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Twin Cities Campus

Asian American Studies Minor

Global Studies Department
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Required credits in this minor: 15
The minor focuses on the history, politics, and culture of Americans of Asian descent. Courses explore the diversity of Asian American communities, and the history and present conditions of racial formation in the United States and other parts of the Americas. The minor draws from courses in a number of disciplines and academic approaches and encourages social awareness, critical thinking, the development of new perspectives, and artistic appreciation. Courses included in the minor allow students to develop their knowledge of Asian American issues in many different contexts. Some courses emphasize an in-depth study of Asian American history, literature and culture, social issues, politics, and psychology. Others include significant attention to Asian American Studies topics in the course of broader discussions.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Students complete at least 15 credits of coursework, including one core course. At least 12 credits must be at the 3xxx-5xxx level. Students interested in the minor should make an appointment with the Asian American Studies director (778 Social Sciences Building, 612-625-4813, aast@umn.edu). Students may request credit towards the minor for other courses with Asian American Studies content by submitting a course syllabus and proof of completion to the Asian American Studies director. A given course may only count towards one minor requirement.
Core Course
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· AAS 3001 - Contemporary Perspectives on Asian America [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMST 3001 - Contemporary Perspectives on Asian America [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3271 -  Learning in the Asian American Community (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3301 - Asian America Through Arts and Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3301 - Asian America through Arts and Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3311 - Asian American Theater (3.0 cr)
or TH 3311 - Asian American Theater (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3341 - Asian American Images [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3341 - Asian American Images [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3361 - Asian Americans and Food (3.0 cr)
or AMST 3361 - Asian Americans and Food (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families, & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3503H - Honors: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3601W - War and Empire: Asian American Perspectives [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3877 - Asian American History, 1850 to Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3877 - Asian American History, 1850-Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
Elective Courses
In addition to the required core course, take 12 or more credits of any 1xxx, 3xxx, 4xxx, or 5xxx AAS course (or other advisor-approved courses).
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AAS 1101 - Imagining Asian America [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3001 - Contemporary Perspectives on Asian America [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMST 3001 - Contemporary Perspectives on Asian America [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3211W - Race & Racism in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3211W - Race and Racism in the US [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3271 -  Learning in the Asian American Community (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3301 - Asian America Through Arts and Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3301 - Asian America through Arts and Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3311 - Asian American Theater (3.0 cr)
or TH 3311 - Asian American Theater (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3341 - Asian American Images [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3341 - Asian American Images [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3361 - Asian Americans and Food (3.0 cr)
or AMST 3361 - Asian Americans and Food (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3483 - Hmong History Across the Globe (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3483 - Hmong History Across the Globe (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families, & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3503H - Honors: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3601W - War and Empire: Asian American Perspectives [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3866 - Arab American Experiences (3.0 cr)
or ALL 3866 - Arab American Experiences (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History [HIS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in US History [HIS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3877 - Asian American History, 1850 to Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3877 - Asian American History, 1850-Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 3113W - Global Minnesota: Diversity in the 21st Century [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· DNCE 3495 - Dance and Global Tourism [GP] (3.0 cr)
 
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AAS 3001 - Contemporary Perspectives on Asian America (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01126
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interdisciplinary overview of Asian American identities. Post-1965 migration/community. History, cultural productions, and concerns of Americans of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, Filipino, and Southeast Asian ancestry.
AMST 3001 - Contemporary Perspectives on Asian America (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01126 - AAS 3001/AmSt 3001
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interdisciplinary overview of Asian American identities. Post-1965 migration/community. History, cultural productions, and concerns of Americans of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, Filipino, and Southeast Asian ancestry.
AAS 3271 - Learning in the Asian American Community
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is intended to give students a general introduction to participatory learning through engagement with Asian American community organizations and/or leaders. The course is based within Asian American studies, an interdisciplinary field of inquiry that examines how histories of immigration, exclusion, racialization, and citizenship have shaped Asian American communities and identities. In turn, Asian American studies asks how Asian Americans, configured as immigrants, refugees, "forever foreigners," and "model minorities," impact how American nation, empire, rights, and belonging are constructed. Working with community partners, students will have the opportunity to learn several different community-based research skills: newspaper article search, archival research and/or archival organization, interviewing skills, and audio/video production. Students also have the option to complete service learning with an organization throughout the semester; with this option, students will write a short reflection statement on their service learning as their final project. prereq: AAS and CRES minors must register A-F.
