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Twin Cities Campus

Management Minor

Curtis L. Carlson School of Management - Adm
Curtis L. Carlson School of Management
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits in this minor: 20 to 23
The Management Minor is a 21 credit minor that provides an opportunity for students in majors outside of the Carlson School of Management to gain exposure to business while developing knowledge in a focus area of business that complements their major and career goals. Students are admitted on a rolling basis and are encouraged to apply for the minor as soon as they have completed microeconomics or business economics and statistics. A minimum 2.5 GPA is recommended.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 2 courses before admission to the program.
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 2.50 already admitted to the degree-granting college
  • 2.50 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
  • 2.50 transferring from outside the University
Students are admitted on a rolling basis and are encouraged to apply for the minor as soon as they have completed microeconomics or business economics and statistics. A minimum 2.5 GPA is recommended.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Required Prerequisites
Economics
ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or ECON 1165 - Business Economics [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or APEC 1101H - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
Statistics
BA 2551 - Business Statistics in R [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 1001 - Introduction to the Ideas of Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3.0 cr)
or STAT 3022 - Data Analysis (4.0 cr)
or PSY 3801 - Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or IE 3521 - Statistics, Quality, and Reliability (4.0 cr)
or EE 3025 - Statistical Methods in Electrical and Computer Engineering (3.0 cr)
or CEGE 3102 - Uncertainty and Decision Analysis (3.0 cr)
or ANSC 3011 - Statistics for Animal Science (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
or POL 3085 - Quantitative Analysis in Political Science [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or NURS 3710 - Statistics for Clinical Practice and Research [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I (4.0 cr)
STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)
or STAT 5101 - Theory of Statistics I (4.0 cr)
STAT 5102 - Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 5651 - Basic Theory of Probability and Statistics (4.0 cr)
MATH 5652 - Introduction to Stochastic Processes (4.0 cr)
Minor Requirements
Minor Core
BA 2051 - Modeling Business Scenarios in Excel (2.0 cr)
ACCT 2051 - Introduction to Financial Reporting (4.0 cr)
or ACCT 2051H - Honors: Introduction to Financial Reporting (4.0 cr)
Management Minor Focus Areas
Students choose 7 credits from one of the minor focus areas. Focus areas cannot be mixed and matched. A minimum 7 credits must come from the same focus area. Substitutions will not be allowed.
General Business
Take 7 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ACCT 3001 - Strategic Management Accounting (3.0 cr)
· FINA 3001 - Finance Fundamentals (3.0 cr)
· HRIR 3021 - Human Capital Management (3.0 cr)
· IDSC 3001 - Information Systems & Digital Transformation (3.0 cr)
· MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing (3.0 cr)
· MGMT 3015 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management (3.0 cr)
· SCO 3001 - Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations (3.0 cr)
· BA 2062 - Powerful Problem Solving (2.0 cr)
or Accounting
ACCT 3001 - Strategic Management Accounting (3.0 cr)
ACCT 5101 - Intermediate Accounting I (4.0 cr)
or Entrepreneurial Management
MGMT 3015 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (4.0 cr)
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· MGMT 4175W - New Business Feasibility and Planning [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4171W - Entrepreneurship in Action I [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4172 - Entrepreneurship in Action II (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4080W - Applied Technology Entrepreneurship [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4055 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action (2.0 cr)
or Finance
FINA 3001 - Finance Fundamentals (3.0 cr)
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· FINA 4121 - Financial Markets and Interest Rates (2.0 cr)
· FINA 4221 - Principles of Corporate Finance (2.0 cr)
· FINA 4321 - Portfolio Management and Performance Evaluation (2.0 cr)
· FINA 4621 - The Global Economy (Macro) (2.0 cr)
or Human Resources
HRIR 3021 - Human Capital Management (3.0 cr)
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· HRIR 3031 - Staffing and Selection: Strategic and Operational Concerns (2.0 cr)
· HRIR 3032 - Training and Development (2.0 cr)
· HRIR 3051 - Compensation: Theory and Practice (2.0 cr)
· HRIR 3071 - Union Organizing and Labor Relations (2.0 cr)
· HRIR 5222 - Creating and Managing Diversity and Inclusion (2.0 cr)
or Labor Relations
HRIR 3021 - Human Capital Management (3.0 cr)
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· HRIR 3071 - Union Organizing and Labor Relations (2.0 cr)
· HRIR 3072 - Collective Bargaining and Dispute Resolution (2.0 cr)
or Organizational Behavior
HRIR 3041 - The Individual and the Organization (2.0 cr)
HRIR 3042 - Organizational Behavior: Groups and Teams (2.0 cr)
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· MGMT 4044 - Negotiation Strategies (4.0 cr)
· HRIR 5222 - Creating and Managing Diversity and Inclusion (2.0 cr)
· HRIR 5443 - Principles of Effective Coaching (2.0 cr)
or Information Systems
IDSC 3001 - Information Systems & Digital Transformation (3.0 cr)
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· IDSC 3104 - Enterprise Systems (2.0 cr)
· IDSC 3202 - Analysis and Modeling of Business Systems (4.0 cr)
· IDSC 4401 - Information Security (2.0 cr)
· IDSC 4411 - Information Technology Governance and Assurance (2.0 cr)
· IDSC 4441 - Electronic Commerce (2.0 cr)
· IDSC 4455 - Web 2.0: The Business of Social Media (2.0 cr)
or Marketing
MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing (3.0 cr)
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· MKTG 3011 - Marketing Research (4.0 cr)
· MKTG 3041 - Buyer Behavior (4.0 cr)
or Strategic Management
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management (3.0 cr)
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· MGMT 4033 - Strategy Implementation (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4034 - Technology Strategy (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4055 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action (2.0 cr)
or Supply Chain & Operations Management
