Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Management Information Systems B.S.B.

Information & Decision Sciences
Curtis L. Carlson School of Management
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 80 to 84
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science in Business
The management information systems (MIS) major prepares students to plan for, design, use, and manage digital assets of an organization. Digital assets of a modern business environment involve not only technology but also the IT-enabled processes governing business activities as well as the associated information/knowledge acquisition, processing, synthesis, management, and transfer processes. MIS coursework prepares students to make better decisions by applying information technologies to solve business problems and transform enterprise operations and to innovate and manage business processes in different functional areas through the best use of the technological infrastructure of an organization. The collective impact of the coursework is to enable students to understand the role of technology in creating business opportunities and to acquire the skills necessary for the functional management of the tasks needed to secure those opportunities.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Freshman and transfer students are usually admitted to pre-major status before admission to this major.
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 3.00 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
  • 3.00 transferring from outside the University
Students in the school have no restrictions on declaring the major but generally declare a major during the semester that they are enrolled in the I-Core. Students from outside of the school must meet overall admission standards to enter this major. Transfer students should complete Business Economics or Microeconomics, Financial Accounting, Business Statistics. University of Minnesota transfer students should also complete Modeling Business Scenarios in Excel prior to admission.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Required Prerequisites
Economics
ECON 1165 - Business Economics [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or APEC 1101H - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
Accounting
ACCT 2051 - Introduction to Financial Reporting (4.0 cr)
or ACCT 2051H - Honors: Introduction to Financial Reporting (4.0 cr)
Statistics
BA 2551 - Business Statistics in R [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Excel
BA 2051 - Modeling Business Scenarios in Excel (2.0 cr)
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
At least 50% (29 cr) of the upper division major credits must be completed at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus.
Required Courses
BA 1011 - Leading Self & Teams (2.0 cr)
BA 1021 - Design Your Life (1.0 cr)
BA 2062 - Powerful Problem Solving (2.0 cr)
BA 3051 - Data-Driven Business Decisions (3.0 cr)
BA 3062 - Impact Lab Project (2.0 cr)
BA 3551 - Business Analytics (3.0 cr)
BA 2021 - Design Your Career (1.0 cr)
or IBUS 3006 - Global Career Skills (2.0 cr)
BA 2005 - Business Ethics, Corporate Responsibility & Sustainability [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or BA 2005H - Business Ethics, Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability [CIV] (3.0 cr)
BA 3033W - Business Communication [WI] (3.0 cr)
or IBUS 3033W - Business Communication in a Global Context [WI] (4.0 cr)
Impact Core
Student will complete the Impact Core (I-Core) as a cohort. The Maroon and Gold I-Core can be taken in either order. Students must have the following courses completed before taking either I-Core: Business Economics or Microeconomics, Financial Accounting, Business Statistics in R, and Modeling Business Scenarios in Excel. In addition, it is also strongly recommended that students complete Leading Self & Teams, Design Your Life, and Powerful Problem Solving before enrolling in the I-Core.
Maroon I-Core
BA 3001 - Race, Power, and Justice in Business [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing (3.0 cr)
or MKTG 3001H - Honors:Principles of Marketing (3.0 cr)
ACCT 3001 - Strategic Management Accounting (3.0 cr)
or IBUS 3002 - Strategic Management Accounting (4.0 cr)
IDSC 3001 - Information Systems & Digital Transformation (3.0 cr)
or IDSC 3001H - Honors: Information Systems for Business Processes and Management (3.0 cr)
Gold I-Core
SCO 3001 - Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations (3.0 cr)
MGMT 3004 - Strategic Management (3.0 cr)
FINA 3001 - Finance Fundamentals (3.0 cr)
or FINA 3001H - Honors: Finance Fundamentals (3.0 cr)
HRIR 3021 - Human Capital Management (3.0 cr)
or HRIR 3021H - Honors: Human Resource Management and Strategy (3.0 cr)
or IBUS 3021 - Human Capital Management (4.0 cr)
Major Courses
Students should be aware that IDSc 3202, 4204W, and 4301 must be taken over a 3 semester sequence.
IDSC 3101 - Introduction to Programming (2.0 cr)
IDSC 3102 - Intermediate Programming (2.0 cr)
IDSC 3103 - Data Modeling and Databases (2.0 cr)
IDSC 3104 - Enterprise Systems (2.0 cr)
IDSC 3202 - Analysis and Modeling of Business Systems (4.0 cr)
IDSC 4204W - Strategic Information Technology Management [WI] (4.0 cr)
IDSC 4301 - MIS in Action: A Capstone Course (2.0 cr)
Electives
IDSc 4493, Directed Study in Information Systems, may be considered for elective credit with department approval. Case competition credit may not fulfill elective credit.