AAS 3301 - Asian America Through Arts and Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01863 - AAS 3301/EngL 3301
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
The course focuses on the close analysis and interpretation of individual works by a range of modern and contemporary artists. Students will analyze, critique, and interpret these works in light of the historical and social contexts in which they were produced, their creation and uses of aesthetic form, and their impact on individuals and communities. Discussion, writing assignments, and oral presentations will focus on different ways of encountering and evaluating artistic work; for instance, students will write critical analyses and production reviews as well as dialogue more informally through weekly journal entries and online discussion forums. We will examine what it means to define artists and their work as being "Asian American" and explore how other categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, or class intersect with race. We will study how art works not only as individual creativity but also as communal and social practice; for instance, we look at the history of theaters, such as East-West Players or Pan Asian Repertory Theatre, that have sustained Asian Americans as actors, playwrights, and designers.
ENGL 3301 - Asian America through Arts and Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01863 - AAS 3301/EngL 3301
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
The course focuses on the close analysis and interpretation of individual works by a range of modern and contemporary artists. Students will analyze, critique, and interpret these works in light of the historical and social contexts in which they were produced, their creation and uses of aesthetic form, and their impact on individuals and communities. Discussion, writing assignments, and oral presentations will focus on different ways of encountering and evaluating artistic work; for instance, students will write critical analyses and production reviews as well as dialogue more informally through weekly journal entries and online discussion forums. We will examine what it means to define artists and their work as being "Asian American" and explore how other categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, or class intersect with race. We will study how art works not only as individual creativity but also as communal and social practice; for instance, we look at the history of theaters, such as East-West Players or Pan Asian Repertory Theatre, that have sustained Asian Americans as actors, playwrights, and designers.
AAS 3311 - Asian American Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02559 - AAS 3311/Th 3311
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through submerging students in both theater history and practice, this class brings students closer to the history, experiences, and politics of Asian Americans. Why are Asian American stories needed and how do we tell them? What are the artistic and social agendas driving the making of Asian American theater? How have the styles of performance shifted? While we will be actively working on readings and original theater projects, you don't need to be a theater expert to enjoy this class. Topics will include reading plays by Frank Chin, David Henry Hwang, Wakako Yamauchi, Naomi Iizuka, and others; looking at the history of Asian American theater companies; discussing creative approaches to casting, acting, directing, and design; and building collaborations among companies, audiences, and communities.
TH 3311 - Asian American Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02559 - AAS 3311/Th 3311
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through submerging students in both theater history and practice, this class brings students closer to the history, experiences, and politics of Asian Americans. Why are Asian American stories needed, and how do we tell them? What are the artistic and social agendas driving the making of Asian American theater? How have the styles of performance shifted? While we will be actively working on readings and original theater projects, you don't need to be a theater expert to enjoy this class. Topics will include reading plays by Frank Chin, David Henry Hwang, Wakako Yamauchi, Naomi Iizuka, and others; looking at the history of Asian American theater companies; discussing creative approaches to casting, acting, directing, and design; and building collaborations among companies, audiences, and communities.
AAS 3341 - Asian American Images (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02576 - AAS 3341/Comm 3341
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
From 19th-century anti-Chinese political cartoons to Harold and Kumar, visual representations of Asians in the United States have long influenced how Asian Americans are seen and treated. What are some of the ways that photography, graphic arts, and digital culture have pictured Asian Americans as aliens, citizens, immigrants, workers, family and community members, entertainers, and artists? Course topics will relate visual images to particular historical moments, including the early exclusion period and the "yellow peril" stereotype; WWII Japanese American incarceration and the drawings of Miné Okubo, and photo-journalism documenting U.S. military involvement in Southeast Asia and its aftermath. How do photographic and other images work to counter historical amnesia, heal traumatic loss, and document social injustice? Other weeks of the class will explore the ways that individuals, families, and communities use photographs, video, and other visual media to preserve a sense of connection and belonging. We will also look at how contemporary Asian American photographers such as Tseng Kwong Chi, Nikki Lee, and Wing Young Huie experiment with visual images to raise questions of racial and national identity, social inequality, gender, sexuality, and political agency. The course also includes a digital storytelling project that encourages students to create video images and sound reflecting Asian American immigration stories from local communities.