SCO 3001 - Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations (3.0 cr)
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· SCO 3041 - Project Management (2.0 cr)
· SCO 3045 - Sourcing and Supply Management (2.0 cr)
· SCO 3048 - Transportation and Logistics Management (2.0 cr)
· SCO 3051 - Service Management (2.0 cr)
· SCO 3056 - Supply Chain Planning and Control (4.0 cr)
· SCO 3059 - Quality Management and Lean Six Sigma (4.0 cr)
· SCO 3072 - Managing Technologies in the Supply Chain (2.0 cr)
 
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ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Microeconomic behavior of consumers, firms, and markets in domestic and world economy. Demand and supply. Competition and monopoly. Distribution of income. Economic interdependencies in the global economy. Effects of global linkages on individual decisions. prereq: knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
ECON 1165 - Business Economics (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course introduces the fundamentals of microeconomics and macroeconomics to business/other students who desire a primer on the working of an economy in a mutually dependent world. It includes the microeconomic interaction of businesses and consumers in markets and the determination of prices and quantities under conditions of competition and monopoly. Economic interdependencies in the global economy are analyzed to obtain the effects of economic changes on the country itself and on the world. The macroeconomics of aggregate consumption, saving, investment, and national income are also examined, as well as the role played by money, banking, and business cycles in the domestic and world economy. This course is only for CSOM undergraduate students.
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
APEC 1101H - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy. prereq: Honors student, proficiency in high school algebra
BA 2551 - Business Statistics in R (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 2551/SCO 2550
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The purpose of the course is to develop skills for improving data-driven decision-making using statistical techniques in the powerful statistical software environment R. As an introductory statistics course, the content will include three main areas of statistics: Descriptive Statistics, Statistical Inference, and Analysis of Relationships with Scatterplots, Correlation and Linear Regression. Developing statistical literacy is increasingly important in understanding data and engaging in the complex business world. BA 2551 focuses on statistical reasoning and how to implement statistical methods in a business context using R. Topics include (but are not limited to) descriptive statistics, statistical inference, variability, sampling, distributions, correlation analysis, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, graphical summaries of data, and introduction to linear regression. Through weekly in-class lab sessions and critical thinking assignments related to statistics in business, the course will train students to become informed consumers of numerical information and provide foundational skills in R to compute statistical procedures in future courses. We use existing packages in R as a tool to enable us to solve business problems that can leverage mathematical and statistical thinking. prereq: [Math 1031 or equiv]
STAT 1001 - Introduction to the Ideas of Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphical/numerical presentations of data. Judging the usefulness/reliability of results/inferences from surveys and other studies to interesting populations. Coping with randomness/variation in an uncertain world. prereq: Mathematics requirement for admission to University
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an introductory course in statistics whose primary objectives are to teach students the theory of elementary probability theory and an introduction to the elements of statistical inference, including testing, estimation, and confidence statements. prereq: Math 1272
STAT 3022 - Data Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical survey of applied statistical inference/computing covering widely used statistical tools. Multiple regression, variance analysis, experiment design, nonparametric methods, model checking/selection, variable transformation, categorical data analysis, logistic regression. prereq: 3011 or 3021 or SOC 3811
PSY 3801 - Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3801/Psy 3801H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Descriptive/basic inferential statistics used in psychology. Measures of central tendency, variability, t tests, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, confidence intervals, effect sizes. Psychological measurement. Graphical data presentation. Statistical software. prereq: High school algebra, [PSY 1001 or equiv]; intended for students who plan to major in psychology
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
IE 3521 - Statistics, Quality, and Reliability
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Random variables/probability distributions, statistical sampling/measurement, statistical inference, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, single/multivariate regression, design of experiments. Applications to statistical quality control and reliability. prereq: MATH 1372 or equiv
EE 3025 - Statistical Methods in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Notions of probability. Elementary statistical data analysis. Random variables, densities, expectation, correlation. Random processes, linear system response to random waveforms. Spectral analysis. Computer experiments for analysis and design in random environment. prereq: [3015, CSE upper division] or instr approval
CEGE 3102 - Uncertainty and Decision Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Stochastic models, their usefulness in reasoning about uncertainty in civil, environmental, and geo-engineering. Techniques for identifying, fitting, and validating models using data samples. Testing hypotheses about, and bounding uncertainty attached to, engineering parameters. Applications to civil, environmental, and geo-engineering. prereq: MATH 1372 or equiv
ANSC 3011 - Statistics for Animal Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic statistical concepts. Develop statistical reasoning/critical thinking skills. Descriptive statistics, probability, sampling and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, experimental design, linear correlation, linear regression and multiple regression. How to make sound arguments/decisions based on statistics when reviewing news articles or scientific publications with statistical content. Explore/draw conclusions from data using a basic statistical software package.
BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended
POL 3085 - Quantitative Analysis in Political Science (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
POL 3085 teaches students how to study politics scientifically and introduces them to how to use quantitative analysis to answer political questions. The first part of the class covers how to formulate a theory (a possible answer to a question), specify testable hypotheses (what you would see if the theory is correct or incorrect), and set up a research design to test those hypotheses. In the second part of the class, we cover quantitative data analysis, beginning from preliminary statistical analysis to multivariate linear regression. There is no mathematical or statistical background required for this course. By the end of the class, students should be able to ask and answer political questions using quantitative data and fluently evaluate statistical analyses of political phenomena in the media and many academic articles.
NURS 3710 - Statistics for Clinical Practice and Research (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Numerical reasoning, measurement principles. Vital statistics, rates, data description. Probability. Hypothesis testing/confidence intervals for tests on means. Proportions, correlations, linear regression. prereq: [High school algebra or instr consent], students enrolled in School of Nursing must take A/F option
STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Random variables/distributions. Generating functions. Standard distribution families. Data summaries. Sampling distributions. Likelihood/sufficiency. prereq: Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572H
STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Estimation. Significance tests. Distribution free methods. Power. Application to regression and to analysis of variance/count data. prereq: STAT 4101
STAT 5101 - Theory of Statistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Logical development of probability, basic issues in statistics. Probability spaces. Random variables, their distributions and expected values. Law of large numbers, central limit theorem, generating functions, multivariate normal distribution. prereq: (MATH 2263 or MATH 2374 or MATH 2573H), (CSCI 2033 or MATH 2373 or MATH 2243)
STAT 5102 - Theory of Statistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sampling, sufficiency, estimation, test of hypotheses, size/power. Categorical data. Contingency tables. Linear models. Decision theory. prereq: [5101 or Math 5651 or instr consent]
MATH 5651 - Basic Theory of Probability and Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 5651/Stat 5101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Logical development of probability, basic issues in statistics. Probability spaces, random variables, their distributions/expected values. Law of large numbers, central limit theorem, generating functions, sampling, sufficiency, estimation. prereq: [2263 or 2374 or 2573], [2243 or 2373]; [2283 or 2574 or 3283] recommended.
MATH 5652 - Introduction to Stochastic Processes
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Random walks, Markov chains, branching processes, martingales, queuing theory, Brownian motion. prereq: 5651 or Stat 5101
BA 2051 - Modeling Business Scenarios in Excel
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The title of the course says it all. You will build and use Excel-models to analyze real-world business problems. You are introduced to basic skills for analyzing data and presenting recommendations to management. In this class you will work extensively with Microsoft Excel and will be better prepared to use it in internships and upper division classes. Excel is a critical business tool. As business students, your familiarity and proficiency in Excel will aid you in upper-level classes and ultimately greatly improve your career prospects. We will learn the tension between parsimony and relevance. You will use models to answer many what-ifs. Most importantly, we hope to instill a disciplined method of structured and rigorous thinking.
ACCT 2051 - Introduction to Financial Reporting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces the topics of financial reporting and accounting. The purpose of financial accounting is to provide information to the entity owners and external parties to serve as the basis for making decisions about that entity. A student who successfully completes this class should be able to 1) understand the concepts and principles of accounting, 2) analyze, record and report the accounting treatment of business transactions, and 3) prepare, interpret, and analyze financial statements.
ACCT 2051H - Honors: Introduction to Financial Reporting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course introduces the topics of financial reporting and accounting. The purpose of the financial accounting is to provide information to the entity owners and external parties to serve as the basis for making decisions about that entity. A student who successfully completes this class should be able to 1) understand the concepts and principles of accounting, 2) analyze, record and report the accounting treatment of business transactions, and 3) prepare, interpret, and analyze financial statements.
