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Twin Cities Campus

Art History Minor

Art History
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits in this minor: 14 to 20
Art history is the study of the visual world, both past and present. Starting from the premise that images, objects, and the built environment speak more directly and deeply about a culture than its written records, our courses prepare students to 'read' and respond to the increasingly visual world in which we live. Through the close, careful study of artworks from different times and places, students acquire a unique understanding of the world and their place within it. Intrinsically interdisciplinary, Art History's curriculum covers not only the fine arts but also visual and material culture more broadly defined: from paintings and sculpture, to architecture and urban design; from films and photographs, to ceramics and textiles; from scientific illustration and political posters, to performance art and street graffiti. Through engaging closely with these and other forms of visual expression, students develop crucial, transferable skills: visual analysis and interpretation, original research and careful argumentation, image-based thinking and communication, and clear and persuasive writing in a variety of modes. Art history prepares students for a variety of professional tracks: visual arts (e.g., art criticism, art appraisal and sales, art therapy, fashion, interior design, museums, and conservation), the humanities (e.g., grant writing, historic preservation, and philanthropy), media and marketing (e.g., advertising, film, journalism, radio, and television), K-12 and post-secondary education (e.g., teaching and administration), information science and collections management (e.g., libraries and archives in public, non-profit, and corporate contexts), and medicine and law. Thanks to their powerful skill set, students of art history also go on to enjoy higher job satisfaction and lower unemployment rates over the course of their working lives than peers in vocational tracks.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Students may earn a BA or a minor in art history, but not both.
Electives
To achieve training across the discipline and its skills, students must meet the following distribution requirements: Level Distribution Requirements: (0-4) 3xxx-level courses (1-5) 5xxx-level courses Chronological and Geographic Distribution Requirements: -Take at least 1 course from at least two of the three historical eras -Take at least 1 course from at least two of the three geographical areas
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
Era I: Ancient to ca. 1300
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
Area: North America and Europe
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3009 - Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3009 - Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3609 -  Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CNRC 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· Area: Middle East and/or Islamic World
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3018 - Art of the Ottoman Empire (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Area: South and/or East Asia
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3765 - Chinese Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5765 - Early Chinese Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3415W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Era II: ca. 1300 to 1800
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
Area: North America and Europe
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3309 - Renaissance Art in Europe [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3311 - Baroque Art in Seventeenth Century Europe [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3312 - European Art of the Eighteenth Century: Rococo to Revolution [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3345 - Imagining the North Country [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5336 - Transformations in 17th Century Art: Caravaggio, Velazquez, and Bernini (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3313 - Spanish Baroque Masters: Tradition and Experimentation in Golden Age Spain [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5313 - Spanish Baroque Masters: Tradition and Experimentation in Golden Age Spain [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3315 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5315 -  The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3708 -  The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age (3.0 cr)
· Area: Middle East and/or Islamic World
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3018 - Art of the Ottoman Empire (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans (3.0 cr)
· Area: South and/or East Asia
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3765 - Chinese Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3415W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
· Era III: 1800 to Present
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
Area: North America and Europe
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3005 - American Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3012 - 19th and 20th Century Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3021 - Art and Revolution, 1789-1889 (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3401W - Art on Trial [AH, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment [AH, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3577 - Photo Nation: Photography in America [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3921W - Art of the Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3929 - Cinema Now [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5411 - Gender and Sexuality in Art Since 1863 (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5413 - Alternative Media: Video, Performance, Digital Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5417 - Twentieth Century Theory and Criticism (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art [WI] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art [AH, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 5216W - Chicana and Chicano Art [AH, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5655 - African-American Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Area: Middle East and/or Islamic World
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment [AH, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans (3.0 cr)
· Area: South and/or East Asia
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment [AH, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3765 - Chinese Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3415W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
· Courses Requiring Advising Appointment for Application to the Distribution Requirements
The below courses are applicable to the distribution requirements described above, but vary in how they may be applied. Some courses span across time periods and geographic/cultural areas. Consult with the program advisor or director of undergraduate studies to determine which requirements these courses fulfill.
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3940 - Topics in Art History (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTH 5766 - Chinese Painting (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5930 - Junior-Senior Seminar (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5950 - Topics: Art History (3.0 cr)
· Directed Museum Experience, Study, or Research
Take at most 3 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3896 - Directed Professional Experience (1.0-2.0 cr)
· ARTH 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTH 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTH 5994 - Directed Research (1.0-4.0 cr)
 
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ARTH 3009 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
MEST 3009 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
RELS 3609 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
ARTH 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3152/CNES 3152
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will provide an introduction to the history of Greek art, architecture and archaeology from the formation of the Greek city states in the ninth century BCE, through the expansion of Greek culture across the Mediterranean and Asia in the Hellenistic period, to the coming of Rome in the first century BCE. While this survey concentrates on the main developments of Greek art, an important sub-theme of this course this is the changes Classical visual culture underwent as it served non-Greek peoples, including the role it played for Alexander and his successors in forging multiethnic, globally minded empires in Western, Central and South Asia. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to interdisciplinary study of art history and the classical world. A number of art historical methodologies will be introduced in order to not only give students a useful background in art history but to give them the tools to think as art historians and incorporate related visual and textual evidence meaningfully into their writing.
