Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Entrepreneurial Management Minor

CSOM Strategic Mgmt & Entrepre
Curtis L. Carlson School of Management
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits in this minor: 16
See major description for more information.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
This minor is only available for students pursuing a BSB degree in the Carlson School of Management.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Minor Requirements
A minimum of 3 credits in the minor must be completed at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus.
Required Courses
MGMT 4008 - Entrepreneurial Management (4.0 cr)
MGMT 3015 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (4.0 cr)
or IBUS 3010 - Introduction to Global Entrepreneurship (4.0 cr)
Plus one from the following:
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· MGMT 4055 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4080W - Applied Technology Entrepreneurship [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4171W - Entrepreneurship in Action I [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4175W - New Business Feasibility and Planning [WI] (4.0 cr)
Electives
Choose additional elective courses from the list below or courses not chosen above for a total of 16 credits. Courses may not count in both categories.
Take 4 - 6 credit(s) from the following:
· ACCT 5161 - Financial Statement Analysis (2.0 cr)
· ACCT 5201 - Intermediate Management Accounting (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· BA 4503 - Carlson Ventures Enterprise (2.0-4.0 cr)
· BLAW 3061 - Business Law Basics (2.0 cr)
· BLAW 3062 - Contract Law and Corporate Regulation (2.0 cr)
· FINA 4221 - Principles of Corporate Finance (2.0 cr)
· FINA 4422 - Financial Modeling (2.0 cr)
· GCC 3005 - Innovation for Changemakers: Design for a Disrupted World [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HRIR 3031 - Staffing and Selection: Strategic and Operational Concerns (2.0 cr)
· HRIR 4801W - HRIR Capstone: Personal and Organizational Leadership [WI] (4.0 cr)
· IBUS 3055 - Innovating with Technology: Global IT Entrepreneurship in Action (4.0 cr)
· IDSC 3202 - Analysis and Modeling of Business Systems (4.0 cr)
· INS 4105 - Corporate Risk Management (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4001 - Social Venturing in Action (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4044 - Negotiation Strategies (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4055 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4080W - Applied Technology Entrepreneurship [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4100 - Topics in Management (2.0-4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4175W - New Business Feasibility and Planning [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4171W - Entrepreneurship in Action I [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4172 - Entrepreneurship in Action II (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 5018 - Philanthropy & Fundraising Strategy (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 5102 - StartUp: Customer Development and Testing (2.0 cr)
· MKTG 3011 - Marketing Research (4.0 cr)
· MKTG 4031 - Sales Management (4.0 cr)
· MKTG 4051 - Advertising and Promotion (4.0 cr)
· PDES 2701 - Creative Design Methods (3.0 cr)
· PDES 3711 - Product Innovation Lab (4.0 cr)
· SCO 3041 - Project Management (2.0 cr)
· SCO 3056 - Supply Chain Planning and Control (4.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· Curtis L. Carlson School of Management


View checkpoint chart:
· Entrepreneurial Management Minor
View PDF Version:
Search.
Search Programs

Search University Catalogs
Related links.

Curtis L. Carlson School of Management

TC Undergraduate Admissions

TC Undergraduate Application

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more
 
MGMT 4008 - Entrepreneurial Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Management of a new venture after founding. Internal/external challenges of managing a startup organization. Working with resource constraints and understanding how business models may change over time. prereq: MGMT 3015 or MGMT 3010 or IBUS 3010
MGMT 3015 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBUS 3010/MGMT 3010/MGMT 3015
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of entrepreneurship. Career paths, including new business start-ups, franchising, acquisitions (including family business succession), corporate venturing, and entre-preneurial services. Legal structures for new business formation. Aspects of business law/ethics.
IBUS 3010 - Introduction to Global Entrepreneurship
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBUS 3010/Mgmt 3010
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of entrepreneurship. Students will learn entrepreneurship concepts and apply them to opportunities in a variety of global contexts including China, Cuba, Brazil, and others. Students will interact virtually with global entrepreneurs and leaders. After engaging with international entrepreneurs students will apply their experience to future entrepreneurship opportunities.