ACCT 3001 - Strategic Management Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 3001/IBus 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Costing techniques, including activity-based costing. Applying costing methods to determine costs of products, services, and production processes. Use of costs in operating/strategic decisions. prereq: ACCT 2051 or 2050
FINA 3001 - Finance Fundamentals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 3501/Fina 3001/Fina 3001H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How competition for capital in Capital Markets establishes metrics and measures used to understand financial performance of the firm. The course introduces the finance view of the firm and the application of value creation principles to firm decision making. Course presents the centrality of cash flows, the theoretical foundations for Time Value of Money, decision tools for investment of capital, basic valuation of stocks and bonds, and the theoretical foundations for the impact of risk on the required return on investor capital. prereq: ACCT 2050 or ACCT 2051, SCO 2550 or BA 2551 or equivalent statistics course
HRIR 3021 - Human Capital Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HRIR 3021/HRIR 3021H/IBUS 3021
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will focus on the people side of business. We will look at how, through managing and leading people, we can create an engaged, productive workforce in order to achieve organizational strategic objectives. The content of this course is complementary to any major or minor. Major topics in this course: - Managing people in an ethical, legal way that is aligned with corporate strategy and helps organizations reach their goals; - Successfully attracting, recruiting, and selecting talented people; - Creating interesting, engaging jobs and giving meaningful feedback in order to retain great employees; - Rewarding and motivating people through intrinsic and extrinsic methods to encourage the most effective and "right" kind of employee behaviors to create an engaged, productive workforce through people strategies and practices.
IDSC 3001 - Information Systems & Digital Transformation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Digital transformation through new technologies such as artificial intelligence, enterprise systems, electronic commerce, Internet of things, social media; IT strategy and data-driven decision making; privacy and security issues related to the Internet; a must take for students who want to be prepared for the rapidly changing technological landscape as successful professionals
MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mktg 3001/Mktg 3001H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to terms, concepts, and skills for analyzing marketing problems. Factors outside the organization affecting its product, pricing, promotion, and distribution decisions. Cases from actual organizations. prereq: ECON 1101 or ECON 1165
MGMT 3015 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBUS 3010/MGMT 3010/MGMT 3015
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of entrepreneurship. Career paths, including new business start-ups, franchising, acquisitions (including family business succession), corporate venturing, and entre-preneurial services. Legal structures for new business formation. Aspects of business law/ethics.
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is about the foundational principles of management, encompassing disciplinary and topical boundaries. We will look at these principles from the perspective of how they guide action, specifically: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. By the end of the course, students will know the basics of how to set up organizations to be effective and innovative, and not just efficient. During the course, you will engage with the material in the course and understand how management frameworks can be used to choose the right internal structures and processes that can best react to your particular industry context and general business environment.
SCO 3001 - Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations Management focuses on the design and management of transformation processes to provide products and services to create value for the people, planet, and firm prosperity. On the one hand, supply chain and operations management involves the integration of activities and processes, to facilitate the flows of materials, services, finances, and information to convert inputs into the firms? primary products and services. Operational issues include the design of products and processes, the procurement of raw materials, the control of inventories, the maintenance of quality, the planning of human resources and facilities, and the delivery of products or services, so that customer expectations and needs are met. Operations also have significant interactions with other functional areas of the firm (e.g., finance, marketing, strategy, and accounting). Therefore, understanding the role of the operations function and its impact on the competitiveness of the firm from both tactical and strategic aspects is an important part of any manager's training. This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts, operations practices, and models in both manufacturing- and service-oriented firms. The course will cover both quantitative and qualitative methods.
BA 2062 - Powerful Problem Solving
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
One of the key distinguishing characteristics of effective leaders is the ability to parse through the overwhelming number of inputs we all receive to understand what needs to be done. ?What problem are we trying to solve?? is a crucial question that too often goes unaddressed in the rush to ?just fix it?. Powerful Problem Solving will expose students to a clear problem solving framework and process, a variety of perspectives on how to approach problems, as well as individual and group activities and assignments to inform and sharpen skills.
ACCT 3001 - Strategic Management Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 3001/IBus 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Costing techniques, including activity-based costing. Applying costing methods to determine costs of products, services, and production processes. Use of costs in operating/strategic decisions. prereq: ACCT 2051 or 2050
ACCT 5101 - Intermediate Accounting I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Valuation, measurement, reporting issues related to selected assets/liabilities of firm. Theory underlying accounting issues. Applying accounting principles. prereq: Grade of B- or better in Acct 2050/Acct 2051 OR passed the Acct pretest (z.umn.edu/Acct5101pretest); CSOM Major, MGMT minor, mgmt grad student
MGMT 3015 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBUS 3010/MGMT 3010/MGMT 3015
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of entrepreneurship. Career paths, including new business start-ups, franchising, acquisitions (including family business succession), corporate venturing, and entre-preneurial services. Legal structures for new business formation. Aspects of business law/ethics.