CNRC 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3152/CNES 3152
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will provide an introduction to the history of Greek art, architecture and archaeology from the formation of the Greek city states in the ninth century BCE, through the expansion of Greek culture across the Mediterranean and Asia in the Hellenistic period, to the coming of Rome in the first century BCE. While this survey concentrates on the main developments of Greek art, an important sub-theme of this course this is the changes Classical visual culture underwent as it served non-Greek peoples, including the role it played for Alexander and his successors in forging multiethnic, globally minded empires in Western, Central and South Asia. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to interdisciplinary study of art history and the classical world. A number of art historical methodologies will be introduced in order to not only give students a useful background in art history but to give them the tools to think as art historians and incorporate related visual and textual evidence meaningfully into their writing.
ARTH 3018 - Art of the Ottoman Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to visual culture under the Ottoman Empire. Initially formed as a small principality at the beginning of the fourteenth century in Anatolia, the Ottoman polity established itself as a major political and military power through the early modern period and beyond. With emphasis placed upon key monuments and objects, we will examine an array of artistic media, ranging from manuscript illumination and calligraphy to ceramics, textiles, metalwork, glasswork and jewelry. Major themes include the urban transformation of the Byzantine capital; the formation of imperial ideology and its visual articulation, the formation of a distinctive imperial style across media; the operation of court ateliers and societies of artists and artisans; contacts and interactions with the European and Islamic contemporaries; and cultural and artistic "decline."
ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
RELS 3706W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class provides an introduction to Buddhist art and architecture, from the sixth-century BCE to the present. Beginning with the life of the historical Buddha (563-483), it will follow the development of Buddhist art in India before tracing it across the Silk Road to China, Korea, and Japan. The class will consider how art and architecture evolved to serve the needs of Buddhism as its doctrine and practice evolved. At the same, we will consider how Buddhist cosmology and metaphysics were translated into culturally specific modes that served the multifarious cultural and artistic traditions of Asia.
ARTH 3765 - Chinese Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class provides an introduction to Chinese art and architecture, from prehistory to the present. Proceeding chronologically and thematically, the class will consider a broad range of artistic media including jade, stone, bronze, paintings, calligraphy, ceramics, printing, photography, and architecture. Through a close connoisseurial engagement and visual analysis these materials, the class will examine how Chinese art developed in relation to broader themes of Chinese political, religious, and cultural history. At the same time, it will consider how the art of China engaged in cultural and artistic dialogue with other traditions and cultures of East Asia.
ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3779/RELS 3779
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course traces the development and diversity of the Indian temple, focusing the ways in which people interact with sacred space and how religious art addresses its viewers. We primarily focus on Hinduism, but also include Buddhism and Jainism. We will discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, dance, and food within the temple. We will also examine how the legacy of colonial and orientalist scholarship inflects our study of these traditions and monuments. Although the architecture of both structural and rock-cut temples will be our main object of study, we will also discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, and food within the temple. Our consideration of the structures will be attentive to the ways in which people interact with the space and how objects of sacred art address their viewers. In classroom discussions we will work together to create an interpretive model that is synthetic, critical, and appreciative of the enormously diverse field that is South Asian Art. Lectures will move from explanatory descriptions of objects and histories that are covered in the textbook to critical interpretations of the historiographies that shape their contemporary reception. Class discussions and assignments are intended to encourage students to bring their own ways of looking at this art, to read critically in light of what they see, and to consider new approaches to the material. No prior experience in the history of art or religions of South Asia is required for this course.
ARTH 5765 - Early Chinese Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Art/material culture of early China from Neolithic age (ca. 10000-2000 BCE) to early imperial period (221 BCE-906 CE).
ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course explores the concept of embodiment and the nature of representation, from images of gods to human portraits, in Hindu, Jain, Buddhist, Muslim, and courtly contexts. We consider diverse media from ancient to modern periods, including painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and literature. This course explores the concept of embodiment in the diverse artistic traditions of South Asia. We will consider how ideas of representation of an individual have been understood and expressed differently across the history of South Asian art and religions. The course will consider the embodied representation of deities and semidivine figures along with those of ?real? people; we will consider, given the ontologies of such representations in their religious and cultural contexts. Representation of an individual ? a portrait ? is a foundational subject in the canon of art history. What does the very idea of a portrait mean so far outside the canon of (Western) art history? As we survey the diverse traditions and media of images of the body, we will be attentive to questions such as, Does media make meaning for these types of images? Can a ?portrait? be textual? Is verisimilitude essential to the depiction of a person? In what ways are practices of depiction informed by other modes of image-making, such as images of religious devotion, and traditions of representation encountered through trade or gift? We will consider diverse media from Ancient India to the modern period, including painting, stone and metal sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and even a Sanskrit play.