MGMT 4055 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBus 4050/Mgmt 4055
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on how business organizations innovate and change. The course covers foundational topics and combines both theoretical insights and practical knowledge based on cases and hands-on exercises. The class topics address the following questions: What are the sources, types and patterns of innovation? What are the characteristics of an organization?s innovation ecosystem? How do organizations compete and collaborate in innovation ecosystems? What are some external forces shaping organizational innovations? How do organizations adapt to these external forces? By the end of this course, students will: Learn the key principles of success and failure of innovation and change in business organizations across different products, services and geographies. Apply course concepts to real organizational cases, diagnose problems and recommend solutions. Use clear written, verbal and online communication skills. Collaborate to create novel solutions to tasks and problems. Demonstrate the use of a wide range of qualitative and quantitative sources to support conclusions and recommendations. prereq: MGMT 3001 or MGMT 3004 or MGMT 3010 or MGMT 3015
MGMT 4080W - Applied Technology Entrepreneurship (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mgmt 4170/Mgmt 4177/Mgmt 5177
Typically offered: Every Spring
Team projects based on commercializable technologies or innovations. Teams present their ideas to investors and industry professionals. Students are encouraged to submit their business plans to Minnesota Cup.
MGMT 4171W - Entrepreneurship in Action I (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Two-semester course. In fall, students identify a business oportunity, develop concept, determine resources required, and launch the business. In spring, students implement business plan, manage business, and determine exit strategy. prereq: 3010, [4008 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4008], completed coursework in business core, CSOM upper division, approved application
MGMT 4175W - New Business Feasibility and Planning (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 03099
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the following insights into ? Techniques for developing and screening business ideas ? Criteria for properly assessing idea feasibility ? Equipping yourself with the necessary information and analysis to develop a useful business plan ? Preparing an effective business plan ? Effectively pitching the plan to stakeholders, primarily prospective investors The class makes use of lecture, videos, articles, cases, class exercises, assignments, and quizzes to help develop depth of understanding amongst students of the relevant subject matter of this course. prereq: MGMT 3010 or MGMT 3015 or IBUS 3010
ACCT 5161 - Financial Statement Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interpretation/analysis of financial statements. Introduces basic techniques of financial statement analysis and applies them in different settings (e.g., in investment/credit decisions). prereq: [5101]
ACCT 5201 - Intermediate Management Accounting
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an in-action course. The course explores the topic of management accounting in greater depth. The course expands introductory course material via special emphasis on decision making, problem solving skills and exploration of accounting's role within overall management. The course is an in-action class. We will have a project working on a business case from a firm as the final assessment for the course. prereq: 3001, acct or finance major
ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4121/Anth 5121
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological/ethnographic understandings/research techniques.
BA 4503 - Carlson Ventures Enterprise
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 4503/MBA 6503
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Carlson Ventures Enterprise (CVE) is intended for highly-motivated entrepreneurially minded graduate and undergraduate students who seek opportunities to develop creative problem solving and critical analysis skills to aid in better identifying, creating, and evaluating any new business opportunity, whether a start-up, social venture or innovation initiative inside a Fortune 500 company. CVE?s comprehensive curriculum includes the best practices, frameworks, and tools used in entrepreneurial and innovative pursuits. In a teach-then-apply environment, students manage client based projects solving real-world problems in real time, whether helping an entrepreneur develop their new business or an established organization evaluate opportunities for growth. CVE fits with multiple degree plans, in multiple schools at the University, as either a requirement, an elective or a capstone. This course will meet with MBA 6503. Registration for this course is by permission only. prereq: approved application
BLAW 3061 - Business Law Basics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides a broad background in the fundamentals of many business law topics that are important to any businessperson. NOTE: This course is designed for students who do not have knowledge or experience with any aspect of business law. There is no prerequisite for this course. The goal is to provide basic concepts that can be used throughout your career to spot legal issues, identify potential concerns, and with the aid of counsel, solve or avoid problems. General topics include: various legal entities in which business can be conducted, tort law (with emphasis on negligence), real estate law, the law of agency, intellectual property (patents, copyrights, trade secrets and trademarks), warranty law, product liability, employment law, certain discrimination laws (including Minnesota?s fairly recent protections for women in the workplace), alternative dispute resolution and administrative law. Throughout the course, we will examine the impact of the Supreme Court on American business. NOTE: Students who previously took BLAW 3058 (4 credit course) should NOT take this course.