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· IBUS 3055 - Innovating with Technology: Global IT Entrepreneurship in Action (4.0 cr)
· IDSC 3511 - Pitching Business Strategy (2.0 cr)
· IDSC 4161 - Python for Business Applications (2.0 cr)
· IDSC 4401 - Information Security (2.0 cr)
· IDSC 4411 - Information Technology Governance and Assurance (2.0 cr)
· IDSC 4441 - Electronic Commerce (2.0 cr)
· IDSC 4444 - Descriptive and Predictive Analytics (2.0 cr)
· IDSC 4455 - Web 2.0: The Business of Social Media (2.0 cr)
· IDSC 4471 - Agile Methods (2.0 cr)
· IDSC 4490 - Information Systems Special Topics (2.0 cr)
International Experience
Students must complete an international experience as part of the program requirements. Short term or semester-length programs may be used to meet this requirement. Students participate in International Experience (IE) 101 early in their program to begin planning.
Upper-division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper-division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· IDSC 4204W - Strategic Information Technology Management [WI] (4.0 cr)
· BA 3033W - Business Communication [WI] (3.0 cr)
· IBUS 3033W - Business Communication in a Global Context [WI] (4.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
A sub-plan is not required for this program.
Integrated BS in Business/Master in HRIR
This integrated program provides a unique opportunity for Carlson students to obtain an advanced degree more quickly and prepare themselves to lead in the shifting landscape of the global marketplace. The integrated program would allow Carlson undergraduate students to complete both their B.S.B. and their MHRIR in a total of five years. Students will follow a normal Carlson undergraduate curriculum for their first three years. They would apply for the MHRIR program by February 1st of their junior year and they would begin the MHRIR program as part of the MHRIR first-year cohort in the fall of their senior year. The senior year would have the integrated program students in all the first-year MHRIR core courses and the remaining undergraduate courses to complete their undergraduate degree.
Twelve credits of the MHRIR first-year would be applied to the undergraduate degree, including HRIR 6301, 6701, and 6501. Thirteen credits would apply to the M.HRIR degree, including HRIR 6001, 6401, 6441, and 6805. Students will finish their MHRIR in the fifth year of the integrated program. HRIR minors: please note that HRIR 6301 is considered equivalent to HRIR 3031 and 3032, HRIR 6401 and 6441 are equivalent to HRIR 3041 and 3042, HRIR 6701 is equivalent to HRIR 3071 and 3072, and HRIR 6501 is equivalent to HRIR 3051. It is recommended that students do not take the equivalent undergraduate HRIR courses if they plan to pursue the integrated degree.
BSB/Masters Human Resources and Industrial Relations
Students in the BSB/M.HRIR integrated degree program should complete the following courses in their senior year. These courses meet requirements for the Masters in Human Resources and Industrial Relations and twelve credits of the BSB Human Resources major/minor.
Fall semester, Year 4
HRIR 6301 - Staffing, Training, and Development (4.0 cr)
HRIR 6001 - Business Principles for the HRIR Professional (4.0 cr)
HRIR 6111 - Using Data and Metrics in Human Resources and Industrial Relations (4.0 cr)
HRIR 6805 - HRIR Leadership Practicum (0.5-1.0 cr)
Spring semester, Year 4
HRIR 6805 is taken both terms.
HRIR 6401 - Organizational Theory Foundations of High-Impact HRIR (2.0 cr)
HRIR 6441 - Organizational Behavior Foundations of High-Impact HRIR (2.0 cr)
HRIR 6701 - Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining (4.0 cr)
HRIR 6501 - Compensation and Benefits (4.0 cr)
 
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· Curtis L. Carlson School of Management

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· Management Information Systems
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· Management Information Systems B.S.B.
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ECON 1165 - Business Economics (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course introduces the fundamentals of microeconomics and macroeconomics to business/other students who desire a primer on the working of an economy in a mutually dependent world. It includes the microeconomic interaction of businesses and consumers in markets and the determination of prices and quantities under conditions of competition and monopoly. Economic interdependencies in the global economy are analyzed to obtain the effects of economic changes on the country itself and on the world. The macroeconomics of aggregate consumption, saving, investment, and national income are also examined, as well as the role played by money, banking, and business cycles in the domestic and world economy. This course is only for CSOM undergraduate students.
ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Microeconomic behavior of consumers, firms, and markets in domestic and world economy. Demand and supply. Competition and monopoly. Distribution of income. Economic interdependencies in the global economy. Effects of global linkages on individual decisions. prereq: knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
APEC 1101H - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy. prereq: Honors student, proficiency in high school algebra
ACCT 2051 - Introduction to Financial Reporting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces the topics of financial reporting and accounting. The purpose of financial accounting is to provide information to the entity owners and external parties to serve as the basis for making decisions about that entity. A student who successfully completes this class should be able to 1) understand the concepts and principles of accounting, 2) analyze, record and report the accounting treatment of business transactions, and 3) prepare, interpret, and analyze financial statements.
ACCT 2051H - Honors: Introduction to Financial Reporting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course introduces the topics of financial reporting and accounting. The purpose of the financial accounting is to provide information to the entity owners and external parties to serve as the basis for making decisions about that entity. A student who successfully completes this class should be able to 1) understand the concepts and principles of accounting, 2) analyze, record and report the accounting treatment of business transactions, and 3) prepare, interpret, and analyze financial statements.
BA 2551 - Business Statistics in R (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 2551/SCO 2550
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The purpose of the course is to develop skills for improving data-driven decision-making using statistical techniques in the powerful statistical software environment R. As an introductory statistics course, the content will include three main areas of statistics: Descriptive Statistics, Statistical Inference, and Analysis of Relationships with Scatterplots, Correlation and Linear Regression. Developing statistical literacy is increasingly important in understanding data and engaging in the complex business world. BA 2551 focuses on statistical reasoning and how to implement statistical methods in a business context using R. Topics include (but are not limited to) descriptive statistics, statistical inference, variability, sampling, distributions, correlation analysis, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, graphical summaries of data, and introduction to linear regression. Through weekly in-class lab sessions and critical thinking assignments related to statistics in business, the course will train students to become informed consumers of numerical information and provide foundational skills in R to compute statistical procedures in future courses. We use existing packages in R as a tool to enable us to solve business problems that can leverage mathematical and statistical thinking. prereq: [Math 1031 or equiv]
BA 2051 - Modeling Business Scenarios in Excel
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The title of the course says it all. You will build and use Excel-models to analyze real-world business problems. You are introduced to basic skills for analyzing data and presenting recommendations to management. In this class you will work extensively with Microsoft Excel and will be better prepared to use it in internships and upper division classes. Excel is a critical business tool. As business students, your familiarity and proficiency in Excel will aid you in upper-level classes and ultimately greatly improve your career prospects. We will learn the tension between parsimony and relevance. You will use models to answer many what-ifs. Most importantly, we hope to instill a disciplined method of structured and rigorous thinking.
BA 1011 - Leading Self & Teams
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mgmt 1001/BA 1011
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course guides Carlson students through a self-reflective journey as they learn about interpersonal competencies and the role of these competencies in their own leadership style and when leading teams. As leadership and teamwork are an essential component in the Carlson education and more broadly in the business community, this class provides the foundational skills necessary for future success. The course is structured into two parts: understanding individual perspectives and understanding team dynamics. The course begins by providing students with a theoretical foundation on interpersonal differences that influence how people lead and interact in teams. Specifically, we explore differences in personality, identity, values, opinions, and cultures and the role they play when interacting with others. The focus of the course is providing students with essential skills to uncover, appreciate and navigate differences to create a solid foundation upon which to develop their own leadership skills and work together as a team. The second half of the course will focus on understanding team dynamics. This class provides students with a unique learning opportunity to learn how teams work while simultaneously working in their teams. In doing so, they will witness the direct application of course material to their own learning teams while completing their team project. Students will learn the science behind how teams are structured, team roles, processes within teams and what leads to effective teams. Specifically, the topics examined will include team decision making, conflict resolution, power, influence, analyzing team dynamics, and providing team feedback. At the end of this course, students will have a deeper understanding of themselves and will master skills for working in and leading teams. prereq: Carlson School of Management student
BA 1021 - Design Your Life
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design Your Life is a class about customizing your college experience to get the most out of it. Using a process rooted in Design Thinking, the course equips students with tools to design and prototype a college experience that best aligns with who they are and what they hope to get from college. Students will explore the purpose of college, reflect on personal values and strengths, learn about educational and career opportunities, and create a prototype of their college experience. Through in-class activities and out of class assignments, students will also learn and practice professional and personal leadership skills Prerequisite: Carlson School student
BA 2062 - Powerful Problem Solving
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
One of the key distinguishing characteristics of effective leaders is the ability to parse through the overwhelming number of inputs we all receive to understand what needs to be done. ?What problem are we trying to solve?? is a crucial question that too often goes unaddressed in the rush to ?just fix it?. Powerful Problem Solving will expose students to a clear problem solving framework and process, a variety of perspectives on how to approach problems, as well as individual and group activities and assignments to inform and sharpen skills.
