition of other spoken and signed languages. prereq: CPSY 2301 / 3301 or equiv
CPSY 4331 - Social and Personality Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Development of social relations and personality; research, methodology, and contrasting theoretical perspectives. Survey of findings on interpersonal relationships, the concept of self, prosocial and antisocial behavior, and acquisition of social roles. prereq: CPSY 2301 / 3301 or equiv
CPSY 4336 - Development and Interpersonal Relationships
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Processes and functions of interactions with personal relationships across the lifespan; analysis of theory and research on developmental changes and influences.
CPSY 1301 - Nature-Based Learning in Early Childhood
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is intended for undergraduate students throughout the University of Minnesota to develop an understanding of the connection between early childhood, development, and nature-based learning and play. Students will learn, through an exploration of national standards and guidelines as well as current research, best practices for connecting children and nature.
CPSY 1334 - Global Issues on Children and Youth in Society (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Study of hot topic issues currently faced by children around the world. Provides an introduction to science, ethics, and ramifications in civic life of controversial issues concerning child or youth development in contemporary societies. Examines topics of ethical and civic concern and interest to parents, society, and young people and how developmental science informs these issues and policies as well as the decisions and actions of citizens in society. Students gain a basic understanding of how developmental research and theory inform policy and practices of societies as well as the individual decisions of parents, teachers, community members, and other citizens that influence the lives of children and youth. This course also examines how social issues influence science and its translation to action. Students will be exposed to a wide range of issues about children and youth that currently confront many societies around the world, and the state of the research evidence pertinent to these issues. Students will also learn how research is translated and disseminated so that it can inform policy and practice.
CPSY 2310 - Special Topics in Child Development
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics vary by semester.
CPSY 3308W - Introduction to Research Methods in Child Psychology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Explore developmental research methodology by learning about observational research and experimental designs. Critically evaluate research articles, learn to report research, and understand the difference between science and pseudoscience. Gain awareness of the ethical and practical issues that developmental psychologists face when they work with children. prereq: CPSY 2301 / 3301 or equiv
CPSY 3601 - Introduction to Child Life Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide an introduction to the child life profession with a strong focus on patient and family-centered care. This course will meet the required topics of study as identified by the Child Life Council. The major learning objectives include 1) gaining an understanding of the fundamental theories that support patient and family-centered care and child life practice, 2) identifying how illness, injury and hospitalization impacts a child's development and their family, 3) gaining an understanding of the Official Documents of the Child Life Council, 4) examining the elements of therapeutic play in a clinical setting, and 5) identifying techniques to prepare a child and their family for healthcare encounters. prereq: any introductory course in CPSY, PSY, or FSOS
CPSY 4302 - Infant Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Perceptual, motor, emotional, social, and cognitive development during the first two years of life; the developing infant in his or her social and physical environment. prereq: CPSY 2301 or equivalent or instructor consent
CPSY 4303 - Adolescent Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Overview of development in the teenage years/second decade of life. Interactions of adolescents with family, school, and society. prereq: PSY 1001 or equivalent
CPSY 4310 - Special Topics in Child Development
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Description is specific to each topics title.
CPSY 4311 - Behavioral and Emotional Problems of Children
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study abnormal psychology and atypical development in children and adolescents. Focus on behavioral and emotional problems, disorders and diagnoses, psychopathology contrasted to normal development. Understand symptoms, causes, course, and prevention of common disorders, excluding physical and sensory handicaps. prereq: CPSY 2301 / 3301 or equiv
CPSY 4313W - Disabilities and Development (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Surveys all areas of exceptionality. Mental, hearing, vision, physical, speech, language handicaps. Learning disabilities. Autism. Emotional/behavior disorders. Giftedness. Study the related legal rights, policies, and education accommodations for students with disabilities. prereq: Psy 1001
CPSY 4329 - Biological Foundations of Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evolutionary theory and behavioral genetics applied to understanding of development of human behavior; formation of species-typical adaptive behavior and individual differences in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. prereq: CPSY 2301 / 3301 or equiv
CPSY 4331 - Social and Personality Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Development of social relations and personality; research, methodology, and contrasting theoretical perspectives. Survey of findings on interpersonal relationships, the concept of self, prosocial and antisocial behavior, and acquisition of social roles. prereq: CPSY 2301 / 3301 or equiv
CPSY 4336 - Development and Interpersonal Relationships
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Processes and functions of interactions with personal relationships across the lifespan; analysis of theory and research on developmental changes and influences.
CPSY 4341 - Perceptual Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study how children learn to perceive and experience the world. Explore different approaches to studying brain function and the development of the sensory and perceptual systems and processes with focus on infant perception and the neurobiology of how the senses work. Cover a variety of developmental disorders of sensation and perception: learn about normal brain function by studying abnormal brain function. prereq: CPSY 2301 / 3301 or equiv
CPSY 4343 - Cognitive Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the scientific study of cognitive development (children's thinking) from infancy through adolescence. Focus on research and practical applications. Specific topic areas include infant perception and cognition, attention and memory development, language and symbolic thinking, social cognition, executive function. prereq: CPSY 2301 or 3301 or equivalent
CPSY 4345 - Language Development and Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How do children acquire language? Learn about acquisition of phonology (the sound system of the language), semantics (the meaning of units in the language), syntax (the structure of sentences), morphology (the structure of words, phrases, and sentences), and pragmatics (language use). Study English learning along with the acquisition of other spoken and signed languages. prereq: CPSY 2301 / 3301 or equiv
CPSY 3896 - Internship in Child Psychology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students secure an internship in the realm of child psychology/development. A student may only earn credit for a given internship through one course at a time. Corresponding online coursework includes written reflections, journals, and career development activities. Credits are variable based on hours at your site: - 1 credit - 45 hour minimum (average 3-4 hours per week) - 2 credit - 90 hour minimum (average 5-7 hours per week) - 3 credit - 135 hour minimum (average 8-9 hours per week) - 4 credit - 180 hour minimum (average 10-12 hours per week) Students and their supervisors must submit a completed internship contract via Goldpass in order to register. http://goldpass.umn.edu/ Contact the CPSY advisor with any questions.
CPSY 4994 - Directed Research in Child Psychology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Serve as a research assistant in an Institute of Child Development lab. Help plan/implement scientific studies, gain experience/expertise in methodology of research. Duties vary based on lab and student and are individually arranged with corresponding faculty member. To register: students must first secure their own placement in a faculty research lab. Then submit signed research contract to CPSY advisor for a permission number to register.