Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Anthropology B.A.

Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2021
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 35
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
Anthropology is the study of human beings and cultures throughout the world during the present and past. It is the study of who we are, and how we came to be that way. Anthropology is partly a natural science, partly a social science, and partly a humanistic study. Anthropology majors compare and contrast the biological, social, and cultural similarities and differences of humans and their societies across the globe and develop a sophisticated understanding of the biological unity of our species. Perhaps more than with any other degree, Anthropology majors are known to possess unique observational and critical thinking skills, and are aware of the role that culture plays in identity, relationships, and decision-making. Students who major in the field are expected to take courses in the four sub-fields of anthropology. Students planning a professional career in anthropology general specialize in one of the sub-fields: biological anthropology (the evolutionary history of human and nonhuman primates), archaeology (the study of prehistoric and historic societies through their material culture), sociocultural anthropology (the study of the behavior of recent people in settings that range from unindustrialized societies to modern urban centers), and linguistic anthropology (the comparative study of languages and communication). The Anthropology Department website (http://cla.umn.edu/anthropology/ba-anthropology) offers several examples of course sequences designed to provide training in particular sub-fields. There are a variety of opportunities for graduates with degrees in anthropology. While some go on to graduate school in order to obtain a position in a university, most graduates find non-academic jobs in the private and public sectors. Private industry consulting, environmental firms, product development and marketing firms, as well as the nonprofit sector all employ anthropologists because of the unique observational and critical thinking skills they possess. Governmental agencies at the state and federal levels seek anthropologists for various positions. Biological anthropologists find employment as forensic scientists working for law enforcement. Archaeologists find jobs in cultural resource management (CRM) firms whose services are contracted by construction companies to ensure compliance with legislation pertaining to archaeological and historical preservation. An anthropology major is also excellent preparation for professional schools in medicine, public health, nursing, and law. An anthropology major offers a holistic education that, regardless of the job attained after graduation, provides a perspective on humanity that inspires a lifetime of engagement with the issues of importance to our globalized society.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
All CLA BA degrees require 18 upper-division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the Anthropology BA is ANTH. At least 14 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. Students may earn a bachelor of arts or a minor in anthropology, but not both. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence. All students must complete a capstone in at least one CLA major. The requirements for double majors completing the capstone in a different CLA major will be clearly stated. Students must also complete all major requirements in both majors to allow the additional capstone to be waived. Student completing an addition degree must complete the capstone in each degree area.
Foundation Courses
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
Subfield Core Courses
Take at least one course from at least three of the four subfields: archeology; biological anthropology; sociocultural anthropology; linguistic anthropology.
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 - 12 credit(s) including 3 or more sub-requirements(s) from the following:
Archeology
· ANTH 3001 - Introduction to Archaeology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· Biological Anthropology
· ANTH 3401 - The Human Fossil Record (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
or EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
· Sociocultural Anthropology Subfield
· ANTH 3003 - Cultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· Linguistic Anthropology Subfield
· ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
Electives
The number of credits required will depend on the amount of credits taken toward the Subfield Core Courses. Students should complete a minimum of 5 courses to reach the 35-credit minimum for the major.
Take 5 or more course(s) from the following:
ANTH 4xxx-5xxx
Take 3 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 4001 - Advanced Method and Theory in Archaeology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4003W - Contemporary Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4007 - Laboratory Techniques in Archaeology (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4019 - Symbolic Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4025 - Studies in Ethnographic Classics (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4031W - Anthropology and Social Justice [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4047 - Anthropology of American Culture [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4053 - Economy, Culture, and Critique [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4069 - Historical Ecology & Anthropology of the Environment (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4077 - Neanderthals: Biology and Culture of Humanity's Nearest Relative (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4101 - Decolonizing Archives (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5008 - Advanced Flintknapping (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5009 - Human Behavioral Biology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5028 - Historical Archaeology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5041 - Ecological Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5113 - Primate Evolution (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 5255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5269 - Analysis of Stone Tool Technology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 5327W -  Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5403 - Quantitative Methods in Biological Anthropology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5448 - Applied Heritage Management (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5450 - Spatial Analysis in Anthropology: Research Design and Field Applications (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5501 - Managing Museum Collections (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5980 - Topics in Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4043 - Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings: Archaeology of Northern Europe (3.0 cr)
or MEST 4043 - Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings: Archaeology of Northern Europe (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4049 - Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
or RELS 4049 - Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
or EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4344 - Europe and its Margins (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4344 - Europe and its Margins (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5707W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5128 - Anthropology of Education (3.0 cr)
or OLPD 5128 - Anthropology of Education (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or AMST 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 5602 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Directed Studies, Reading and Research Courses
Courses must be taken for at least 3 credits to count toward this requirement.
Take at most 6 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 4991 - Independent Study (1.0-6.0 cr)
· ANTH 4992 - Directed Readings (1.0-6.0 cr)
· ANTH 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-6.0 cr)
· ANTH 4994W - Directed Research [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)
· ANTH 3xxx
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3001 - Introduction to Archaeology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3003 - Cultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3004 - Great Controversies in Anthropology [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3006 - Humans and Aliens: Learning Anthropology through Science Fiction [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3008 - Introduction to Flintknapping (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3022W - Anthropology of Dreaming and Myth [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3028 - Historical Archaeology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3034W - Roots Music in American Culture and Society [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3035 - Anthropologies of Death [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3036 - The Body in Society (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3043 - Art, Aesthetics and Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3046W - Romance and Culture [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3049W - Anthropology of Social Class [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3145W - Urban Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3221 - Field School (6.0 cr)
· ANTH 3242W - Hero, Savage, or Equal? Representations of NonWestern Peoples in the Movies [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3327W -  Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3401 - The Human Fossil Record (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3405 - Human Skeletal Analysis (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3501 - Managing Museum Collections (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3896 - Internship for Academic Credit (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3980 - Topics in Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
or EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3066 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilization [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3707W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3023 - Culture and Society of India [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3961 - Culture and Society of India [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3067W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3254 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3601 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3602 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3631 - Islam in America: A History of the Present (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3631 - Islam in America: A History of the Present (3.0 cr)
Capstone
Choose one of the following two options. Students who wish to undertake primary research should complete Option 1. Students wishing to acquire additional training through coursework should complete Option 2. Honors students seeking honors in Anthropology should complete Option 1. Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major may waive the Anthropology BA capstone, and they do not need to replace the 4 credits
Option 1
Students should enroll in ANTH 3913 at least one semester before taking ANTH 4013.
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3913 - Capstone Project Planning (1.0 cr)
· Take exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 4013 - Capstone Project Writing Seminar (3.0 cr)
or Option 2
Students should enroll in both courses in the same semester.