MGMT 4175W - New Business Feasibility and Planning (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 03099
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the following insights into ? Techniques for developing and screening business ideas ? Criteria for properly assessing idea feasibility ? Equipping yourself with the necessary information and analysis to develop a useful business plan ? Preparing an effective business plan ? Effectively pitching the plan to stakeholders, primarily prospective investors The class makes use of lecture, videos, articles, cases, class exercises, assignments, and quizzes to help develop depth of understanding amongst students of the relevant subject matter of this course. prereq: MGMT 3010 or MGMT 3015 or IBUS 3010
MGMT 4171W - Entrepreneurship in Action I (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Two-semester course. In fall, students identify a business oportunity, develop concept, determine resources required, and launch the business. In spring, students implement business plan, manage business, and determine exit strategy. prereq: 3010, [4008 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4008], completed coursework in business core, CSOM upper division, approved application
MGMT 4172 - Entrepreneurship in Action II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Second of two-semester sequence. In fall, students identify business opportunity, develop concept, determine resources required, and launch business. In spring, students implement busienss plan, manage business, and determine exit strategy. prereq: 4171
MGMT 4080W - Applied Technology Entrepreneurship (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mgmt 4170/Mgmt 4177/Mgmt 5177
Typically offered: Every Spring
Team projects based on commercializable technologies or innovations. Teams present their ideas to investors and industry professionals. Students are encouraged to submit their business plans to Minnesota Cup.
MGMT 4055 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBus 4050/Mgmt 4055
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on how business organizations innovate and change. The course covers foundational topics and combines both theoretical insights and practical knowledge based on cases and hands-on exercises. The class topics address the following questions: What are the sources, types and patterns of innovation? What are the characteristics of an organization?s innovation ecosystem? How do organizations compete and collaborate in innovation ecosystems? What are some external forces shaping organizational innovations? How do organizations adapt to these external forces? By the end of this course, students will: Learn the key principles of success and failure of innovation and change in business organizations across different products, services and geographies. Apply course concepts to real organizational cases, diagnose problems and recommend solutions. Use clear written, verbal and online communication skills. Collaborate to create novel solutions to tasks and problems. Demonstrate the use of a wide range of qualitative and quantitative sources to support conclusions and recommendations. prereq: MGMT 3001 or MGMT 3004 or MGMT 3010 or MGMT 3015
FINA 3001 - Finance Fundamentals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 3501/Fina 3001/Fina 3001H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How competition for capital in Capital Markets establishes metrics and measures used to understand financial performance of the firm. The course introduces the finance view of the firm and the application of value creation principles to firm decision making. Course presents the centrality of cash flows, the theoretical foundations for Time Value of Money, decision tools for investment of capital, basic valuation of stocks and bonds, and the theoretical foundations for the impact of risk on the required return on investor capital. prereq: ACCT 2050 or ACCT 2051, SCO 2550 or BA 2551 or equivalent statistics course
FINA 4121 - Financial Markets and Interest Rates
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fina 4121/Fina 4121H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides a framework to understand how financial markets operate and how they establish the cost of capital demanded by investors through market interest rates. Course presents valuation models for bonds, the impact of the Federal Reserve on the level and term structure of interest rates, measures of interest rate risk, financing markets for securities and how these define the pricing of futures and forward contracts. prereq: 3001 or 3001H, CSOM major or Math/Actuarial Science major or Management minor.
FINA 4221 - Principles of Corporate Finance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fina 4221/Fina 4241
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course evaluates how the financing choices the firm makes influence the creation of firm value and allocation of firm risks among investors. Course presents the debt vs. equity trade-off, tax effects of financing, dividend vs. share repurchases, and the impact on managerial incentives and agency problems. prereq: 3001 or 3001H, CSOM major or Math/Actuarial Science major or Management Minor
FINA 4321 - Portfolio Management and Performance Evaluation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fina 4321/Fina 4321H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course uses statistics to demonstrate how the construction of portfolios of individual securities impacts the risk return trade-off for investors through diversification. Course presents models of pricing investor risk, impact of asset allocation on returns, active versus indexed portfolio management, and approaches to measure value added performance of investment portfolios. prereq: 3001 or 3001H, CSOM major or math/actuarial science major or Management minor
FINA 4621 - The Global Economy (Macro)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fina 4621/Fina 4641
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides the student with a foundation for understanding the macroeconomics of the global economy with a focus on international financial issues. The course presents macroeconomic models, international capital flows, and currency and exchange rate systems. prereq: 3001 or 3001H, CSOM major or Math major/Act Sci, or Management minor.
HRIR 3021 - Human Capital Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HRIR 3021/HRIR 3021H/IBUS 3021
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will focus on the people side of business. We will look at how, through managing and leading people, we can create an engaged, productive workforce in order to achieve organizational strategic objectives. The content of this course is complementary to any major or minor. Major topics in this course: - Managing people in an ethical, legal way that is aligned with corporate strategy and helps organizations reach their goals; - Successfully attracting, recruiting, and selecting talented people; - Creating interesting, engaging jobs and giving meaningful feedback in order to retain great employees; - Rewarding and motivating people through intrinsic and extrinsic methods to encourage the most effective and "right" kind of employee behaviors to create an engaged, productive workforce through people strategies and practices.