BA 3051 - Data-Driven Business Decisions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on applying statistical techniques to make evidence-based recommendations for business decisions. Topics include (but are not limited to) linear regression, logistic regression, multiple regression, A/B testing, time-series data, and optimization. Students will work with data sets and practice applying these skills to make data-based recommendations across different areas of business. This course explicitly builds on the Business Statistics in R and the Modeling Business Decisions in Excel courses. The Data-Driven Business Decisions course uses both Excel and R. Prereqs: Modeling Business Scenarios in Excel and Business Statistics in R
BA 3062 - Impact Lab Project
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This research project course centers on working with an organization to solve a real business challenge with an impact. The purpose of the Impact Lab Project is to apply the skills learned in the BA 2062 Powerful Problem Solving course to a real business problem. Students will be provided with a business problem faced by an organization that is partnering with the class. Using the skills learned in the powerful problem solving course, along with the knowledge gained in the business fundamentals courses, students will define the problem, disaggregate the issues, conduct appropriate research, generate data-driven solutions, critically evaluate alternatives, and present their final recommendations to the client partner. Faculty in the class will serve as coaches as students work on the projects. Prerequisite: BA 2062
BA 3551 - Business Analytics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In a world of ever growing information sources, any student of business should be equipped with the ability to prepare and analyze data to produce actionable insights. Equally important is the capacity to understand such analysis and to present it to key stakeholders. This course offers an introduction to data processing and data mining for business applications. Prereqs: Modeling Business Scenarios in Excel (BA 2051) and Business Statistics in R (BA 2551)
BA 2021 - Design Your Career
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 2021/IBus 3006
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The focus of this course is to increase your awareness, knowledge, and skills associated with the career and job search process. The course includes major/career exploration and discovery, as well as the tactical pieces of a job search. You will learn how to write a professional resume and cover letter and will learn how to navigate the interview process. You will be exposed to a variety of individuals who will give you different perspectives on the process, including recruiters from local organizations, alumni, and other business professionals. This development will increase your ability to undertake a successful career and job search in your succeeding years. (Credit will not be granted if credit was received for BA 3000. ) prereq: Carlson School undergraduate student
IBUS 3006 - Global Career Skills
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 2021/IBus 3006
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The focus of this education abroad course is to increase your awareness, knowledge and skills associated with the career and job search process both domestically and globally. The course includes career exploration and discovery, as well as the tactical pieces of a job search. You will be exposed to a variety of individuals, organizations, and cultures in Minnesota and internationally who will give you different perspectives on the process such as recruiters from multi-national organizations, students who have completed an internship, and presenters abroad. You will also learn to use the Carlson School of Management Undergraduate Business Career Center (UBCC), On Campus Recruiting, and GoldPASS Powered by Handshake. This development will increase your ability to undertake a successful career and job search during college and beyond. This course is designed to be taken prior to or concurrent with enrollment in I-CORE. Prereq: an approved education abroad application and CSOM BSB students only.
BA 2005 - Business Ethics, Corporate Responsibility & Sustainability (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3613/EPsy 5613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course seeks to give you the vocabulary necessary to describe and explain the ethical issues you will learn to identify through lectures, readings, and case studies. It will provide you with a decision-making framework that you can use to disentangle the most complicated scenarios, which will then allow you to use critical thinking and analysis to arrive at a decision on how you would respond as an individual in an ethically-defensible manner. This course will also anticipate your future career growth into positions of management and leadership, and will help give you the tools to manage people, money, and business affairs both effectively and ethically. BA 2005 was previously offered as Mgmt 1005
BA 2005H - Business Ethics, Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course seeks to give you the vocabulary necessary to describe and explain the ethical issues you will learn to identify through lectures, readings, and case studies. You will be provided with a decision-making framework that you can use to disentangle the most complicated scenarios, which will then allow you to use critical thinking and analysis to arrive at a decision on how you would respond as an individual in an ethically-defensible manner. This course will also anticipate your future career growth into positions of management and leadership, and will help give you the tools to manage people, money, and business affairs both effectively and ethically. BA2005H was previously offered as MGMT1005H prereq: Honors student
BA 3033W - Business Communication (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 3033W/Mgmt 3033W/IBUS 3033W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course teaches strategies and skills to communicate with confidence, clarity, and impact in business settings. Students develop their abilities in critical thinking (analyzing data, audience, purpose, and context) and craft (honing skills in storytelling, persuasion, writing, diction, tone, presence, data visualization, and visual design). They learn to navigate ambiguity, evaluate the needs of internal and external stakeholders, and communicate solutions to complex business problems. The course is performance- and project-based. Students produce professional-level memos, emails, and research-based proposal decks. They deliver multiple presentations (individual and team) and learn to communicate effectively with data. Students will meet with the instructor in small groups outside of class time for one scheduled lab session. The course culminates in the Case Study Competition where student teams apply their knowledge to address a real challenge from one of our industry partners. prereq: First Year Writing, Carlson School junior or senior.