COMM 3341 - Asian American Images (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02576 - AAS 3341/Comm 3341
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
From 19th-century anti-Chinese political cartoons to Harold and Kumar, visual representations of Asians in the United States have long influenced how Asian Americans are seen and treated. What are some of the ways that photography, graphic arts, and digital culture have pictured Asian Americans as aliens, citizens, immigrants, workers, family and community members, entertainers, and artists? Course topics will relate visual images to particular historical moments, including the early exclusion period and the "yellow peril" stereotype; WWII Japanese American incarceration and the drawings of Miné Okubo, and photo-journalism documenting U.S. military involvement in Southeast Asia and its aftermath. How do photographic and other images work to counter historical amnesia, heal traumatic loss, and document social injustice? Other weeks of the class will explore the ways that individuals, families, and communities use photographs, video, and other visual media to preserve a sense of connection and belonging. We will also look at how contemporary Asian American photographers such as Tseng Kwong Chi, Nikki Lee, and Wing Young Huie experiment with visual images to raise questions of racial and national identity, social inequality, gender, sexuality, and political agency. The course also includes a digital storytelling project that encourages students to create video images and sound reflecting Asian American immigration stories from local communities.
AAS 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02623 - AAS 3351/Comm 3351
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Over the past few decades, Asian Americans have become increasingly visible both as the subjects and producers of popular culture in the United States. This course will explore how this new recognition of Asian Americans in popular literature, cinema, television, and entertainment is related both to longer histories of Asian immigration and racial exclusion and to post-1960s efforts to forward racial awareness, community activism, and social justice. Our first unit will look at how particular stereotypes such as the yellow peril or the wartime enemy encouraged anti-Asian feeling and violence and legal restrictions on immigration and naturalization. We will then examine how throughout history, Asian immigrants and their descendants used song, dance, theater, writing, and other forms of popular culture to express personal desires and foster collective ties. Our final unit concentrates on contemporary popular culture and its relationship to the changing identities of Asian Americans. How do Asian Americans influence the current essays, films, and videos that are consumed by millions today? How are increasingly pan-ethnic, interracial, multiracial, transnational, and global experiences reflected in popular culture?
COMM 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02623 - AAS 3351/Comm 3351
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Over the past few decades, Asian Americans have become increasingly visible both as the subjects and producers of popular culture in the United States. This course will explore how this new recognition of Asian Americans in popular literature, cinema, television, and entertainment is related both to longer histories of Asian immigration and racial exclusion and to post-1960s efforts to forward racial awareness, community activism, and social justice. Our first unit will look at how particular stereotypes such as the yellow peril or the wartime enemy encouraged anti-Asian feeling and violence and legal restrictions on immigration and naturalization. We will then examine how throughout history, Asian immigrants and their descendants used song, dance, theater, writing, and other forms of popular culture to express personal desires and foster collective ties. Our final unit concentrates on contemporary popular culture and its relationship to the changing identities of Asian Americans. How do Asian Americans influence the current essays, films, and videos that are consumed by millions today? How are increasingly pan-ethnic, interracial, multiracial, transnational, and global experiences reflected in popular culture?