BLAW 3062 - Contract Law and Corporate Regulation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course highlights topics that are important to any business major, with particular emphasis on publicly-traded companies. NOTE: This course is designed for students who do not have knowledge or experience with any aspect of business law. There is no prerequisite for this course. General topics include: (1) the law of contracts and transactions involving the sale of goods, (2) secured transactions (how creditors can use a debtor?s assets as collateral to secure indebtedness), and (3) the basics of bankruptcy law. Public company subjects include: pros and cons of going public, the IPO process, federal securities laws and SEC regulations regarding public company reporting requirements, insider trading, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and its impact on corporate governance, trends in shareholder democracy rights and shareholder activism, and the role of boards and audit committees. Throughout the course, we will examine the impact of the Supreme Court on American business. NOTE: Students who previously took BLAW 3058 (4 credit course) should NOT take this course.
FINA 4221 - Principles of Corporate Finance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fina 4221/Fina 4241
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course evaluates how the financing choices the firm makes influence the creation of firm value and allocation of firm risks among investors. Course presents the debt vs. equity trade-off, tax effects of financing, dividend vs. share repurchases, and the impact on managerial incentives and agency problems. prereq: 3001 or 3001H, CSOM major or Math/Actuarial Science major or Management Minor
FINA 4422 - Financial Modeling
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This applied course builds on principles from the prerequisite courses and provides students with significant practice building financial models to identify the free cash flow from and required investment in projects or firms for discounted cash flow and sensitivity analysis. Course presents net operating working capital requirements, Valuation with Free Cash Flow based methods, and the construction of three statement pro-forma cash flow projections. Prereq: FINA 4221, ACCT 5101, CSOM major
GCC 3005 - Innovation for Changemakers: Design for a Disrupted World (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CEGE 5571/GCC 3005/GCC 5005
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
Do you want to make a difference? We live at the intersection of COVID-19, racism, economic recession, and environmental collapse. Now is the time to make an impact. In this project-based course, you will work in interdisciplinary teams. You'll develop entrepreneurial responses to current social and environmental problems. You'll develop tools, mindsets, and skills to address any complex grand challenge. Your project may address food insecurity, unemployment, housing, environmental impacts, equity, or other issues. Proposed designs for how you might have a social impact can take many forms (student group, program intervention with an existing organization, public policy strategy, or for-profit or non-profit venture) but must have ideas for how to be financially sustainable. Community members, locally and globally, will serve as mentors and research consultants to teams. Weekly speakers will share their innovative efforts to serve the common good. A primary focus of the course is up-front work to identify the ?right? problem to solve. You will use a discovery process, design thinking, and input from field research to addressing the challenge you choose. You will build a model around the community?s culture, needs, and wants. By the end of the class, you will have a well-designed plan to turn your project into an actionable solution if that is of interest. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. GCC courses are open to all students and fulfill an honors experience for University Honors Program students.
HRIR 3031 - Staffing and Selection: Strategic and Operational Concerns
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to theory/practice of staffing decisions. Recruitment, selection, promotion, demotion, transfer, dismissal, layoff, retirement. Staffing analyzed from strategic/operational perspectives. Legal issues.
HRIR 4801W - HRIR Capstone: Personal and Organizational Leadership (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is a writing intensive capstone course for undergraduates majoring in HR. Given the emphasis of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) on the critical need for HR professionals to both be leaders and understand leadership development, we focus this capstone class on the topic of leadership within the context of the SHRM competency model. The first part of the course provides students with a solid understanding of leadership needs within organizations and current tools, vendors, and techniques that can be used to develop leadership bench strength and capability within companies. The second part of the course features guest speakers from different areas of HR and student presentations based on the SHRM competency model. The course will help students reflect upon the extreme importance of leadership, how to develop organizational leaders, and will provide means to develop their own first level leadership and human resources competencies. prereq: 3021, 6 HRIR credits, [senior status or dept consent]
IBUS 3055 - Innovating with Technology: Global IT Entrepreneurship in Action
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides state-of-the-art knowledge about information technologies and fundamentals of entrepreneurship with an international perspective. It also provides a comprehensive overview of current and emerging technologies in several different areas of IT, focusing on the needs of the modern net-enhanced organizations and IT adaptation to local markets. In particular, the course covers basics of consumer electronics, Internet and mobile communications, web technologies, cloud computing, cyber-security, social network, etc. Students will be trained to use sprints to evaluate ideas, risk, costs, and culturalization needs of IT solution for local markets. We will look at how technology leaders/entrepreneurs in the rest of the world are addressing these opportunities. This class will teach students to use sprints to answer pressing business questions. First, students will map out the problem and pick an important place to focus. Second, they will sketch competing IT solutions on paper. Third, they will need to make decisions and turn their ideas into testable hypothesis. Fourth, they will develop a real or conceptual model for a prototype. Lastly, they will prepare to test out the ideas or pitch them to the partner companies.