HRIR 3031 - Staffing and Selection: Strategic and Operational Concerns
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to theory/practice of staffing decisions. Recruitment, selection, promotion, demotion, transfer, dismissal, layoff, retirement. Staffing analyzed from strategic/operational perspectives. Legal issues.
HRIR 3032 - Training and Development
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to theory/research/practice of design/implementation/evaluation of employee training/development programs. Training as process for influencing individual/organizational outcomes.
HRIR 3051 - Compensation: Theory and Practice
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to compensation/reward programs in employing organizations. Theories of organizational/employee behavior used in design/implementation of pay programs. Design, implementation, job evaluation, salary surveys, skill-based pay, merit-based pay, other compensation programs.
HRIR 3071 - Union Organizing and Labor Relations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of labor unions, employee associations, collective bargaining within framework of contemporary American legislation/policy. Forming/organizing labor unions. Management strategies/responsibilities, historical influences on policy/practice in private/public sectors.
HRIR 5222 - Creating and Managing Diversity and Inclusion
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course covers the challenges and rewards associated with managing today?s increasingly diverse workforce. Diversity has the potential to benefit employees and organizations alike, yet the benefits of diversity are only realized in organizations with effective diversity management practices. In this course, we will discuss the power of inclusion as it relates to the employee experience. We will study effective strategies for building diverse and inclusive companies, and will address the barriers that can often exist. We will look at approaches to organizational design that limit unconscious bias and produce more objective decisions across the employee experience?from engaging and hiring candidates to retaining employees and helping them thrive. Finally, we will dive into how to create inclusive cultures and a sense of belonging, across local and global contexts. Student engagement and willingness to share diverse perspectives are critical to the success of this course. prereq: HRIR MA student must register A-F, 3021, [CSOM or HRD junior or senior or dept consent]
HRIR 3021 - Human Capital Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HRIR 3021/HRIR 3021H/IBUS 3021
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will focus on the people side of business. We will look at how, through managing and leading people, we can create an engaged, productive workforce in order to achieve organizational strategic objectives. The content of this course is complementary to any major or minor. Major topics in this course: - Managing people in an ethical, legal way that is aligned with corporate strategy and helps organizations reach their goals; - Successfully attracting, recruiting, and selecting talented people; - Creating interesting, engaging jobs and giving meaningful feedback in order to retain great employees; - Rewarding and motivating people through intrinsic and extrinsic methods to encourage the most effective and "right" kind of employee behaviors to create an engaged, productive workforce through people strategies and practices.
HRIR 3071 - Union Organizing and Labor Relations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of labor unions, employee associations, collective bargaining within framework of contemporary American legislation/policy. Forming/organizing labor unions. Management strategies/responsibilities, historical influences on policy/practice in private/public sectors.
HRIR 3072 - Collective Bargaining and Dispute Resolution
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Collective bargaining, contract administration, grievance processing, interest/rights arbitration, strikes, related policies/practices of employers, workers, labor unions in private/public sectors. Impact/transfer of practices to non-union sector.
HRIR 3041 - The Individual and the Organization
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to understand both the impact and experience of the individual in an organizational setting. We will discuss the influence that individual differences and behaviors play within an organization, focusing on the employee as the key factor through which organizations function and grow. An employer?s success is largely attributable to the motivation and performance of those they employ. The factors that influence both their motivation and performance will be the focus of our content. We will explore topics such as personality, values, perceptions, and diversity among others. Each topic covered will enrich our understanding of the complex relationship between the individual and the organization. Recommended prerequisite: HRIR 3021
HRIR 3042 - Organizational Behavior: Groups and Teams
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to understand both the impact and experience of the individual, leaders, and teams in an organizational setting. We will discuss the influence that individual differences and behaviors play within work teams, and how leadership may shape team experiences, focusing on the team as the key factor through which organizations function and grow. An employer?s success is largely attributable to the motivation and performance of those they employ. The factors that influence group, team, and organizational performance will be the focus of this class. We will explore topics such as communication, conflict, negotiation, leadership, organizational structure and change, among others. Each topic covered will enrich our understanding of the complex relationship between the individual, team, and the organization. Recommended prerequisite: HRIR 3021
MGMT 4044 - Negotiation Strategies
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of negotiation as the art and science of securing agreements between two or more interdependent parties seeking to maximize their own outcomes. The concepts you learn and the skills you develop in this class will apply to both your work and personal negotiations. At the heart of this class is the idea that the best way to learn to negotiate is by engaging in negotiation and then rigorously analyzing your experience. Therefore, this course is designed to be a highly interactive learning experience. The role of the course instructor is to help you get the most out of this experience by selecting relevant and compelling exercises and readings, as well as by facilitating engaging and meaningful discussion of class negotiations, negotiation research and best practices.