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 4093 - In-Class Capstone Project (1.0 cr)
with ANTH 4xxx
or ANTH 5xxx
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3022W - Anthropology of Dreaming and Myth [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3034W - Roots Music in American Culture and Society [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3046W - Romance and Culture [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3047W - Anthropology of Sex, Gender and Sexuality [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3049W - Anthropology of Social Class [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3145W - Urban Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3242W - Hero, Savage, or Equal? Representations of NonWestern Peoples in the Movies [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3327W -  Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4003W - Contemporary Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4031W - Anthropology and Social Justice [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4994W - Directed Research [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)
· ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5327W -  Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3707W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5707W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3067W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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· College of Liberal Arts

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· Four-Field Anthropology
· Archaeology, Biological, and Linguistic Subfields
· Archaeology, Biological, and Sociocultural Subfields
· Biological, Linguistic, and Sociocultural Subfields

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· Anthropology B.A.
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ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
What does it mean to be human? This question, central to the discipline of anthropology, has provided inspiration to scientists, philosophers, and artists for many centuries. In this course, we will begin to answer this question using the scientific study of the biological and cultural evolution of the human lineage. The first half of the term will introduce you to basic concepts in evolutionary theory: natural selection, genetics, behavioral ecology, and comparative anatomy. Using these tools, we will then spend the rest of the semester reconstructing the ecology, diet, anatomy, and behavior of our early ancestors, from the first apes to walk on two legs to the modern humans that conquered the globe. Weekly readings and lectures will provide the theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary biology of Homo sapiens; laboratory sections will give you an opportunity to apply these theories and evaluate the fossil evidence for yourself. Through this combined approach, we will tackle such important questions as: What features define the human lineage? In what ecological setting did our ancestors become bipedal? What role did global climate change play in our evolution? How did tool use and cultural evolution feedback into our biological evolution? When and where did modern humans originate and what behaviors characterized this emergence? Why were there many species of humans in the past but only one today? Why is it important for the future of humanity for the average citizen to understand the principles of evolution as applied to the human animal? Upon completion of this course, you will have a broad knowledge of the role biological anthropology plays within the discipline of anthropology. More importantly, however, you will acquire a better understanding of the biological heritage of our species and our place among other forms of life on our planet.
ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 1003W/Anth 1003V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social and cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies and cultures around the world. Topics include adaptive strategies; economic processes; kinship, marriage, and gender; social stratification; politics and conflicts; religion and ritual; personality and culture.
ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 1003W/Anth 1003V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social/cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies/cultures around world. Adaptive strategies. Economic processes. Kinship, marriage, gender. Social stratification. Politics/conflicts. Religion/ritual. Personality/Culture. prereq: Honors
ANTH 3001 - Introduction to Archaeology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Archaeology is the study of humans in the past, primarily through the material remains they left behind. It seeks to answer fundamental questions, such as ?When did humans first become dependent on fire??, ?What factors led to the development of agriculture??, or ?How can we explain the rise and fall of early civilizations?? The study of each of these big questions relies on answering many small questions that are asked in the context of archaeological excavations and laboratory analyses. A common theme underlies them: archaeology aims to reconstruct and understand why past human cultures changed. The goal of this class is to provide an understanding of the methods and techniques used by archaeologists in their investigations. It includes not only hands-on learning of specific analytical techniques, such as faunal and lithic analysis as well as site survey and excavation strategies, but also focuses on the theoretical approaches that guide the questions we ask and the methods we apply to answer them. This class, therefore, prepares students for more upper-level classes in archaeology. It also leads to a new way of thinking. This way of thinking is primarily critical and analytical. It leads one to think about how data are interpreted, and how theoretical frameworks as well as innate biases color these interpretations. Seeking solutions to interpretive problems requires the creative application of multidisciplinary approaches. Therefore, the study of archaeology leads to a new way of thinking about and doing science.
ANTH 3401 - The Human Fossil Record
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3401/Anth 5401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Fossil evidence paleoanthropologists use to reconstruct human evolutionary history. Taxonomy, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, tool use, land use, biogeography. Hands-on examination of fossil casts, readings from primary/secondary professional sources. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3401/Anth 5401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Fossil evidence paleoanthropologists use to reconstruct human evolutionary history. Taxonomy, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, tool use, land use, and biogeography. Examination of fossil casts, readings from primary/secondary professional sources. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories used to understand humans in an evolutionary framework. What can be known only, or primarily, form an evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/co-evolve in humans.
EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories to understand humans in evolutionary framework. What can be known only/primarily from evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/coevolve in humans.
ANTH 3003 - Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3003/GloS 3003
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics vary. Field research. Politics of ethnographic knowledge. Marxist/feminist theories of culture. Culture, language, and discourse. Psychological anthropology. Culture/transnational processes.
ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Studying language as a social practice, students transcribe and analyze conversation they record themselves, and consider issues of identity and social power in daily talk.
ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 4001 - Advanced Method and Theory in Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An upper-level archaeology class, highly recommended for anthropology students considering a career in archaeology or biological anthropology. Some years it is taught as a methods course (e.g., Experimental Archaeology), other years as a theory course (e.g., the Archaeology of Religion).
ANTH 4003W - Contemporary Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course considers issues of race, class, gender, “culture," and globality across multiple genres of writing (ethnography, history, fiction, poetry, memoir). We do this by reading the work of writers who, with an ethnographic sensibility, focus on a particular person whose life is lived in obscurity, at the margins. We ask how such an approach that aims to evoke a world through a life might allow the reader to understand how people move across space and time and through their social worlds, in ways that other kinds of ethnographic or historical writing might not. prereq: [1003 or 1005], or instr consent
ANTH 4007 - Laboratory Techniques in Archaeology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4007/Anth 4007H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Plant remains, material culture, faunal remains, human osteology. Emphasizes lab experience. Instructor consent required. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 4019 - Symbolic Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4019/8211
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Pragmatic/structural aspects of social symbolism cross-culturally. Focuses on power, exchange, social boundaries, gender, and rituals of transition/reversal. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or grad student or instr consent
ANTH 4025 - Studies in Ethnographic Classics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Five types of explanations employed in ethnographic research: diffusionism and theory of survivals; functionalist response; British structuralists; French structuralism; interpretive turn. Problems in ethnographic practice, analysis, and writing. Focuses on several classic monographic examples and associated theoretical writing. prereq: 1003 or 1005
ANTH 4031W - Anthropology and Social Justice (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Practical application of theories/methods from social/cultural anthropology. Issues of policy, planning, implementation, and ethics as they relate to applied anthropology. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or 4003 or grad student or instr consent
ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of and current issues in ethnographic research. Research projects, including participant observation, interviewing, research design, note taking, life history, and other ethnographic methods. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or grad student
ANTH 4047 - Anthropology of American Culture (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological approaches to contemporary American society/culture. Tensions between market and family. Unity, diversity. Individualism, community.