ARTH 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3014W/ RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Spring
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
RELS 3415W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3014W/ RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Spring
Indian sculpture, architecture, and paintings from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
ARTH 3309 - Renaissance Art in Europe (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major monuments of painting/sculpture in Western Europe, 1400-1600. Close reading of individual works in historical context. Influence of patrons. Major social/political changes such as Renaissance humanism, Protestant Reformation, market economy.
ARTH 3311 - Baroque Art in Seventeenth Century Europe (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Dominant trends/figures of Italian, French, Flemish, and Dutch Baroque period. Works of major masters, including Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, Velazquez, Rembrandt, and Rubens. Development of illusionistic ceiling decoration. Theoretical basis of Baroque art. Art's subservience to Church and royal court.
ARTH 3312 - European Art of the Eighteenth Century: Rococo to Revolution (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major developments in 18-century painting, sculpture, and interior decoration, from emergence of Rococo to dawn of Neoclassicism. Response of art to new forms of patronage. Erotics of 18-century art. Ways art functioned as social/political commentary.
ARTH 3345 - Imagining the North Country (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
All around us, carefully crafted landscapes of the North Country are presented to us in images. We encounter them every day on this campus whether we are at the Bell Museum of Natural History pondering Charles Corwin?s diorama of beavers at Lake Itasca, in the James Ford Bell Library examining Jean Baptiste Nolin?s seventeenth-century map of the Pays d?en Haut (?Upper Country?), or looking from the steps of Northrop Auditorium across the green spaces and architecture of the state?s land-grant university. These images exert a powerful influence on us, making our world cohere and forming the basis of strong communal identities. At the same time, without knowledge of their histories and conventions, they can stand as barriers to a more complex sense of the ground we stand on. This course will examine broadly the landscapes of the ?North Country,? the area roughly corresponding to present-day Minnesota that has for thousands of years been home to the Dakota and Ojibwe peoples and their ancestors, and more recently to peoples of European descent who in the seventeenth century began to refashion the landscape of the North Country in their own image. The aim of the class is to explore but also to unsettle our received habits of imagining the landscape, in the process opening up possibilities we may not have considered before.
ARTH 5336 - Transformations in 17th Century Art: Caravaggio, Velazquez, and Bernini
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course offers an in-depth examination of three of the most innovative masters of early modern European art, the painters Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio and Diego Velázquez, and the sculptor and architect Gianlorenzo Bernini. Through selected readings, slide presentations and discussions, we will explore the lives and works of these artists, paying particular attention to the ways they created an entirely new relationship between the work of art and the viewer and ushered in a radically new way of conceiving visual imagery.
ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
RELS 3706W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
ARTH 3313 - Spanish Baroque Masters: Tradition and Experimentation in Golden Age Spain (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3313/ArtH 5313
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This seminar focuses on some of the major masters of Spanish Baroque art, including Francisco de Zurbarán, Diego Velázquez, Jusepe de Ribera, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, and Juan Sánchez Cotán. We will explore their works from a variety of perspectives in an effort to understand the unique character and contributions of the art of the Spanish Golden Age.
ARTH 5313 - Spanish Baroque Masters: Tradition and Experimentation in Golden Age Spain (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3313/ArtH 5313
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This seminar focuses on some of the major masters of Spanish Baroque art, including Francisco de Zurbarán, Diego Velázquez, Jusepe de Ribera, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, and Juan Sánchez Cotán. We will explore their works from a variety of perspectives in an effort to understand the unique character and contributions of the art of the Spanish Golden Age.
ARTH 3315 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
ARTH 5315 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
HIST 3708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
HIST 5708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
ARTH 3335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
ARTH 5335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
RELS 3612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
RELS 5612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
ARTH 3422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3422/ArtH 5422
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History/theory of creation of lithography, social caricature (e.g., Daumier, Gavarni), revival of etching (e.g., Goya/mid-century practitioners, Whistler), and color lithography (e.g., Toulouse-Lautrec, Vuillard, Bonnard). Media changes of 20th century. Revolutionary nature of new media.
ARTH 5422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3422/ArtH 5422
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History/theory of creation of lithography, social caricature (e.g., Daumier, Gavarni), revival of etching (e.g., Goya, mid-century practitioners, Whistler), and color lithography (e.g., Toulouse-Lautrec, Vuillard, Bonnard). Media changes of 20th century. Revolutionary nature of new media.
ARTH 3018 - Art of the Ottoman Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to visual culture under the Ottoman Empire. Initially formed as a small principality at the beginning of the fourteenth century in Anatolia, the Ottoman polity established itself as a major political and military power through the early modern period and beyond. With emphasis placed upon key monuments and objects, we will examine an array of artistic media, ranging from manuscript illumination and calligraphy to ceramics, textiles, metalwork, glasswork and jewelry. Major themes include the urban transformation of the Byzantine capital; the formation of imperial ideology and its visual articulation, the formation of a distinctive imperial style across media; the operation of court ateliers and societies of artists and artisans; contacts and interactions with the European and Islamic contemporaries; and cultural and artistic "decline."
ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
RELS 3706W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
ARTH 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5781/RelS 5781
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Artistic developments under the three most powerful Islamic empires of the 16th through 19th centuries: Ottomans of Turkey; Safavids of Iran; Mughals of India. Roles of religion and state will be considered to understand their artistic production.
RELS 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5781/RelS 5781
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Artistic developments under the three most powerful Islamic empires of the 16th through 19th centuries: Ottomans of Turkey; Safavids of Iran; Mughals of India. Roles of religion and state will be considered to understand their artistic production.
ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class provides an introduction to Buddhist art and architecture, from the sixth-century BCE to the present. Beginning with the life of the historical Buddha (563-483), it will follow the development of Buddhist art in India before tracing it across the Silk Road to China, Korea, and Japan. The class will consider how art and architecture evolved to serve the needs of Buddhism as its doctrine and practice evolved. At the same, we will consider how Buddhist cosmology and metaphysics were translated into culturally specific modes that served the multifarious cultural and artistic traditions of Asia.
ARTH 3765 - Chinese Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class provides an introduction to Chinese art and architecture, from prehistory to the present. Proceeding chronologically and thematically, the class will consider a broad range of artistic media including jade, stone, bronze, paintings, calligraphy, ceramics, printing, photography, and architecture. Through a close connoisseurial engagement and visual analysis these materials, the class will examine how Chinese art developed in relation to broader themes of Chinese political, religious, and cultural history. At the same time, it will consider how the art of China engaged in cultural and artistic dialogue with other traditions and cultures of East Asia.
ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3779/RELS 3779
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course traces the development and diversity of the Indian temple, focusing the ways in which people interact with sacred space and how religious art addresses its viewers. We primarily focus on Hinduism, but also include Buddhism and Jainism. We will discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, dance, and food within the temple. We will also examine how the legacy of colonial and orientalist scholarship inflects our study of these traditions and monuments. Although the architecture of both structural and rock-cut temples will be our main object of study, we will also discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, and food within the temple. Our consideration of the structures will be attentive to the ways in which people interact with the space and how objects of sacred art address their viewers. In classroom discussions we will work together to create an interpretive model that is synthetic, critical, and appreciative of the enormously diverse field that is South Asian Art. Lectures will move from explanatory descriptions of objects and histories that are covered in the textbook to critical interpretations of the historiographies that shape their contemporary reception. Class discussions and assignments are intended to encourage students to bring their own ways of looking at this art, to read critically in light of what they see, and to consider new approaches to the material. No prior experience in the history of art or religions of South Asia is required for this course.
ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course explores the concept of embodiment and the nature of representation, from images of gods to human portraits, in Hindu, Jain, Buddhist, Muslim, and courtly contexts. We consider diverse media from ancient to modern periods, including painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and literature. This course explores the concept of embodiment in the diverse artistic traditions of South Asia. We will consider how ideas of representation of an individual have been understood and expressed differently across the history of South Asian art and religions. The course will consider the embodied representation of deities and semidivine figures along with those of ?real? people; we will consider, given the ontologies of such representations in their religious and cultural contexts. Representation of an individual ? a portrait ? is a foundational subject in the canon of art history. What does the very idea of a portrait mean so far outside the canon of (Western) art history? As we survey the diverse traditions and media of images of the body, we will be attentive to questions such as, Does media make meaning for these types of images? Can a ?portrait? be textual? Is verisimilitude essential to the depiction of a person? In what ways are practices of depiction informed by other modes of image-making, such as images of religious devotion, and traditions of representation encountered through trade or gift? We will consider diverse media from Ancient India to the modern period, including painting, stone and metal sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and even a Sanskrit play.
ARTH 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3014W/ RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Spring
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
RELS 3415W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3014W/ RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Spring
Indian sculpture, architecture, and paintings from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
ARTH 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact. There are no prerequisites for this course.
RELS 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact. There are no prerequisites for this course.
RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
ARTH 3005 - American Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Artistic practice in the United States: colonial period to cold war. America as idea/identity shaped, expressed, represented, and contested through art. Canon of American art history. Works by individuals outside of traditional channels of art instruction/reception. Questions about what does/does not count as art history.
ARTH 3012 - 19th and 20th Century Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major monuments/issues of modern period. Sculpture, architecture, painting, prints. Neo-classicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, evolution of modernism, symbolism, fauvism, cubism, dadaism, surrealism, abstract expressionism, pop art, conceptualism, postmodernism.
ARTH 3021 - Art and Revolution, 1789-1889
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The visual arts both reflected and shaped the large-scale transformations?from imperialism to the rise of the ?new? woman?that defined the modern world as we know it. Focusing on European artworks produced between 1789 and 1889, we?ll investigate how paintings, sculptures, prints, and photographs both illustrated and fashioned the revolutionary character of the period and the enduring legacies of the nineteenth century today.