HRIR 5222 - Creating and Managing Diversity and Inclusion
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course covers the challenges and rewards associated with managing today?s increasingly diverse workforce. Diversity has the potential to benefit employees and organizations alike, yet the benefits of diversity are only realized in organizations with effective diversity management practices. In this course, we will discuss the power of inclusion as it relates to the employee experience. We will study effective strategies for building diverse and inclusive companies, and will address the barriers that can often exist. We will look at approaches to organizational design that limit unconscious bias and produce more objective decisions across the employee experience?from engaging and hiring candidates to retaining employees and helping them thrive. Finally, we will dive into how to create inclusive cultures and a sense of belonging, across local and global contexts. Student engagement and willingness to share diverse perspectives are critical to the success of this course. prereq: HRIR MA student must register A-F, 3021, [CSOM or HRD junior or senior or dept consent]
HRIR 5443 - Principles of Effective Coaching
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Skills/competencies required to coach, mentor, develop employees/leaders. Managing coaching process. Planning coaching relationship. Coaching as leadership development strategy. Coaching executives. prereq: HRIR MA student must register A-F, [CSOM or HRD junior or senior or dept consent] with HRIR 3021
IDSC 3001 - Information Systems & Digital Transformation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Digital transformation through new technologies such as artificial intelligence, enterprise systems, electronic commerce, Internet of things, social media; IT strategy and data-driven decision making; privacy and security issues related to the Internet; a must take for students who want to be prepared for the rapidly changing technological landscape as successful professionals
IDSC 3104 - Enterprise Systems
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Management aspects of Enterprise Systems. Vendor/vendor management options. Technologies, organizational readiness. Hands-on access to software solutions from ERP software provider. End-to-end processes. Measurement of key performance indicators. Analytics, workflow. prereq: 3001
IDSC 3202 - Analysis and Modeling of Business Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Improving/automating key business processes in manufacturing and service industries. Roles of business management and MIS. Selecting business process opportunities, business process analysis, process modeling of work/data flow, decomposition, software tools. Traditional/object analysis methods. prereq: 3001
IDSC 4401 - Information Security
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/issues of security and data integrity threats that undermine utility, robustness, and confidence in electronic technologies in facilitating business transactions. prereq: 3001
IDSC 4411 - Information Technology Governance and Assurance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Information technology audit function, internal control, audit process, smart operations, network security, systems development life cycle, enterprise resource planning risk, compliance issues. IT governance, business continuity, frameworks/methodologies. Lectures, case studies, real-world examples. prereq: 3001
IDSC 4441 - Electronic Commerce
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Issues/trends in applying e-commerce initiatives. Technological infrastructure, revenue models, web marketing, business-to-business strategies, online auctions, legal and ethical aspects, hardware/software, payment systems, security. Conceiving, planning, building, and managing e-commerce initiatives. prereq: 3001
IDSC 4455 - Web 2.0: The Business of Social Media
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Business use of social media technologies. Blogs, wikis, online social networks. Readings, forum discussion, case analyses. How technologies engage consumers, market products or services, benefit from open innovation, foster collaboration among employees. prereq: 3001
MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mktg 3001/Mktg 3001H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to terms, concepts, and skills for analyzing marketing problems. Factors outside the organization affecting its product, pricing, promotion, and distribution decisions. Cases from actual organizations. prereq: ECON 1101 or ECON 1165
MKTG 3011 - Marketing Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on managing the entire marketing research process, which involves collecting and analyzing relevant, timely, and accurate information to gain customer insights and drive effective marketing decision making. Students learn fundamental techniques of data collection and analysis to solve specific marketing problems. The class offers hands-on learning-by-doing opportunities through group projects for students to practice every stage of marketing research. prereqs: 3001 and BA 2551 or SCO 2550 or equivalent statistics course
MKTG 3041 - Buyer Behavior
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mktg 3040/Mktg 3041
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of behavioral sciences to buyer behavior. Perception, attitudes, learning, persuasion, motivation, decision-making, social/cultural influences, managerial implications. prereq: 3001
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is about the foundational principles of management, encompassing disciplinary and topical boundaries. We will look at these principles from the perspective of how they guide action, specifically: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. By the end of the course, students will know the basics of how to set up organizations to be effective and innovative, and not just efficient. During the course, you will engage with the material in the course and understand how management frameworks can be used to choose the right internal structures and processes that can best react to your particular industry context and general business environment.
MGMT 4033 - Strategy Implementation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course focuses on implementing and executing strategy at both the organizational and functional level. It will focus on the relationship between strategy formulation and execution, the systematic and structural problems with implementing strategy, and various methods to minimize these problems. The course is designed both as a standalone topic and to deepen the student?s understanding of the other strategic concepts covered in the strategy minor. prereq: Mgmt 3004 or 3001.