ANTH 4053 - Economy, Culture, and Critique (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4053/8205
Typically offered: Every Fall
Systems of production/distribution, especially in nonindustrial societies. Comparison, history, critique of major theories. Cross-cultural anthropological approach to material life that subsumes market/nonmarket processes.
ANTH 4069 - Historical Ecology & Anthropology of the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This seminar course discusses current approaches to historical ecology, the study of human-environmental relationships over time. The course draws on and combines perspectives from the four subdisciplines of anthropology (archaeological anthropology, bioarchaeological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and sociocultural anthropology), and similar disciplines, to understand the varying ways that scholars have analyzed and defined ecologies and environmental problems. It places particular emphasis on theories that define human relationships to the environment as recursive and interdependent. These theories stand in contrast to common Western theological suppositions that see the environment as a framework to which human societies adapt or a set of resources for human communities to exploit. Rather, historical ecologists argue that the environment is a true ecology with humans in it. They contend that human communities are fundamentally and inextricably intertwined with the life cycles and needs of other species, and consequently they study how human-environmental interactions emerge through distinct historical processes and cultural circumstances.
ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Introduction to historically informed anthropology of healing practice. Shift to biologically based medicine in Europe, colonialist dissemination of biomedicine, political/cultural collisions between biomedicine and "ethnomedicines," traffic of healing practices in a transnationalist world.
ANTH 4077 - Neanderthals: Biology and Culture of Humanity's Nearest Relative
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Paleontological/archaeological record. Students reconstruct behavioral similarities/differences between Neanderthals and modern humans. Why humans alone survived end of Pleistocene. prereq: 1001 or 3001 or 3002 or instr consent
ANTH 4101 - Decolonizing Archives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Archives are not neutral. In order to decolonize them, scholars in anthropology and other disciplines must first understand the ways in which Western settler values have structured them. Who decides acquisition policy? How are items indexed, described, and related to one another? Who has access, and under what conditions? And who is structurally excluded? In this course we decolonize by recontextualizing both the archives as institutions and their contents. In other words, we use methods appropriate for contemporary anthropological archival research. We will consider preservation, curation, organizational bias in archives, analytic scale, voice, and how historical texts are material culture. Students engage in original archival research.
ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4121/Anth 5121
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological/ethnographic understandings/research techniques.
ANTH 5008 - Advanced Flintknapping
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Hands-on training in techniques of advanced stone tool production, artifact reproduction, and lithic experimental design for academic/artistic purposes. prereq: [3008 or 5269] or instr consent
ANTH 5009 - Human Behavioral Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
In-depth introduction to, and critical review of, human behavioral biology, examining the approaches in anthropology and related fields. Classic texts/recent empirical studies of humans and other species. Theoretical underpinnings of this new discipline/how well theoretical predictions have been supported by subsequent research.
ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists/historians analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman Period. Interpreting archaeological evidence from specific sites to understand broad trends in human past.
ANTH 5028 - Historical Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3028/Anth 5028
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will explore the theories and methods of historical archaeology ? such as material culture studies, landscape perspectives, archival, and oral historical interpretation - as a means of intervening in contemporary discussions of diversity in the United States. Historical archaeology can be a very effective means to challenge some of the standard American narratives about our diverse past. Our aim is to move beyond either a simplistic ethnic pluralism or the superficial ?melting pot? progressive history and instead grapple with the materiality of settler colonialism, white supremacy, and capitalism. In learning about this field, we will consider what has distinguished historical archaeology from American archaeology more broadly, and how those differences are parlayed into specific research strengths. This includes several themes: colonialism; the modern world and globalizing economies; intersectional identities (race and ethnicity, class, sex and gender, religion, age, ability/disability) and social movements; public memory and commemoration; landscapes and social space; citizenship and subjectivity. Although historical archaeology until recently has been restrictively defined as addressing the European-colonized New World, the discipline in the past twenty years has significantly broadened its scope and impact on the practice of archaeology as a whole. Throughout the course we will discuss these developments, and what directions archaeology may take in the future as a result. Course work includes both reading/discussion and learning methods through practical exercises, and handling of archaeological material.
ANTH 5041 - Ecological Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3041/Anth 5041
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Concepts, theories, and methods of ecological anthropology (cultural ecology) show how humans interact with the biophysical environment. Compare biological and cultural interactions with the environment; examine adaptive strategies cross-culturally. prereq: grad or instr consent
ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3145W/Anth 5045W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This class explores anthropological approaches to urban life. On one hand, the course examines the ontological nature of the city by looking into the relation between cities and their environment, and asking whether and how people differentiate "urban" and 'non-urban" spaces. It uncovers the social practices and behaviors that define urban life; urban-rural distinctions; the material and ecological processes that constitute cities; and popular representations of city and/or countryside. On the other hand, the course investigates the spatial and social divisions of the city, seeking to understand the historical struggles and ongoing processes that both draw together and differentiate the people of an urban environment. It studies how cities influence political decision-making, contributing to the uneven distribution of power and resources. It considers: industrialization; urban class conflict; gendered and racialized spaces; and suburbanization. Both of these approaches will also critically consider the city as a social object that we encounter and learn about through our engagement with kinds of media, such as novels and film. Hence, reading for the class will include literature from the social sciences and humanities, as well as critical works of fiction. Students will engage with these broader anthropological issues through an investigation of several global cities, especially Minneapolis-St. Paul, Chicago, Paris, Mexico City, Brasilia, and New Delhi. The class mixes lecture, discussion, and guided research. Lectures will introduce the history of urbanism and urban anthropology. Discussions will critically evaluate the readings, and offer insights and examples to better understand them. By participating in a guided research project, students will uncover hidden aspects of their own city, using ethnography or archaeology to shed light on the urban environment, social struggles over space, or other themes.
ANTH 5112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5112/Anth 8112
Prerequisites: Previous coursework in Biological Anthropology or Archaeology
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Major hypotheses regarding evolution of human behavior. Combine evidence from realm of biological anthropology as we consider link between bone biology/behavior. Archaeological record. Hypotheses about biocultural evolution regarding tool-use, hunting, scavenging, food sharing, grandmothers, cooking, long distance running. prereq: Previous coursework in Biological Anthropology or Archaeology
ANTH 5113 - Primate Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5113/Anth 8113
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Evolutionary history of primates. Particular focus on origin/diversification of apes/Old World monkeys. prereq: Anthropology major, junior or senior
ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The course examines material culture as a social creation, studied from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives (e.g., social anthropology, archaeology, primatology, history of science). The course examines the changing role of material culture from prehistory to the future.