AAS 3361 - Asian Americans and Food
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02691 - AAS 3361/AmSt 3361
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Asian Americans have always been intimately connected to food practices and institutions in the American imagination. Food is the medium through which Asian American cultural difference--including their status as "perpetual foreigners" or their "model minority character"--are typically expressed and disseminated. Historically, Asian migration to the United States was fueled by labor needs particularly in the agricultural sector. In addition, Asian labor has been stereotypically linked to food service and preparation such as the ubiquitous Chinese take-out place and more recently, the sushi and Korean fusion joints. This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of food to better understand the historical, social, and cultural aspects of Asian American food preparation, distribution and consumption. Students will investigate the politics and poetics of Asian American foodways by examining social habits, and rituals around food in restaurants, homes and other public venues. The course texts include ethnographic essays, fictional works, memoirs, magazines, and television shows.
AMST 3361 - Asian Americans and Food
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02691 - AAS 3361/AmSt 3361
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Asian Americans have always been intimately connected to food practices and institutions in the American imagination. Food is the medium through which Asian American cultural difference, their status as "perpetual foreigners" and the "model minority character" are typically expressed and disseminated. Historically, Asian migration to the United States was fueled by labor needs particularly in the agricultural sector. In addition, Asian labor has been stereotypically linked to food service and preparation such as the ubiquitous Chinese take-out place and more recently, the sushi and Korean fusion joints. This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of food to better understand the historical, social, and cultural aspects of Asian American food preparation, distribution and consumption. Students will investigate the politics and poetics of Asian American foodways by examining social habits, and rituals around food in restaurants, homes and other public venues. The course texts include ethnographic essays, fictional works, memoirs, magazines, and television shows.
AAS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01876
Typically offered: Every Fall
Diversity of cultures designated "Asian American." Understanding women's lives in historical, cultural, economic, and racial contexts.
GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis of media, art, literature, performance, on artistic contributions. History, politics, culture of Asian American women. Interpret cultural production to better understand role of race, gender, nation within American society/citizenship.
AAS 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families, & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society.
SOC 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A/F
SOC 3503H - Honors: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, honors
AAS 3601W - War and Empire: Asian American Perspectives (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course examines the reach of war and empire in Asian America since the turn of the twentieth century. Starting with US wars in the Philippines (1898-1910) and the formation of the colonial state, the course will track the ascendancy of US empire in Asia and paths toward wars against imperialist Japan (1941-1945), in Korea (1950-53), and in Vietnam (1955-1975). The course will address the relevance of the unending Global War on Terrorism (2001-) in contemporary Asian America. Together, the course explores how these wars have shaped and continue to inform the lives and memories of Asian immigrants and refugees, their children, and other Asian Americans.
AAS 3877 - Asian American History, 1850 to Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01066 - AAS 3877/HIST 3877
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Asian American history and contemporary issues, from 1850 to present. Immigration, labor, anti-Asian movements, women/families, impact of World War Two, new immigrant/refugee communities, civil rights, Asian American identity/culture.
HIST 3877 - Asian American History, 1850-Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01066
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Asian American history and contemporary issues, from 1850 to the present. Immigration, labor, anti-Asian movements, women/families, impact of World War Two, new immigrant/refugee communities, civil rights, Asian American identity/culture.
AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01865 - AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01865 - AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
AAS 1101 - Imagining Asian America (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Issues in Asian American Studies. Historical/recent aspects of the diverse/multifaceted vision of "Asian America," using histories, films, memoirs, and other texts as illustrations.
AAS 3001 - Contemporary Perspectives on Asian America (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01126
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interdisciplinary overview of Asian American identities. Post-1965 migration/community. History, cultural productions, and concerns of Americans of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, Filipino, and Southeast Asian ancestry.
AMST 3001 - Contemporary Perspectives on Asian America (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01126 - AAS 3001/AmSt 3001
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interdisciplinary overview of Asian American identities. Post-1965 migration/community. History, cultural productions, and concerns of Americans of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, Filipino, and Southeast Asian ancestry.
AAS 3211W - Race & Racism in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible?some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial ?problems? by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
SOC 3211W - Race and Racism in the US (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible?some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial ?problems? by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality.
AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581 - AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical overview of three major forms of inequalities in the United Sates today: race, class, gender. Focus on these inequalities as relatively autonomous from one another and as deeply connected/intertwined with one another. Intersectionality key to critical understanding of these social forces. Social change possibilities.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
AAS 3271 - Learning in the Asian American Community
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is intended to give students a general introduction to participatory learning through engagement with Asian American community organizations and/or leaders. The course is based within Asian American studies, an interdisciplinary field of inquiry that examines how histories of immigration, exclusion, racialization, and citizenship have shaped Asian American communities and identities. In turn, Asian American studies asks how Asian Americans, configured as immigrants, refugees, "forever foreigners," and "model minorities," impact how American nation, empire, rights, and belonging are constructed. Working with community partners, students will have the opportunity to learn several different community-based research skills: newspaper article search, archival research and/or archival organization, interviewing skills, and audio/video production. Students also have the option to complete service learning with an organization throughout the semester; with this option, students will write a short reflection statement on their service learning as their final project. prereq: AAS and CRES minors must register A-F.
AAS 3301 - Asian America Through Arts and Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01863 - AAS 3301/EngL 3301
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
The course focuses on the close analysis and interpretation of individual works by a range of modern and contemporary artists. Students will analyze, critique, and interpret these works in light of the historical and social contexts in which they were produced, their creation and uses of aesthetic form, and their impact on individuals and communities. Discussion, writing assignments, and oral presentations will focus on different ways of encountering and evaluating artistic work; for instance, students will write critical analyses and production reviews as well as dialogue more informally through weekly journal entries and online discussion forums. We will examine what it means to define artists and their work as being "Asian American" and explore how other categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, or class intersect with race. We will study how art works not only as individual creativity but also as communal and social practice; for instance, we look at the history of theaters, such as East-West Players or Pan Asian Repertory Theatre, that have sustained Asian Americans as actors, playwrights, and designers.
ENGL 3301 - Asian America through Arts and Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01863 - AAS 3301/EngL 3301
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
The course focuses on the close analysis and interpretation of individual works by a range of modern and contemporary artists. Students will analyze, critique, and interpret these works in light of the historical and social contexts in which they were produced, their creation and uses of aesthetic form, and their impact on individuals and communities. Discussion, writing assignments, and oral presentations will focus on different ways of encountering and evaluating artistic work; for instance, students will write critical analyses and production reviews as well as dialogue more informally through weekly journal entries and online discussion forums. We will examine what it means to define artists and their work as being "Asian American" and explore how other categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, or class intersect with race. We will study how art works not only as individual creativity but also as communal and social practice; for instance, we look at the history of theaters, such as East-West Players or Pan Asian Repertory Theatre, that have sustained Asian Americans as actors, playwrights, and designers.
AAS 3311 - Asian American Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02559 - AAS 3311/Th 3311
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through submerging students in both theater history and practice, this class brings students closer to the history, experiences, and politics of Asian Americans. Why are Asian American stories needed and how do we tell them? What are the artistic and social agendas driving the making of Asian American theater? How have the styles of performance shifted? While we will be actively working on readings and original theater projects, you don't need to be a theater expert to enjoy this class. Topics will include reading plays by Frank Chin, David Henry Hwang, Wakako Yamauchi, Naomi Iizuka, and others; looking at the history of Asian American theater companies; discussing creative approaches to casting, acting, directing, and design; and building collaborations among companies, audiences, and communities.
TH 3311 - Asian American Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02559 - AAS 3311/Th 3311
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through submerging students in both theater history and practice, this class brings students closer to the history, experiences, and politics of Asian Americans. Why are Asian American stories needed, and how do we tell them? What are the artistic and social agendas driving the making of Asian American theater? How have the styles of performance shifted? While we will be actively working on readings and original theater projects, you don't need to be a theater expert to enjoy this class. Topics will include reading plays by Frank Chin, David Henry Hwang, Wakako Yamauchi, Naomi Iizuka, and others; looking at the history of Asian American theater companies; discussing creative approaches to casting, acting, directing, and design; and building collaborations among companies, audiences, and communities.
