Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Outdoor Recreation and Education Minor

Kinesiology, School of
College of Education and Human Development
  • Students will no longer be accepted into this program after Spring 2019. Program requirements below are for current students only.
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Required credits in this minor: 15
The outdoor recreation and education minor provides students with the opportunity to study a specific area of the recreation and leisure field. While students can take other coursework related to leadership, management, policy, programming, and tourism, no other University classes have a specific outdoor focus. The priority of the outdoor recreation and education minor would be to provide students with education and skills training necessary to be successful in this field. Students will concentrate on the following: 1) Specific leadership skills to work with groups and individuals from various socioeconomic backgrounds, with varying physical and cognitive abilities, from all age groups, races, and orientations, along with the understanding of leadership roles, methods and models; 2) The development, implementation, and evaluation of programs and services to meet the needs of these populations; 3) Policy and management related to our public land for both use by our citizens and also preservation for the enjoyment of future generations; 4) Understanding the use of our outdoor resources and the economic and environmental impact created; 5) Eco-tourism and sustainability; 6) Global impacts based on the use of outdoor spaces, pollution, climate changes, and others. Students in the minor will benefit from the many alumni and community partners that have a vested interest in the education and training of our future professionals. Specific individual projects and/or research will be conducted with related agencies that will provide not only real-world, relevant experience and skill development, but establish mentor relationships and premium opportunities for networking in the industry. For more detailed information regarding this free standing minor, visit: z.umn.edu/oreminor
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Student must complete 15 credits from the designated list for the ORE minor.
Required courses
REC 2151 - Outdoor and Camp Leadership (3.0 cr)
REC 4311 - Programming Outdoor & Env Ed (3.0 cr)
REC 4161 - Recreation Land Policy (3.0 cr)
REC 3321 - Outdoor Recreation 3-Season Skills (3.0 cr)
or REC 3322 - Outdoor Recreation Winter Skills (3.0 cr)
Electives
Other electives may be accepted after consultation with your advisor.
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· REC 4191 - Adventure Recreation, Tourism, and Eco-Tourism (3.0 cr)
· REC 4301 - Wilderness and Adventure Education (4.0 cr)
· REC 3993 - Directed Study in Recreation Administration (1.0-9.0 cr)
· ESPM 2401 - Environmental Education/Interpretation (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development [GP] (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
· LEAD 1961W - Personal Leadership in the University [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LEAD 3961 - Leadership, You, and Your Community (3.0 cr)
· SSM 1004 - Sustainable Systems Management Orientation (1.0 cr)
· SSM 2003 - Systems Thinking: Development and Applications in Sustainability (3.0 cr)
· SSM 3301 - Global Water Resource Use and Sustainability [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· YOST 2241 - Experiential Learning (4.0 cr)
 
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· College of Education and Human Development

View sample plan(s):
· Outdoor Recreation and Educ Sample Plan
· Outdoor Recreation and Educ Sample Plan
· Outdoor Recreation and Educ Sample Plan
· Outdoor Recreation and Educ Sample Plan