ANTH 5244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5244/8244
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
How anthropologists use fossil bones to answer questions of past human diet, behavior, and environments. Basics of skeletal-element/species identification of humans and large mammals. Project where students analyze a small assemblage of bones. Emphasizes scientific method, data analysis using computers. prereq: 1001
ANTH 5255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3255/Anth 5255/RelS 3254/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course discusses evidence for the origins of religion and its diverse roles in human societies over millennia. It focuses on how artifacts and architecture are essential to religious experience. It asks: What constitutes religion for different cultures? Why is religion at the heart of politics, social life, and cultural imagination?
ANTH 5269 - Analysis of Stone Tool Technology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course offers practical lab experience in analyzing archaeological collections of stone tools to learn about human behavior in the past. Students gain experience needed to get a job in the cultural resource management industry.
ANTH 5327W - Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3327W/Anth 5327W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course is an intensive examination of the emergence, growth, and conquest of native civilizations in ancient America, focusing on the Maya, Aztec, and Inca states. Lectures and discussions examine the culture and history of these Native American civilizations, while also introducing students to anthropological theories of the state, religion, aesthetics, and history.
ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3401/Anth 5401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Fossil evidence paleoanthropologists use to reconstruct human evolutionary history. Taxonomy, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, tool use, land use, and biogeography. Examination of fossil casts, readings from primary/secondary professional sources. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
ANTH 5402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists reconstruct the past through the study of animal bones associated with artifacts at archaeological sites. Skeletal element (e.g., humerus, femur, tibia), and taxon (e.g., horse, antelope, sheep, bison, hyena) when confronted with bone. Comparative collection of bones from known taxa.
ANTH 5403 - Quantitative Methods in Biological Anthropology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Quantitative methods used by biological anthropologists. Applying these methods to real anthropometric data. Lectures, complementary sessions in computer lab. prereq: Basic univariate statistics course or instr consent
ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3405/Anth 5405
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, design, and variability of modern human skeleton. Anatomy, functional morphology, development, evolutionary history. Bone histology/biology, excavation, preservation, taphonomy, pathology, forensic analyses. Differentiating between males/females, adults/sub-adults, and humans/non-humans. Quizzes, exams, research paper, project.
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Have you ever wondered how archaeologists interpret the vast amount of archaeological evidence from the British Isles, one of the most studied and best documented parts of the world? And how do archaeologists and governmental agencies protect the heritage of Britain, from major monuments such as Stonehenge, Roman forts, and Shakespeare?s theaters, to the minor products of craft industries such as personal ornaments and coins? This course teaches you about the archaeology of the British Isles, in all of its aspects. You learn how archaeologists study the changing societies of Britain and Ireland, from the first settlers about a million years ago to modern times. You learn about the strategies that public institutions employ to preserve and protect archaeological sites, and about the place of archaeology in tourism in the British Isles and in the formation of identities among the diverse peoples of modern Britain.
ANTH 5448 - Applied Heritage Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Contexts of cultural heritage applicable to federal/state protection. Approaches to planning/management. Issues of heritage/stakeholder conflict.
ANTH 5450 - Spatial Analysis in Anthropology: Research Design and Field Applications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This advanced undergraduate and graduate course introduces students to spatial analyses essential to anthropological ethnography, archaeology, and historical ecology. It builds on introductory courses at UMN, providing students an opportunity to learn anthropological applications of spatial analysis methods, including: research design, field mapping, database management, digital survey platforms, GIS analyses, and integration of quantitative and qualitative (ethnographic and historical) data. The structure of the course will follow the trajectory of a typical doctoral-level anthropological project, from pre-field data acquisition and preparation, to in-field data collection, post-field analysis, and presentation. Students who take this course will master skills that are crucial for successful anthropological spatial analysis in the field and laboratory.
ANTH 5501 - Managing Museum Collections
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3501/Anth 5501
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course provides a hands-on and research experience in collections management utilizing artifact, archival, and digital collections. Museum collections, the objects or specimens they contain, the information associated with them, and their care and maintenance are a crucial part of both the sciences and the humanities. While seemingly disparate, many of the issues faced by those responsible for collections are quite similar: how to preserve and care for those collections, legal issues surrounding the materials they contain, how to organize and classify the items, how to facilitate discovery and access, and how to make the information contained in them available to the broadest audience possible. The course includes lectures by museum professionals, hands-on activities, and selected readings. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for ANTH 3501.
ANTH 5980 - Topics in Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANTH 4043 - Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings: Archaeology of Northern Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4043/MeSt 4043
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Archaeology of the British Isles, Scandinavia, and northern continental Europe, from the Romans through the Viking Period. Themes to be examined include social and political organization, cross-cultural interaction, art and symbolism, and religion and ritual.
MEST 4043 - Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings: Archaeology of Northern Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4043/MeSt 4043
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Archaeology of the British Isles, Scandinavia, and northern continental Europe, from the Romans through the Viking period. Themes to be examined include social and political organization, cross-cultural interactions, art and symbolism, and religion and rituals.
ANTH 4049 - Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4049/RelS 4049
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Religious beliefs and world views cross-culturally. Religious dimensions of human life through theories of origins, functions, and forms (e.g. myth, ritual, symbolism) of religion in society. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or instr consent
RELS 4049 - Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4049/RelS 4049
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Religious beliefs and world views cross-culturally. Religious dimensions of human life through theories of origins, functions, and forms (e.g. myth, ritual, symbolism) of religion in society. prereq: ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1005 or instr consent
ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent
EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent
ANTH 4344 - Europe and its Margins
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4344/GloS 4344
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course explores some of the forms of human imagining (literary, artistic, political, social scientific) engendered by the notoriously hard to define entity known as "Europe." It does so by focusing on regions and populations that have been thought of at various times as marking Europe's inner and outer cultural and/or geographical limits. Topics addressed include: the relationship between physical geography, cultural memory, and the formation (or subversion) of identity claims; the reconfigured political landscapes of post-socialism and European integration; immigration, refugee flows, and the rise of far-right ethno-nationalisms; and the effects of pandemics past and present. prereq: One course in [ANTH or GLOS]
GLOS 4344 - Europe and its Margins
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4344/GloS 4344
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course explores some of the forms of human imagining (literary, artistic, political, social scientific) engendered by the notoriously hard to define entity known as "Europe." It does so by focusing on regions and populations that have been thought of at various times as marking Europe's inner and outer cultural and/or geographical limits. Topics addressed include: the relationship between physical geography, cultural memory, and the formation (or subversion) of identity claims; the reconfigured political landscapes of post-socialism and European integration; immigration, refugee flows, and the rise of far-right ethno-nationalisms; and the effects of pandemics past and present. prereq: One course in [ANTH or GLOS]
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
RELS 5707W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 5128 - Anthropology of Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5128/OLPD 5128
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Cross-cultural perspectives in examining educational patterns. Implicit/explicit cultural assumptions. Methods/approaches to cross-cultural studies in education.
OLPD 5128 - Anthropology of Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5128/OLPD 5128
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Insights from educational anthropology for educators to address issues of culture, ethnicity, and power in schools.
ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the inter connections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
AMIN 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
AMST 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
CHIC 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
AMIN 5602 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
ANTH 4991 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Under special circumstances and with the approval of the instructor, qualified students may register for a listed course on a tutorial basis. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 4992 - Directed Readings
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Allows students to pursue special interests in anthropology through reading materials under the guidance of a faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Allows students to pursue special interests in anthropology under the guidance of a faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 4994W - Directed Research (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Qualified students may conduct a well-defined research project under the guidance of a faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 3001 - Introduction to Archaeology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Archaeology is the study of humans in the past, primarily through the material remains they left behind. It seeks to answer fundamental questions, such as ?When did humans first become dependent on fire??, ?What factors led to the development of agriculture??, or ?How can we explain the rise and fall of early civilizations?? The study of each of these big questions relies on answering many small questions that are asked in the context of archaeological excavations and laboratory analyses. A common theme underlies them: archaeology aims to reconstruct and understand why past human cultures changed. The goal of this class is to provide an understanding of the methods and techniques used by archaeologists in their investigations. It includes not only hands-on learning of specific analytical techniques, such as faunal and lithic analysis as well as site survey and excavation strategies, but also focuses on the theoretical approaches that guide the questions we ask and the methods we apply to answer them. This class, therefore, prepares students for more upper-level classes in archaeology. It also leads to a new way of thinking. This way of thinking is primarily critical and analytical. It leads one to think about how data are interpreted, and how theoretical frameworks as well as innate biases color these interpretations. Seeking solutions to interpretive problems requires the creative application of multidisciplinary approaches. Therefore, the study of archaeology leads to a new way of thinking about and doing science.
ANTH 3003 - Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3003/GloS 3003
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics vary. Field research. Politics of ethnographic knowledge. Marxist/feminist theories of culture. Culture, language, and discourse. Psychological anthropology. Culture/transnational processes.
ANTH 3004 - Great Controversies in Anthropology (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Notable controversies in anthropology: Is human "reason" the same in all cultures? What makes up evidence/truth when we study people? Whose "voices" should be heard? Should anthropologists support contemporary attempts at economic "development"? Is it possible to agree on a set of universal individual or cultural rights? Can we make qualitative judgments about cultures? What civic/political responsibilities does the anthropologist have at home and with the people whom she or he studies? In-class debates.
ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Studying language as a social practice, students transcribe and analyze conversation they record themselves, and consider issues of identity and social power in daily talk.
ANTH 3006 - Humans and Aliens: Learning Anthropology through Science Fiction (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 2006/Anth 3006
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Science Fiction has been one of the most popular genres of literature over the last century and a half. Despite its great popularity, however, many fans of the genre do not realize how much it has in common with the discipline of Anthropology. Anthropology is the study of what it means to be human in all times and places. Science fiction, for its part, explores human existence in equally diverse contexts, except that those imagined contexts frequently have not yet happened. Despite this similarity, anthropology is extremely poorly known compared to science fiction. This course uses the stimulating and entertaining literature of science fiction to expose students to anthropology who, having never been exposed to it in high school, are likely to leave university without learning the power of the discipline?s perspective on humanity. Through individual pairings of anthropology texts and science fiction stories, the course explores the relevance of biological anthropology, social anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and archaeology to humanity?s future. The course?s juxtaposition of anthropological literature to science fiction stories is designed to provide students with the ability to see how our future is more dependent on how humanity works (as anthropology understands it), than merely what the next technological invention has to offer us. This course introduces students to the breadth of anthropological topics using the literature of such award-winning science fiction (SF) authors as Isaac Asimov, Elisabeth Bear, Jerome Bixby, Octavia Butler, Ted Chiang, Arthur C. Clarke, Philip K. Dick, Robert Heinlein, Frank Herbert, Ursula K. Le Guin, Catherine Moore, Mike Resnik, Kim Stanley Robinson, Neil Stephenson, James Tiptree, Jr., and Kurt Vonnegut. While the course is not designed to cover the literary criticism of SF literature nor the social analysis of the SF community of readers and authors, the choice of which SF authors to oppose to select anthropological topics was shaped by my understanding of the historical development of SF literature. Students will thus read stories written from the Golden Age of magazine SF to the most recent post-cyberpunk novelists. The selection of SF stories is of course idiosyncratic but it is designed to reflect the goal of learning something of anthropology while having a blast reading SF.
ANTH 3008 - Introduction to Flintknapping
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Hands-on experience in replication of prehistoric stone tools, as basis for archaeological analysis and as art form in itself.
ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 3022W - Anthropology of Dreaming and Myth (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
What is universal in dreaming/myth, how they vary in different cultures. Influence of dreams on myths. Appearance of folk narratives and cultural symbols in dreams. Relationship between individual and culture. Symbolism, metaphor, metonymy, other tropes common to dreaming/myth. Underlying psychological processes. Papers by anthropologists, case studies, cultural examples.
ANTH 3028 - Historical Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3028/Anth 5028
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will explore the theories and methods of historical archaeology ? such as material culture studies, landscape perspectives, archival, and oral historical interpretation - as a means of intervening in contemporary discussions of diversity in the United States. Historical archaeology can be a very effective means to challenge some of the standard American narratives about our diverse past. Our aim is to move beyond either a simplistic ethnic pluralism or the superficial ?melting pot? progressive history and instead grapple with the materiality of settler colonialism, white supremacy, and capitalism. In learning about this field, we will consider what has distinguished historical archaeology from American archaeology more broadly, and how those differences are parlayed into specific research strengths. This includes several themes: colonialism; the modern world and globalizing economies; intersectional identities (race and ethnicity, class, sex and gender, religion, age, ability/disability) and social movements; public memory and commemoration; landscapes and social space; citizenship and subjectivity. Although historical archaeology until recently has been restrictively defined as addressing the European-colonized New World, the discipline in the past twenty years has significantly broadened its scope and impact on the practice of archaeology as a whole. Throughout the course we will discuss these developments, and what directions archaeology may take in the future as a result. Course work includes both reading/discussion and learning methods through practical exercises, and handling of archaeological material.
ANTH 3034W - Roots Music in American Culture and Society (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course focuses on aspects of southern American vernacular music that came to public attention in the 1920s and 1930s as commercial recordings and field recordings of rural music became available. Although the music had deep roots in the American past, it also underwent dramatic transformations as a result of the coming of industrial capitalism to the south and as a result of the commercial recording process itself. This music continues to profoundly shape popular music today. We will try to consider as many questions as possible during the semester, but we will focus especially on three sets of issues. First, we will consider the music in terms of the historical contexts that shaped it. Second, we will consider the cultural politics surrounding the music as we focus on question of how historical narratives, popular media and popular perceptions, and scholarly works represent and interpret (in often problematic ways) certain genres of popular music and what the politics of those representations might be; and we will consider also how we listen to ?roots music,? how our listening is shaped by contemporary social and political circumstances. Third, we will attempt to understand musical genres in relation to the production of race and class and the experience of racial and class inequalities in the United States, and this may in turn prompt us to think critically about the idea of musical genre itself.