MGMT 4034 - Technology Strategy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course addresses challenges and opportunities in the strategic management of technology and innovation. The course will equip students with the conceptual frameworks, tools, and language for analyzing and managing businesses in environments of technological change. We will examine how new technologies transform industries and create new markets, strategies for addressing technological change, and approaches for managers to shape and/or respond to new technologies. Because innovating or responding to new technologies often involves strategic and organizational change, we will also discuss how organizations change in response to new technologies. We will use a combination of readings, lectures, case discussions, and simulations. The final team project provides an opportunity to explore in-depth the technology strategy and innovation challenges of a particular organization. The class is heavily discussion-based, which means that all students must read the material and be prepared to contribute to the learning process. prereq: Mgmt 3004 or 3001
MGMT 4055 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBus 4050/Mgmt 4055
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on how business organizations innovate and change. The course covers foundational topics and combines both theoretical insights and practical knowledge based on cases and hands-on exercises. The class topics address the following questions: What are the sources, types and patterns of innovation? What are the characteristics of an organization?s innovation ecosystem? How do organizations compete and collaborate in innovation ecosystems? What are some external forces shaping organizational innovations? How do organizations adapt to these external forces? By the end of this course, students will: Learn the key principles of success and failure of innovation and change in business organizations across different products, services and geographies. Apply course concepts to real organizational cases, diagnose problems and recommend solutions. Use clear written, verbal and online communication skills. Collaborate to create novel solutions to tasks and problems. Demonstrate the use of a wide range of qualitative and quantitative sources to support conclusions and recommendations. prereq: MGMT 3001 or MGMT 3004 or MGMT 3010 or MGMT 3015
SCO 3001 - Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations Management focuses on the design and management of transformation processes to provide products and services to create value for the people, planet, and firm prosperity. On the one hand, supply chain and operations management involves the integration of activities and processes, to facilitate the flows of materials, services, finances, and information to convert inputs into the firms? primary products and services. Operational issues include the design of products and processes, the procurement of raw materials, the control of inventories, the maintenance of quality, the planning of human resources and facilities, and the delivery of products or services, so that customer expectations and needs are met. Operations also have significant interactions with other functional areas of the firm (e.g., finance, marketing, strategy, and accounting). Therefore, understanding the role of the operations function and its impact on the competitiveness of the firm from both tactical and strategic aspects is an important part of any manager's training. This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts, operations practices, and models in both manufacturing- and service-oriented firms. The course will cover both quantitative and qualitative methods.
SCO 3041 - Project Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles and methods useful for planning and controlling a project, including development of project plan, resource planning and scheduling, and project monitoring and control. Selected computerized packages are studied, including PERT and CPM, and examples of different types of projects from manufacturing and service industries are used. prereq: 3000 or instr consent
SCO 3045 - Sourcing and Supply Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Strategic/operational role of purchasing/supply. Supply management. Supplier-selection criteria such as quantity, quality, cost/price considerations. Buyer-supplier relationships. prereq: 3001
SCO 3048 - Transportation and Logistics Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Linkages between logistics/transportation and marketing, operations, and finance. How different industries integrate logistics, warehousing, transportation, and information systems. prereq: 3001
SCO 3051 - Service Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Issues unique to managing service processes. Identifying service needs, designing services, and managing services. prereq: 3001
SCO 3056 - Supply Chain Planning and Control
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course teaches the essential tools and tasks to design an efficient supply chain planning and control system, including ERP, integrated business planning, forecasting, inventory management, capacity/production/material planning, and scheduling. Prereq: 3001 or instr consent
SCO 3059 - Quality Management and Lean Six Sigma
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts and principles of Quality Management and Lean Six Sigma. Process improvement is an important part of every manager?s job. Both the managerial and the technical aspects of quality improvement are considered. Three tiers of the quality field are presented including; quality frameworks, quality methodologies, and quality tools. The foundation starts with learning the overarching quality frameworks such as the Malcolm Baldrige Performance Excellence framework, Six Sigma process improvement, and ISO 9001. Next the course examines quality methodologies such as the six sigma DMAIC methodology, Rummler-Brache process improvement methodology, Lean Thinking, Plan-Do-Check-Act, and the Theory of Constraints. Applications of process improvement are conducted using the many tools of process improvement; SIPOC diagram, Critical-to-Quality Tree, cross-functional process maps, project charter, affinity diagram, quality function deployment, cycle of service, moments of truth, service recovery plan, control plan, statistical process control, control charts, process capability, balanced scorecard, performance metrics matrix, design of experiments. Lean tools such as; Kaizen, Kanban, Five Why, Andon, 5S, Gemba, 8 wastes, Takt time, standardized work, bottleneck analysis, poka-yoke, root causal analysis, and visual control. prereq: 3001 or equiv or instr consent
SCO 3072 - Managing Technologies in the Supply Chain
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Technologies and technological change within/between firms as opportunities for professional leadership. Selecting technologies, nurturing their adoption, and ensuring their exploitation. prereq: 3001