IBUS 3033W - Business Communication in a Global Context (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 3033W/Mgmt 3033W/IBUS 3033W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Written/oral communication skills for effective participation in contemporary organizations. From basic principles to communication strategy. Communication technology. Cases, simulations of "real-world" situations in a domestic and global context. Global perspectives of focus have included India, Spain, South Korea and Japan. prereq: Fr composition, CSOM upper-div, at least 60 cr
BA 3001 - Race, Power, and Justice in Business (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The United States is a diverse nation founded on the principle of equality, and yet has roots in slavery, indigenous genocide, colonialism, and dispossession. These roots shaped economic relations and business practices that continue today. Rather than seeing business as ahistorical organizations in which bundles of functional practices seek economic efficiency and respond to idealized market conditions, this course considers the socially-embedded nature of business in which racial and other structural inequalities are inherent in the development and contemporary practice of business. This includes questioning standard assumptions of free markets, meritocracy, and equal opportunity by considering alternative models of social relations and discrimination, and evidence on systemic economic injustice that reflect power differences, the contested nature of race, and the intersection of race, class, and other marginalized identities. This course also reveals ways in which business practices reflect hidden power dynamics and stereotypes. This deeper understanding of how race, power, and justice issues are fundamental to business and management is intended to provide students with a richer lens to more critically examine business practices while considering ways to address power hierarchies and promote social justice in the context of business. This includes a consideration of alternative business practices as well as how corporations can advance diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). To complete the progression from macro-level structural and historical issues and then mid-level organization practices, the course concludes with an individual-level focus that considers how individuals navigate social identity differences at work, the impact of personal bias, and how to be an ally to advance justice and DEI. The course culminates with personal development plans in which students will demonstrate their belief in their own agency by devising plans for addressing their own biases and for identifying specific actions they can use to address power hierarchies and promote social justice. By providing a common experience for all Carlson School undergraduate students, this course also provides a shared vocabulary and diversity of perspectives to facilitate a shared sense of responsibility to build and maintain community as well as fostering openness to ongoing, respectful conversations on race, identity, power, and injustice. prereq: BA 1011 recommended
MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mktg 3001/Mktg 3001H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to terms, concepts, and skills for analyzing marketing problems. Factors outside the organization affecting its product, pricing, promotion, and distribution decisions. Cases from actual organizations. prereq: ECON 1101 or ECON 1165
MKTG 3001H - Honors:Principles of Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mktg 3001/Mktg 3001H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Honors: Introduction to terms, concepts, and skills for analyzing marketing problems. Factors outside the organization affecting its product, pricing, promotion, and distribution decisions. Cases from actual organizations. prereq: ECON 1101 or ECON 1165, Honors Student
ACCT 3001 - Strategic Management Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 3001/IBus 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Costing techniques, including activity-based costing. Applying costing methods to determine costs of products, services, and production processes. Use of costs in operating/strategic decisions. prereq: ACCT 2051 or 2050
IBUS 3002 - Strategic Management Accounting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 3001/IBus 3002
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Costing techniques, including activity-based costing. Applying costing methods to determine costs of products, services, and production processes. Use of costs in operating/strategic decisions. This education abroad course provides an overview of managerial accounting concepts with a lens towards how different cultural contexts might influence the decisions that managers make around the world or in within different organizational cultures. prereq: ACCT 2051 or 2050
IDSC 3001 - Information Systems & Digital Transformation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Digital transformation through new technologies such as artificial intelligence, enterprise systems, electronic commerce, Internet of things, social media; IT strategy and data-driven decision making; privacy and security issues related to the Internet; a must take for students who want to be prepared for the rapidly changing technological landscape as successful professionals
IDSC 3001H - Honors: Information Systems for Business Processes and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: IDSC 3001/IDSC 3001H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Digital transformation through new technologies such as artificial intelligence, enterprise systems, electronic commerce, Internet of things, social media; IT strategy and data-driven decision making; privacy and security issues related to the Internet; a must take for Honors students who want to be prepared for the rapidly changing technological landscape as successful professionals.