ARTH 3401W - Art on Trial (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Why does art so often elicit anger, debate, protest, and vandalism? Arts controversies raise many difficult questions that this class examines: should artists be allowed to use taxpayer funds to create works of art critical of the government or that some find offensive? Should public sculptures commemorate Confederates, slave owners, or colonialists? How do we know when something is obscene? Is censorship ethical? Do artists have the right to control the fate of their work after it is sold? Who should decide what artists are chosen for public commissions, what artworks are selected for public buildings, or how works of art should be interpreted? Does public opinion make bad art? This course trains students in the history of arts controversies in the United States from the 19th century to the present and in the changing social conditions through which art has become a flashpoint for public debate. Assignments focus on discipline-specific research and writing techniques that build toward a group project in which students research, take up positions, and debate the merits of important case studies. The class is primarily designed for students to learn about the arts and arts policy today, i.e., the art world of which they are and will be citizens. They are asked to inspect the sources of dominant cultural beliefs and to gain a deeper understanding of and take responsibility for their own cultural, political, and artistic values.
ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment (AH, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical development of land, earth, and environmental art since 1968. Artists' engagement with environmental problems. Responses to changing aesthetic, political, biological, economic, agricultural, technological, and climactic conditions from global perspective.
ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The end of the Second World War is commonly understood as a watershed moment in art history when the center of western art shifted from Paris to New York and the old tradition of art academies and annual salons disappeared once and for all. It is a moment that sees dramatic changes in who artists are, how they are trained, what kind of art they make, and the audiences to whom they appeal. This course surveys U.S. and European art history from 1945 to the present so that students gain a thorough understanding of the social, political, and economic forces that contributed to the development of significant art movements including abstract expressionism, pop art, and minimalism, as well as key modes of artmaking including painting and sculpture, happenings, installations, video, earthworks, and participatory art. The course also trains students in philosophies of art and tracks the dramatic changes in aesthetics over the period. Primarily a lecture course, students? historical knowledge is assessed through two in-class examinations in which they identify, compare, contrast, and think critically about works of art. In addition, students practice discipline-specific research skills by compiling an annotated bibliography and writing short papers that rigorously examine primary sources.
ARTH 3577 - Photo Nation: Photography in America (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Development of photography, from 19th century to present. Photography as legitimate art form. Portraits/photo albums in culture. Birth of criminal justice system. Technological/market aspects. Politics of aesthetics. Women in photography. Ways in which idea of America has been shaped by photographs.
ARTH 3921W - Art of the Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will engage with the history of film as an art form through a selection of significant movements, styles, filmmakers, institutions, and, of course, individual films from around the world. While this will not be a comprehensive study, it will address both mainstream, commercial films as well as oppositional, experimental, underground, and otherwise challenging works. Some of the wide-ranging selection of films we will watch and discuss: Germaine Dulac?s La Coquille et le Clergyman (The Seashell and the Clergyman) (1922), Gillo Pontecorvo?s The Battle of Algiers (1966), Julie Dash?s Daughters of the Dust (1991), and Alfonso Cuarón?s Roma (2018).
ARTH 3929 - Cinema Now (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Course examines contemporary cinema, including fiction films, documentaries, animation, and avant-garde experiments. Focuses on feature-length theatrical films, but will also consider other aspects of the contemporary media world: graphic novels, video games, television series and the Internet (e.g., Youtube). Examines media production, distribution, marketing, exhibition, and reception. Course will also present a survey of developments in contemporary cinema studies, since the choice of films will support a variety of critical approaches including economic, aesthetic (generic, auteurist, formalist), ideological (race, class, gender), and reception studies.
ARTH 5411 - Gender and Sexuality in Art Since 1863
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In 1863, Édouard Manet painted a scandalous nude titled Olympia, which was met with outrage by critics when it was exhibited at the Paris Salon in 1865. The painting has been the subject of extensive discussion ever since among critics, curators, and art historians who examine not only its modernist style and formal qualities, but also the class, racial, and sexual identities of the two figures it depicts. This course surveys the role gender and sexuality have played in the historical development of western art from Manet?s Olympia to the present, and the role that art has played in both reinforcing and challenging dominant theories of gender identity. It considers modernism and postmodernism not only as products of the rise of industrial and post-industrial capitalism, urbanization, colonialism, and globalization, etc., but also as tangled up with the establishment of gender and sexuality as powerful ideas that bring into being the very categories they name. Students gain knowledge not only about the historical development of art throughout this period, but also about diverse strategies for scholarly research that is informed by theories of gender and sexuality, and art historical models for reading bodies, gestures, texts, and works of art. They complete guided or independent research papers, prepare an in-class presentation on a work of art in a local museum, and complete a structured literature review through which they learn to read and critically evaluate art historical scholarship.