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· Outdoor Recreation and Education Minor
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REC 2151 - Outdoor and Camp Leadership
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical/theoretical study of leading/educating diverse groups in outdoor settings. Outdoor leadership skills, styles/methods, how these translate to general leadership methods in other settings/careers. How leadership styles impacts learning processes.
REC 4311 - Programming Outdoor & Env Ed
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods, materials, settings for developing/conducting environmental/outdoor education programs. prereq: REC major or ORE minor or instr consent
REC 4161 - Recreation Land Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Historical development of recreational land policy in United States. Related contemporary issues in policy, management, interpretation, research.
REC 3321 - Outdoor Recreation 3-Season Skills
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to essential outdoor technical skills as they relate to outdoor leadership and programming. Focus on teaching students to lead/instruct in outdoor classroom. prereq: Student will not receive credit if they have previously taken REC 4900/5900 - Special Topics with this topic title
REC 3322 - Outdoor Recreation Winter Skills
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to essential winter technical skills as they relate to outdoor leadership/programming. Focus on teaching students to lead/instruct in outdoor classroom. prereq: Student will not receive credit if they have previously taken REC 4900/5900 - Special Topics with this topic title
REC 4191 - Adventure Recreation, Tourism, and Eco-Tourism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Development of adventure recreation programs, including emphasis on tourism industry.
REC 4301 - Wilderness and Adventure Education
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Rationale for, methods in applying wilderness/adventure education programs in education, recreation, corporate, human service settings. Emphasizes adventure/wilderness program management.
REC 3993 - Directed Study in Recreation Administration
Credits: 1.0 -9.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Work with faculty or grad students on research or scholarly or creative activities. Students usually assist with faculty scholarship or carry out projects under faculty supervision. Topic leads to new learning or discovery or contributes to student?s academic program. prereq: Rec major, instr consent
ESPM 2401 - Environmental Education/Interpretation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundational view of environmental education/interpretation, its history, theories, and methodologies. Practical skills for teaching in the outdoors. Educational content, state/national standards, effective pedagogy for informal learning environments.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00768 - ESPM 3031/ESPM 5031
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
GPS principles, operations, techniques to improve accuracy. Datum, projections, and coordinate systems. Differential correction, accuracy assessments discussed/applied in lab exercises. Code/carrier phase GPS used in exercises. GPS handheld units, PDA based ArcPad/GPS equipment. Transferring field data to/from desktop systems, integrating GPS data with GIS. prereq: Intro GIS course
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00379 - ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00361 - ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3251/5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use and sustainable development. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Global case studies. Impact of consumption in developed countries on sustainable development in lesser developed countries.
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00410 - FNRM 3101/FNRM 5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Tourism is a significant industry locally, nationally, and internationally. Park and protected area attractions are among the most visited but also the most vulnerable attractions. This course is designed to familiarize you with the basic concept of park and protected area tourism, including cultural and ecotourism, and then develop your expertise to plan and evaluate sustainable tourism development and operations. Accordingly, you will complete assignments that apply the knowledge gained to planning and evaluation activities. This course is offered partially on-line. COURSE OBJECTIVES By the end of the class you will be able to: 1.Differentiate and appreciate the complexities involved with defining and developing nature, eco, heritage, geo-, park and protected, cultural and "sustainable tourism." 2.Identify specific social, economic, and environmental impacts associated with park and protected area tourism, how to measure them, and methods to minimize the negative and maximize the positive impacts. 3.Analyze domestic and international case studies of park and protected area tourism. 4.Critically evaluate park and protected area tourism services and effective management and planning. 5. Create elements of a business plan for park and protected area tourism operations that emphasize sustainability.
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02381 - FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 3131/5131
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
LEAD 1961W - Personal Leadership in the University (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00296 - Lead 1961W/OLPD 1301W/OLPD 130
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Examine personal views of leadership, differences between personal/positional leadership, leadership ethics/values, personal leadership strengths/skills.
LEAD 3961 - Leadership, You, and Your Community
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00297 - Lead 3961//OLPD 3302W/PA 3961
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How do effective leaders create positive systemic change within complex systems? What is community and how does it shape the work of leadership? Students examine leadership from a multi-dimensional and multicultural perspective and critically examine leadership theories in authentic, complex community settings.
SSM 1004 - Sustainable Systems Management Orientation
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will receive an introduction to the Sustainable Systems Management Major. They will learn about internships in the field and about career paths that they may follow. There will also be presentations and assignments on preparing resumes and finding jobs in this area. Graduates and professionals in the related fields of sustainable systems will present for the class. Combining course work and field trips, this class will provide students with the opportunity to meet their fellow students and to form a cohort of students with similar interests and career aspirations. prereq: None
SSM 2003 - Systems Thinking: Development and Applications in Sustainability
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will provide introduction to basic systems thinking fundamentals: defining a systems perspective about any situation or problem, solving problems with that perspective, describing and modeling problems, and designing and improving upon system solutions.
SSM 3301 - Global Water Resource Use and Sustainability (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
What is the value of clean water? Explore the many facets of water, earth's most abundant resource. Ponder the value water for you, society, a region or nation; the complexities of ownership and protection; the influence of culture and traditions; and potential impacts of climate change. Consider realistic and holistic solutions to water issues.
YOST 2241 - Experiential Learning
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01135
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
History/theory of experiential learning, its application in youthwork. Observation, reflection, program design, and evaluation skills grounded in experiential learning theory. 15 hours of field observation required. prereq: [1001, 2001] or instr consent