SCO 3001 - Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations Management focuses on the design and management of transformation processes to provide products and services to create value for the people, planet, and firm prosperity. On the one hand, supply chain and operations management involves the integration of activities and processes, to facilitate the flows of materials, services, finances, and information to convert inputs into the firms? primary products and services. Operational issues include the design of products and processes, the procurement of raw materials, the control of inventories, the maintenance of quality, the planning of human resources and facilities, and the delivery of products or services, so that customer expectations and needs are met. Operations also have significant interactions with other functional areas of the firm (e.g., finance, marketing, strategy, and accounting). Therefore, understanding the role of the operations function and its impact on the competitiveness of the firm from both tactical and strategic aspects is an important part of any manager's training. This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts, operations practices, and models in both manufacturing- and service-oriented firms. The course will cover both quantitative and qualitative methods.
MGMT 3004 - Strategic Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mgmt 3004/Mgmt 4004W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Business strategy. How business firms set and pursue their goals. Key categories of strategic issues and concepts/frameworks managers use to analyze and address those issues. Attention to specific firms and situations. prereq: CSOM, soph or jr
FINA 3001 - Finance Fundamentals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 3501/Fina 3001/Fina 3001H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How competition for capital in Capital Markets establishes metrics and measures used to understand financial performance of the firm. The course introduces the finance view of the firm and the application of value creation principles to firm decision making. Course presents the centrality of cash flows, the theoretical foundations for Time Value of Money, decision tools for investment of capital, basic valuation of stocks and bonds, and the theoretical foundations for the impact of risk on the required return on investor capital. prereq: ACCT 2050 or ACCT 2051, SCO 2550 or BA 2551 or equivalent statistics course
FINA 3001H - Honors: Finance Fundamentals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 3501/Fina 3001/Fina 3001H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Financial management principles. Money/capital markets, risk/return/valuation triad, capital budgeting. Capital structure, financial leverage. Cost of capital, financial performance measures, dividend policy, working capital management, international financial management/derivatives. prereq: Acct 2050 or Acct 2051, SCO 2550 or BA 2551 or equivalent statistics course
HRIR 3021 - Human Capital Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HRIR 3021/HRIR 3021H/IBUS 3021
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will focus on the people side of business. We will look at how, through managing and leading people, we can create an engaged, productive workforce in order to achieve organizational strategic objectives. The content of this course is complementary to any major or minor. Major topics in this course: - Managing people in an ethical, legal way that is aligned with corporate strategy and helps organizations reach their goals; - Successfully attracting, recruiting, and selecting talented people; - Creating interesting, engaging jobs and giving meaningful feedback in order to retain great employees; - Rewarding and motivating people through intrinsic and extrinsic methods to encourage the most effective and "right" kind of employee behaviors to create an engaged, productive workforce through people strategies and practices.
HRIR 3021H - Honors: Human Resource Management and Strategy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HRIR 3021/HRIR 3021H/IBUS 3021
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Human capital is an essential role in today?s organizations. If you plan to be a manager or organizational leader, or if you plan to major or minor in HR, this course is an essential introduction to the role of human resource management in organizations. In this class you will learn: How to recruit and select the best people. How to evaluate performance and give employees feedback. How to help individuals improve when their performance is subpar, and how to conduct terminations when those efforts do not work. Methods that are used to develop individuals so they can move into higher leadership roles. How to examine turnover problems and retain employees. How large companies set pay levels to ensure internal and external equity. Recent issues around worker rights and unions. The basics of employment law. Contemporary human resources issues that employers are dealing with, such as labor market shortages and sexual harassment policies. This class is for honor?s students only. prereq: ECON 1101, ECON 1102, PSY 1001
IBUS 3021 - Human Capital Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HRIR 3021/HRIR 3021H/IBUS 3021
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will look at how, through managing and leading people, we can achieve organizational strategic objectives. The class will learn about managing people in an ethical, legal way that is aligned with organizational strategy and helps organizations reach their goals through recruiting, selecting, training, rewarding, coaching, motivating, and developing the people within the organization. Overall the course will prepare the students to be managers and leaders in an increasingly complex, global business environment.
IDSC 3101 - Introduction to Programming
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to Programming introduces students to a number of fundamental programming concepts, including: variables, decision structures, programming functions, and repetition structures. These concepts, which are widely applicable to different programming languages, are introduced using Python.
IDSC 3102 - Intermediate Programming
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Programming concepts to develop large, full-featured applications. Object-oriented programming, database applications, Web applications. Style, performance, UI design.
IDSC 3103 - Data Modeling and Databases
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts for designing, using, and implementing database systems. Normalization techniques. Structured Query Language (SQL). Analyzing a business situation. Building a database application.