ARTH 5413 - Alternative Media: Video, Performance, Digital Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
One rather old and rigid concept in the history of art and aesthetics is that artistic media, each with its distinct qualities, are most successful when they remain separate. The best painting, according to this view, is one that explores its own properties of flatness, abstraction, and color. What became known in the first half of the 20th century as the philosophy of ?medium specific purity? was radically challenged in the 1960s when the differences between painting and sculpture were intentionally blurred and when new media (performance, body art, happenings, video art, installations and digital art) were introduced. This course seeks to understand how alternative media were developed not through the invention of new technologies nor in isolation, but through revolutionary modes of thinking about time and space, human and non-human life, machines, archives, cyborgs, and interactivity (some of which date back to the 18th and 19th centuries). Through assigned readings and discussions as well as structured essay assignments, the class provides students with extensive practice in the critical analysis of theoretical texts and ample experience synthesizing diverse intellectual ideas and arguments in written form. More broadly, through a creative ?timeline? assignment, the course seeks to teach students to think inventively about new media and their histories, to learn strategies for looking at, evaluating, and thinking about works of new media art. It also provides instruction in research techniques and resources in contemporary art, as well as on writing in art history.
ARTH 5417 - Twentieth Century Theory and Criticism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Since the 19th century, artists, critics, and historians have deployed philosophical and theoretical ideas to think self-reflexively about the meaning of art. What counts as a work of art and who qualifies as an artist? What is the role of the viewer and how should works of art be interpreted? Are they passive reflections of their historical milieu or do they play an active role in forming cultural values? In the 1920s, the surrealists were reading Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud to answer these questions. Artists of the Harlem Renaissance studied the sociological essays of W.E.B. Dubois and Zora Neale Hurston. Conceptualist artists in the 1960s read books on semiotics; performance artists studied phenomenology reading the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Feminist artists in the 1970s read up on psychoanalysis and feminist philosophy. Following in their footsteps, this is primarily a readings course designed to familiarize students with important theoretical ideas applied to the visual arts of the 20th century. The course focuses on significant trends in that century?s art theory, historical methodology, and criticism. It examines key philosophical ideas of modernism and postmodernism including formalism, semiotics, poststructuralism, feminism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction, critical race and queer theory. Because the course is organized chronologically as well as thematically and follows the lives and writings of key figures, it is also intended to help students trace intellectual histories as they develop over the century. In addition, it seeks to foster students? critical reading skills, discipline-specific writing skills, and to help them consider the historical implications of art theory for the production and reception of works of art today.
ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The art of today as it is practiced around the globe takes a bewildering variety of forms?from traditional painting and sculpture to AI, interactive digital media, film projections, bio art (involving human, plant, and animal blood, tissue and DNA), participatory and community engaged projects, and environmental interventions. It addresses urgent social and political themes including globalization, institutionalized racism, climate crisis, big data, and mechanized vision. Just as today?s citizens should inform themselves about contemporary politics and current events, so is it crucial that we understand the art of our own time. In this course students gain an understanding of art?s development since the late 20th century and key ideas that are central to interpreting the art of this period. The course begins with a review of important movements, significant artists, and influential theories and issues. It then takes up and studies specific themes through the reading and analysis of theoretical texts. Students are asked to read, participate in class discussions, complete guided or independent research papers, prepare an in-class presentation on one of the course themes, and complete a book review for a textbook on contemporary art history. Each of these assignments is designed to impart specific historical knowledge about the period of the contemporary, to provide students with opportunities to practice critical reading and synthetic writing, and to offer them a chance to inspect their own positions regarding key debates.
ARTH 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3216W/Chic 3216W/Chic 512
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A Chicana/o has been described as a Mexican-American with a political sense of identity that emerges from a desire for social justice. One journalist bluntly stated, "A Chicano is a Mexican-American with a non-Anglo image of himself" (Ruben Salazar, Los Angeles Times, 1970). This identity emerged through the Chicano Movement, a social and political mobilization that began in the 1960s and 1970s. The Chicano Movement witnessed the rise of community-based political organizing to improve the working conditions, education, housing opportunities, health, and civil rights for Mexican-Americans. For its inception, the Chicano Movement attracted artists who created a new aesthetic and framework for producing art. A major focus of Chicana/o artists of the 1960s and 1970s was representation, the right to self-determination, and the role of art in fostering civic and public engagement. This focus continues to inform Chicana/o cultural production. Social intervention, empowerment, and institutional critique remain some of the most important innovations of American art of the last several decades, and Chicana/o artists played a significant role in this trend.
CHIC 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A Chicana/o has been described as a Mexican-American with a political sense of identity that emerges from a desire for social justice. One journalist bluntly stated, "A Chicano is a Mexican-American with a non-Anglo image of himself" (Ruben Salazar, Los Angeles Times, 1970). This identity emerged through the Chicano Movement, a social and political mobilization that began in the 1960s and 1970s. The Chicano Movement witnessed the rise of community-based political organizing to improve the working conditions, education, housing opportunities, health, and civil rights for Mexican-Americans. For its inception, the Chicano Movement attracted artists who created a new aesthetic and framework for producing art. A major focus of Chicana/o artists of the 1960s and 1970s was representation, the right to self-determination, and the role of art in fostering civic and public engagement. This focus continues to inform Chicana/o cultural production. Social intervention, empowerment, and institutional critique remain some of the most important innovations of American art of the last several decades, and Chicana/o artists played a significant role in this trend.