ANTH 3035 - Anthropologies of Death (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological perspectives on death. Diverse understandings of afterlife, cultural variations in death ritual, secularization of death in modern era, management of death in medicine, cultural shifts/conflicts in what constitutes good or natural death.
ANTH 3036 - The Body in Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Body-related practices throughout the world. Readings, documentaries, mass media.
ANTH 3043 - Art, Aesthetics and Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Summer Odd Year
The relationship of art to culture from multiple perspectives including art as a cultural system; the cultural context of art production; the role of the artist in different cultures; methodological considerations in the interpretation of art across cultural boundaries.
ANTH 3046W - Romance and Culture (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Romance, aspects of this kind of love relationships from different perspectives in social/biological sciences. Draws on cross-cultural materials.
ANTH 3049W - Anthropology of Social Class (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is divided into three parts, each of which has different, but related, purposes. The initial part has general and theoretical goals. First, differences between cultural anthropology and sociology with respect to the study of class difference will be introduced. Secondly, the major theories about hierarchy in pre-state society will be examined. Third, central theories and concepts in the study of stratification in complex societies will be surveyed. In particular, attention will be paid to the relationship between class and individual taste in the work of Pierre Bourdieu. The second part will focus on attitudes about class difference in N. American society. Topics will center on class in everyday life, with special reference to the domains of education, consumption and romantic love. The third part of the course will concern class in nonWestern and/or developing countries, specifically in the Pacific and India. Throughout the course, in addition to readings and lectures, use will be made of representations of class in popular culture, such as magazines and the movies.
ANTH 3145W - Urban Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3145W/Anth 5045W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This class explores anthropological approaches to urban life. On one hand, the course examines the ontological nature of the city by looking into the relation between cities and their environment, and asking whether and how people differentiated "urban" and "non-urban" spaces. It uncovers the social practices and behaviors that define urban life; urban-rural distinctions; the material and ecological processes that constitute cities; and popular representations of city and/or countryside. On the other hand, the course investigates the spatial and social divisions of the city, seeking to understand the historical struggles and ongoing processes that both draw together and differentiate the people of an urban environment. It studies how cities influence decision-making, contributing to the uneven distribution of power and resources. It considers: industrialization; urban class conflict; gendered and racialized spaces; and suburbanization. Both of these approaches will also critically consider the city as a social object that we encounter and learn about through our engagement with kinds of media, such as novels and film. Hence, reading for the class will include literature from the social sciences and humanities, as well as critical works of fiction. Students will engege with these broader anthropological issues through an investigation of several global cities, especially Minneapolis-St. Paul, Chicago, Paris, Mexico City, Brasilia, and New Delhi. The class mixes lecture, discussion, and guided research. Lectures will introduce the history of urbanism and urban anthropology. Discussions will critically examine the readings, and offer insights and examples to better understand them. By participating in a guided research project, students will uncover hidden aspects of their own city, using ethnography or archaeology to shed light on the urban environment, social struggles over space, or other themes.
ANTH 3221 - Field School
Credits: 6.0 [max 18.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3221/Anth 8220
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field excavation, survey, and research. Intensive training in excavation techniques, recordation, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological materials or prehistoric remains. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 3242W - Hero, Savage, or Equal? Representations of NonWestern Peoples in the Movies (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will explore images of nonWestern peoples and cultures as they have appeared in the movies and in other popular media. It has four aims: l) to introduce the problem of nonWestern peoples in the West from historical points of view, 2) to discuss the relationship between mass media and issue of representation to the marketplace, 3) to introduce the concept of morality in and through collective representations as developed by Durkheim, and 4) to analyze the problem of moral agency in a series of Hollywood and Independent movies which portray nonwestern peoples and cultures. We will watch movies portraying three different groups of cultures, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, and the Japanese. In each unit, we will first read important commentary on Western representations of each of these peoples, such as Bernard Smith on Pacific Islanders and Vine Deloria on images of Native Americans and Gina Marchetti on Hollywood?s Japanese.
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
ANTH 3327W - Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3327W/Anth 5327W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course is an intensive examination of the emergence, growth, and conquest of native civilizations in ancient America, focusing on the Maya, Aztec, and Inca states. Lectures and discussions examine the culture and history of these Native American civilizations, while also introducing students to anthropological theories of the state, religion, aesthetics, and history.
ANTH 3401 - The Human Fossil Record
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3401/Anth 5401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Fossil evidence paleoanthropologists use to reconstruct human evolutionary history. Taxonomy, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, tool use, land use, biogeography. Hands-on examination of fossil casts, readings from primary/secondary professional sources. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
ANTH 3402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists reconstruct past societies, diets, and environments. Bones and bone fragments to skeletal element (e.g., femur, humerus, tibia), side, age, and taxon (e.g., horse, bison, antelope, hyena). Adaptations and functional morphology of animals¿ anatomy. Tool marks, tooth marks, burning, and types of bone breakage. Past societies' hunting, sharing, cooking practices as well as environmental reconstruction using vertebrates.
ANTH 3405 - Human Skeletal Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3405/Anth 5405
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, design, and variability of modern human skeleton. Anatomy, functional morphology, development, evolutionary history. Bone histology/biology, excavation/preservation, taphonomy, pathology, forensic analyses. Differentiating between males/females, adults/sub-adults, and humans/non-humans.
ANTH 3501 - Managing Museum Collections
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3501/Anth 5501
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course provides a hands-on and research experience in collections management utilizing artifact, archival, and digital collections. Museum collections, the objects or specimens they contain, the information associated with them, and their care and maintenance are a crucial part of both the sciences and the humanities. While seemingly disparate, many of the issues faced by those responsible for collections are quite similar: how to preserve and care for those collections, legal issues surrounding the materials they contain, how to organize and classify the items, how to facilitate discovery and access, and how to make the information contained in them available to the broadest audience possible. The course includes lectures by museum professionals, hands-on activities and selected readings. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for ANTH 5501.
ANTH 3896 - Internship for Academic Credit
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
An applied learning experience in an agreed-upon, short-term, supervised workplace activity, with defined goals, which may be related to a student's major field or area of interest. The work can be full or part time, paid or unpaid, primarily in off-campus environments. Internships integrate classroom knowledge and theory with practical application and skill development in professional or community settings. The skills and knowledge learned should be transferable to other employment settings and not simply to advance the operations of the employer. Typically the student's work is supervised and evaluated by a site coordinator or instructor.