AAS 3341 - Asian American Images (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02576 - AAS 3341/Comm 3341
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
From 19th-century anti-Chinese political cartoons to Harold and Kumar, visual representations of Asians in the United States have long influenced how Asian Americans are seen and treated. What are some of the ways that photography, graphic arts, and digital culture have pictured Asian Americans as aliens, citizens, immigrants, workers, family and community members, entertainers, and artists? Course topics will relate visual images to particular historical moments, including the early exclusion period and the "yellow peril" stereotype; WWII Japanese American incarceration and the drawings of Miné Okubo, and photo-journalism documenting U.S. military involvement in Southeast Asia and its aftermath. How do photographic and other images work to counter historical amnesia, heal traumatic loss, and document social injustice? Other weeks of the class will explore the ways that individuals, families, and communities use photographs, video, and other visual media to preserve a sense of connection and belonging. We will also look at how contemporary Asian American photographers such as Tseng Kwong Chi, Nikki Lee, and Wing Young Huie experiment with visual images to raise questions of racial and national identity, social inequality, gender, sexuality, and political agency. The course also includes a digital storytelling project that encourages students to create video images and sound reflecting Asian American immigration stories from local communities.
COMM 3341 - Asian American Images (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02576 - AAS 3341/Comm 3341
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
From 19th-century anti-Chinese political cartoons to Harold and Kumar, visual representations of Asians in the United States have long influenced how Asian Americans are seen and treated. What are some of the ways that photography, graphic arts, and digital culture have pictured Asian Americans as aliens, citizens, immigrants, workers, family and community members, entertainers, and artists? Course topics will relate visual images to particular historical moments, including the early exclusion period and the "yellow peril" stereotype; WWII Japanese American incarceration and the drawings of Miné Okubo, and photo-journalism documenting U.S. military involvement in Southeast Asia and its aftermath. How do photographic and other images work to counter historical amnesia, heal traumatic loss, and document social injustice? Other weeks of the class will explore the ways that individuals, families, and communities use photographs, video, and other visual media to preserve a sense of connection and belonging. We will also look at how contemporary Asian American photographers such as Tseng Kwong Chi, Nikki Lee, and Wing Young Huie experiment with visual images to raise questions of racial and national identity, social inequality, gender, sexuality, and political agency. The course also includes a digital storytelling project that encourages students to create video images and sound reflecting Asian American immigration stories from local communities.
AAS 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02623 - AAS 3351/Comm 3351
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Over the past few decades, Asian Americans have become increasingly visible both as the subjects and producers of popular culture in the United States. This course will explore how this new recognition of Asian Americans in popular literature, cinema, television, and entertainment is related both to longer histories of Asian immigration and racial exclusion and to post-1960s efforts to forward racial awareness, community activism, and social justice. Our first unit will look at how particular stereotypes such as the yellow peril or the wartime enemy encouraged anti-Asian feeling and violence and legal restrictions on immigration and naturalization. We will then examine how throughout history, Asian immigrants and their descendants used song, dance, theater, writing, and other forms of popular culture to express personal desires and foster collective ties. Our final unit concentrates on contemporary popular culture and its relationship to the changing identities of Asian Americans. How do Asian Americans influence the current essays, films, and videos that are consumed by millions today? How are increasingly pan-ethnic, interracial, multiracial, transnational, and global experiences reflected in popular culture?
COMM 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02623 - AAS 3351/Comm 3351
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Over the past few decades, Asian Americans have become increasingly visible both as the subjects and producers of popular culture in the United States. This course will explore how this new recognition of Asian Americans in popular literature, cinema, television, and entertainment is related both to longer histories of Asian immigration and racial exclusion and to post-1960s efforts to forward racial awareness, community activism, and social justice. Our first unit will look at how particular stereotypes such as the yellow peril or the wartime enemy encouraged anti-Asian feeling and violence and legal restrictions on immigration and naturalization. We will then examine how throughout history, Asian immigrants and their descendants used song, dance, theater, writing, and other forms of popular culture to express personal desires and foster collective ties. Our final unit concentrates on contemporary popular culture and its relationship to the changing identities of Asian Americans. How do Asian Americans influence the current essays, films, and videos that are consumed by millions today? How are increasingly pan-ethnic, interracial, multiracial, transnational, and global experiences reflected in popular culture?