CHIC 5216W - Chicana and Chicano Art (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3216W/Chic 3216W/Chic 512
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A Chicana/o has been described as a Mexican-American with a political sense of identity that emerges from a desire for social justice. One journalist bluntly stated, "A Chicano is a Mexican-American with a non-Anglo image of himself" (Ruben Salazar, Los Angeles Times, 1970). This identity emerged through the Chicano Movement, a social and political mobilization that began in the 1960s and 1970s. The Chicano Movement witnessed the rise of community-based political organizing to improve the working conditions, education, housing opportunities, health, and civil rights for Mexican-Americans. For its inception, the Chicano Movement attracted artists who created a new aesthetic and framework for producing art. A major focus of Chicana/o artists of the 1960s and 1970s was representation, the right to self-determination, and the role of art in fostering civic and public engagement. This focus continues to inform Chicana/o cultural production. Social intervention, empowerment, and institutional critique remain some of the most important innovations of American art of the last several decades, and Chicana/o artists played a significant role in this trend.
ARTH 5655 - African-American Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3655/ArtH 3655/ArtH 5655
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
African American cinematic achievements, from silent films of Oscar Micheaux through contemporary Hollywood and independent films. Class screenings, critical readings.
ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment (AH, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical development of land, earth, and environmental art since 1968. Artists' engagement with environmental problems. Responses to changing aesthetic, political, biological, economic, agricultural, technological, and climactic conditions from global perspective.
ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The end of the Second World War is commonly understood as a watershed moment in art history when the center of western art shifted from Paris to New York and the old tradition of art academies and annual salons disappeared once and for all. It is a moment that sees dramatic changes in who artists are, how they are trained, what kind of art they make, and the audiences to whom they appeal. This course surveys U.S. and European art history from 1945 to the present so that students gain a thorough understanding of the social, political, and economic forces that contributed to the development of significant art movements including abstract expressionism, pop art, and minimalism, as well as key modes of artmaking including painting and sculpture, happenings, installations, video, earthworks, and participatory art. The course also trains students in philosophies of art and tracks the dramatic changes in aesthetics over the period. Primarily a lecture course, students? historical knowledge is assessed through two in-class examinations in which they identify, compare, contrast, and think critically about works of art. In addition, students practice discipline-specific research skills by compiling an annotated bibliography and writing short papers that rigorously examine primary sources.
ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The art of today as it is practiced around the globe takes a bewildering variety of forms?from traditional painting and sculpture to AI, interactive digital media, film projections, bio art (involving human, plant, and animal blood, tissue and DNA), participatory and community engaged projects, and environmental interventions. It addresses urgent social and political themes including globalization, institutionalized racism, climate crisis, big data, and mechanized vision. Just as today?s citizens should inform themselves about contemporary politics and current events, so is it crucial that we understand the art of our own time. In this course students gain an understanding of art?s development since the late 20th century and key ideas that are central to interpreting the art of this period. The course begins with a review of important movements, significant artists, and influential theories and issues. It then takes up and studies specific themes through the reading and analysis of theoretical texts. Students are asked to read, participate in class discussions, complete guided or independent research papers, prepare an in-class presentation on one of the course themes, and complete a book review for a textbook on contemporary art history. Each of these assignments is designed to impart specific historical knowledge about the period of the contemporary, to provide students with opportunities to practice critical reading and synthetic writing, and to offer them a chance to inspect their own positions regarding key debates.
ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
RELS 3706W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
ARTH 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5781/RelS 5781
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Artistic developments under the three most powerful Islamic empires of the 16th through 19th centuries: Ottomans of Turkey; Safavids of Iran; Mughals of India. Roles of religion and state will be considered to understand their artistic production.
RELS 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5781/RelS 5781
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Artistic developments under the three most powerful Islamic empires of the 16th through 19th centuries: Ottomans of Turkey; Safavids of Iran; Mughals of India. Roles of religion and state will be considered to understand their artistic production.
ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class provides an introduction to Buddhist art and architecture, from the sixth-century BCE to the present. Beginning with the life of the historical Buddha (563-483), it will follow the development of Buddhist art in India before tracing it across the Silk Road to China, Korea, and Japan. The class will consider how art and architecture evolved to serve the needs of Buddhism as its doctrine and practice evolved. At the same, we will consider how Buddhist cosmology and metaphysics were translated into culturally specific modes that served the multifarious cultural and artistic traditions of Asia.
ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment (AH, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical development of land, earth, and environmental art since 1968. Artists' engagement with environmental problems. Responses to changing aesthetic, political, biological, economic, agricultural, technological, and climactic conditions from global perspective.
ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The end of the Second World War is commonly understood as a watershed moment in art history when the center of western art shifted from Paris to New York and the old tradition of art academies and annual salons disappeared once and for all. It is a moment that sees dramatic changes in who artists are, how they are trained, what kind of art they make, and the audiences to whom they appeal. This course surveys U.S. and European art history from 1945 to the present so that students gain a thorough understanding of the social, political, and economic forces that contributed to the development of significant art movements including abstract expressionism, pop art, and minimalism, as well as key modes of artmaking including painting and sculpture, happenings, installations, video, earthworks, and participatory art. The course also trains students in philosophies of art and tracks the dramatic changes in aesthetics over the period. Primarily a lecture course, students? historical knowledge is assessed through two in-class examinations in which they identify, compare, contrast, and think critically about works of art. In addition, students practice discipline-specific research skills by compiling an annotated bibliography and writing short papers that rigorously examine primary sources.