ANTH 3980 - Topics in Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories used to understand humans in an evolutionary framework. What can be known only, or primarily, form an evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/co-evolve in humans.
EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories to understand humans in evolutionary framework. What can be known only/primarily from evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/coevolve in humans.
ANTH 3009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3009/Anth 8009/Hist 3066
Typically offered: Every Spring
How did complex urban societies first develop? This course addresses this question in ten regions of the world including Maya Mesoamerica, Inca South America, Sumerian Near East, Shang Civilization in East Asia, and early Greece and Rome.
HIST 3066 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilization (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3009/Anth 8009/Hist 3066
Typically offered: Every Spring
How did complex urban societies first develop? This course addresses this question in ten regions of the world, including Maya Mesoamerica, Inca South America, Sumerian Near East, Shang Civilization in East Asia and early Greece and Rome.
ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
RELS 3707W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 3023 - Culture and Society of India (GP, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3676/Anth 3023/GloS 3961
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Contemporary society and culture in South Asia from an anthropological perspective with reference to nationalism; postcolonial identities; media and public culture; gender, kinship and politics; religion; ethnicity; and the Indian diaspora.
GLOS 3961 - Culture and Society of India (GP, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3676/Anth 3023/GloS 3961
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Contemporary society and culture in South Asia from an anthropological perspective with reference to nationalism; postcolonial identities; media and public culture; gender, kinship and politics; religion; ethnicity; and the Indian diaspora.
ANTH 3027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman period.
HIST 3067W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman period.
ANTH 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: an Analysis of the Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and bodies to perceived pollutions cause by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to anceint Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
CNES 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
JWST 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Typically offered: Every Spring
Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
ANTH 3255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3255/Anth 5255/RelS 3254/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course discusses evidence for the origins of religion and its diverse roles in human socieities over millennia. It focuses on how artifacts and architecture are essential to religious experience. It asks: What constitutes religion for different cultures? Why is religion at the heart of politics, social life, and cultural imagination?
RELS 3254 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3255/Anth 5255/RelS 3254/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course discusses evidence for the origins of religion and its diverse roles in human societies over millennia. It focuses on how artifacts and architecture are essential to religious experience. It asks: What constitutes religion for different cultures? Why is religion at the heart of politics, social life, and cultural imagination?
ANTH 3601 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
AMIN 3602 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
ANTH 3631 - Islam in America: A History of the Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3631/RelS 3631
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
From the "Age of Discovery" and the African slave trade, to Malcolm X and the War on Terror, Islam has long been an integral part of the American landscape. In this course, students will examine the history of Islam and social formation of Muslim communities in the United States. We will approach this history in the plural: as histories of Islam in America, paying particular attention to the different local and global dynamics that led to the migration of this racially, ethnically, and class variegated community. This course will explore how racial, national, cultural, and sectarian differences within and between Muslim communities shape and challenge the notion of a singular Islam or Muslim community. We will ask how and why Islam and Muslims have been characterized - both historically and today - as a "problem" in/for America. What does the emergence of terminology like "American Muslim" and "American Islam" tell us about these historical tensions, conceptions of good/bad citizenship, and identity politics more broadly, in the United States today?
RELS 3631 - Islam in America: A History of the Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3631/RelS 3631
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
From the ?Age of Discovery? and the African slave trade, to Malcolm X and the War on Terror, Islam has long been an integral part of the American landscape. In this course students will examine the history of Islam and social formation of Muslim communities in the United States. We will approach this history in the plural: as histories of Islam in America, paying particular attention to the different local and global dynamics that led to the migration of this racially, ethnically, and class variegated community. This course will explore how racial, national, cultural, and sectarian differences within and between Muslim communities shape and challenge the notion of a singular Islam or Muslim community. We will ask how and why Islam and Muslims have been characterized - both historically and today - as a "problem" in/for America. What does the emergence of terminology like ?American Muslim? and ?American Islam? tell us about these historical tensions, conceptions of good/bad citizenship, and identity politics more broadly, in the United States today?
ANTH 3913 - Capstone Project Planning
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Evaluation of work to date. Planning future course work and prospectus for senior research project. Defining senior project, finding an adviser, developing preliminary bibliography. prereq: [Jr or sr] anth major, instr consent
ANTH 4013 - Capstone Project Writing Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This seminar is designed for students participating in the Anthropology Senior Capstone Project. The purpose of this seminar is to provide students with instructional support and a structured environment in which to develop their research and writing skills within the practical context of writing a senior thesis for the Capstone. The thesis is based on original research for the Senior Capstone Project conducted by students in consultation with their advisors, and it is advised that students finish conducting research before enrolling in this course. In some cases it is possible research may continue from the planning course into this seminar. The seminar meets once a week, during which time students engage in active learning exercises, in-class discussions, and peer review as they write their thesis. The goal of this course is to align the writing abilities of students with the writing criteria developed by departmental faculty as part of the Center for Writing?s Writing Enriched Curriculum. This course compliments student?s advisor-advisee relationship for the Senior Capstone Project, and it is required that students set up regular meetings with their advisors to discuss their progress in the course in addition to consulting about the content of their projects. prereq: sr major, instr consent
ANTH 4093 - In-Class Capstone Project
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Course that fulfills the senior capstone requirement as an add-on directed study in association with an upper-level 4xxx-5xxx-level ANTH course. Instructor or department consent required.
ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Studying language as a social practice, students transcribe and analyze conversation they record themselves, and consider issues of identity and social power in daily talk.
ANTH 3022W - Anthropology of Dreaming and Myth (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
What is universal in dreaming/myth, how they vary in different cultures. Influence of dreams on myths. Appearance of folk narratives and cultural symbols in dreams. Relationship between individual and culture. Symbolism, metaphor, metonymy, other tropes common to dreaming/myth. Underlying psychological processes. Papers by anthropologists, case studies, cultural examples.
ANTH 3034W - Roots Music in American Culture and Society (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course focuses on aspects of southern American vernacular music that came to public attention in the 1920s and 1930s as commercial recordings and field recordings of rural music became available. Although the music had deep roots in the American past, it also underwent dramatic transformations as a result of the coming of industrial capitalism to the south and as a result of the commercial recording process itself. This music continues to profoundly shape popular music today. We will try to consider as many questions as possible during the semester, but we will focus especially on three sets of issues. First, we will consider the music in terms of the historical contexts that shaped it. Second, we will consider the cultural politics surrounding the music as we focus on question of how historical narratives, popular media and popular perceptions, and scholarly works represent and interpret (in often problematic ways) certain genres of popular music and what the politics of those representations might be; and we will consider also how we listen to ?roots music,? how our listening is shaped by contemporary social and political circumstances. Third, we will attempt to understand musical genres in relation to the production of race and class and the experience of racial and class inequalities in the United States, and this may in turn prompt us to think critically about the idea of musical genre itself.