AAS 3361 - Asian Americans and Food
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02691 - AAS 3361/AmSt 3361
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Asian Americans have always been intimately connected to food practices and institutions in the American imagination. Food is the medium through which Asian American cultural difference--including their status as "perpetual foreigners" or their "model minority character"--are typically expressed and disseminated. Historically, Asian migration to the United States was fueled by labor needs particularly in the agricultural sector. In addition, Asian labor has been stereotypically linked to food service and preparation such as the ubiquitous Chinese take-out place and more recently, the sushi and Korean fusion joints. This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of food to better understand the historical, social, and cultural aspects of Asian American food preparation, distribution and consumption. Students will investigate the politics and poetics of Asian American foodways by examining social habits, and rituals around food in restaurants, homes and other public venues. The course texts include ethnographic essays, fictional works, memoirs, magazines, and television shows.
AMST 3361 - Asian Americans and Food
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02691 - AAS 3361/AmSt 3361
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Asian Americans have always been intimately connected to food practices and institutions in the American imagination. Food is the medium through which Asian American cultural difference, their status as "perpetual foreigners" and the "model minority character" are typically expressed and disseminated. Historically, Asian migration to the United States was fueled by labor needs particularly in the agricultural sector. In addition, Asian labor has been stereotypically linked to food service and preparation such as the ubiquitous Chinese take-out place and more recently, the sushi and Korean fusion joints. This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of food to better understand the historical, social, and cultural aspects of Asian American food preparation, distribution and consumption. Students will investigate the politics and poetics of Asian American foodways by examining social habits, and rituals around food in restaurants, homes and other public venues. The course texts include ethnographic essays, fictional works, memoirs, magazines, and television shows.
AAS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01876
Typically offered: Every Fall
Diversity of cultures designated "Asian American." Understanding women's lives in historical, cultural, economic, and racial contexts.
GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis of media, art, literature, performance, on artistic contributions. History, politics, culture of Asian American women. Interpret cultural production to better understand role of race, gender, nation within American society/citizenship.
AAS 3483 - Hmong History Across the Globe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02422 - AAS 3483/Hist 3483
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Hmong interaction with lowland Southeast Asian states (Laos, Vietnam) and Western colonial powers (French, American) since 19th century. Changes to religious, social, political, and gender institutions. Aspirations for political autonomy.
HIST 3483 - Hmong History Across the Globe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02422 - AAS 3483//ALL 3776/Hist 3483
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Hmong interaction with lowland Southeast Asian states (Laos, Vietnam) and Western colonial powers (French, American) since 19th century. Changes to religious, social, political, and gender institutions. Aspirations for political autonomy.
AAS 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02097 - AAS 3486/Hist 3486
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Socio-economic, political, gender, cultural/religious changes in Hmong American community during last three decades. How Hmong are racialized in American society. Impact to first/second generations.
HIST 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02097
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Socio-economic, political, gender, cultural/religious changes in Hmong American community during last three decades. How Hmong are racialized in American society. Impact to first/second generations.
AAS 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families, & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society.
SOC 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A/F
SOC 3503H - Honors: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, honors
AAS 3601W - War and Empire: Asian American Perspectives (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course examines the reach of war and empire in Asian America since the turn of the twentieth century. Starting with US wars in the Philippines (1898-1910) and the formation of the colonial state, the course will track the ascendancy of US empire in Asia and paths toward wars against imperialist Japan (1941-1945), in Korea (1950-53), and in Vietnam (1955-1975). The course will address the relevance of the unending Global War on Terrorism (2001-) in contemporary Asian America. Together, the course explores how these wars have shaped and continue to inform the lives and memories of Asian immigrants and refugees, their children, and other Asian Americans.