ARTH 3765 - Chinese Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class provides an introduction to Chinese art and architecture, from prehistory to the present. Proceeding chronologically and thematically, the class will consider a broad range of artistic media including jade, stone, bronze, paintings, calligraphy, ceramics, printing, photography, and architecture. Through a close connoisseurial engagement and visual analysis these materials, the class will examine how Chinese art developed in relation to broader themes of Chinese political, religious, and cultural history. At the same time, it will consider how the art of China engaged in cultural and artistic dialogue with other traditions and cultures of East Asia.
ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3779/RELS 3779
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course traces the development and diversity of the Indian temple, focusing the ways in which people interact with sacred space and how religious art addresses its viewers. We primarily focus on Hinduism, but also include Buddhism and Jainism. We will discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, dance, and food within the temple. We will also examine how the legacy of colonial and orientalist scholarship inflects our study of these traditions and monuments. Although the architecture of both structural and rock-cut temples will be our main object of study, we will also discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, and food within the temple. Our consideration of the structures will be attentive to the ways in which people interact with the space and how objects of sacred art address their viewers. In classroom discussions we will work together to create an interpretive model that is synthetic, critical, and appreciative of the enormously diverse field that is South Asian Art. Lectures will move from explanatory descriptions of objects and histories that are covered in the textbook to critical interpretations of the historiographies that shape their contemporary reception. Class discussions and assignments are intended to encourage students to bring their own ways of looking at this art, to read critically in light of what they see, and to consider new approaches to the material. No prior experience in the history of art or religions of South Asia is required for this course.
ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The art of today as it is practiced around the globe takes a bewildering variety of forms?from traditional painting and sculpture to AI, interactive digital media, film projections, bio art (involving human, plant, and animal blood, tissue and DNA), participatory and community engaged projects, and environmental interventions. It addresses urgent social and political themes including globalization, institutionalized racism, climate crisis, big data, and mechanized vision. Just as today?s citizens should inform themselves about contemporary politics and current events, so is it crucial that we understand the art of our own time. In this course students gain an understanding of art?s development since the late 20th century and key ideas that are central to interpreting the art of this period. The course begins with a review of important movements, significant artists, and influential theories and issues. It then takes up and studies specific themes through the reading and analysis of theoretical texts. Students are asked to read, participate in class discussions, complete guided or independent research papers, prepare an in-class presentation on one of the course themes, and complete a book review for a textbook on contemporary art history. Each of these assignments is designed to impart specific historical knowledge about the period of the contemporary, to provide students with opportunities to practice critical reading and synthetic writing, and to offer them a chance to inspect their own positions regarding key debates.
ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course explores the concept of embodiment and the nature of representation, from images of gods to human portraits, in Hindu, Jain, Buddhist, Muslim, and courtly contexts. We consider diverse media from ancient to modern periods, including painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and literature. This course explores the concept of embodiment in the diverse artistic traditions of South Asia. We will consider how ideas of representation of an individual have been understood and expressed differently across the history of South Asian art and religions. The course will consider the embodied representation of deities and semidivine figures along with those of ?real? people; we will consider, given the ontologies of such representations in their religious and cultural contexts. Representation of an individual ? a portrait ? is a foundational subject in the canon of art history. What does the very idea of a portrait mean so far outside the canon of (Western) art history? As we survey the diverse traditions and media of images of the body, we will be attentive to questions such as, Does media make meaning for these types of images? Can a ?portrait? be textual? Is verisimilitude essential to the depiction of a person? In what ways are practices of depiction informed by other modes of image-making, such as images of religious devotion, and traditions of representation encountered through trade or gift? We will consider diverse media from Ancient India to the modern period, including painting, stone and metal sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and even a Sanskrit play.
ARTH 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3014W/ RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Spring
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
RELS 3415W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3014W/ RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Spring
Indian sculpture, architecture, and paintings from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
ARTH 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact. There are no prerequisites for this course.
ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
RELS 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact. There are no prerequisites for this course.
RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
ARTH 3940 - Topics in Art History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ARTH 5766 - Chinese Painting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major works from the late bronze age to the modern era that illustrate the development of Chinese landscape painting and associated literary traditions.
ARTH 5930 - Junior-Senior Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major art-historical theme, artist, period, or genre. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [Jr or sr] ArtH major, instr consent
ARTH 5950 - Topics: Art History
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ARTH 3896 - Directed Professional Experience
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Internship or research assistantship in approved program, art institution, business or museum. prereq: instr consent
ARTH 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
TBD prereq: instr consent
ARTH 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
TBD prereq: instr consent
ARTH 5994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
tbd prereq: instr consent