IDSC 3104 - Enterprise Systems
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Management aspects of Enterprise Systems. Vendor/vendor management options. Technologies, organizational readiness. Hands-on access to software solutions from ERP software provider. End-to-end processes. Measurement of key performance indicators. Analytics, workflow. prereq: 3001
IDSC 3202 - Analysis and Modeling of Business Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Improving/automating key business processes in manufacturing and service industries. Roles of business management and MIS. Selecting business process opportunities, business process analysis, process modeling of work/data flow, decomposition, software tools. Traditional/object analysis methods. prereq: 3001
IDSC 4204W - Strategic Information Technology Management (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Information services as service function. Investing resources to support strategy. Managing IS resources. Project Management, Human Capital Management, Infrastructure Management. Emphasis on cloud/big data infrastructures, outsourcing.
IDSC 4301 - MIS in Action: A Capstone Course
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The course is designed for students to integrate a large number of concepts they have studied in previous course work within the department and school. The class uses a live-case/project-based design that requires students to identify and develop a detailed managerial analysis of an information technology and/or management information system (IT, MIS) project for a local corporation.
IBUS 3055 - Innovating with Technology: Global IT Entrepreneurship in Action
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides state-of-the-art knowledge about information technologies and fundamentals of entrepreneurship with an international perspective. It also provides a comprehensive overview of current and emerging technologies in several different areas of IT, focusing on the needs of the modern net-enhanced organizations and IT adaptation to local markets. In particular, the course covers basics of consumer electronics, Internet and mobile communications, web technologies, cloud computing, cyber-security, social network, etc. Students will be trained to use sprints to evaluate ideas, risk, costs, and culturalization needs of IT solution for local markets. We will look at how technology leaders/entrepreneurs in the rest of the world are addressing these opportunities. This class will teach students to use sprints to answer pressing business questions. First, students will map out the problem and pick an important place to focus. Second, they will sketch competing IT solutions on paper. Third, they will need to make decisions and turn their ideas into testable hypothesis. Fourth, they will develop a real or conceptual model for a prototype. Lastly, they will prepare to test out the ideas or pitch them to the partner companies.
IDSC 3511 - Pitching Business Strategy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contemporary business strategy drives growth across industries and geographies. Thus, effectively selling an approach to an ambiguous business situation is an important skill for those entering the business world - either as a consultant or a staff member wishing to sell ideas to senior management. You will learn how to approach an opportunity and how to communicate your approach and an action plan to management with appropriate emphasis and structure. The class consists of a series of hands-on workshops and real-world, global business cases (which serve as proxies for real-life consulting and staff experiences). Prereq: IDSc 3001 or I-Core (completed or concurrent), or Instructor permission.
IDSC 4161 - Python for Business Applications
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
According to recent industry surveys, Python is a highly popular tool used by organizations for business tasks. This course is designed for students who already have an intermediate programming background such as IDSC 3101/3102 (or equivalent Computer Science programming courses) and would like to explore using Python for tasks such as text processing, data analysis, and website scraping. This course focuses on business-oriented applications of Python without requiring students to learn formal computing concepts. Participants will then learn how to apply functionality from powerful and popular libraries. We will spend most of our class time completing practical hands-on exercises.
IDSC 4401 - Information Security
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/issues of security and data integrity threats that undermine utility, robustness, and confidence in electronic technologies in facilitating business transactions. prereq: 3001
IDSC 4411 - Information Technology Governance and Assurance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Information technology audit function, internal control, audit process, smart operations, network security, systems development life cycle, enterprise resource planning risk, compliance issues. IT governance, business continuity, frameworks/methodologies. Lectures, case studies, real-world examples. prereq: 3001
IDSC 4441 - Electronic Commerce
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Issues/trends in applying e-commerce initiatives. Technological infrastructure, revenue models, web marketing, business-to-business strategies, online auctions, legal and ethical aspects, hardware/software, payment systems, security. Conceiving, planning, building, and managing e-commerce initiatives. prereq: 3001
IDSC 4444 - Descriptive and Predictive Analytics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Descriptive and Predictive Analytics exposes students to a number of data mining and machine learning methods, including: exploratory methods (such as association rules and cluster analysis), predictive methods (such as K-NN and decision trees), and text mining methods. The course combines theoretical lectures with lab lectures, where the methods are practically implemented using the software R. prereqs: IDSC 3001; non-MIS majors also need IDSC 4110
IDSC 4455 - Web 2.0: The Business of Social Media
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Business use of social media technologies. Blogs, wikis, online social networks. Readings, forum discussion, case analyses. How technologies engage consumers, market products or services, benefit from open innovation, foster collaboration among employees. prereq: 3001
IDSC 4471 - Agile Methods
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
With the changing landscape of MIS methodologies, it is important to prepare for the future. This course will cover modern lightweight, and interactive IT development practices. Topics will include methodologies (RUP, Scrum, Kanban, and others); requirements gathering processes (Epics, User Stories); tools (burn-down chart, Kanban visualization); and leadership concepts (Scrum master, team member, sponsor). This class is appropriate for those with project-oriented career goals, in IT organizations as well as consulting roles.