IDSC 3202 - Analysis and Modeling of Business Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Improving/automating key business processes in manufacturing and service industries. Roles of business management and MIS. Selecting business process opportunities, business process analysis, process modeling of work/data flow, decomposition, software tools. Traditional/object analysis methods. prereq: 3001
INS 4105 - Corporate Risk Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ins 6105/ Ins 4105
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory applied to corporate risk management and insurance practices. Identification, measurement, and treatment of an organization.s financial risks integrated with its property, liability, workers compensation, and human resource risks. Selection and application of risk control and risk financing tools: risk retention, reduction and transfer, including insurance.
MGMT 4001 - Social Venturing in Action
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA4000/MGMT4000/MGMT4001
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Capstone course. Students choose projects with nonprofit organizations in local communities. Readings/discussions tie managerial theory to experiences. The focus of this course is on sectors of the economy that provide goods and services with motivation beyond generating profits for investors. The non-profit sector and impact-related for-profit organizations are a large, growing, and increasingly entrepreneurial part of our economy. Non-profit administration and social entrepreneurship require knowledge of subjects unique to this sector. This class will provide a basis of knowledge about these issues from the standpoint of practitioners and researchers. Because the landscape of the non-profit and impact-related for-profit world is broad, one seminar course cannot possibly cover all of the important and interesting issues in this field. In this course, we will focus our attention by exploring a number of issues that involve the intersection of the for-profit and the not-for- profit economies. prereq: Senior standing
MGMT 4044 - Negotiation Strategies
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of negotiation as the art and science of securing agreements between two or more interdependent parties seeking to maximize their own outcomes. The concepts you learn and the skills you develop in this class will apply to both your work and personal negotiations. At the heart of this class is the idea that the best way to learn to negotiate is by engaging in negotiation and then rigorously analyzing your experience. Therefore, this course is designed to be a highly interactive learning experience. The role of the course instructor is to help you get the most out of this experience by selecting relevant and compelling exercises and readings, as well as by facilitating engaging and meaningful discussion of class negotiations, negotiation research and best practices.
MGMT 4055 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBus 4050/Mgmt 4055
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on how business organizations innovate and change. The course covers foundational topics and combines both theoretical insights and practical knowledge based on cases and hands-on exercises. The class topics address the following questions: What are the sources, types and patterns of innovation? What are the characteristics of an organization?s innovation ecosystem? How do organizations compete and collaborate in innovation ecosystems? What are some external forces shaping organizational innovations? How do organizations adapt to these external forces? By the end of this course, students will: Learn the key principles of success and failure of innovation and change in business organizations across different products, services and geographies. Apply course concepts to real organizational cases, diagnose problems and recommend solutions. Use clear written, verbal and online communication skills. Collaborate to create novel solutions to tasks and problems. Demonstrate the use of a wide range of qualitative and quantitative sources to support conclusions and recommendations. prereq: MGMT 3001 or MGMT 3004 or MGMT 3010 or MGMT 3015
MGMT 4080W - Applied Technology Entrepreneurship (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mgmt 4170/Mgmt 4177/Mgmt 5177
Typically offered: Every Spring
Team projects based on commercializable technologies or innovations. Teams present their ideas to investors and industry professionals. Students are encouraged to submit their business plans to Minnesota Cup.
MGMT 4100 - Topics in Management
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics vary for each offering.