AAS 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
HIST 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19nth century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin American, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
AAS 3866 - Arab American Experiences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02528
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Arab diasporic experiences in the West, and in America in particular, have been mediated by popular depictions of "the Arab" as violent terrorist, oppressor of/oppressed woman, religious fanatic, and myriad other negative stereotypes, heightened since September 11, 2001. How do Arabs in America, especially youth, navigate the superimposition of these images upon them? How do they relate to the multiple locations of "home" between the West and the Arab world? To what extent are they perpetually "out of place," and what strategies have they developed to navigate their liminal and often marginalized social position? Through the examination of memoirs, novels, film, music, and even food, this course will use Arab American cultural production as a lens through which to explore these questions.
ALL 3866 - Arab American Experiences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02528
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Arab diasporic experiences in the West, and in America in particular, have been mediated by popular depictions of "the Arab" as violent terrorist, oppressor of/oppressed woman, religious fanatic, and myriad other negative stereotypes, heightened since September 11, 2001. How do Arabs in America, especially youth, navigate the superimposition of these images upon them? How do they relate to the multiple locations of "home" between the West and the Arab world? To what extent are they perpetually "out of place," and what strategies have they developed to navigate their liminal and often marginalized social position? Through the examination of memoirs, novels, film, music, and even food, this course will use Arab American cultural production as a lens through which to explore these questions.
AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History (HIS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02074 - AAS 3875W/Hist 3875W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This writing-intensive course examines the racial history of modern America. The focus is placed on how American Indians, African Americans, and immigrants from Europe, Asia, and Latin America struggle over identity, place, and meanings of these categories in society where racial hierarchy not only determined every aspect of how they lived, but also functioned as a lever to reconstitute a new nation and empire in the aftermath of the Civil War. We are interested in studying how these diverse groups experienced racialization not in the same way but in various and distinct ways in relation to each other.
HIST 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in US History (HIS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02074
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This writing-intensive course examines the racial history of modern America to learn from and engage with what historians enmeshed in ethnic studies do. These historians examine the systematic and coordinated exercises of power called race in the American past and make legible how racially aggrieved groups responded to this shaping power. Thus, throughout, we ask, "What did racial subjects do with what was done to them by the American system forged out of settler colonialism, slavery, racism, and other forms of injustice, exclusion, and violence?" This question issues an intellectual challenge to do all that needs to be done to capture community life, the politics of difference, and the dynamism of social identities in all their richness, fullness, and complexity. In other words, we study and write about the racial history of modern America, including its ugly past and arc of justice, to consider what it would take to transcend this racial past.
AAS 3877 - Asian American History, 1850 to Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01066 - AAS 3877/HIST 3877
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Asian American history and contemporary issues, from 1850 to present. Immigration, labor, anti-Asian movements, women/families, impact of World War Two, new immigrant/refugee communities, civil rights, Asian American identity/culture.
HIST 3877 - Asian American History, 1850-Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01066
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Asian American history and contemporary issues, from 1850 to the present. Immigration, labor, anti-Asian movements, women/families, impact of World War Two, new immigrant/refugee communities, civil rights, Asian American identity/culture.
AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AAS 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01811 - AAS 4232/EngL 4232
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected works by Asian American, African American, American Indian, Latino, and Chicano playwrights. How racial/ethnic differences are integral to shaping different visions of American drama. History of minority/ethnic theaters, politics of casting, mainstreaming of the minority playwright.
ENGL 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01811
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected works by African American, Latinx, Native American, and Asian American playwrights. How racial/ethnic differences are integral to shaping different visions of American drama. History of minority/ethnic theaters, politics of casting, mainstreaming of the minority playwright. Students in this class will have the opportunity to participate in service-learning.
AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01865 - AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01865 - AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
AMST 3113W - Global Minnesota: Diversity in the 21st Century (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diverse cultural (racial, ethnic, class) groups in America. Institutions/processes that shape their relations and create domination, resistance, hybridity, nationalism, racism, alliance. Specific content may vary.
DNCE 3495 - Dance and Global Tourism (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political economy of the dancing body and its role in the representation of nation-states through global tourism. Dance and its relationship to belonging, nationalism, and the politics of art and tradition. prereq: Jr or sr