ANTH 3046W - Romance and Culture (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Romance, aspects of this kind of love relationships from different perspectives in social/biological sciences. Draws on cross-cultural materials.
ANTH 3047W - Anthropology of Sex, Gender and Sexuality (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3047W/GWSS 3047W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the concepts of "sex," "gender," and "sexuality" through the scholarship of feminist anthropology, queer anthropology, and their antecedents. Students will read ethnographies that grapple with the contingent and shifting formations of these social constructions - when they emerge, disentangle, re-entangle, submerge, etc. The course will highlight the roles of imperialism, (settler) colonialism, capitalism, racism, heteropatriarchy, ableism, and other forms of social power in shaping these formations as well at the social categories - "sex," "gender," and "sexuality" - themselves.
ANTH 3049W - Anthropology of Social Class (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is divided into three parts, each of which has different, but related, purposes. The initial part has general and theoretical goals. First, differences between cultural anthropology and sociology with respect to the study of class difference will be introduced. Secondly, the major theories about hierarchy in pre-state society will be examined. Third, central theories and concepts in the study of stratification in complex societies will be surveyed. In particular, attention will be paid to the relationship between class and individual taste in the work of Pierre Bourdieu. The second part will focus on attitudes about class difference in N. American society. Topics will center on class in everyday life, with special reference to the domains of education, consumption and romantic love. The third part of the course will concern class in nonWestern and/or developing countries, specifically in the Pacific and India. Throughout the course, in addition to readings and lectures, use will be made of representations of class in popular culture, such as magazines and the movies.
ANTH 3145W - Urban Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3145W/Anth 5045W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This class explores anthropological approaches to urban life. On one hand, the course examines the ontological nature of the city by looking into the relation between cities and their environment, and asking whether and how people differentiated "urban" and "non-urban" spaces. It uncovers the social practices and behaviors that define urban life; urban-rural distinctions; the material and ecological processes that constitute cities; and popular representations of city and/or countryside. On the other hand, the course investigates the spatial and social divisions of the city, seeking to understand the historical struggles and ongoing processes that both draw together and differentiate the people of an urban environment. It studies how cities influence decision-making, contributing to the uneven distribution of power and resources. It considers: industrialization; urban class conflict; gendered and racialized spaces; and suburbanization. Both of these approaches will also critically consider the city as a social object that we encounter and learn about through our engagement with kinds of media, such as novels and film. Hence, reading for the class will include literature from the social sciences and humanities, as well as critical works of fiction. Students will engege with these broader anthropological issues through an investigation of several global cities, especially Minneapolis-St. Paul, Chicago, Paris, Mexico City, Brasilia, and New Delhi. The class mixes lecture, discussion, and guided research. Lectures will introduce the history of urbanism and urban anthropology. Discussions will critically examine the readings, and offer insights and examples to better understand them. By participating in a guided research project, students will uncover hidden aspects of their own city, using ethnography or archaeology to shed light on the urban environment, social struggles over space, or other themes.
ANTH 3242W - Hero, Savage, or Equal? Representations of NonWestern Peoples in the Movies (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will explore images of nonWestern peoples and cultures as they have appeared in the movies and in other popular media. It has four aims: l) to introduce the problem of nonWestern peoples in the West from historical points of view, 2) to discuss the relationship between mass media and issue of representation to the marketplace, 3) to introduce the concept of morality in and through collective representations as developed by Durkheim, and 4) to analyze the problem of moral agency in a series of Hollywood and Independent movies which portray nonwestern peoples and cultures. We will watch movies portraying three different groups of cultures, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, and the Japanese. In each unit, we will first read important commentary on Western representations of each of these peoples, such as Bernard Smith on Pacific Islanders and Vine Deloria on images of Native Americans and Gina Marchetti on Hollywood?s Japanese.
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
ANTH 3327W - Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3327W/Anth 5327W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course is an intensive examination of the emergence, growth, and conquest of native civilizations in ancient America, focusing on the Maya, Aztec, and Inca states. Lectures and discussions examine the culture and history of these Native American civilizations, while also introducing students to anthropological theories of the state, religion, aesthetics, and history.
ANTH 4003W - Contemporary Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course considers issues of race, class, gender, “culture," and globality across multiple genres of writing (ethnography, history, fiction, poetry, memoir). We do this by reading the work of writers who, with an ethnographic sensibility, focus on a particular person whose life is lived in obscurity, at the margins. We ask how such an approach that aims to evoke a world through a life might allow the reader to understand how people move across space and time and through their social worlds, in ways that other kinds of ethnographic or historical writing might not. prereq: [1003 or 1005], or instr consent
ANTH 4031W - Anthropology and Social Justice (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Practical application of theories/methods from social/cultural anthropology. Issues of policy, planning, implementation, and ethics as they relate to applied anthropology. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or 4003 or grad student or instr consent
ANTH 4994W - Directed Research (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Qualified students may conduct a well-defined research project under the guidance of a faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3145W/Anth 5045W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This class explores anthropological approaches to urban life. On one hand, the course examines the ontological nature of the city by looking into the relation between cities and their environment, and asking whether and how people differentiate "urban" and 'non-urban" spaces. It uncovers the social practices and behaviors that define urban life; urban-rural distinctions; the material and ecological processes that constitute cities; and popular representations of city and/or countryside. On the other hand, the course investigates the spatial and social divisions of the city, seeking to understand the historical struggles and ongoing processes that both draw together and differentiate the people of an urban environment. It studies how cities influence political decision-making, contributing to the uneven distribution of power and resources. It considers: industrialization; urban class conflict; gendered and racialized spaces; and suburbanization. Both of these approaches will also critically consider the city as a social object that we encounter and learn about through our engagement with kinds of media, such as novels and film. Hence, reading for the class will include literature from the social sciences and humanities, as well as critical works of fiction. Students will engage with these broader anthropological issues through an investigation of several global cities, especially Minneapolis-St. Paul, Chicago, Paris, Mexico City, Brasilia, and New Delhi. The class mixes lecture, discussion, and guided research. Lectures will introduce the history of urbanism and urban anthropology. Discussions will critically evaluate the readings, and offer insights and examples to better understand them. By participating in a guided research project, students will uncover hidden aspects of their own city, using ethnography or archaeology to shed light on the urban environment, social struggles over space, or other themes.
ANTH 5327W - Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3327W/Anth 5327W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course is an intensive examination of the emergence, growth, and conquest of native civilizations in ancient America, focusing on the Maya, Aztec, and Inca states. Lectures and discussions examine the culture and history of these Native American civilizations, while also introducing students to anthropological theories of the state, religion, aesthetics, and history.
ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
RELS 3707W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
RELS 5707W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 3027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman period.
ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists/historians analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman Period. Interpreting archaeological evidence from specific sites to understand broad trends in human past.
HIST 3067W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman period.