MGMT 4175W - New Business Feasibility and Planning (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 03099
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the following insights into ? Techniques for developing and screening business ideas ? Criteria for properly assessing idea feasibility ? Equipping yourself with the necessary information and analysis to develop a useful business plan ? Preparing an effective business plan ? Effectively pitching the plan to stakeholders, primarily prospective investors The class makes use of lecture, videos, articles, cases, class exercises, assignments, and quizzes to help develop depth of understanding amongst students of the relevant subject matter of this course. prereq: MGMT 3010 or MGMT 3015 or IBUS 3010
MGMT 4171W - Entrepreneurship in Action I (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Two-semester course. In fall, students identify a business oportunity, develop concept, determine resources required, and launch the business. In spring, students implement business plan, manage business, and determine exit strategy. prereq: 3010, [4008 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4008], completed coursework in business core, CSOM upper division, approved application
MGMT 4172 - Entrepreneurship in Action II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Second of two-semester sequence. In fall, students identify business opportunity, develop concept, determine resources required, and launch business. In spring, students implement busienss plan, manage business, and determine exit strategy. prereq: 4171
MGMT 5018 - Philanthropy & Fundraising Strategy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This brief experiential course explores the evolving world of philanthropy and provides an opportunity to directly influence a real-life nonprofit?s funding strategies. It shows students how, despite resource constraints, nonprofit organizations can effectively build meaningful engagement and financial support around society?s most pressing needs. It provides an immersive experience ? supported by a professional ecosystem ? where students can learn, be inspired and leave this class more driven (and capable) to be ?a force for good.? By the end of this course, students will have gained hands-on consulting experience in partnership with nonprofit organizational leaders, active consultants and major philanthropists. They will have devised and presented implementable strategies at the ?virtuous nexus? between potential donors and their client?s organizational needs - solutions which increase engagement and promote lasting symbiotic relationships between the private and nonprofit sectors. They will be well-positioned to make a significant positive impact throughout their careers in the Twin Cities and beyond.
MGMT 5102 - StartUp: Customer Development and Testing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Provides a structured process with faculty and mentor oversight for students at any level and from any college at the University to learn the initial process of customer development by testing market acceptance of a specific new business concept. Students primarily take this course individually and must have an idea or technology that they are interested in pursuing. The goal of the curse is to teach the process to quickly and efficiently test the value and market fit for a new concept.
MKTG 3011 - Marketing Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on managing the entire marketing research process, which involves collecting and analyzing relevant, timely, and accurate information to gain customer insights and drive effective marketing decision making. Students learn fundamental techniques of data collection and analysis to solve specific marketing problems. The class offers hands-on learning-by-doing opportunities through group projects for students to practice every stage of marketing research. prereqs: 3001 and BA 2551 or SCO 2550 or equivalent statistics course
MKTG 4031 - Sales Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Hiring, motivating, performance enhancement. Customer relationship management, data analysis, quantitative methods. Developing metrics to evaluate individual/group performance in attaining an organization's strategic goals. prereq: MKTG 3040 or 3041
MKTG 4051 - Advertising and Promotion
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Managing/integrating communication aspects of marketing. Advertising, sales promotion, public relations. Setting objectives, selecting media. Measuring effectiveness. Sales promotion techniques. Issues in global IMC. prereq: MKTG 3011 and MKTG 3041 (or 3010 & 3040) or instructor approval
PDES 2701 - Creative Design Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This class is an introduction to a variety of tools and methods used in developing new product concepts. The focus of the class is on the early stage of product development which includes user research, market research, idea generation methods, concept evaluation, concept selection, intellectual property, and idea presentation. Students work individually applying the content taught in lecture to a semester-long design project. Students meet in teams bi-weekly to present and critique their work.
PDES 3711 - Product Innovation Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PDes 3711/PDes 5711
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
A hands-on experience in integrated product design and development processes. Elements of industrial design, engineering, business, and humanities are applied to a semester-long product design project. Cross-functional teams of students in different majors work together to design and develop new consumer product concepts with guidance from a community of industry mentors. prereq: PDes 2772 OR Junior/Senior (any major) or permission from instructor
SCO 3041 - Project Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles and methods useful for planning and controlling a project, including development of project plan, resource planning and scheduling, and project monitoring and control. Selected computerized packages are studied, including PERT and CPM, and examples of different types of projects from manufacturing and service industries are used. prereq: 3000 or instr consent
SCO 3056 - Supply Chain Planning and Control
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course teaches the essential tools and tasks to design an efficient supply chain planning and control system, including ERP, integrated business planning, forecasting, inventory management, capacity/production/material planning, and scheduling. Prereq: 3001 or instr consent