IDSC 4490 - Information Systems Special Topics
Credits: 2.0 [max 10.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Discussion and analysis of current topics and developments in information systems.
IDSC 4204W - Strategic Information Technology Management (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Information services as service function. Investing resources to support strategy. Managing IS resources. Project Management, Human Capital Management, Infrastructure Management. Emphasis on cloud/big data infrastructures, outsourcing.
BA 3033W - Business Communication (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 3033W/Mgmt 3033W/IBUS 3033W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course teaches strategies and skills to communicate with confidence, clarity, and impact in business settings. Students develop their abilities in critical thinking (analyzing data, audience, purpose, and context) and craft (honing skills in storytelling, persuasion, writing, diction, tone, presence, data visualization, and visual design). They learn to navigate ambiguity, evaluate the needs of internal and external stakeholders, and communicate solutions to complex business problems. The course is performance- and project-based. Students produce professional-level memos, emails, and research-based proposal decks. They deliver multiple presentations (individual and team) and learn to communicate effectively with data. Students will meet with the instructor in small groups outside of class time for one scheduled lab session. The course culminates in the Case Study Competition where student teams apply their knowledge to address a real challenge from one of our industry partners. prereq: First Year Writing, Carlson School junior or senior.
IBUS 3033W - Business Communication in a Global Context (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 3033W/Mgmt 3033W/IBUS 3033W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Written/oral communication skills for effective participation in contemporary organizations. From basic principles to communication strategy. Communication technology. Cases, simulations of "real-world" situations in a domestic and global context. Global perspectives of focus have included India, Spain, South Korea and Japan. prereq: Fr composition, CSOM upper-div, at least 60 cr
HRIR 6301 - Staffing, Training, and Development
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Developing plans for hiring to facilitate strategic goals, attracting talent, selecting best candidates, helping new employees onboard, developing knowledge/skills over time, keeping talented people. Evaluation of staffing, training, development effectiveness. prereq: HRIR MA student or dept consent
HRIR 6001 - Business Principles for the HRIR Professional
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/functions of business corporations. Role of HRIR in business. Markets, competition, profitability, employment, investment. Introduction to finance/accounting. Global business pressures/HRIR. Trends for future. prereq: MHRIR student or dept consent
HRIR 6111 - Using Data and Metrics in Human Resources and Industrial Relations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory/applications of methods of data analysis for using data in HRIR decision-making. Descriptive/inferential statistics, especially hypothesis tests/confidence intervals. Regression analysis. Identification of appropriate techniques. Avoiding unreliable inferences. Introduction to HRIR metrics. prereq: HRIR MA student or dept consent
HRIR 6805 - HRIR Leadership Practicum
Credits: 0.5 -1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to help build a foundation for HRIR students to be leaders in the HR profession. The course will consist of leadership training, cross-cultural agility assessments and development, scenario-base exercises, and reflection by the student on themselves as an HR global leader.
HRIR 6401 - Organizational Theory Foundations of High-Impact HRIR
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic aspects of individual and group behavior in organizations. Individual and collective rationality, information, incentives, coordination problems, and contracts. Impacts on HRIR decisions and outcomes. Solutions and approaches to problems in organizations at micro and macro levels. prereq: dept consent
HRIR 6441 - Organizational Behavior Foundations of High-Impact HRIR
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Psychological aspects of individual/group behavior in organizations. Individual motivation, attitudes/job satisfaction. Leadership. Organization design/culture. Impacts on HRIR decisions/outcomes. Solutions/approaches to problems in organizations at micro/macro levels. prereq: HRIR MA student or dept consent
HRIR 6701 - Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evolution of U.S. labor unions/public policy, bargaining environment/structure, goals/negotiations, contract administration/results. International comparisons, labor-management cooperation, newly emerging issues. prereq: HRIR MA student or dept consent
HRIR 6501 - Compensation and Benefits
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The objective of this course is to provide students a foundation for designing and implementing a complete compensation plan. Through cases, lectures, and simulations, we examine how organizations set up the base compensation, incentive structures, equity awards, and benefits programs that attract, retain, and motivate the people who will execute the organization?s strategy. Topics include job analysis, labor markets, pay structures, merit raises, short-term incentives, long-term incentives (e.g. stock options), benefits, and compliance issues (e.g. the FLSA). Regular cases illustrate the type of strategic, technical, and interpersonal issues confronted by compensation and benefits professionals. prereq: HRIR Masters student or dept consent